web site hit counter Honor Bound: Day of Honor - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Honor Bound: Day of Honor

Availability: Ready to download

There is no occasion more sacred to the Klingons than the Day of Honor. And to the Klingon youth, honor is a lesson heard-learned and harder-earned. The hunter instinct is taking over Alexander, driving him to violence when he can't control his emerging Klingon traits. He's in trouble at school when his father, Worf, gives his word as a Starfleet officer that Alexander's b There is no occasion more sacred to the Klingons than the Day of Honor. And to the Klingon youth, honor is a lesson heard-learned and harder-earned. The hunter instinct is taking over Alexander, driving him to violence when he can't control his emerging Klingon traits. He's in trouble at school when his father, Worf, gives his word as a Starfleet officer that Alexander's behavior will change. But it takes a frightening confession from Worf before Alexander understands that he must learn to control himself or lose everything he loves. A Klingon is honor-bound to keep his word, at any cost. And Alexander is about to pay the price as he faces disgrace and dishonor for challenging his bullying classmates with character instead of force.


Compare

There is no occasion more sacred to the Klingons than the Day of Honor. And to the Klingon youth, honor is a lesson heard-learned and harder-earned. The hunter instinct is taking over Alexander, driving him to violence when he can't control his emerging Klingon traits. He's in trouble at school when his father, Worf, gives his word as a Starfleet officer that Alexander's b There is no occasion more sacred to the Klingons than the Day of Honor. And to the Klingon youth, honor is a lesson heard-learned and harder-earned. The hunter instinct is taking over Alexander, driving him to violence when he can't control his emerging Klingon traits. He's in trouble at school when his father, Worf, gives his word as a Starfleet officer that Alexander's behavior will change. But it takes a frightening confession from Worf before Alexander understands that he must learn to control himself or lose everything he loves. A Klingon is honor-bound to keep his word, at any cost. And Alexander is about to pay the price as he faces disgrace and dishonor for challenging his bullying classmates with character instead of force.

30 review for Honor Bound: Day of Honor

  1. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Bensley

    A really fun Star Trek young adult story about Alexander.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Plume

    I enjoyed the Day of Honor series, though I think most of the other "crossover" series were a little better. I enjoyed the Day of Honor series, though I think most of the other "crossover" series were a little better.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Tyler

    Over the past few weeks I have been working my way through the Star Trek: Day of Honor books. I have visited the original series, Voyager, Generations and DS9, but none took me to the place that ‘Honor Bound’ by Dina G Gallagher did; the Tween novel. After every other book in the series was an ‘adult’ book, this one is set in a high school and even has images. Puberty is hitting Alexander hard, he has all the usual worries of a teenager, but no one told him about the rage that comes with being a Over the past few weeks I have been working my way through the Star Trek: Day of Honor books. I have visited the original series, Voyager, Generations and DS9, but none took me to the place that ‘Honor Bound’ by Dina G Gallagher did; the Tween novel. After every other book in the series was an ‘adult’ book, this one is set in a high school and even has images. Puberty is hitting Alexander hard, he has all the usual worries of a teenager, but no one told him about the rage that comes with being a Klingon. With the Federation and Klingon Empire back at war, he is not the most popular student in school. When he is targeted by bullies, Alex finds it hard not to tear their arms out. Enter Worf, can he teach his son to rise above petty issues and use his honour to stay calm? As a novel for the 8-10 year old market I have no real reason to enjoy ‘Honor Bound’, but it works because it is one of the few books in the ‘Day of Honor’ series that actually remembers to be about honour. Alexander is getting heavily bullied and rather than rising to it, he walks away. This does not stop him being persecuted by the school and it is only the intervention of Worf that can save the day. The solid centre of the book works; be honourable and things will work out. This simplifies view of matters permeate the rest of the book and it does not work quite as well. The relationships are very teeny; glances and crushes. For the correct audience this should speak to them, but after five adult Honor books, it does feel a little odd. Also, the gymnastics part of the book is just odd! The important thing is though that the book works for an emerging reader. The characters and plot is pedestrian, but simple enough to follow. I found the images a little embarrassing, but they do break up the text if your attention span is a little light. Despite the book being aimed at a younger audience and having a weird gymnastics subplot, I still found it entertaining enough as an adult. It was pacy and importantly remembered the central message of honour throughout.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alvaro Zinos-Amaro

    One of the best in the series. Some wonderful tie-in references to previous events from the TV series/books. *spoiler* Only element that felt somewhat implausible was the speed of reversal of the other boys' attitudes towards Alexander at the end. One of the best in the series. Some wonderful tie-in references to previous events from the TV series/books. *spoiler* Only element that felt somewhat implausible was the speed of reversal of the other boys' attitudes towards Alexander at the end.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I came across this one when weeding our SF shelves - and I really, really liked it. If the language were a bit cleaner and less pedestrian, it would merit four stars. The story, though simple, is heartfelt. Young Alexader Rozhenko, part Klingon and entirely confused, is awaiting his father's arrival. As he approaches his teens, his temper is becoming volatile, and he's afraid of what he may do to the bullies who are tormenting him if he cannot control his emotions. Lieutenant Commander Worf come I came across this one when weeding our SF shelves - and I really, really liked it. If the language were a bit cleaner and less pedestrian, it would merit four stars. The story, though simple, is heartfelt. Young Alexader Rozhenko, part Klingon and entirely confused, is awaiting his father's arrival. As he approaches his teens, his temper is becoming volatile, and he's afraid of what he may do to the bullies who are tormenting him if he cannot control his emotions. Lieutenant Commander Worf comes back to earth to help his young son through this trial. Alexander badly needs to learn self-control and discipline, but he also has to find a way to cope with the bullying without resorting to violence. With his father's help, he begins to find his equilibrium. But then he is accused of starting a fight. Next to injuring or killing another child, what Alexander most dreads is disappointing his father and his grandparents. Will they believe him, or his accusers? With his father's help, Alexander concocts a clever plan to confront the bullies and get at the truth . . . It's easy, I would think, for any kid to relate to Alexander's struggles, especially his fear of disappointing the adults he loves. And there are a lot of good messages in this short book - messages that are the more powerful because they're integral to the story. What does it mean to be an honorable person? Is it ever right to break your word? when, and how, is it right to fight? Alexander struggles with all of these as he works to acquire control and find his way forward. A lot of substance for a light, pleasant read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    A not unpleasant but annoyingly simplistic story about Worf's son Alexander and his adjustment to a racist human community. The book tries to be a smart and encouraging tale about conquering prejudice, but in the setting of Star Trek it feels awfully off and simplistic. Gallagher writes pretty well, but when the story is so very unenlightened there isn't much to be done. A not unpleasant but annoyingly simplistic story about Worf's son Alexander and his adjustment to a racist human community. The book tries to be a smart and encouraging tale about conquering prejudice, but in the setting of Star Trek it feels awfully off and simplistic. Gallagher writes pretty well, but when the story is so very unenlightened there isn't much to be done.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shelby Lynne

  9. 5 out of 5

    Malte

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Verhaegen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adler Hobby llc

  12. 5 out of 5

    Captainkoloth

  13. 5 out of 5

    greekgeek

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  16. 5 out of 5

    reherrma

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  18. 4 out of 5

    elaine

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nem8Nem80 Literatura

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karl Schreiner

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kal

  22. 5 out of 5

    RL Botelho

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brian Resila

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Riley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Neil

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paget

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melony

  28. 5 out of 5

    Satyajeet

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Jones

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sinéad

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.