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In yet another page-turner, New York Times best-selling author and acclaimed management expert Patrick Lencioni addresses the costly and maddening issue of silos, the barriers that create organizational politics. Silos devastate organizations, kill productivity, push good people out the door, and jeopardize the achievement of corporate goals. As with his other books, Lenci In yet another page-turner, New York Times best-selling author and acclaimed management expert Patrick Lencioni addresses the costly and maddening issue of silos, the barriers that create organizational politics. Silos devastate organizations, kill productivity, push good people out the door, and jeopardize the achievement of corporate goals. As with his other books, Lencioni writes Silos, Politics, and Turf Wars as a fictional--but eerily realistic--story. The story is about Jude Cousins, an eager young management consultant struggling to launch his practice by solving one of the more universal and frustrating problems faced by his clients. Through trial and error, he develops a simple yet ground-breaking approach for helping them transform confusion and infighting into clarity and alignment.


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In yet another page-turner, New York Times best-selling author and acclaimed management expert Patrick Lencioni addresses the costly and maddening issue of silos, the barriers that create organizational politics. Silos devastate organizations, kill productivity, push good people out the door, and jeopardize the achievement of corporate goals. As with his other books, Lenci In yet another page-turner, New York Times best-selling author and acclaimed management expert Patrick Lencioni addresses the costly and maddening issue of silos, the barriers that create organizational politics. Silos devastate organizations, kill productivity, push good people out the door, and jeopardize the achievement of corporate goals. As with his other books, Lencioni writes Silos, Politics, and Turf Wars as a fictional--but eerily realistic--story. The story is about Jude Cousins, an eager young management consultant struggling to launch his practice by solving one of the more universal and frustrating problems faced by his clients. Through trial and error, he develops a simple yet ground-breaking approach for helping them transform confusion and infighting into clarity and alignment.

30 review for Silos, Politics and Turf Wars: A Leadership Fable about Destroying the Barriers That Turn Colleagues Into Competitors

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christina Saldivia

    Lencioni is a good writer. Highlights: 1. Silos occur because executives fail to give their employees a compelling context for working together a. Without this, everyone moves in different directions, often at cross purposes b. Every assumes their own activities are in the best interest of the company and don't understand why others aren't doing the same c. They begin to resent each other 2. Dissolve Silos by creating a thematic goal: A Rallying Cry. a. A Thematic Goal - a single, qualitative fo Lencioni is a good writer. Highlights: 1. Silos occur because executives fail to give their employees a compelling context for working together a. Without this, everyone moves in different directions, often at cross purposes b. Every assumes their own activities are in the best interest of the company and don't understand why others aren't doing the same c. They begin to resent each other 2. Dissolve Silos by creating a thematic goal: A Rallying Cry. a. A Thematic Goal - a single, qualitative focus that is shared by the entire leadership team and ultimately, by the entire organization and that applies for only a specified time period. i. For example - rebuild our credibility, b. A Set of Defining Objectives i. Shared by all members of the leadership team ii. Like customer satisfaction, establish a unified marketing message, eliminiate redundant and underperforming products, merge back office systems and processes, market share, quality, establish a strategy, c. Time Frame - # months (it's not permanent) d. A set of ongoing standard operating objectives i. Revenue ii. Market share by product iii. Employee turnover iv. Etc.. e. Metrics

  2. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Blackledge

    Another engaging and useful read from Patric Lencioni, best know for The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. Lencioni’s books are presented as ‘fables’ i.e. fictional pedagogical short stories intended to illustrate and teach his ideas on organizational management. It sounded cringe worthy to me before I started reading them. Now I’m HOOKED. They are so damn effective. As the title suggests. This one is pertinent to toxic intraorganizational competition and infighting. More importantly. It gives practical Another engaging and useful read from Patric Lencioni, best know for The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. Lencioni’s books are presented as ‘fables’ i.e. fictional pedagogical short stories intended to illustrate and teach his ideas on organizational management. It sounded cringe worthy to me before I started reading them. Now I’m HOOKED. They are so damn effective. As the title suggests. This one is pertinent to toxic intraorganizational competition and infighting. More importantly. It gives practical advice on how to reduce (or better yet) eliminate that shit altogether. I won’t bother with the details. It’s a Saturday and I am feeling too chill for all that. Suffice it to say. This is a good one. But start with The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. If you like that one, you’ll like this one.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Silvert

    Lencioni knows a good formula when he finds it: Pick a thorny subject like Silos, Meetings, Team Dysfunction, spin a story that illustrates the ins and outs of the issue in the real world, then boil it down to a quickie model that readers can immediately use – whether they’ve actual read the preceding fable or not. While not at the level of his best selling work, ”The Five Dysfunctions of a Team,” this is a valuable addition to the subject and quandary of organizational silos. The story revolves Lencioni knows a good formula when he finds it: Pick a thorny subject like Silos, Meetings, Team Dysfunction, spin a story that illustrates the ins and outs of the issue in the real world, then boil it down to a quickie model that readers can immediately use – whether they’ve actual read the preceding fable or not. While not at the level of his best selling work, ”The Five Dysfunctions of a Team,” this is a valuable addition to the subject and quandary of organizational silos. The story revolves around a young consultant struggling to get his practice off the ground while riding the rough waves of unhappy clients. Eventually, our hero comes up with a model that ties departments together towards a common cause: The Thematic Goal. A Thematic Goal is the “single, qualitative, time framed, rallying cry adopted by the entire management team.” If for example, your company has just made an acquisition, a thematic goal that every department could collaborate upon would be: Integrating the acquisition into the company. Each functional area would draw up “Defining Objectives” that represent their contribution to achieving the goal. With everyone pulling in the same direction, great ideas are more likely to cross pollinate and groups that normally barely talk to one another actually work together towards the Thematic Goal’s success. While this model is far from a complete solution to the issue of silos in the workplace, it is well thought out place to start. Highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    After another frustrating encounter at the office a coworker recommended this book. I’m glad they did. Not only does Lenccioni weave a story to provide a fictional story the reader can relate to, he closes with the non-fictional practical theory of how to break down silos. The blending of fiction with what would otherwise be dry theory provides the views needed for readers to start with an actionable plan for their teams to work with one goal in mind.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashik Uzzaman

    I finished "Silos, Politics and Turf Wars: A Leadership Fable About Destroying the Barriers That Turn Colleagues Into Competitors" by Patrick Lencioni yesterday. In Pat's true style like "Five Dysfunctions of Team", this is another business fable where he tackles a big problem in organizations - Silos. He not only gives us ways to identify silos, departmental politics but also tells us how to solve it. The model for combating silos consists of four components - 1) A Thematic Goal - A single qualit I finished "Silos, Politics and Turf Wars: A Leadership Fable About Destroying the Barriers That Turn Colleagues Into Competitors" by Patrick Lencioni yesterday. In Pat's true style like "Five Dysfunctions of Team", this is another business fable where he tackles a big problem in organizations - Silos. He not only gives us ways to identify silos, departmental politics but also tells us how to solve it. The model for combating silos consists of four components - 1) A Thematic Goal - A single qualitative focus that is shared by the entire leadership team–and ultimately, by the entire organization–and that applies for only a specified time period. It must be, * Single. There can only be one. Something has to be the most important. * Qualitative. This is not a number. It is a general statement of the desired accomplishment requiring a verb because it rallies people to do something (e.g. Improve, Reduce, Increase, Grow, Change, Establish, Eliminate, Accelerate, etc.) * Time-Bound. The thematic goal does not live beyond a fixed time period, because that would suggest that it is an ongoing objective. * Shared. The thematic goal applies to everyone on the leadership team regardless of their area of expertise or interest. 2) A Set of Defining Objectives - Components or building blocks that serve to clarify exactly what is meant by the thematic goal. Like the thematic goal, these objectives are also qualitative, time-bound, and shared. 3) A Set of Ongoing Standard Operating Objectives - The ongoing objectives that don’t go away from period to period. The danger is in mistaking one of these critical objectives for a rallying cry (thematic goal). 4) Metrics - Measurement. Metrics could be numbers or dates (time frames). Source: http://www.dragon-bishop.com/2020/08/...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Kassing

    If you aren’t familiar with Lencioni’s work he writes fables that embed simple business truths into a story. This book is no different. I usually approach his work looking for basic sociological insights into leadership. My big take away here is that a clearly defined share goal with actionable steps is critical for a team to not settle into their respective “turf”. If a team member is going to own the whole he has to know how he is a part of the whole or how he should subordinate his role to the If you aren’t familiar with Lencioni’s work he writes fables that embed simple business truths into a story. This book is no different. I usually approach his work looking for basic sociological insights into leadership. My big take away here is that a clearly defined share goal with actionable steps is critical for a team to not settle into their respective “turf”. If a team member is going to own the whole he has to know how he is a part of the whole or how he should subordinate his role to the success of the whole.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joe Van Huysen

    Very insightful and organized protocol to follow for organizations and their executive teams. The case studies and real life examples across industries are perfect to relate to. Main takeaways: Assess the current status of your organization, decide as a team what needs to be improved upon the most (the “Thematic Goal”), and get all departments on board. Set a realistic time to accomplish with specific steps. Once it has been accomplished, decide upon a new Thematic Goal. Always have one in motio Very insightful and organized protocol to follow for organizations and their executive teams. The case studies and real life examples across industries are perfect to relate to. Main takeaways: Assess the current status of your organization, decide as a team what needs to be improved upon the most (the “Thematic Goal”), and get all departments on board. Set a realistic time to accomplish with specific steps. Once it has been accomplished, decide upon a new Thematic Goal. Always have one in motion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meaghan Johns

    2.5 stars. This is a business fable that might have been more effective as a white paper. Lencioni shares the good advice of rallying an entire organization behind a clear and time-sensitive cause in order to eliminate politics and silos, but that's where the story ends. He shares what a leader should do to start eradicating silos and what happens after silos are eradicated, but misses the challenges and the journey that happens in the middle. I appreciated the message, but felt that the story w 2.5 stars. This is a business fable that might have been more effective as a white paper. Lencioni shares the good advice of rallying an entire organization behind a clear and time-sensitive cause in order to eliminate politics and silos, but that's where the story ends. He shares what a leader should do to start eradicating silos and what happens after silos are eradicated, but misses the challenges and the journey that happens in the middle. I appreciated the message, but felt that the story was incomplete - or perhaps written from the wrong character's point of view.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Flanagan

    Truly Insightful! Lencioni’s use of the fable to explain the Silo problem and its solution really helped clarify the issues and made it easy to recognize how they play out in real life. This is a useful read for those interested in cohesion within an organization and figuring out how to make all the moving parts come together toward common goals.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Some great concepts and practical leadership advice but far too much time on the “fable” and too little time on the theory. The theory portion is only 30 pages and I would have like it to be fleshed out a bit more.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Barrett Merrill

    Such a brilliant use of a fable to convey core principles around the dangers of internal organizational conflict. As companies expand, they become more prone to developing silos of leaders and teams with narrow (typically department-centric) visions for the future. This narrowness often is a result of progressive role specialization, that, while many times necessary, creates significant leanings and biases based off the needs that are most relevant to “your team.” Lencioni’s simple concepts of hav Such a brilliant use of a fable to convey core principles around the dangers of internal organizational conflict. As companies expand, they become more prone to developing silos of leaders and teams with narrow (typically department-centric) visions for the future. This narrowness often is a result of progressive role specialization, that, while many times necessary, creates significant leanings and biases based off the needs that are most relevant to “your team.” Lencioni’s simple concepts of having a broad, Thematic Goal (a qualitative mission involving all teams) to help everyone take off their functional hats and share a general/executive hat, along with a Rallying Cry and Defining Objectives to synchronize the efforts of each individual team, have proven helpful on several occasions. This book shines a light on the intent of each team, and asks “do we still share a common, driving purpose with everyone else?” and “in what ways have I contributed to cultural fragmentation?” Lastly, a point that was emphasized in multiple instances: if we have a department for ‘it’, it’s either vital to the whole or must go immediately. Turf wars commence abruptly when teams begin developing departmental hierarchy on the mere basis of being “most important” to company success, and such superiority complexes are toxic.

  12. 5 out of 5

    CJ

    I think of Lencioni's little books as the romance section of the business genre. They're quick to read, easily digestible, and actually have some salient points, I just don't know how readily you can apply those points to your own business situation. Silos, Politics and Turf Wars deals with the way people try to protect "their" areas when they feel threatened. I'm sure everyone works with someone who is territorial and defensive when they're asked probing questions or to explain something more co I think of Lencioni's little books as the romance section of the business genre. They're quick to read, easily digestible, and actually have some salient points, I just don't know how readily you can apply those points to your own business situation. Silos, Politics and Turf Wars deals with the way people try to protect "their" areas when they feel threatened. I'm sure everyone works with someone who is territorial and defensive when they're asked probing questions or to explain something more completely. The gem I'm taking from this book is how to identify these behaviors. I work in a very small shop and try to be as open and honest as I can in order to avoid turf wars, but they do crop up now and again. If this book helps me head those off in the future, the purchase price and time spent reading it were worth it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thadeus

    This is the second Patrick Lencioni ‘leadership fable book’ I’ve read and it did not disappoint. If you are part of an organization that is looking for ways to breakdown silos and work toward building a cohesive team, this is the book for you. I was very impressed with how well the fable relayed the key principles, and I also appreciated the laying out of the model components after the fable. I hope to see the implementation of this approach make a positive difference in my organization. Highly re This is the second Patrick Lencioni ‘leadership fable book’ I’ve read and it did not disappoint. If you are part of an organization that is looking for ways to breakdown silos and work toward building a cohesive team, this is the book for you. I was very impressed with how well the fable relayed the key principles, and I also appreciated the laying out of the model components after the fable. I hope to see the implementation of this approach make a positive difference in my organization. Highly recommended!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek Shekhar

    HR Theory sugar coated with a fable. I would have liked it more if the theory was just put in plain without trying to create fiction over it. The last section summarizes all the way to have a thematic goal with few case studies. This sections sums it all that author puts forward and can be used by organizations or consultants to improve silos problem. One Takeway: To destroy barriers (silos) you need to create a crisis.

  15. 4 out of 5

    DeeDee Wilson

    I liked the principals of the book, but the fable was too long and the actual content too short. As a result, we get a great high level perspective on how to address silos, but the practical application barely scratched the surface.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    one of the best out of this author's leadership books so far. a must read. one of the best out of this author's leadership books so far. a must read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Schulte

    I was disappointed in this book. It started off promisingly, suggesting that it could help to break down silos within organizations. The book is written in story format where we follow a guy named Jude as he starts a consulting business and discovers the solution to silos. There author have an interview at the end of the audiobook where he said that he felt that the story format makes the message of the book more relatable. I'm not sure I agree. I felt that the story format just adds clutter aro I was disappointed in this book. It started off promisingly, suggesting that it could help to break down silos within organizations. The book is written in story format where we follow a guy named Jude as he starts a consulting business and discovers the solution to silos. There author have an interview at the end of the audiobook where he said that he felt that the story format makes the message of the book more relatable. I'm not sure I agree. I felt that the story format just adds clutter around the book's real purpose: to inform me how to combat silos in my organization. Instead, I got a lot of information about Jude's family life, including how he and his wife scheduled visiting their premature twin daughters in the hospital. If you want a good family drama about dealing with the pressures of having children and starting a new business, I recommend looking to other books. The main argument this book has is that silos can be beaten by unifying an organization around a rallying cry. The author also talks about this rallying cry as a fabricated crisis which will unify an organization. This seems to oversimplify the problem a little bit. I think it's trust the author a little more if he quoted a free studies or gave examples from real organizations, but unfortunately he doesn't.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Patrick Lencioni delivers another brilliant leadership book. In an era of OKRs (Objectives and Key Results), over 10 years ago Patrick was describing in this fable the importance of knocking down walls that divide through thematic goals, objectives and measures. The most important aspect of this fable (told through a series of fictional companies) is how the executive team are a single team with one common objective, being the successful delivery to their purpose. Patrick explores that silos, polit Patrick Lencioni delivers another brilliant leadership book. In an era of OKRs (Objectives and Key Results), over 10 years ago Patrick was describing in this fable the importance of knocking down walls that divide through thematic goals, objectives and measures. The most important aspect of this fable (told through a series of fictional companies) is how the executive team are a single team with one common objective, being the successful delivery to their purpose. Patrick explores that silos, politics and turf wars are driven from the top, in how the executive team engage each other and work together. To do this, the book covers, - How to recognize the signs of the devastating power of silos. - Why it is necessary to take steps to start knocking down the walls that divide departments. - How to create a rallying cry or an over-arching thematic goal. - How to determine an organization’s defining objectives and standard operating objectives. - Why it is important to measure and monitor your organization’s performance against these goals. - How employees can survive the confusion that is often found in matrix organizations. This is the 3rd book by Patrick Lencioni I have read and each has been brilliant.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Silva

    Not my favorite Lencioni book, but one worth reading. Although the "consultant figuring it out along the way" is a relatable story, and I think the overall themes are pretty good, but it didn't have any major AHA type moments in the book like some of the others have. The concepts are on point. Silos and turf wars ruin organizations and start even at small sizes, and so understanding that and working actively to prevent it is a good thing. I think the major thing to take away from the book is tha Not my favorite Lencioni book, but one worth reading. Although the "consultant figuring it out along the way" is a relatable story, and I think the overall themes are pretty good, but it didn't have any major AHA type moments in the book like some of the others have. The concepts are on point. Silos and turf wars ruin organizations and start even at small sizes, and so understanding that and working actively to prevent it is a good thing. I think the major thing to take away from the book is that if you sit on a leadership team, you need to leave your title at the door and just come into all meetings with the idea that your job - regardless of your role - is to make the company better. This concept resonates with me but is in conflict with the box concept EOS drives. I don't think they intentionally mean for people to not help other boxes, but I do think the overall concept sets the foundation for Silos to be built.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rakesh

    A must read for everyone who wants to learn leadership lessons on the crisis. I just read at one go and enjoyed a lot while reading. There are so many things rightly mentioned by author with real life scenario's and that are happening still in the corporate day to day life. If someone wants to start consulting business then this is the book to read. The Silos theory and basic roots are well explained with the example. The corporate should implement these timeless principles and framework to improve th A must read for everyone who wants to learn leadership lessons on the crisis. I just read at one go and enjoyed a lot while reading. There are so many things rightly mentioned by author with real life scenario's and that are happening still in the corporate day to day life. If someone wants to start consulting business then this is the book to read. The Silos theory and basic roots are well explained with the example. The corporate should implement these timeless principles and framework to improve the boding with the team and it helps company culture. I like this line from the book about Silos definition. "Silos are nothing more than the barriers that exist between departments within an organization, causing people who are supposed to be on the same team to work against one another. And whether we call this phenomenon departmental politics, divisional rivalry, or turf warfare, it is one of the most frustrating aspects of life in any sizable organization"

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julian Dunn

    Not bad, but if you already know about OKRs, this is basically a rehash. My cynical but realistic take: OKRs (or what Lencioni calls them, themes and objectives) can be a helpful tool, but often fail to align teams because they depend on strong executive teams to work together and hold each other accountable to strategic (and not just operational) results. Most executive teams are not that strong, because most executives are not that good. The success of such tools also depends on the CEO seeing Not bad, but if you already know about OKRs, this is basically a rehash. My cynical but realistic take: OKRs (or what Lencioni calls them, themes and objectives) can be a helpful tool, but often fail to align teams because they depend on strong executive teams to work together and hold each other accountable to strategic (and not just operational) results. Most executive teams are not that strong, because most executives are not that good. The success of such tools also depends on the CEO seeing themselves as the "manager/administrator in chief" and driving organizational change into the different parts of his or her organization, but again, many CEOs do not see things that way. The CEO role is often focused on specific areas of the business and doesn't act as a generalist that holds the organization together.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Holly Buxton

    I am a fan of fables to drive a point across so I naturally gravitate to Lencioni’s format. The fable was easy to follow, quick to read, and crafted in a way that I didn’t want to put the book down so that I could finish the story section. Though I did not find the theory section earth shattering, I did find myself examining my own experiences on teams and analyzing ways silos contributed to lack of progression toward vision and it helped me gain insight for future team building success. For me pe I am a fan of fables to drive a point across so I naturally gravitate to Lencioni’s format. The fable was easy to follow, quick to read, and crafted in a way that I didn’t want to put the book down so that I could finish the story section. Though I did not find the theory section earth shattering, I did find myself examining my own experiences on teams and analyzing ways silos contributed to lack of progression toward vision and it helped me gain insight for future team building success. For me personally, the most insightful part of the fable was the use of the main characters experience in the ER to illustrate how crisis situations can cause silos to disappear and diminish the significance of petty complaints that build up when teams have silos.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    Really light. Really. Skip to the back, to the theory, because the rest is mostly idealized fluff to create a narrative around the theory. The context talks more about how to start your business as a consultant branching out on your own than provide deep insight into rallying the leadership around a thematic goal, defining objectives, and standard operating objectives. Even skipping to the meat of the content, there's not much there. Plus, I suspect this rallying only works when the leadership s Really light. Really. Skip to the back, to the theory, because the rest is mostly idealized fluff to create a narrative around the theory. The context talks more about how to start your business as a consultant branching out on your own than provide deep insight into rallying the leadership around a thematic goal, defining objectives, and standard operating objectives. Even skipping to the meat of the content, there's not much there. Plus, I suspect this rallying only works when the leadership silos exist out of habit and not out of actual animosity -- if you've got actual personality clashes at your leadership table and they've rooted, this book will not be useful. At least it only takes an hour or so to read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    I enjoy Patrick's books. I enjoy the fable that leads to a solution format. I get that people think it's too cutesy for a business book but I disagree. It's how I see the problem in a realistic scenario THEN learn the lesson rather than the other way around. Sadly everyone is familiar with silos. I like this method of a crisis bringing everyone together but I think sometimes there needs to be an incentive for making everyone a success. Especially in very large orgs where it's not just department I enjoy Patrick's books. I enjoy the fable that leads to a solution format. I get that people think it's too cutesy for a business book but I disagree. It's how I see the problem in a realistic scenario THEN learn the lesson rather than the other way around. Sadly everyone is familiar with silos. I like this method of a crisis bringing everyone together but I think sometimes there needs to be an incentive for making everyone a success. Especially in very large orgs where it's not just department silos but full business line silos. How do we invent one business line to make another business line a success? Much to think about and share.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tony Creech

    Some solid and important stuff here, that fits into OKRs and leadership development through structured practices of health. But. I honestly hate these weak “fables” that a lot of non-fiction authors have been told are so much more “engaging” to put their lessons into. I can hear the dumb template book teaching by guys like Michael Hyatt ringing in my ears “they won’t get it unless it’s in a story!” In truth they are unfailingly lame poorly written stories (or they’d be novellas good in their own Some solid and important stuff here, that fits into OKRs and leadership development through structured practices of health. But. I honestly hate these weak “fables” that a lot of non-fiction authors have been told are so much more “engaging” to put their lessons into. I can hear the dumb template book teaching by guys like Michael Hyatt ringing in my ears “they won’t get it unless it’s in a story!” In truth they are unfailingly lame poorly written stories (or they’d be novellas good in their own right). Great nonfiction writing is much better than that. See Jon Krakauer or Malcolm Gladwell for a better approach.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Krissy

    Working for a company that loves themselves some silos, "Silos, Politics and Turf Wars" was a must-read to understand how I can contribute to changing the cultural breaks that occur in this type of environment. While I am not a huge fan of Lencioni's fables (I am more of a get-to-the-point type of learner), it does help paint a picture that will stick in the reader's mind. While you may not remember every component that makes up a good Rallying Cry, the reader will certainly connect to, and be a Working for a company that loves themselves some silos, "Silos, Politics and Turf Wars" was a must-read to understand how I can contribute to changing the cultural breaks that occur in this type of environment. While I am not a huge fan of Lencioni's fables (I am more of a get-to-the-point type of learner), it does help paint a picture that will stick in the reader's mind. While you may not remember every component that makes up a good Rallying Cry, the reader will certainly connect to, and be able to recall, the lesson of the story. Quick read and I would highly suggest it. Especially if you are in the role of a Change Manager or Change Leader.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason Carter

    I've read many of Lencioni's books, and there's something helpful in all of them. Further, they're generally quick reads that can be finished in a sitting or three. This one is no different. As per his style, Lencioni offers a "fable" with a business lesson, followed by a section which explains the model the consultant "discovered" in the fable. As the title would suggest, this one is about eliminating organizational silos. Not a lot of rocket science involved and no real "aha" moments for me, but I've read many of Lencioni's books, and there's something helpful in all of them. Further, they're generally quick reads that can be finished in a sitting or three. This one is no different. As per his style, Lencioni offers a "fable" with a business lesson, followed by a section which explains the model the consultant "discovered" in the fable. As the title would suggest, this one is about eliminating organizational silos. Not a lot of rocket science involved and no real "aha" moments for me, but I good, solid practical advice throughout.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emil Bredahl

    I have read most of author Patrick Lencioni’s books and some of them are good yet some of them are disappointing. The way he writes can get a bit tiresome and the ideas that he wants to highlight are not 100% clear. This book dealt with teams and inter personal issues that we can experience in teams all over the world. It would be great if his points were greater emphasized because as the book finished did i feel a bit empty and bored 😐 Not his best leadership book and I do not want to recommend I have read most of author Patrick Lencioni’s books and some of them are good yet some of them are disappointing. The way he writes can get a bit tiresome and the ideas that he wants to highlight are not 100% clear. This book dealt with teams and inter personal issues that we can experience in teams all over the world. It would be great if his points were greater emphasized because as the book finished did i feel a bit empty and bored 😐 Not his best leadership book and I do not want to recommend this one at all.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Hale

    Has some great insights on setting a thematic goal for your organization to keep. Following this goal will create more unity between different departments and eliminate politics that seem to be inevitable in a workplace. Like 5 Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni illustrates his solutions through fictitious characters and their story. I enjoyed this one. I learned some great things about Silos too (for one, I learned what a silo is). Easy and fast read which I’d recommend to any prospective Has some great insights on setting a thematic goal for your organization to keep. Following this goal will create more unity between different departments and eliminate politics that seem to be inevitable in a workplace. Like 5 Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni illustrates his solutions through fictitious characters and their story. I enjoyed this one. I learned some great things about Silos too (for one, I learned what a silo is). Easy and fast read which I’d recommend to any prospective business workers or administrators.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Harris

    Another great leadership fable. In this book we learn about solid and turf wars that impact productivity and profitability in organizations. I really enjoyed not only the fable, but it has a great section on how leaders can apply these lessons to their own organizations. It isn't easy, but then if it was would the be a problem? If you enjoy the leadership lessons of Patrick Lencioni, then you will enjoy this quick, but valuable read. Another great leadership fable. In this book we learn about solid and turf wars that impact productivity and profitability in organizations. I really enjoyed not only the fable, but it has a great section on how leaders can apply these lessons to their own organizations. It isn't easy, but then if it was would the be a problem? If you enjoy the leadership lessons of Patrick Lencioni, then you will enjoy this quick, but valuable read.

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