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The second in the Dr. Max Liebermann series, literature’s first psychoanalytic detective. In the grip of a Siberian winter in 1902, a serial killer in Vienna embarks upon a bizarre campaign of murder. Vicious mutilation, a penchant for arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victim are his most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summon The second in the Dr. Max Liebermann series, literature’s first psychoanalytic detective. In the grip of a Siberian winter in 1902, a serial killer in Vienna embarks upon a bizarre campaign of murder. Vicious mutilation, a penchant for arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victim are his most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summons a young disciple of Freud - his friend Dr. Max Liebermann — to assist him with the case. The investigation draws them into the sphere of Vienna’s secret societies — a murky underworld of German literary scholars, race theorists, and scientists inspired by the new evolutionary theories coming out of England. At first, the killer’s mind seems impenetrable — his behaviour and cryptic clues impervious to psychoanalytic interpretation; however, gradually, it becomes apparent that an extraordinary and shocking rationale underlies his actions. . . . Against this backdrop of mystery and terror, Liebermann struggles with his own demons. The treatment of a patient suffering from paranoia erotica (a delusion of love) and his own fascination with the enigmatic Englishwoman Amelia Lydgate raises doubts concerning the propriety of his imminent marriage. To resolve the dilemma, he must entertain the unthinkable — risking opprobrium and accusations of cowardice.


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The second in the Dr. Max Liebermann series, literature’s first psychoanalytic detective. In the grip of a Siberian winter in 1902, a serial killer in Vienna embarks upon a bizarre campaign of murder. Vicious mutilation, a penchant for arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victim are his most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summon The second in the Dr. Max Liebermann series, literature’s first psychoanalytic detective. In the grip of a Siberian winter in 1902, a serial killer in Vienna embarks upon a bizarre campaign of murder. Vicious mutilation, a penchant for arcane symbols, and a seemingly random choice of victim are his most distinctive peculiarities. Detective Inspector Oskar Rheinhardt summons a young disciple of Freud - his friend Dr. Max Liebermann — to assist him with the case. The investigation draws them into the sphere of Vienna’s secret societies — a murky underworld of German literary scholars, race theorists, and scientists inspired by the new evolutionary theories coming out of England. At first, the killer’s mind seems impenetrable — his behaviour and cryptic clues impervious to psychoanalytic interpretation; however, gradually, it becomes apparent that an extraordinary and shocking rationale underlies his actions. . . . Against this backdrop of mystery and terror, Liebermann struggles with his own demons. The treatment of a patient suffering from paranoia erotica (a delusion of love) and his own fascination with the enigmatic Englishwoman Amelia Lydgate raises doubts concerning the propriety of his imminent marriage. To resolve the dilemma, he must entertain the unthinkable — risking opprobrium and accusations of cowardice.

30 review for Vienna Blood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    Vienna Blood is the sequel to Death In Vienna. The beginning presents an intriguing case that is tossed at the reader like a scattered deck of cards and over a course of many pages, begins to form a well-played hand. Reminiscent of a Sherlock Holmes detective story, Vienna Blood is packed full of historical detail and delivers an intelligent and well-written mystery. Tallis draws on case comparisons to Jack the Ripper when tracking a serial killer. Also, other fascinating historical persons dire Vienna Blood is the sequel to Death In Vienna. The beginning presents an intriguing case that is tossed at the reader like a scattered deck of cards and over a course of many pages, begins to form a well-played hand. Reminiscent of a Sherlock Holmes detective story, Vienna Blood is packed full of historical detail and delivers an intelligent and well-written mystery. Tallis draws on case comparisons to Jack the Ripper when tracking a serial killer. Also, other fascinating historical persons directly interact with main characters including Freud. This story is refreshingly cliché free, which can be a rare experience in crime stories. Some readers may find the mystery rather slow-moving. In addition, a great many characters are presented and can be quite difficult to keep straight. This is further complicated by the references made to other fictional characters. Without the knowledge of the references, the ‘hint’s’ or expected conclusions may be lost on the reader. It takes some effort to understand which characters are important to remember and which ones are named for scenic purposes, or really weren’t necessary to name in the first place because they end up being insignificant. To fully enjoy the story, the reader may have to pause to look up plays, songs, operas and poems. This was a difficult novel to rate because the research and writing is a 4 star quality, but I simply did not find the book enjoyable. I chalk this up to my personal taste and not due to the author’s talent and therefore, have given it two ratings. 4 Star writing, 2 Star enjoyability

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Brilliantly conceived and written, and also enlightening historically. A series of serial killings in Vienna in 1902 seems insoluble since there is no discernible pattern linking those killed...and the anaconda Hildegard, Emperor Franz Josef's favorite snake in the zoo, is one of the victims. What does the murder of a snake have to do with that of three prostitutes and a madam, of a Czech chicken seller found with a padlock in his throat, of a Nubian servant? Liebermann's night at the opera with Brilliantly conceived and written, and also enlightening historically. A series of serial killings in Vienna in 1902 seems insoluble since there is no discernible pattern linking those killed...and the anaconda Hildegard, Emperor Franz Josef's favorite snake in the zoo, is one of the victims. What does the murder of a snake have to do with that of three prostitutes and a madam, of a Czech chicken seller found with a padlock in his throat, of a Nubian servant? Liebermann's night at the opera with Clara and her family provides the inspiration for the solution, along with Freud's knowledge of Sanskrit arcana...which identifies the strange cross painted in blood on the wall of the brothel where the first murders occurred. "Swastika" comes from Sanskrit words meaning "to be" and "well" - and also happens to be the "18th rune" of the mythical pre-Christian Germanic tribe which inspires the secret Arman fraternities, the ancestors of the Nazi party. Tallis has cleverly interwoven the growing popularity of the pan-German ideology into the discovery of the murderer. Well before World War I and the Versailles treaty, these ancestors of the Nazis were tracing their identity back to a 4th century Germanic tribe's victory over Rome. They were proudly anti-Semitic, anti-Freemason, anti-Catholic -- they worshiped the pagan Norse gods, and their use of "Heil und Sieg" as their salutation had little to do with "salvation" in the Christian sense and everything to do with the salvation of the Teutonic race. Mozart is denigrated as "a superficial composer," Mahler is ridiculed, and Tallis paints some telling tongue-in-cheek portraits of second-rate painters and composers who turn out suitably Teutonic trash. A famous opera by Mozart turns out to have provided the template for the murders, but the motivation is not solely political -- there are roots in the killer's psychological history which Liebermann deftly uncovers, with the help of Freud. Tallis handles this complex plot brilliantly and the characters are memorable, including several historical figures - Guido von List, a writer/journalist who was considered something of a joke by the real Viennese literati, but whose writings were later used by Adolf Hitler. In an afterword, Tallis details the connections between Hitler and List's Armanenschaft society, linked by Lanz von Liebenfels, one of List's disciples. It's horrifying stuff. Houston Stewart Chamberlain has a cameo part too, making a nasty little speech about "semi-barbarism--dirt, coarseness, falsehood, poverty" the closer one gets to Rome. Tallis cites as a source Brigitte Hamann's Hitler's Vienna: a Dictator's Apprenticeship, published by Oxford University Press in 1999. Could be fascinating reading...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I liked this one better than the first one in the series and I liked that one also! Set in one of my favorite cities, Vienna (in 1902), it's got Viennese pastries, music, murders, Viennese pastries, art, Mozart, Viennese pastries, compelling protagonists, psychoanalysis, Viennese pastries, Freemasons, atmosphere, and Viennese pastries. I liked this one better than the first one in the series and I liked that one also! Set in one of my favorite cities, Vienna (in 1902), it's got Viennese pastries, music, murders, Viennese pastries, art, Mozart, Viennese pastries, compelling protagonists, psychoanalysis, Viennese pastries, Freemasons, atmosphere, and Viennese pastries.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Claude

    Even better than the first episode in this series that I really liked a lot, I'm looking forward to the third episode. Even better than the first episode in this series that I really liked a lot, I'm looking forward to the third episode.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This installment finds Max at a crossroads, both in terms of the mystery and his personal life. What is enjoyable about Tallis is that he does not demonize characters. Clara, for instance, isn't a bad woman, but simply, perhaps, not the one for Max. It makes a refreshing change. The mystery itself was thrilling and great fun to read. I enjoy the connection to Freud and the coming of WWII. This installment finds Max at a crossroads, both in terms of the mystery and his personal life. What is enjoyable about Tallis is that he does not demonize characters. Clara, for instance, isn't a bad woman, but simply, perhaps, not the one for Max. It makes a refreshing change. The mystery itself was thrilling and great fun to read. I enjoy the connection to Freud and the coming of WWII.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    Historical mystery, travelogue, social and political commentary ... what a smorgasbord! Dateline Vienna 1902, location - the sprawling majestic Schönnbrunn Palace's Tiergarten Zoo. Detective Oskar Reinhardt is called to the scene of a grisly slaying - the cruel killing of a 30 foot long anaconda that has been cut into three sections with a saber. But even such an unprecedented bizarre case must fade into the background when Reinhardt is faced with the brutal maniacal slaying of a brothel's madam Historical mystery, travelogue, social and political commentary ... what a smorgasbord! Dateline Vienna 1902, location - the sprawling majestic Schönnbrunn Palace's Tiergarten Zoo. Detective Oskar Reinhardt is called to the scene of a grisly slaying - the cruel killing of a 30 foot long anaconda that has been cut into three sections with a saber. But even such an unprecedented bizarre case must fade into the background when Reinhardt is faced with the brutal maniacal slaying of a brothel's madam and two prostitutes. Reinhardt and his close friend, Dr Max Liebermann, a respected practitioner of Freudian psychology, are convinced that the murders, with a strong resemblance to the recent Whitechapel Jack the Ripper executions, are the work of a demented serial killer who will soon be looking for a fourth victim. Vienna Blood is a superbly crafted historical mystery built around a compellingly recreated Vienna. Rheinhardt is portrayed as an early believer in the infant science of forensics and profiling. But, even in turn of the century Vienna, like his modern counterparts, he is faced with internal political pressures. He is being harried to stick to solid, established techniques of dogged police work and to produce a quick arrest. Vienna Blood is a magnificent travelogue of what is arguably one of the most beautiful and exciting cities in Europe and the classical music capital of the world - the Opera House under the leadership of Gustav Mahler, the cafés, the scrumptious calorie laden Mozart and Sacher tortes, the Ringstrasse, the birth of the electric tram system, the magnificent art gallery in the Belvedere; the entertaining natural history collection in the Kunsthistorisches Museum and the extraordinary outdoors beauty of the Vienna Woods on the western fringe of the city. Vienna Blood is also a frightening political commentary. Dealing with the disturbing prevalence of secret societies in Vienna in the early twentieth century, Tallis makes a convincing argument that faults Vienna's "Law on Associations" with driving subversive political groups underground and making them even more dangerous. Tallis shows how the sinister Guido von List - a successful journalist and writer, much loved at the time by hardcore Teutonic Germans obsessed with superiority of the Aryan race and preserving the purity of German bloodlines - was likely the seed that sprouted into the National Socialist movement and their anti-Semitic policies. Finally, Vienna Blood is a wonderful story of the cultural and social milieu of the city. Reinhardt, who is engaged to the vapid but sexually enticing Clara Weiss, realizes that he simply cannot in good conscience marry her because he does not love her. He struggles with the difficulty and the social embarrassment of breaking off the engagement as he realizes he is growing fond of Amelia Lydgate who is studying medicine at the Anatomical Institute. In a most interesting side plot, Amelia is forced to deal with the chauvinistic (nay, misogynistic) attitudes towards women, the clearly inferior sex, who would presume to test their hands at the male professions of art, science and medicine. When I was in Vienna on vacation last week, I visited a local English language bookstore - Shakespeare & Co - and asked the proprietor to recommend a novel that was not a tour guide but that would represent the city of Vienna well and serve as a memorable souvenir. Five stars for Tallis and Vienna Blood and five stars to the lady that made such a superb recommendation. Thank you very much! Paul Weiss

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tory Wagner

    Vienna Blood by Frank Tallis is an elegantly written murder mystery that was a joy to read. There is plenty of blood and gore, but the layers of Viennese society are so elegantly portrayed that the violence fits the well written mystery. Tallis mixes real characters such as Sigmund Freud with fictional characters in a tale that is reminiscent of the unsolved Jack the Ripper murders.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I found this book frustrating/irritating, because the author was constantly describing things that are hard to describe in words, such as music and paintings and food. The book needs illustrations! And maybe an accompanying CD of German art-songs and opera excerpts! It would make an exciting movie (in the style of "The Illusionist," perhaps) or BBC miniseries. It has great settings - the opera house, the coffee shops, the reptile house at the zoo, the underground sewers (shades of Les Miz and Pha I found this book frustrating/irritating, because the author was constantly describing things that are hard to describe in words, such as music and paintings and food. The book needs illustrations! And maybe an accompanying CD of German art-songs and opera excerpts! It would make an exciting movie (in the style of "The Illusionist," perhaps) or BBC miniseries. It has great settings - the opera house, the coffee shops, the reptile house at the zoo, the underground sewers (shades of Les Miz and Phantom!). Most importantly, several major turning points in the action take place through VISUAL media -- someone has an epiphany during an opera performance, or when looking at paintings in a gallery, or in getting a close look at a person's face or expression. Music is also hugely important - the sound of a singer's voice, the emotional quality of a melody. The murder mystery is MUCH more bloody and downright disgusting than the previous book ("A Death in Vienna"). This time it's a serial killer in the style of "Seven"... and I didn't find the resolution very plausible. The chapters are incredibly short (some as short as 3 pages), which adds to the sense that it really should be a movie. Although the point of view changes in every chapter (some chapters follow the detective, some follow the psychologist, some show different possible suspects), the narrative voice never changes. It's always bland and descriptive. I kept reading 'til I found out "who dunnit," and then stopped. I think Tallis is going for something along the lines of Caleb Carr's "The Alienist," but isn't willing to write at such a "literary" pace or with such moral seriousness. The most disturbing aspect of the book is not the murder mystery, but the description of various intellectual/cultural/political currents c 1900 that would all too quickly provide the basis of Nazi thought and policy. The author obviously cares about this, because he has a little "afterword" about his sources... but I felt he used it in kind of a bland and superficial way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This is the second installment of Tallis's murder mystery psychoanalytical series pairing up homicide detective Reinhardt and Freudian psychologist Leibermann. A serial killer has been unleashed in Vienna - massacring innocent victims with unspeakable violence. As Reinhardt seeks out the murderer, a secret Masonic society is carrying on in the Austrian underground. Leibermann works with a patient suffering from a delusion that a wealthy monarch is in love with him and that her every move is calc This is the second installment of Tallis's murder mystery psychoanalytical series pairing up homicide detective Reinhardt and Freudian psychologist Leibermann. A serial killer has been unleashed in Vienna - massacring innocent victims with unspeakable violence. As Reinhardt seeks out the murderer, a secret Masonic society is carrying on in the Austrian underground. Leibermann works with a patient suffering from a delusion that a wealthy monarch is in love with him and that her every move is calculated to convey messages to him. Leibermann also questions his engagement to Clara, and increasingly finds ways to involve Miss Lydgate and her ever-developing theories of serology in his cases. Like the first book, Reinhardt and Leibermann test out their theories and mull over possiblities while playing classical music and eating pastries in cafes. And of course, Liebermann's break-throughs with his patients will have direct insight into finding the killer. I find Liebermann to be a very likeable character, despite his social awkwardness and while Vienna Blood didn't blow me away, it was a fun entertaining mystery.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Published in 2003, Vienna Blood offers all the elements of a first-rate historical mystery. The setting--early 20th century Vienna––comes alive as Tallis' protagonist Dr. Liebermann provides insights into the rash of murders that detective Oskar Rheinhardt is charged with solving. Using his profession as a psychiatrist to suss out the motivation of the murder, Liebermann overcomes the society's undercurrent of anti-semitism, takes advantage of modern scientific insights, and even borrows Sigmund Published in 2003, Vienna Blood offers all the elements of a first-rate historical mystery. The setting--early 20th century Vienna––comes alive as Tallis' protagonist Dr. Liebermann provides insights into the rash of murders that detective Oskar Rheinhardt is charged with solving. Using his profession as a psychiatrist to suss out the motivation of the murder, Liebermann overcomes the society's undercurrent of anti-semitism, takes advantage of modern scientific insights, and even borrows Sigmund Freud's insights into the dream of a patient to identify a key clue to the murder's identity. In addition to life in Vienna, including the cultural milieu interspersing performances at the Opera House and references to musical lyrics performed for personal pleasure by his heroes, Tallis brings to life a variety of characters, including soldiers, professors, doctors as well as nascent Nazis. Beautifully written.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dora Okeyo

    Oh! How I loved this book! Let me give you two reasons why: Sigmund Freud. Yes, there's a serial killer running loose in the streets of Vienna and the Inspector consults Dr. Liebermann who happens to be a Psychiatrist and somewhere along the way, the doctor consults Professor Sigmund Freud, as a Psychology major I nearly died a sweet death right there! My dreams are valid in saying that I would have loved to meet the man, and also Carl Jung, but the mastermind behind the killings is unveiled in a Oh! How I loved this book! Let me give you two reasons why: Sigmund Freud. Yes, there's a serial killer running loose in the streets of Vienna and the Inspector consults Dr. Liebermann who happens to be a Psychiatrist and somewhere along the way, the doctor consults Professor Sigmund Freud, as a Psychology major I nearly died a sweet death right there! My dreams are valid in saying that I would have loved to meet the man, and also Carl Jung, but the mastermind behind the killings is unveiled in a way that reminds me of Sherlock. The advantage here is that Dr. Liebermann is thoughtful and not as quick to get into trouble or test his theories, which gives this a good pace for a thriller, and an intriguing mystery.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karmen

    This book was much better - a traditional thriller with psychological overtones. It explores rising ethnic tensions within the Habsburg empire. The relationship b/w former patient Amelia Lydgate and Max Lieberman continues to grow as she becomes a police contributor.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jack Hrkach

    To begin, I have a habit of reading detective and sometimes spy fiction in a given city before I visit. Why? Spies infiltrate governments, thieves lurk in alleyways...you get the picture. The fiction may be well-written, suspense-filled, engaging, or...not. But if nothing else I can follow the action through different parts of cities I am about to explore (or not - COVID-19). I read Frank Tallis's Death in Vienna week before last and liked it very much intelligent and suspenseful, a cut above much To begin, I have a habit of reading detective and sometimes spy fiction in a given city before I visit. Why? Spies infiltrate governments, thieves lurk in alleyways...you get the picture. The fiction may be well-written, suspense-filled, engaging, or...not. But if nothing else I can follow the action through different parts of cities I am about to explore (or not - COVID-19). I read Frank Tallis's Death in Vienna week before last and liked it very much intelligent and suspenseful, a cut above much other detective fiction I've read. Low and behold this Brit seems to know Vienna like the back of his hand. I am forced to read Kindle books because my eyes are not what they used to be, so I can bookmark pages that mention specific locations (with no fear that a piece of paper in a conventional book will slip out) easily, and after I've finished I'll go back over the bookmarks with Google Maps (the confession of a nerd). I liked Vienna Blood less than the first in this series. Liebermann is a young doctor and protege of Freud. He teams up with Detective Inspector Rheinhardt not just to hunt down really twisted criminals, but to play the piano (Liebermann) and sing (Rheinardt) for their own entertainment. Usually they perform lieder and art songs - lots of Schumann, and afterwards smoke cigars and sip brandy in the library. (If you watched the recent series on PBS you will have missed these activities.) And in cafes where they discuss cases, they indulge in sinfully sweet Vienna pastries. I got a kick out of these activities in the first book, less so in this one. More significantly, the plot of the first I followed arduously, but in Vienna Blood I found myself aware of the author's tricks, and became disappointed in coincidences for which even I could not suspend my disbelief. But I think I'll continue the series. If I may not fly to Vienna at the end of April I can get a sense of it from my armchair.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gabriela Francisco

    This is the second book in The Liebermann Papers series, and the third one I've read. The author, Frank Tallis, manages to make 1902 Vienna come alive with historically accurate descriptions of Mahler's conducting, Freud's lectures, and most importantly, the detailed write ups of Viennese coffee houses and desserts!! Gorgeous setting, check! Mouth-watering dessert descriptions, check check! Intelligent dialogue and well-constructed plot, triple check! And instead of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Wats This is the second book in The Liebermann Papers series, and the third one I've read. The author, Frank Tallis, manages to make 1902 Vienna come alive with historically accurate descriptions of Mahler's conducting, Freud's lectures, and most importantly, the detailed write ups of Viennese coffee houses and desserts!! Gorgeous setting, check! Mouth-watering dessert descriptions, check check! Intelligent dialogue and well-constructed plot, triple check! And instead of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson, we have Detective Inspector Rheinhardt paired with Doctor Max Liebermann, who hunt for serial killers by day, and meet up for music-making at night, singing around the Bosendorfer piano before working some more. The music major in me revels in the descriptions of the lieder or the operas that they listen to, but it's not thrown in merely for pedantic effect. It's always connected to the case they're working on. I didn't think Mozart and murder went together, but Frank Tallis changed my mind! It was such a pleasant surprise to discover that the first three books of the series has been made into a BBC TV show! Entitled... VIENNA BLOOD! :) For the trailer, go to this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vg1rX...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Penny Crichton-Seager

    Absolutely loved it and every bit as good as the first in the series. It takes the reader into the fascinating world of fin de siècle Viennese Cafe Society, with pastries and coffee liberally strewn throughout. If you are a lover of music, particularly Austrian, then there is plenty to enjoy before you begin to fathom out the murders and the interwoven intriguing, horrifying, beginnings of Nazism are extraordinarily educational. The plot is similar to the Da Vinci code in its intracacy, but well Absolutely loved it and every bit as good as the first in the series. It takes the reader into the fascinating world of fin de siècle Viennese Cafe Society, with pastries and coffee liberally strewn throughout. If you are a lover of music, particularly Austrian, then there is plenty to enjoy before you begin to fathom out the murders and the interwoven intriguing, horrifying, beginnings of Nazism are extraordinarily educational. The plot is similar to the Da Vinci code in its intracacy, but well written, with great characterisation and a wonderful chase sequence at the end, which will get your pulse racing. You might want to brush up on your Mozart before you start to read! Was incredibly disappointed that the TV series of the same seems to gloss over so much and remove the best parts of the characterisation ie make the superb Miss Lydgate (who helps to solve the crimes, with intelligence and skill) just another woman and entirely remove the delightful piano and vocal duets of the two detectives. Worse, the TV replaced the recurrent Swastika symbol and put a rune in its place - dumbing down for whom? If you liked the TV series, then read and love the books, they are so much more. If you loved the books, then avoid the TV series or at least, watch when there are no bricks to hand.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wendell

    I wanted to read the book after seeing the BBC television productions of both his first two novels. Tallis is clearly an excellent writer and the story is well-crafted and reads smoothly. However.... his heavy dependency upon and extensive (to the point of boredom) use of massive amounts of arcane knowledge and details regarding the time period, the city, various little known Aryan/Teutonic philosophies, rituals and symbols, in addition to Germanic literature, music, and art (whew) was overwhelm I wanted to read the book after seeing the BBC television productions of both his first two novels. Tallis is clearly an excellent writer and the story is well-crafted and reads smoothly. However.... his heavy dependency upon and extensive (to the point of boredom) use of massive amounts of arcane knowledge and details regarding the time period, the city, various little known Aryan/Teutonic philosophies, rituals and symbols, in addition to Germanic literature, music, and art (whew) was overwhelming. For the most part, though readable and interesting here and there for the lesser known facts about German secret societies, the overall effect of so much minutia was off-putting---is this a mystery or an early history of the German people and culture? While I did manage to finally finish the book, I had lost almost complete interest in the story, the characters, or what happened well before the end. Perhaps his other Liebermann novels are more engaging, but I don't think I would recommend this particular book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hypatia

    I found this one almost boring at times. I did enjoy reading it, and I (coincidentally) ended up reading it while I was in Vienna, so that was kind of fun. I got to actually see some of the places mentioned, but it also turned out that my hotel was just around the corner from the Anatomical Institute and Schottering. There's a police station near there, so in my mind that will be the one that was there 100 years ago. So while I enjoyed the setting, I found the story was a bit slow to get going. I found this one almost boring at times. I did enjoy reading it, and I (coincidentally) ended up reading it while I was in Vienna, so that was kind of fun. I got to actually see some of the places mentioned, but it also turned out that my hotel was just around the corner from the Anatomical Institute and Schottering. There's a police station near there, so in my mind that will be the one that was there 100 years ago. So while I enjoyed the setting, I found the story was a bit slow to get going. It was not completely unpredictable, and some things happened that I was glad to see. (view spoiler)[ It was obvious even in the first book that Liebermann was going to fall for Miss Lydgate, and that he and Clara weren't going to work out. (hide spoiler)]

  18. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    A complex historical mystery featuring Detective Oskar Reinhardt and psychologist Dr. Max Liebermann. It is the second of this series that I have read. The story takes place in the early 1900s in Vienna. It appears there is a serial killer on the loose when more than one body shows up wearing a strange cross on its body. Reinhardt follows new criminal procedures while Max tries to suss out the type of person who would do these killings. The hunt takes them into a strange religious operation, elab A complex historical mystery featuring Detective Oskar Reinhardt and psychologist Dr. Max Liebermann. It is the second of this series that I have read. The story takes place in the early 1900s in Vienna. It appears there is a serial killer on the loose when more than one body shows up wearing a strange cross on its body. Reinhardt follows new criminal procedures while Max tries to suss out the type of person who would do these killings. The hunt takes them into a strange religious operation, elaborate and secret. Strong indications of bigotry reign. Well written, bits of historical interest incorporated.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Louis

    Vienna Blood is not a murder mystery book. It's a historical murder book with an emphasis on the historical. I mean how many other detective novels have a list of sources as an annex? Now this wouldn't be problematic if the writing and pacing had been well done. Instead this reads like someone's master's thesis on Austria in the early 1900's with references to a bunch of personae that were historically relevant but have little to do with the tale (ex. Freud). Not to mention the obsession with mu Vienna Blood is not a murder mystery book. It's a historical murder book with an emphasis on the historical. I mean how many other detective novels have a list of sources as an annex? Now this wouldn't be problematic if the writing and pacing had been well done. Instead this reads like someone's master's thesis on Austria in the early 1900's with references to a bunch of personae that were historically relevant but have little to do with the tale (ex. Freud). Not to mention the obsession with music and food the two main characters seem to have. The story was promising but overall (unless you're a fan of historical novels) don't bother.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Susan Elizabetha

    This is a remarkable book. Vienna in the early twentieth century where the story takes place sounds beautiful. But greed and intrigue are about as politicians, Universities, hospitals vie for money and power. Here Doctor Max Lieberman and Inspector Oskar Reinholdt solve the gruesome crimes by decapitation. Who could perform these gruesome acts and how did they accomplish the crime? It is also the story about anti-Semitism, while temporarily diverted in this story. It would soon gain more momentu This is a remarkable book. Vienna in the early twentieth century where the story takes place sounds beautiful. But greed and intrigue are about as politicians, Universities, hospitals vie for money and power. Here Doctor Max Lieberman and Inspector Oskar Reinholdt solve the gruesome crimes by decapitation. Who could perform these gruesome acts and how did they accomplish the crime? It is also the story about anti-Semitism, while temporarily diverted in this story. It would soon gain more momentum in events leading up to and during World War II. Highly recommend this book as it is a fascinating mystery and commentary about prejudice and hatred.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joan Friedman

    Great atmosphere, mediocre plot The plot is far-fetched and the psychoanalysis too obvious and superficial. But most of all I am tired of authors who trivialize Jewish life so that their sensitive, intellectual protagonists prove their merit appealing by rejecting it. Worse, Jewish women are made to epitomize all that is wrong with the community. Is there really any reason why the author couldn't imagine his alter ego encountering a Jewish woman just as intellectual as Miss Lydgate? Great atmosphere, mediocre plot The plot is far-fetched and the psychoanalysis too obvious and superficial. But most of all I am tired of authors who trivialize Jewish life so that their sensitive, intellectual protagonists prove their merit appealing by rejecting it. Worse, Jewish women are made to epitomize all that is wrong with the community. Is there really any reason why the author couldn't imagine his alter ego encountering a Jewish woman just as intellectual as Miss Lydgate?

  22. 4 out of 5

    A Hudak

    Another Max Liebermann mystery set in turn of the century Vienna. Max reminds one of Sherlock Holmes except that he uses his awareness of psychological forces as well as astute perception of circumstances. I especially love all the scenes in Viennese cafes eating delicious pastries and coffees. The relationship between Max and Detective Oscar Rheinhart is also entertaining. The actual mystery was less interesting to me than the characters and Viennese settings in mental hospitals, opera houses, Another Max Liebermann mystery set in turn of the century Vienna. Max reminds one of Sherlock Holmes except that he uses his awareness of psychological forces as well as astute perception of circumstances. I especially love all the scenes in Viennese cafes eating delicious pastries and coffees. The relationship between Max and Detective Oscar Rheinhart is also entertaining. The actual mystery was less interesting to me than the characters and Viennese settings in mental hospitals, opera houses, cafes, museums, and elsewhere.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Fairly obvious thriller set in Vienna in 1902. Because of when and where it's set, you can bet that one of the main investigators of crime is a psychiatrist, and that he meets and discusses some of his cases with Dr. Freud. Also, there is a lot of foreshadowing that the seeds of Naziism are at work. There is some nice discussion of the State Opera House, which I took of tour of last week, and the importance of The Marriage of Figaro to the plot. Fairly obvious thriller set in Vienna in 1902. Because of when and where it's set, you can bet that one of the main investigators of crime is a psychiatrist, and that he meets and discusses some of his cases with Dr. Freud. Also, there is a lot of foreshadowing that the seeds of Naziism are at work. There is some nice discussion of the State Opera House, which I took of tour of last week, and the importance of The Marriage of Figaro to the plot.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bibliophile

    Bloodier than the first book, and better: this time there is a musical serial killer in Vienna! Inspector Rheinhardt and Dr. Liebermann are shocked and appalled to realize they are looking for a Mozart-hating murderer. Who can even fathom such a thing? After worriedly munching on pastries in Viennese cafés and trading jokes with Dr. Freud, they are able to pull themselves together and solve the case with psychoanalysis. It's as fantastic as it sounds. Bloodier than the first book, and better: this time there is a musical serial killer in Vienna! Inspector Rheinhardt and Dr. Liebermann are shocked and appalled to realize they are looking for a Mozart-hating murderer. Who can even fathom such a thing? After worriedly munching on pastries in Viennese cafés and trading jokes with Dr. Freud, they are able to pull themselves together and solve the case with psychoanalysis. It's as fantastic as it sounds.

  25. 5 out of 5

    M B P WADSWORTH

    What I particularly like in this book is the attention to details about the period , life in Vienna at the time, reconstruction of social, political atmosphere and events. It mixed well several socio-economic and cultural strands of the Viennese society and time and that made it an engaging read. Characters were well drawn. The action and story unfolding from multiple angles and characters made it a page turner where you want to find out what happens next. I will be reading more in the series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elderberrywine

    So here's the one I started first, and it's every bit as good as the previous. Rather a Jack the Ripper mystery except involving The Magic Flute (so glad BTW for that wonderful Ingmar Bergman version from the '70's - can't tell you how many times I saw that). Quite the combo. Heh. You say there are more? *pricks up ears* So here's the one I started first, and it's every bit as good as the previous. Rather a Jack the Ripper mystery except involving The Magic Flute (so glad BTW for that wonderful Ingmar Bergman version from the '70's - can't tell you how many times I saw that). Quite the combo. Heh. You say there are more? *pricks up ears*

  27. 5 out of 5

    Btetlow

    Really enjoyed this turn of the century CSI. It is written in the style of a turn of the century classic and is a wonderful exploration of Vienna. As has been mentioned, it might help a bit to have a better understanding of the historical references and names in the book, but it didn't detract from things too much. Really enjoyed it! Really enjoyed this turn of the century CSI. It is written in the style of a turn of the century classic and is a wonderful exploration of Vienna. As has been mentioned, it might help a bit to have a better understanding of the historical references and names in the book, but it didn't detract from things too much. Really enjoyed it!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mysteryfan

    I started reading the books because I enjoyed the PBS series. This was quite good, a little darker than the series. I liked the portrayal of turn-of-the-century Vienna, with all the class and religious clashes. The characters are well-drawn. The solution was a little off but I'll read more of these. I started reading the books because I enjoyed the PBS series. This was quite good, a little darker than the series. I liked the portrayal of turn-of-the-century Vienna, with all the class and religious clashes. The characters are well-drawn. The solution was a little off but I'll read more of these.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Willie Kirschner

    This is the second book in a series which I recently discovered after watching the PBS series named for this book. I enjoy the relationship between the main characters and the way the stories reflect the history that was happening at that time. This book gives insight on the sources of Hitler and the Nazi philosophy. I look forward to continuing to reading the remaining books in the series.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Debbi

    A satisfying read. This book moves along with POV moving among characters and progress slowly happening. When Max solves the who-done-it, it’s ‘wait, what just happened’! All in all, a well written, plotted book.

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