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Viktor Frankl's Logotherapy: Meaning-Centered Counseling

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Dr. Ann Graber's magnificent work presented here in the Second Edition on Viktor Frankl is a serious attempt to demonstrate the effectiveness and viability of the use of existential analysis (logotherapy) and meaning centered counseling. Dr. Graber has poignantly demonstrated that existential analysis can be both scientifically sound and theologically grounded. Unlike the Dr. Ann Graber's magnificent work presented here in the Second Edition on Viktor Frankl is a serious attempt to demonstrate the effectiveness and viability of the use of existential analysis (logotherapy) and meaning centered counseling. Dr. Graber has poignantly demonstrated that existential analysis can be both scientifically sound and theologically grounded. Unlike the other Viennese schools of depth psychology, Frankl centers his work in the spiritual vitality of the human soul wherein is located the origin and destiny of all emotional healing.


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Dr. Ann Graber's magnificent work presented here in the Second Edition on Viktor Frankl is a serious attempt to demonstrate the effectiveness and viability of the use of existential analysis (logotherapy) and meaning centered counseling. Dr. Graber has poignantly demonstrated that existential analysis can be both scientifically sound and theologically grounded. Unlike the Dr. Ann Graber's magnificent work presented here in the Second Edition on Viktor Frankl is a serious attempt to demonstrate the effectiveness and viability of the use of existential analysis (logotherapy) and meaning centered counseling. Dr. Graber has poignantly demonstrated that existential analysis can be both scientifically sound and theologically grounded. Unlike the other Viennese schools of depth psychology, Frankl centers his work in the spiritual vitality of the human soul wherein is located the origin and destiny of all emotional healing.

30 review for Viktor Frankl's Logotherapy: Meaning-Centered Counseling

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zeev Crombie

    Great book on Logotheraphy This is a very clear and readable book that explains Logotheraphy In an easy way. I would recommend this book to any one that is interested in this subject.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul Dubuc

    This book is an excellent overview of the background, influential ideas and applications of Dr. Victor Frankl's logotherapy, a school of psychology that advances beyond Freud's "will to pleasure" and Adler's "will to power" to posit the "will to meaning" as the most basic human desire. I was eager to read this book in view of its underlying thesis that logotherapy is the "method of choice in ecumenical pastoral psychology". I strongly agree with that thesis. More than any other school of psychol This book is an excellent overview of the background, influential ideas and applications of Dr. Victor Frankl's logotherapy, a school of psychology that advances beyond Freud's "will to pleasure" and Adler's "will to power" to posit the "will to meaning" as the most basic human desire. I was eager to read this book in view of its underlying thesis that logotherapy is the "method of choice in ecumenical pastoral psychology". I strongly agree with that thesis. More than any other school of psychology, Frankl's logotherapy seems to take seriously the importance of religion and spirituality to our psychological well being. Yet, I was a little disappointed by Dr. Graber's approach. She seems to want to make logotherapists out of pastoral psychologists more than to help them apply logotherapy in their own work. There is very little in the way of theological insight applied to logotherapy in this book. Instead of applying the insights of her own religious tradition to the practice of pastoral psychology, she seems more concerned that the practice of that profession be "universally applicable" (pp. 54-5). She says in several places that logotherapy appeals to people of all religious persuasions and to those who have no religion. I understand Frankl's desire and need to keep religion separate from his contributions to the field of psychiatry in order to preserve their scientific credentials. But why should pastoral psychologists need, or want, to do that? The desire for universal applicability seems a little misplaced in a pastoral profession, especially for those whose religion already makes universally applicable claims. For Graber the term “ecumenical” seems to imply universalism. Quoting Huston Smith, in part, she says that, “We need to keep in mind that every person has a spiritual core and that there are 'many paths to the same summit' (quoting Smith). Some paths are religious, some are non-religious; some theistic in their orientation, some are non-theistic in their understanding of the Source of Being. The therapeutic process will take on a hopeful note when this presupposition that spirituality is central, and the particular religion of a client is incidental, is remembered” (Graber p. 52). I agree that people are spiritual beings with a common need for transcendence, but this doesn't mean that they end up in the same place in their pursuit of meaning. Later, Graber quotes Joseph Fabry to say that, “According to logotherapy, sickness can originate in our noos; but unlike our body and psyche, the noos, our spirit, can never become sick” (p. 76). Some religions teach otherwise and I wonder if Frankl himself wouldn't disagree with this statement having spent three years in Nazi concentration camps. Throughout the book it seems evident to this reader that logotherapy works well within the Judeo-Christian religious worldview but the author's claim that it appeals also to atheists and agnostics seems expected be taken for granted. Graber acknowledges the influence of existentialist philosophers Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche on Frankl (p. 33) but sidesteps the fact that these two men worked from very different premises (those of Christianity vs. atheism) and came to very different conclusions about man's search for ultimate meaning (the need for radical religious reform vs. nihilism). How can logotherapists maintain that “tragic optimism” is inherent in the human condition (p. 126) and that pessimism is not (the strong preference of many for optimism notwithstanding)? Does self-transcendence (p. 80) have any meaning in itself without a transcendent God to support the ultimate meaning it seeks? There are many answers to theological and philosophical questions that seem to be assumed by logotherapy. That, in itself, seems to imply that the science of logotherapy doesn't stand on its own. Its compatibility with, and acceptance of, the importance of religion goes deep. I highly recommend this book for its very organized and readable presentation of Frankl's logotherapy, its interesting case studies, and very useful glossary of terms. It's no substitute for reading Frankl's books, of course, but but it's a very good distillation of his important ideas and a good introduction to his work. Dr. Graber makes a very good case for the effectiveness of logotherapy in soul care. Those who want to use it in pastoral care are well advised to do so but they will have to make their own way, or look elsewhere for help, in finding a theological basis for doing so within their own faith tradition.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Riitta Toivonen

    Graber's book, written in heavy German scholarly style, is challenging reading. The title of the Finnish edition I read suggests that logotherapy can help you find meaning in life, and some practical guidance is available within the rather theoretical book, but finding it requires perseverance. Frankl's theory itself seems worth getting to know however, and I would recommend finding more friendly reading on it. (I read the Finnish edition: Ann V. Graber: Viktor Franklin Logoterapia - Löydä tarko Graber's book, written in heavy German scholarly style, is challenging reading. The title of the Finnish edition I read suggests that logotherapy can help you find meaning in life, and some practical guidance is available within the rather theoretical book, but finding it requires perseverance. Frankl's theory itself seems worth getting to know however, and I would recommend finding more friendly reading on it. (I read the Finnish edition: Ann V. Graber: Viktor Franklin Logoterapia - Löydä tarkoitus elämääsi")

  4. 5 out of 5

    Janice Weaver

  5. 4 out of 5

    458223

  6. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm North

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Schroeder

  8. 5 out of 5

    Indah Sianturi

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nehir Ak

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  11. 5 out of 5

    ADL

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hanlie

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marc A.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Craig Rinzema

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pierre Akouete

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dan Hostetler

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mewra

  19. 5 out of 5

    Janko

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Silverman

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Patterson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Lafontant

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  24. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena Palomar

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jay Lein

  27. 5 out of 5

    salt.fox

  28. 4 out of 5

    Larry Ousley

  29. 4 out of 5

    Phil

  30. 4 out of 5

    Helena Jelena

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