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Gospel and Kingdom: A Christian Interpretation of the Old Testament

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Gospel and Kingdom is concerned with finding the gospel principles inherent in the Pentateuch and historical books of the Old Testament


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Gospel and Kingdom is concerned with finding the gospel principles inherent in the Pentateuch and historical books of the Old Testament

30 review for Gospel and Kingdom: A Christian Interpretation of the Old Testament

  1. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Another gift thanks to Matt Pitts. 'Gospel & Kingdom' is one of the best introductions to Biblical Theology that I have ever seen, even with it's absolutely repulsive book cover. Goldsworthy doesn't use overly complicated language and writes to lay Christians to help them understand the purpose of the OT for Christians. He manages to skim across the general narrative of the OT in under a hundred pages and then focuses on how various OT passages point to the coming Christ. There wasn't anything pa Another gift thanks to Matt Pitts. 'Gospel & Kingdom' is one of the best introductions to Biblical Theology that I have ever seen, even with it's absolutely repulsive book cover. Goldsworthy doesn't use overly complicated language and writes to lay Christians to help them understand the purpose of the OT for Christians. He manages to skim across the general narrative of the OT in under a hundred pages and then focuses on how various OT passages point to the coming Christ. There wasn't anything particularly new for me and the book doesn't pretend to be a full Biblical theological treatment, but I really haven't yet found a more concise and clear intro to Christians as to how to read the OT. I will be recommending this book to Christians who need help understanding the OT from the perspective of the NT. ...and really, the book cover is one of the worst.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rob McCutcheon

    This is an excellent introduction to biblical theology, and it lays out a very accessible and clear outline of the coherency and unity of Scripture. I’m appreciative of the way Goldsworthy delves sufficiently into the recurring themes and types of scripture without becoming too immersed in all the complications that invariably exist. Does this leave the reader wanting more of his analysis? Certainly, but that’s why this is merely an introduction. This book is a foundational text for the growth o This is an excellent introduction to biblical theology, and it lays out a very accessible and clear outline of the coherency and unity of Scripture. I’m appreciative of the way Goldsworthy delves sufficiently into the recurring themes and types of scripture without becoming too immersed in all the complications that invariably exist. Does this leave the reader wanting more of his analysis? Certainly, but that’s why this is merely an introduction. This book is a foundational text for the growth of any Bible-believing Christian.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Wu

    I think i need to reread this 3 more times. So well written for such a huge topic on approaching the OT. It is so concise and well structured and its easy to read. But i think for me to get full use out of the book i need to spend more time dwelling on the ideas and truly fleshing out every statement he says. Eager to reread!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell Dixon

    An amazing overview of biblical theology. I am going to use this in discipleship groups as a basis for understanding the old testament and new.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    An academic exposition of the Old Testament 18 July 2012 Well, it seems as if I am the only person on Goodreads that has given this book less than four, though I do notice that a couple of people have given it a three. I do expect to get some nasty comments to my commentary here, however I assure you that I have no intention of getting into an argument with anybody over my position on Christianity. First of all, at this stage of my life I am loathe to call myself an evangelical, particularly sinc An academic exposition of the Old Testament 18 July 2012 Well, it seems as if I am the only person on Goodreads that has given this book less than four, though I do notice that a couple of people have given it a three. I do expect to get some nasty comments to my commentary here, however I assure you that I have no intention of getting into an argument with anybody over my position on Christianity. First of all, at this stage of my life I am loathe to call myself an evangelical, particularly since to me evangelical seems to suggest arrogance, stubbornness, and a refusal to acknowledge that one has actually done wrong. To some evangelicals that I know the concept of salvation by grace simply means that they do not and cannot sin and anybody who dares criticise them is either wrong or misguided. In a way, the most skillful tactic that evangelicals have developed today is the skill of obfuscation, especially when it comes to their own failures. Before I continue I believe that it is best to outline my position of Christianity. I believe in one true God as outlined in the Bible, and that Jesus is God in the flesh, fully human and fully divine. I believe that he came to Earth no only as a sacrifice for our sins but also to teach us about God and to teach us how God created us to live. I believe that the Bible is the revelation of God and that it is inerrant. However I also believe that the Bible is much more than a dry, academic, ancient text, but that it is a living, breathing, spiritual book shrouded in myth and mysticism, and to me, modern academic Christianity has discarded the living element of the Bible to chain in up in their own humanist philosophy. I do believe that Gospel and Kingdom is useful and helpful in understanding the Old Testament, however the problem that I had with this book, having only recently read it, is the same problem that I had with Don Carson's A Call to a Spiritual Reformation, and that is that I have heard it all before. In his introduction, Goldsworthy laments that at the time there was a lack of literature that people could use to help them understand the Old Testament, so he set out to write a book and laid down one way of reading the Old Testament. However, the problem that has arisen is that because the book became so popular (and because the book came out of a major Australian theological college) that it has pretty much become the only way of reading the Old Testament. While I agree with him that a hit and miss interpretation does not get the best of the Old Testament, I will argue that neither does a rigid academic approach, and that is the problem that I have found with modern Christianity:t it has become way too academic. Christianity has become dominated by the theological colleges, and the interpretation and understanding of scripture has been hijacked by a very rigid method. Terms like Biblical Theology, Systematic Theology, and Hermeneutics (just to name a few) have arisen to describe a number of ways of reading the Bible. I remember that churches have constantly said that when we read the Bible we should always ask God to speak to us as we read the scriptures, however my concern is that while we may ask God to speak to us, we will only let him speak to us out of the rigid restrictions that we have created. There are a number of Christians out there that attack the concept of humanism, however this academic approach to Christianity that I see coming out of a lot of universities to me reeks of humanism. Further, the theological college has created what is termed as a barrier to entry. Unless you have a theology degree (and sometimes higher) then you are not qualified to speak on the Bible, and in a way, God is not allowed to speak to you unless he follows the rules set down by the colleges. I will give an example of how I find academic Christianity destroying the Bible. Since the 19th Century scholars have struggled over the fact that the book of Isaiah predicts events that happened hundreds of years after the book was written, and this caused such a concern that the scholars decided to create Deutero-Isaiah (or second Isaiah) to write the parts of Isaiah after the events that they predicted. The same was done with the book of Daniel, being taken out of its Babylonian context and shifted two hundred years into the future after the appearance and death of Antiochus Epiphanes. I have been to evangelical Bible colleges that have then accepted this rendering of these two books, thus undermining what I consider to be the sovereignty of God and his prophetic nature. I shall now spend some time criticising Goldsworthy's methodology, namely because this methodology is what many evangelical churches have taken on board. First, he describes the Old Testament not as a religious history, because that is from the people, but as theological history. This reminds me of something that I used to be taught: Christianity is not a religion because a religion is defined by earning our way to heaven, whereas Christianity offers salvation as a free gift. So, when a friend said that I was religious, I proudly stood up and said 'I am not religious, I am a Christian'. My friend then looked at the others with an odd look on his face and replied by saying 'so, you are not religious because you are religious? Do you believe in God?' I said 'yes', and he replied, 'so you are religious?'. If we go any further, I will assure you that you will descend into an argument that will simply result in you losing friends. Okay, to other Christians, sure, kid ourselves, and tell each other that we are not religious, but when we are talking with non-Christians, the best thing to do is to simply nod and smile. Now, I want to talk about Goldsworthy's use of grammar. Honestly it is atrocious. In one spot he says 'God's people is … now this may sound like bad grammer but I assure you it is not'. My response to that it 'I assure you that it is. It is bad grammar, very bad grammar'. Personally I do not care how the Hebrew writes that phrase, we are not reading Hebrew we a reading English, and to be blunt, unless the noun is a collective noun, you do not use 'is' you use 'are'. There is no two ways about that. You simply cannot change grammar to suit your own purpose. I don't even care if you consider the noun 'people of God' as being a singular, it is not, it is a plural, and it will always be a plural. If you wish to use that phrase in the singular, find an English word that is singular, such as nation. Another thing he does a couple of times is to tell us about the literal interpretation of a passage, that being from John 1, 'and he dwelt among us'. Goldsworthy then goes on to say that the Greek literally means 'tabernacled'. Personally, there are two problems with that. The first being that you do not, and never, literally translate a language. Why? Because it makes no sense whatsoever. When you translate, you read the language, get the idea that the language is expressing, and then write the same idea down using English. Take for instance this German phrase 'werden sie mit mir einkaufen gehen'. Translated into English it says 'will you go shopping with me?' Literally it says 'will you with me shopping to go?' Okay, we understand the meaning, but translating it literally is impossible because the rules of English do not allow us to do that. Isn't it funny that when it comes to moral and civil laws we are not allowed to break them, but when it comes to grammatical laws, all bets are off. I also notice that in some places it is okay for them to talk about the literal meaning of the Greek, and other places we completely ignore it, and even try to explain it away. Romans 1:1 says 'Paul, servant of Jesus Christ'. The Greek uses the word doulos, which translated into English, means 'slave'. When I confronted a pastor about this he said (despite knowing that I knew Greek, but then because he had a Theology degree and I didn't, my opinion was worthless) 'it can also mean servant'. Actually, no it can't. The Greek word for servant is oikonomos. Simply put you cannot pick and chose that which you want to transliterate and that which you do not. Now, let us consider the word tabernacled. Okay, a mature Christian will know that the tabernacle was the tent that the Israelites built in the desert to remind them of God's presence. Actually, I just checked the Greek translation of John 1:14, and the word that is used for dwelt is eskenosen. I am not going to go for a translation, however we must also remember than Jesus did not speak in Greek but in Aramaic, and as such many parts of the New Testament are the Greek translation of the Aramaic (including the entire book of Matthew). Here I go, I am criticising academic Christianity and I am being academic myself. Anyway, as I have indicated above, while we can use the English language, and push it to its limits (as Shakespeare did), we are still bound by the rules, namely that it has to make sense. George Orwell once posed a number of simple rules, and finished it off by saying, follow these rules unless what you are saying makes no sense, then happily butcher it. In relation to this discussion, some have even suggested that the word 'tented' is a better translation. My response is no it is not. Tented is not a word, and the noun tent cannot be turned into a verb. Anyway, if you want to use a word with that meaning then we have a perfectly good word to use, and that is 'camped'. I said said quite a lot so far, and there are still two more books in his trilogy to read, so I think I will leave it there, except to finish off by saying that my position, the major theme that runs through the Bible is that of the fall and redemption of humanity, and the question that the Bible goes out of its way to answer is 'how then shall we live'. Actually, there is one more thing that I want to discuss so I will finish it off with that, and once again it involves Goldsworthy manipulating and butchering the English language. In his book he talks about the reason for Christ coming to Earth, but during this discussion he says that we focus too much on Christ's good works and his divinity. While his works are important they are not the focal point, and while his divinity is important it is not the focal point. In doing this he has effectively pushed this into the background and we no longer think about Christ's good works or his divinity, because despite him saying that it is important, we do not think of it as important. The focal point, he says, is the resurrection. Now, in saying this I am probably going to make quite a few enemies amongst evangelical circles, but I will go out on a limb and say that outside of Christ's good works and divinity (as well as his humanity) the resurrection is meaningless. I am then going to suggest that he is not the only figure in mythology (just because it is mythology does not mean that it is not true, that is not the nature of myth) that is a dying resurrecting God-king. Okay, you may ask, name ten. I will: Odysseus, Aeneas, Mithras, Osiris, Heracles, Orpheus, Dionysius, Theseus, Persephone, Aidonis, and Attis, and they are just the ones (and not all of them) from the Eastern Mediterranean. To be honest, they are permeated throughout the cultures of Earth (even Odin gets a mention). No, my position is that Christ's resurrection is only important because of the context in which it exists. If it was only the resurrection that was important, God could have done that during Herod's massacre. Instead, while Christ's journey in this world was always focused on the cross, it was the path that took him there that makes his death and resurrection so important. In his journey he teaches us about God, about himself and his mission, and most importantly, how then do we live. In fact, it is the how then do we live as redeemed, reformed, evolved, human beings that is the central aspect of the Bible. The resurrection is simply the method that God uses to redeem us, once redeemed, we are to live as redeemed human beings, and that, my friend, is what the Bible tells us.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mushi Rahman

    The theology in this book is sound. Goldsworthy explains how the Old Testament points towards the coming of Christ in the New Testament. Goldsworthy clearly demonstrates the importance of seeing New Testament teaching in the Old Testament scriptures. What is written in the Law, the Prophets and the Psalms is not obsolete because of the New Testament but is relevant for the 21st century. Jesus himself said he had come to fulfil what was written in the Old Testament. "Don’t think that I came to ab The theology in this book is sound. Goldsworthy explains how the Old Testament points towards the coming of Christ in the New Testament. Goldsworthy clearly demonstrates the importance of seeing New Testament teaching in the Old Testament scriptures. What is written in the Law, the Prophets and the Psalms is not obsolete because of the New Testament but is relevant for the 21st century. Jesus himself said he had come to fulfil what was written in the Old Testament. "Don’t think that I came to abolish the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to abolish but to fulfil. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass away, not the smallest letter or one stroke of a letter will pass away from the law until all things are accomplished" (Matthew 5:17-18). Goldsworthy also encourage us to see Jesus and the gospel in the Old Testament. Appendix A contains a basic list of Bible readings so you grasp the salient features and themes of the Old Testament; I found this tough going but a worthwhile exercise on completion. Appendix B has questions linked to each chapter which help me to embed my learning from the book. Appendix C provides ten passages from the Old Testament for you to interpret asking yourself three questions: 1) What did the text mean to the original writer? 2) What does the text mean in the light of the Gospel? 3) What is its specific meaning to me or my hearers now? I commend this book to anyone wanting to build a good theological knowledge of the Bible.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Nelms

    "Underlying [this book] has been the conviction that twentieth century evangelical Christians have experienced a radical loss of direction in handling the Old Testament." I know of no other book of 150 pages that introduces the reader to grappling with the Old Testament in such a masterful way. In fact, it was a easy read for me only because his ideas have permeated without measure the current Neo-Calvinism/resurgence of Reformation-hermeneutics that I have been well acquainted with them already. "Underlying [this book] has been the conviction that twentieth century evangelical Christians have experienced a radical loss of direction in handling the Old Testament." I know of no other book of 150 pages that introduces the reader to grappling with the Old Testament in such a masterful way. In fact, it was a easy read for me only because his ideas have permeated without measure the current Neo-Calvinism/resurgence of Reformation-hermeneutics that I have been well acquainted with them already. Christ is the key of all biblical interpretation, and he unifies and fulfills all of biblical history. In him all the stories, prophetic writings and (even) wisdom literature come alive and have real and final meaning. His approach is nothing new, but merely an attempt to lay out in simple fashion many of the ideas of Luther and the Reformers (and many of the church fathers) concerning the role of Christ as the center-point and key of biblical interpretation. It's short, yet amazingly comprehensive. This is a book I will gladly re-read for the sake of refreshment. Can't believe it's taken me so many years to finally read this book after it's been recommended to me 1,000 times. Excited to dig into the remainder of his trilogy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    James Williamson

    Gospel and Kingdom is a helpful entry-level work on the structure of the Bible, primarily focusing on the nature and meaning of the Old Testament. Through the unifying principle of the kingdom of God, in which God's people are meant to dwell in God's place under God's rule. The successive covenants God makes under Abraham, through Moses, and to David, are all developing this theme. Ultimately, Goldworthy argues, the Old Testament promises have their fulfillment and consummation in Christ Himself Gospel and Kingdom is a helpful entry-level work on the structure of the Bible, primarily focusing on the nature and meaning of the Old Testament. Through the unifying principle of the kingdom of God, in which God's people are meant to dwell in God's place under God's rule. The successive covenants God makes under Abraham, through Moses, and to David, are all developing this theme. Ultimately, Goldworthy argues, the Old Testament promises have their fulfillment and consummation in Christ Himself. Therefore, one must return to the Old Testament with the facts of the gospel as keys to the meaning of Old Testament types and shadows-- indeed, as the key to the whole Old Testament. In this way, a primary purpose of Gospel and Kingdom is to provide an interpretive template for Old Testament. This is achieved by showing the unity of the whole Bible as one great plan of God unfolding through successive ages of human history. For a more thorough and detailed exposition on the interpretation of the Old Testament, see Goldsworthy's Gospel-Centered Hermeneutics. The book is well written and easy to follow, and a lot is packed into its 150 pages. It is a useful guide to Biblical Theology for laymen and teachers, especially if you have limited time to study this issue. Recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Solid little read about the importance and relevance of the Old Testament not only to the entirety of the Scriptures but also to the Christian's faith and overall understanding of the Christian doctrine. Goldsworthy argues that the OT is often overlooked and/or ignored in favor of the New Testament and as such, many believers have developed (i.e. been taught) the wrong interpretation about what the OT actually is and what it means. The author also strongly makes the point that the Bible in its e Solid little read about the importance and relevance of the Old Testament not only to the entirety of the Scriptures but also to the Christian's faith and overall understanding of the Christian doctrine. Goldsworthy argues that the OT is often overlooked and/or ignored in favor of the New Testament and as such, many believers have developed (i.e. been taught) the wrong interpretation about what the OT actually is and what it means. The author also strongly makes the point that the Bible in its entirety points to the same thing - the Gospel - in a unified and purposeful manner. You cannot separate out the OT and claim that it is simply a historical "relic" of an ancient time. No. Rather, the NT cannot, and would not, exist without the OT, and vice versa. The entirety of Scriptures all point towards the same thing - the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ - whom God pre-ordained to send to earth as fully man and fully divine to reconcile us with God.

  10. 4 out of 5

    An Te

    A book that is basic, principled and hugely edifying in raising up an understanding that the God of the Old testament is indeed the God of the New Testament. If you ever wished to see how to read the scriptures, with Christ in mind, then this is the best primer that I have yet read on this topic. The treatment of prophecy as God's promise is remarkably well-led and it is the ground upon which faith is founded. Faith is believing and trusting in God's promises and Graeme writes lucidly, with the A book that is basic, principled and hugely edifying in raising up an understanding that the God of the Old testament is indeed the God of the New Testament. If you ever wished to see how to read the scriptures, with Christ in mind, then this is the best primer that I have yet read on this topic. The treatment of prophecy as God's promise is remarkably well-led and it is the ground upon which faith is founded. Faith is believing and trusting in God's promises and Graeme writes lucidly, with the odd sagacious opinion, that is not out of line with God's view on salvific history. There is also a priming section on exegesis, hermeneutics and application which is of great relevance for any one wishing to read the Bible afresh and mine it of its depths. All in all, a helpful and instructive book on how to read Jesus as the fulfilment of the Old Testament and how we are now to look at Jesus' promises with his Second impending coming.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Brown

    I've read a few of the classic bigger works on Reformed Biblical Theology. Goldsworthy's classic will be my first recommendation as an introduction to the OT from hereafter! He begins by pointing out a few of the challenges for reading and applying the OT to Christians today, then spends the bulk of the book reviewing the OT history through the lens of the Kingdom theme. He defines the kingdom as 1) God's people, 2) in God's place, 3) under God's rule. He then traces the development of these con I've read a few of the classic bigger works on Reformed Biblical Theology. Goldsworthy's classic will be my first recommendation as an introduction to the OT from hereafter! He begins by pointing out a few of the challenges for reading and applying the OT to Christians today, then spends the bulk of the book reviewing the OT history through the lens of the Kingdom theme. He defines the kingdom as 1) God's people, 2) in God's place, 3) under God's rule. He then traces the development of these concepts from the Garden, to Abraham, to Sinai, to David, to the Prophets, and finally to Christ himself! The final chapter takes 5 examples from the OT and shows how they rightly should help us see the person and work of Christ. This one is clearly a classic for a reason!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Williams

    "The gospel is not simply 'forgiveness of sins' and 'going to heaven when you die.' The gospel is a restoration of relationships between God, man, and the world." This is an excellent summary statement of Graeme Goldsworthy's work on explaining the continuity and relationship of the Old and New Testaments. We can no more "unhitch" ourselves from the Old Testament than we can detach ourselves from life and breath itself. All of Scripture is interpreted in light of the coming kingdom of Jesus Chri "The gospel is not simply 'forgiveness of sins' and 'going to heaven when you die.' The gospel is a restoration of relationships between God, man, and the world." This is an excellent summary statement of Graeme Goldsworthy's work on explaining the continuity and relationship of the Old and New Testaments. We can no more "unhitch" ourselves from the Old Testament than we can detach ourselves from life and breath itself. All of Scripture is interpreted in light of the coming kingdom of Jesus Christ, and His ushering in the Kingdom of God, foreshadowed brilliantly in the pages of the Old Testament scriptures.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Greg Mathis

    To weigh this book properly, one must understand not only the subject matter handled, but also a bit of the long history of the biblical theology movement. Written in 1981, this text seems a bit dated given the massive influx of new material in the field that has surfaced since. While seminal, this work holds its own, even so early in the shift of emphasis within evangelicalism. As a primer, this text remains appropriately brief while handling all pertinent material. I give it a well-earned 4 st To weigh this book properly, one must understand not only the subject matter handled, but also a bit of the long history of the biblical theology movement. Written in 1981, this text seems a bit dated given the massive influx of new material in the field that has surfaced since. While seminal, this work holds its own, even so early in the shift of emphasis within evangelicalism. As a primer, this text remains appropriately brief while handling all pertinent material. I give it a well-earned 4 stars.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Short

    This is a good book in its central thesis of interpreting the Old Testament in light of the Gospel. This is generally a good overview of biblical theology. The kingdom is certainly a prominent theme throughout scripture we must be aware of when looking at smaller portions. His view of the kingdom is not entirely in line with Scripture, though quite consistent with reformed dichotomous covenant theology and the over realized eschatology of amillennialism. It turns as you would expect in certain p This is a good book in its central thesis of interpreting the Old Testament in light of the Gospel. This is generally a good overview of biblical theology. The kingdom is certainly a prominent theme throughout scripture we must be aware of when looking at smaller portions. His view of the kingdom is not entirely in line with Scripture, though quite consistent with reformed dichotomous covenant theology and the over realized eschatology of amillennialism. It turns as you would expect in certain places. This is still a good resource for seeing Christ in the Old Testament.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason Wilson

    The first in Goldsworthy’s famed trilogy, this is a penetrating thesis on God’s kingdom as revealed in the unity of old and new testaments ; there is much that’s fresh here including an innovative look at the law/gospel relationship ; itself grace, but an external forerunner of what would later be internalised.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Breezee

    Utilizing biblical theology, Goldsworthy takes the reader through the theme of Kingdom from creation to consummation. As an added bonus, he supplies illustrations throughout. Short, sweet, easy read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt Curtis

    An excellent introductory Biblical Theology Text. I look forward to reading the other two books in his "Goldsworthy Trilogy." So far this is the best book I've read in 2020 and would recommend it to anyone looking to understand their Bible better. An excellent introductory Biblical Theology Text. I look forward to reading the other two books in his "Goldsworthy Trilogy." So far this is the best book I've read in 2020 and would recommend it to anyone looking to understand their Bible better.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karl

    Goldsworthy reminds Christians of the OT's importance for us. He briefly shows how to interpret it in light of the Gospel of Jesus. He warms us against neglecting or interpreting it as an end in itself. My only complain is his brevity, which was also his goal. Goldsworthy reminds Christians of the OT's importance for us. He briefly shows how to interpret it in light of the Gospel of Jesus. He warms us against neglecting or interpreting it as an end in itself. My only complain is his brevity, which was also his goal.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jason Suydam

    A very good, clear and simple presentation of the overarching theme of the Bible. Like a Bob Ross episode, we should see the image of Christ progressively taking form throughout the scriptures.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Such a key, key book for Christians to grow in their understanding and applying all of the Scriptures in light of the central message of the gospel.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Philip Brown

    Terrific introduction to biblical theology.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben Cook

    Helpful framework for biblical theology for those who want a deeper dive than books such as Roberts God's Big Picture Helpful framework for biblical theology for those who want a deeper dive than books such as Roberts God's Big Picture

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    Good, concise introduction to biblical theology, specifically focusing on the Old Testament’s place.

  24. 5 out of 5

    JT Stead

    Great introduction to Biblical theology and understanding the Old testament. Redemptive historical hermeneutic for the win.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy Koehler

    Great intro on biblical theology. Simple language and concise.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Gentzler

    Pretty good introduction to the topic. Read because of the Doctrine & Devotion podcast.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brian The Furnace Man

    I almost gave this book 5 stars because of the authors really cool name. I thought that may be a little unfair though. Excellent study on how the old testament relates to the new testament. I guess a better way to put it would be how the old testament points to and is fulfilled in the new testament. The idea that the new covenant some how replaces the old covenant is absurd. To imply that God made a mistake and needed a do over does not fit into the context and true meaning of the bible as a who I almost gave this book 5 stars because of the authors really cool name. I thought that may be a little unfair though. Excellent study on how the old testament relates to the new testament. I guess a better way to put it would be how the old testament points to and is fulfilled in the new testament. The idea that the new covenant some how replaces the old covenant is absurd. To imply that God made a mistake and needed a do over does not fit into the context and true meaning of the bible as a whole. I felt the author did a good job handling this topic. His use of hermeneutics and biblical theology was well done. I would recommend this book to anyone who feels time spent reading the old testament is unnecessary. You simply cannot understand the new testament without first understanding the old testament.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hopson

    Gospel & Kingdom is a fantastic little resource as an introduction to biblical theology. It's clear, simple, easy to read, and short. Goldsworthy offers a helpful overview of the Old Testament, while rightly pointing the reader to its ultimate fulfillment in Christ. Although I don't agree with all his implications for sermon application, I found this a very helpful book and would recommend it to those wanting to understand the Old Testament better or those wanting an introduction to the discipli Gospel & Kingdom is a fantastic little resource as an introduction to biblical theology. It's clear, simple, easy to read, and short. Goldsworthy offers a helpful overview of the Old Testament, while rightly pointing the reader to its ultimate fulfillment in Christ. Although I don't agree with all his implications for sermon application, I found this a very helpful book and would recommend it to those wanting to understand the Old Testament better or those wanting an introduction to the discipline of biblical theology. For Tim Challies' 2016 Reading Challenge, this is the book I read with an ugly cover (the edition I have is even worse than the image above).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Noel Adams

    This is quite possibly the BEST book I have read this year. Goldsworthy gently but deftly defends his thesis that today's typical evangelical reads the Old Testament badly. I think it's a sign of a good book when I've underlined and starred nearly the entire text. This is the best survey of the Old Testament that I am aware of. And it's now official 'required reading' for my children. After all, the Bible is a sword...and if you're gonna swing that thang around, you should have proper weapons tr This is quite possibly the BEST book I have read this year. Goldsworthy gently but deftly defends his thesis that today's typical evangelical reads the Old Testament badly. I think it's a sign of a good book when I've underlined and starred nearly the entire text. This is the best survey of the Old Testament that I am aware of. And it's now official 'required reading' for my children. After all, the Bible is a sword...and if you're gonna swing that thang around, you should have proper weapons training. Five stars. Fantastic!!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Goldsworthy sets out to prove that 20th century (and 21st cwntury0 evangelicals have 'experienced a radical loss of direction in handling the Old Testament... By reverting to either allegorical interpretation on the one hand or prophetic literalism on the other, .. thrown away the hermeneutic gains of the Reformers in favor of a mediaeval approach to the Bible." This book serves to correct those losses. A great read; heartily recommended! Goldsworthy sets out to prove that 20th century (and 21st cwntury0 evangelicals have 'experienced a radical loss of direction in handling the Old Testament... By reverting to either allegorical interpretation on the one hand or prophetic literalism on the other, .. thrown away the hermeneutic gains of the Reformers in favor of a mediaeval approach to the Bible." This book serves to correct those losses. A great read; heartily recommended!

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