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The Smashing Book #4 - New Perspectives on Web Design

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Written by well-respected designers and developers, the 4th Smashing Book contains lots of actionable takeaways that will help you in your daily routine. Think of it as a reliable playbook for issues that keep following you in every project. This eBook is for you because you’ll discover plenty of valuable, time-saving techniques that will improve your workflow right away. Written by well-respected designers and developers, the 4th Smashing Book contains lots of actionable takeaways that will help you in your daily routine. Think of it as a reliable playbook for issues that keep following you in every project. This eBook is for you because you’ll discover plenty of valuable, time-saving techniques that will improve your workflow right away. Smashing Book #4 — New Perspectives on Web Design features valuable insights into large-scale projects, adaptive interfaces, customer support, user psychology and typography. We will also uncover smart front-end strategies, obscure back-end techniques and find out what it takes to improve website performance for faster and more robust apps. Table Of Contents: - Preface by Vitaly Friedman - Modern CSS Architecture and Front-End Development by Harry Roberts - Writing Maintainable, Future-Friendly Code by Nicholas Zakas - The Vanilla Web Diet by Christian Heilmann - Culture of Performance by Tim Kadlec - Robust, Responsible, Responsive Web Design by Mat Marquis - Finding and Fixing Mobile Web Rendering Issues by Addy Osmani - Designing Adaptive Interfaces by Aaron Gustafson - How To Fix the Web: Obscure Back-End Techniques and Terminal Secrets by Paul Tero - The Next Steps for Web Typography by Marko Dugonjić - The Two Faces of Content Strategy: Balancing the Needs of Users and Editors by Corey Vilhauer - Supporting Your Product by Rachel Andrew - The Design of People by Nishant Kothary - On Creative Spirit by Christopher Murphy


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Written by well-respected designers and developers, the 4th Smashing Book contains lots of actionable takeaways that will help you in your daily routine. Think of it as a reliable playbook for issues that keep following you in every project. This eBook is for you because you’ll discover plenty of valuable, time-saving techniques that will improve your workflow right away. Written by well-respected designers and developers, the 4th Smashing Book contains lots of actionable takeaways that will help you in your daily routine. Think of it as a reliable playbook for issues that keep following you in every project. This eBook is for you because you’ll discover plenty of valuable, time-saving techniques that will improve your workflow right away. Smashing Book #4 — New Perspectives on Web Design features valuable insights into large-scale projects, adaptive interfaces, customer support, user psychology and typography. We will also uncover smart front-end strategies, obscure back-end techniques and find out what it takes to improve website performance for faster and more robust apps. Table Of Contents: - Preface by Vitaly Friedman - Modern CSS Architecture and Front-End Development by Harry Roberts - Writing Maintainable, Future-Friendly Code by Nicholas Zakas - The Vanilla Web Diet by Christian Heilmann - Culture of Performance by Tim Kadlec - Robust, Responsible, Responsive Web Design by Mat Marquis - Finding and Fixing Mobile Web Rendering Issues by Addy Osmani - Designing Adaptive Interfaces by Aaron Gustafson - How To Fix the Web: Obscure Back-End Techniques and Terminal Secrets by Paul Tero - The Next Steps for Web Typography by Marko Dugonjić - The Two Faces of Content Strategy: Balancing the Needs of Users and Editors by Corey Vilhauer - Supporting Your Product by Rachel Andrew - The Design of People by Nishant Kothary - On Creative Spirit by Christopher Murphy

30 review for The Smashing Book #4 - New Perspectives on Web Design

  1. 4 out of 5

    Niklas

    First part of the book was about hot topics in front-end design with mostly practical tips and pokes to change your attitude what we should aim for. Some random notes: I'm going to try BEM convention for html class naming. Multiple of chapters talked about how to do progressive enhancement with JavaScript as well as responsive design and avoiding loading unnecessary stuff. Some of the suggestions are not supported by browsers yet. Well, at least I got inspiration to add webp support for banner imag First part of the book was about hot topics in front-end design with mostly practical tips and pokes to change your attitude what we should aim for. Some random notes: I'm going to try BEM convention for html class naming. Multiple of chapters talked about how to do progressive enhancement with JavaScript as well as responsive design and avoiding loading unnecessary stuff. Some of the suggestions are not supported by browsers yet. Well, at least I got inspiration to add webp support for banner images of front page of translatewiki.net Chapter 3 argues that websites don't need to look or behave the same for everyone. Was expecting more from chapter 4. Now it mostly stated that performance must not be an afterthought and we should set budgets. To set budgets we need to know what to measure and what are acceptable values. That is lot of work and would have liked more tips for coming up with performance metrics. It was also very frontend focused - acceptable given the frame of the book, but nevertheless performance goes through the whole stack as I've blogged recently. Chapter 6 goes into some of the tools I've already using to fix performances. Tried to evaluate some repaint problems on my code with the tips, but got nowhere - the repaints stayed even after I removed all extra styles, code and html. But they were not present if I copied the affected part to blank page - maybe a Chrome bug. Got some more understanding on browser rendering, but was hoping for more. Chapter 7 is somewhat similar to chapter 5, but more about progressive enhancement with JavaScript with some tricks. I understand that sites should be usable without JavaScript and even CSS, but somewhere there has to be line where it is not worth trying to support the non-CSS non-JS use case. I develop a web software that is more like desktop app. Having it to work without JavaScript feels like trying to make desktop app to work on terminal. Both might have their places, but they would have very different interface and be two different applications possible sharing the same backend. In few chapters it was suggested to use some kind of css reset styles to take full control of the layout, but then again in other places it was suggested not to use css-reset style (or any other components for that matter) if you don't understand what they are for because they add to the size to the page or because of the aforementioned thing that websites don't need to look the same to all. Chapter 8 is a nice intro to administrating website. Though there was one big WTF. It is using 'find ... | sed 's/ /\\ /g' | xargs' instead of 'find ... -print0 | xargs -0'. It also claims that display_errors doesn't display parse errors - this is only true if the parse error is before or in the same file where display_settings is called. I don't quite understand who is the target audience for chapter 9 - certainly not a web developer like me. The lack of proper explanation of included images bothers me. Reader is warned that "designing for international audience means understanding there are significant differences" but then are left on air with only one example scratching the surface of this without any practical tips. At Wikimedia this problem is literally on our face. While we handle some issues like not applying bold or italics as emphasis for all scripts - things like what fonts to choose for headings and text are currently being discussed. What is acceptable coverage of characters? Can we use proprietary fonts or should we restrict to free fonts alone? Should we have separate font stacks for every language? This chapter depicts somewhat idealized world where we would have time to carefully choose fonts and tweak their tiniest details - clearly not practical approach for Wikimedia which needs to support hundreds of languages, get acceptance from communities for changing fonts, delivering fonts efficiently while supporting old browsers and trying to avoid using too much bandwidth. The rest of the book is more philosophical. Not something concrete you can apply immediately, but something which helps you to think out of the box and actually change processes to evolve you and your team to next level.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anca

    I took a long break from reading this because there was too much on my plate for a while to be able to focus on it in my spare time but when I got in on a frontend project at work again, I felt like diving in again. Well worth my while. Also, full disclosure: I skipped the chapter on web typography (couldn't be bothered) and the one about content strategy (couldn't figure out what it was about, to be honest). I took a long break from reading this because there was too much on my plate for a while to be able to focus on it in my spare time but when I got in on a frontend project at work again, I felt like diving in again. Well worth my while. Also, full disclosure: I skipped the chapter on web typography (couldn't be bothered) and the one about content strategy (couldn't figure out what it was about, to be honest).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alessandro Pellizzari

    Un'ottima raccolta di articoli su vari aspetti dello sviluppo web, che spaziano dal design all'usabilità passando per un po' di psicologia e di filosofia. Forse l'unico difetto è proprio la varietà di argomenti, per cui difficilmente un lettore sarà interessato a tutti i capitoli (io uno l'ho saltato, per esempio), e il fatto che siano in gran parte introduttivi e poco approfonditi. Un'ottima raccolta di articoli su vari aspetti dello sviluppo web, che spaziano dal design all'usabilità passando per un po' di psicologia e di filosofia. Forse l'unico difetto è proprio la varietà di argomenti, per cui difficilmente un lettore sarà interessato a tutti i capitoli (io uno l'ho saltato, per esempio), e il fatto che siano in gran parte introduttivi e poco approfonditi.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fernando

    Great articles by a lot of talented folks that shape the internet.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Sagarwala

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  7. 4 out of 5

    Evan Levesque

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jodi

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robin Verheyden

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mirza

  12. 4 out of 5

    Juan

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gishan

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Henderson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Yoran

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tomek

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Dlugosz

  18. 5 out of 5

    Danu

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ava Guerrero

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nico van Zyl

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Topaloudis

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ilya

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jose

  24. 5 out of 5

    John

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  26. 5 out of 5

    Isabella Di Fabio

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tumas

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pablo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul Wilcox

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jason Rogers

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