web site hit counter The Second Lives of Honest Men - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Second Lives of Honest Men

Availability: Ready to download

On the evening of April 14th, 1865, a flawless duplicate replaced the 16th President an instant prior to his assassination. Two centuries later, Honest Abe opened his eyes to a world in desperate need of guidance. THE SECOND LIVES OF HONEST MEN is a character driven story about love, redemption, and hope. It challenges how we think, feel, and reason in a world where it's ir On the evening of April 14th, 1865, a flawless duplicate replaced the 16th President an instant prior to his assassination. Two centuries later, Honest Abe opened his eyes to a world in desperate need of guidance. THE SECOND LIVES OF HONEST MEN is a character driven story about love, redemption, and hope. It challenges how we think, feel, and reason in a world where it's ironically easy to feel disconnected.


Compare

On the evening of April 14th, 1865, a flawless duplicate replaced the 16th President an instant prior to his assassination. Two centuries later, Honest Abe opened his eyes to a world in desperate need of guidance. THE SECOND LIVES OF HONEST MEN is a character driven story about love, redemption, and hope. It challenges how we think, feel, and reason in a world where it's ir On the evening of April 14th, 1865, a flawless duplicate replaced the 16th President an instant prior to his assassination. Two centuries later, Honest Abe opened his eyes to a world in desperate need of guidance. THE SECOND LIVES OF HONEST MEN is a character driven story about love, redemption, and hope. It challenges how we think, feel, and reason in a world where it's ironically easy to feel disconnected.

30 review for The Second Lives of Honest Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lita Burke

    The Second Lives of Honest Men by John R. Cameron is a science fiction time travel tale about a soon-to-retire humanities professor, Jacob Wentworth, and his undertaking to bring an American president from the past to help fight the worldwide addiction of the Internet. I purchased a copy of this book. The first day of the semester starts differently this time for Jacob. Among the dozens of students mesmerized by the Internet’s seductive prattle through their ever-present ear buds and contact lens The Second Lives of Honest Men by John R. Cameron is a science fiction time travel tale about a soon-to-retire humanities professor, Jacob Wentworth, and his undertaking to bring an American president from the past to help fight the worldwide addiction of the Internet. I purchased a copy of this book. The first day of the semester starts differently this time for Jacob. Among the dozens of students mesmerized by the Internet’s seductive prattle through their ever-present ear buds and contact lenses, a brilliant science student, Bryce Trent, listens to the professor’s lecture. So begins their many conversations about humanity now lost in the ignorance-producing salve of The Interface. A lifelong friendship blossoms between the lonely prodigy and humanities professor, and they concoct an improbable plan to save the world. They will build a time machine and bring back Abraham Lincoln a second before the fatal bullet kills the president. The Second Lives of Honest Men is a clever and well-written story with unlikely heroes. The stakes are oh so very high. Only a humble and courageous leader like Lincoln can focus the freed people after The Interface comes down. Cameron did a masterful job making an improbable set of circumstances believable and weaving them into a story filled with memorable characters. The frightening near-future dystopia of universal Internet addiction gave me the chills. The interaction between Jacob and his supporters made me smile, and other times brought tears. The Second Lives of Honest Men is a thoughtful story—just slip into The Interface and give it a read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Before anything else, I would like to thank the author of this amazing book for giving me the opportunity to read it for free. Thanks Mr. Cameron! Set in the future, say around 50 years from now, The Second Lives of Honest Men tells what happened next after the Internet and technology have advanced even further. There is now this so-called Interface and Company. The Interface is much like the Internet, it is accessed by using a lens. Through this lens, you can pretty much do everything (chat with Before anything else, I would like to thank the author of this amazing book for giving me the opportunity to read it for free. Thanks Mr. Cameron! Set in the future, say around 50 years from now, The Second Lives of Honest Men tells what happened next after the Internet and technology have advanced even further. There is now this so-called Interface and Company. The Interface is much like the Internet, it is accessed by using a lens. Through this lens, you can pretty much do everything (chat with your friends, watch videos, rent a van, pay your bills, and anything else you could think of) in a blink of an eye. Basically, this Interface has become a lifestyle. This Interface is also provided by the Company, which now controls the entire economy. One more advancement in technology and the Company will have full control of every single person in the planet including their emotions and actions. The world is in need of help to open their eyes to this matter and that is with the help of Honest Abe. The Second Lives of Honest Men is an amazing, well-written, and memorable book. It masterfully tells how technology can destroy us, but more so it talks about hope in humanity if we could just open our eyes to the reality and help each other move forward towards the right direction.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa B

    What an interesting book! I can compare it to Feherenheit 451 in some ways, but it is deeper and much more intricate. I can also compare it to The Book Thief - as the characters' search for knowledge in a world that does not welcome anything but mind control. The characters are well developed, believable,and admirable in their courage and attitudes. Unfortunately, it mirrors many of our current day values and practices, (I workplace is a high school so I see this every day)so the premise is not a What an interesting book! I can compare it to Feherenheit 451 in some ways, but it is deeper and much more intricate. I can also compare it to The Book Thief - as the characters' search for knowledge in a world that does not welcome anything but mind control. The characters are well developed, believable,and admirable in their courage and attitudes. Unfortunately, it mirrors many of our current day values and practices, (I workplace is a high school so I see this every day)so the premise is not a clearly unimaginable one. Perhaps this book predicts our future! I highly recommend this book. Bravo to Mr. Cameron on a work well done!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    In the future the world relies on social media and no longer care about the real world or history. In his final year of teaching history before he retires and the department is dissolved, Professor Jacob Wentworth who shuns social media gets a science prodigy in his class. Five years later the two of them plot to recuse Abraham Lincoln from the past to battle the Company which controls the world in place of government. A very enlightening read looking at what the world could become if mankind is In the future the world relies on social media and no longer care about the real world or history. In his final year of teaching history before he retires and the department is dissolved, Professor Jacob Wentworth who shuns social media gets a science prodigy in his class. Five years later the two of them plot to recuse Abraham Lincoln from the past to battle the Company which controls the world in place of government. A very enlightening read looking at what the world could become if mankind is not careful. This was a free review copy from the author.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Lavender

    Thoroughly enjoyed this incredible book by John R. Cameron. Rather frightening to read because it reeks of what could be our future reality, yet also provides hope that we can redeem ourselves. Well worth the read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Coops

    The Second Lives of Honest Men- Review I was given a free copy of this book for review, and I thank the author for the opportunity to read it. I initially thought it would be a while till I got around to reading it because I was reading two other books simultaneously; another time travel novel, and a best selling dystopian series. Luckily for “The Second Lives of Honest Men,” it turns out the other time travel novel was dauntingly dry, largely because its characters seem to have never heard of us The Second Lives of Honest Men- Review I was given a free copy of this book for review, and I thank the author for the opportunity to read it. I initially thought it would be a while till I got around to reading it because I was reading two other books simultaneously; another time travel novel, and a best selling dystopian series. Luckily for “The Second Lives of Honest Men,” it turns out the other time travel novel was dauntingly dry, largely because its characters seem to have never heard of using contractions, and the dystopian novel was set in a world that I could not ever see existing, despite exerting my considerable ability to suspend disbelief. I turned to “The Second Lives of Honest Men,” partly from frustration with the other two, and found it to be a refreshing change of pace. Here was a world that I could easily see existing, and the author clearly had a flair for writing dialogue that is actually enjoyable to read! I was also delighted to find another author who at least noted the motion of the earth through space in his time travel premise. Finally! The main protagonist, an aging professor at a university, is caught in the twilight of a world still barely capable of real knowledge; a world rapidly being consumed by reliance on technology as well as rampant greed and consumerism. Professor Jacob Wentworth is the conscience of the story, and still remembers a time when people used their education and memories for knowledge, instead of relying completely on “The Interface.” His single remaining bright pupil, Bryce, is his only hope to pass along his life’s knowledge of history to someone who might actually care. This relationship is set up in the prologue, and as a result of this strong beginning I read the first third of this book at one sitting. This book started out as a five star read for me. The world was believable, the characters were engaging and the story starts with an air of nostalgia for things not yet completely lost, but rapidly fading; The world of books with pages and real social interactions, not the illusions of them on a digital screen. The book is extremely well edited and formatted, with none of the obvious typos or glitches that would slow a reader down. It’s intelligent and captivating while still being easy to read. The problems that kept it from remaining a five star book to me, mounted slowly, but endured. The narrative begins to jump around in an omniscient manner from character to character, revealing thoughts of different speakers, sometimes in the same scene. I found that method to be distracting and inconsistent. While the main protagonist, Jacob and his protégé, Bryce, are well established and believable, there are only two major female characters in the book and I felt these were both highly improbable. I could blame my own life and only complain that I have never had incredibly intelligent, yet captivatingly beautiful single women fall madly in love with me, mere hours after meeting them, and hope that the rest of mankind is faring better, but I suspect that’s not the case. The brilliant female scientist and the vacuous, Interface-addicted spouse, only seem to have one thing in common, and that is their insatiable sexual appetite for their male counterparts. The two womens’ dialogue was not on par with the men, and even though the one was supposed to be brainless, both women’s roles strayed well beyond the limits of believability for me. The main plot of the story was also a bit of a letdown. As listed in the book’s cover blurb, the central plot involves wrenching Abraham Lincoln from his time, to solve the problems of the future. I was willing to play along with this concept, hoping it was going to pan out in a believable fashion. I had already resigned myself to this tale being mostly cautionary in nature, and was willing to give it the benefit of the doubt, especially based on the strong beginning, but ultimately I was disappointed. I had hoped Lincoln’s character would be a bit more realistic and would have liked the sixteenth President’s response to the future to be a bit more than a, “Let’s destroy it all and start over,” approach. In reality, the Lincoln presence in the story ends up being more of a subplot and seems almost an afterthought to the real action. His relevance to the story is more symbolic than practical. In the interest of being a morality tale, his character makes a good receiver for Jacob and his explanation of how the world has gone to hell, but it was ultimately unnecessary for the already dangerously thin plot. The villains of the story also seemed like somewhat of an afterthought to me and blended together a lot in my mind. I read the second two-thirds of the book rather quickly, (also at one sitting) and was propelled onward less by excitement and more from the rapid pacing of the plot. While the beginning had been subtle and thought provoking, the second two-thirds went from soapbox monologue about the state of the world to a rather hasty and improbable resolution of the massive problems facing the characters. The entire ending felt rushed as a result, and ultimately unsatisfying, though still a fun read if you have abandoned hope that it will stray back into the realm of probability. The time travel element had some logical flaws, (Like, if you use old blood from someone who died in order to create a clone, and then send the clone back to die in place of the person, that means the blood you used originally was actually from the clone…) but that sort of causal loop/brain teaser comes with the territory, and really didn’t bother me too much. So I give the beginning of this book five stars, the ending two, and after counterbalancing the unbelievable female characters and far fetched plot against the fact that I still very much enjoyed the read, we end up at three stars. It’s a great read if you want another reason to turn off your television, leave your phone at home and go outside for a walk. I imagine that’s where you’d likely find the author; outside treasuring nature, or maybe on a park bench somewhere, reading a good book on history.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Werner

    When I've read the book description of "The Second Lives of Honest Men" I was both intrigued and skeptical. The later was mostly based on the mention of Honest Abe making an appearance and the wonder how that would work, written by someone who - just like everyone of us - never met the man and had only historical documents to go by. Would Honest Abe be realistic enough to be a man ripped out of his time into ours? Of course I was also curious to see what happened to our world that it was in such When I've read the book description of "The Second Lives of Honest Men" I was both intrigued and skeptical. The later was mostly based on the mention of Honest Abe making an appearance and the wonder how that would work, written by someone who - just like everyone of us - never met the man and had only historical documents to go by. Would Honest Abe be realistic enough to be a man ripped out of his time into ours? Of course I was also curious to see what happened to our world that it was in such despair to need to steal the former president to help us. So I decided to satisfy my curiosity and start to read as soon as I got a copy of it. To my utter surprise and horror the story's catastrophe was more than just realistic: Being addicted and completely dependent on "The Interface" and not thinking for ourselves anymore at all appears to be a too likely development from the internet we now know. It certainly hits close to home and gives goosebumps to even only think about it. I can easily see this happen within my own lifetime, which is a rather scary thought. But this is only the beginning of the story around Jacob, a History Professor who is rather fond of the old ways and sees the differences as he has seen the world before 'The Interface'. He is deeply concerned about the future and with the help of a - for this time - rather unusual student Bryce at some point comes up with the idea to call Honest Abe for help, or rather replace the original right before his assassination with a clone and bring the real deal into their time and situation. And as skeptical I was about the integration and execution of Honest Abe's part in the story, as pleased I was with the outcome. I have enjoyed reading about his struggles to understand the new world, his curiosity in some things and the horror about what the world he thought he helped saving turned into. So my question if he would be a realistic picture, I can only answer with a clear 'Yes'. All of the characters in the story left imprints in my mind and heart. They were interesting, and it was easy to see the reasons for their actions, understand what they are going through and had quite some emotional moments that hit deep into my heart. A brilliant story that I have enjoyed reading quite a lot and I even consider reading it again to make sure I did not miss any of the many details. Quite a few passages where a pleasure to read simply because of Cameron's choice of words. He painted pictures with his descriptions that sometimes had me put away the reader for a moment to appreciate the resonating feelings it caused. If you are not sure if this book really is what you are looking for give it a chance. While I did believe it would be interesting, it was even better than I thought.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    In the not so distant future (about 2050), technology has advanced to the point that simply putting in a pair of contacts will serve as your computer, TV, phone, etc. all rolled into one, called the Interface. As a result, people have no need to learn things such as simple math - the internet will do it for them! Since they can also be constantly connected to the Interface, many social skills have also fallen by the wayside. Bryce Trent is a genius and cocky because he knows it, but after having In the not so distant future (about 2050), technology has advanced to the point that simply putting in a pair of contacts will serve as your computer, TV, phone, etc. all rolled into one, called the Interface. As a result, people have no need to learn things such as simple math - the internet will do it for them! Since they can also be constantly connected to the Interface, many social skills have also fallen by the wayside. Bryce Trent is a genius and cocky because he knows it, but after having a history class with his professor, Jacob Wentworth, he starts to look at life a little differently. Five years later, Bryce Trent is working on creating the next big leap forward in the Interface - an implant directly in the brain! However, after watching a test run of it on some people, he realizes that this will give the Business (who essentially own/run the world) the power to control people's thoughts, senses, and actions and realizes that he has to come up with a plan to stop this from happening. I absolutely loved this book! The story line had me hooked from the start. I thought Abraham Lincoln was well-written; his words and behaviors seemed like they would fit the man as he is taught in history. When I got to the end of the book, I was a little sad that we didn't get to hear more about what life was like then, so I was excited to hear that there will be a sequel!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denim Datta

    I was given a electronic copy of this book for review, and I thank the author for the opportunity to read it. With Google Glass a reality, and Google Lens taking its first step, now Interface does not sound impossible. And how Internet and Social Media Site help people to be disconnected from the surroundings is not unknown. Now put these two together, and WOW, the scenario created by Mr. Cameron does not sound improbable. A good plot, written nicely. I was given a electronic copy of this book for review, and I thank the author for the opportunity to read it. With Google Glass a reality, and Google Lens taking its first step, now Interface does not sound impossible. And how Internet and Social Media Site help people to be disconnected from the surroundings is not unknown. Now put these two together, and WOW, the scenario created by Mr. Cameron does not sound improbable. A good plot, written nicely.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sriram Jaju

    I was sent a free copy of ebook for review by the author, for which I'm grateful. It is an dystopian novel set in near future, where America is taken over by a private corporation as Government has failed to sustain the country. In this world People are so addicted to the Social Media/Technology and consumerism that they no more care about other people and their entire life is focused on being online and buying trendy worthless gadgets. It is mixture of 1984 plus time travelling. This is a real pa I was sent a free copy of ebook for review by the author, for which I'm grateful. It is an dystopian novel set in near future, where America is taken over by a private corporation as Government has failed to sustain the country. In this world People are so addicted to the Social Media/Technology and consumerism that they no more care about other people and their entire life is focused on being online and buying trendy worthless gadgets. It is mixture of 1984 plus time travelling. This is a real page-turner. It reads fast, well, the dialogues are well-paced and engaging. However the story lacks details at times. I think the book gives a lot of insight into a very possible potential future by taking some elements of the past to compare the two almost extremes. The plot could have been little more developed in terms of characters and the world. I definitely recommend this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace S.

    I was generously offered an electronic copy of this book free of charge in exchange for an unbiased review. Warning: enjoyment of this book completely hinges on the reader's ability to suspend his/her disbelief so far as not to care that it's about (view spoiler)[a twenty-something wunderkind building a time machine out of stolen plutonium and bringing Abraham Lincoln two hundred years forward in time so that they can save the world by literally nuking the internet. (hide spoiler)] As long as you I was generously offered an electronic copy of this book free of charge in exchange for an unbiased review. Warning: enjoyment of this book completely hinges on the reader's ability to suspend his/her disbelief so far as not to care that it's about (view spoiler)[a twenty-something wunderkind building a time machine out of stolen plutonium and bringing Abraham Lincoln two hundred years forward in time so that they can save the world by literally nuking the internet. (hide spoiler)] As long as you can get through that sentence and still say to yourself, "Hey, I'd give that book a shot!", you're fine. It sounds like some sort of super old B sci-fi movie, doesn't it? And in many ways, it reads like one. You don't mind the cheesy concept, the excessively vilified inundation of technology, the...I'm sorry, I did mention that Abe Lincoln (view spoiler)[nukes the internet (hide spoiler)] , right?...yes? Good. Anyway, if you embrace the cheesiness as sort of a loveable artistic quirk instead of spending the whole book thinking about how impossible it all is, it's really pretty entertaining. I think a big saving grace for me was that even the characters recognize that there's no logical reason to bring Abraham Lincoln to the future. They're just doing it because "hey, why not..." That being said, there are a few things I'm just not buying. 1) I'm not buying that this set of four (and a half) characters have sufficient know-how to pull this whole thing off by themselves. In three weeks. Without Julia magically knowing how to do ALL THE SCIENCE and the time machine being able to essentially procure all their supplies for them at the press of a button, there's no way they would've pulled even STEP ONE: CLONE LINCOLN off. I mean for goodness sake, they (view spoiler)[stole Lincoln's DNA from the past, cloned Lincoln, aged the clone via plastic surgery, subbed the clone for the real thing just before the trigger was pulled, engineered and tested a retrovirus to make human brains able to learn, built a nuke, covered their tracks, planned a wedding, hacked into the internet, and blew up Washington DC (hide spoiler)] with a four man team. In three weeks. 2) SOMEBODY should've been more concerned about whether what they were doing was morally right. Just because a select few people thought the world was a horrible place doesn't mean they have the right to instate a radical change and plunge the entire US into anarchy, uprooting the lives of every American citizen. Plus, I think it was totally immoral of them to mess with poor Lincoln's life in the first place. Very cool of Abe not to ask them what right they had to play God like that and mess with his life and (he believes) his afterlife, just because they can't figure out their own problems. The only action that was evaluated morally was the decision to (view spoiler)[set off the nuke knowing it would have a catastrophic fatality rate (hide spoiler)] , and again, the conclusion that "it's worth it to destroy that evil internet" rests on my accepting that what four people see as the proper thing for the world is more important than what the ENTIRE REST OF THE WORLD has to say about it. 3) And really at the heart of it is that I think the "ultimate evil villain" Interface was completely excessive. EVERYTHING about the Interface was SO evil in EVERY way. Jacob slammed everything about technology at every opportunity, pretty much insinuating that anyone who sends an email is a brain-dead techno-zombie. But it's next to impossible for me to believe that even a society THAT devoted to the internet would devolve so quickly and so severely that they don't know what 12 plus 19 is without a calculator. Isn't there even ONE positive influence of the internet that Jacob could accept? And if the Interface is the ultimate evil, how did it produce such upstanding characters as Bryce and Julia, both of whom somehow managed to get advanced college degrees and create amazing scientific inventions, while Brianna was too stupid to WATCH A MOVIE? (Also, plot-hole beef--if Interface addicts are too stupid to add two-digit numbers without a calculator, how are they smart enough to locate the (view spoiler)[street address Lincoln provides in the pre-crash warning video (hide spoiler)] by walking there unassisted? Shouldn't they like...freak out without their GPS and their self-driving cars? And that's really where the "this is so corny it's fun!" B-movie turned into "oh brother...". If the Interface had been anything less than the ULTIMATE EVIL, I would've enjoyed the book a whole lot more. While it's easy and even fun to imagine the worst-case scenario of a society devoted to the internet, it's simply not realistic that everybody's going to become a complete moron (why do universities still operate in a society that can't add?), that nobody will have read a book online, that not a single person would have used the Interface for artistic expression or even just learning something new. Also, gotta add 4) The women. I have a beef with them. Particularly the way they're so forcefully sexual all the time. ("Hey baby, I know I have to invent pills to cure Abe Lincoln's cancer in the morning, but I'm really turned on by you right now! Let's make love!") I just gotta say it. Still...all that considered...and I'm shocked to be saying this...this wasn't a completely useless book to read. It gets you thinking about the way our society is expressing itself, it's entertaining in sort of a satirical corny B-movie capacity, it's grammatically sound and well formatted. All in all, for a book about Abe Lincoln (view spoiler)[building a nuclear bomb and using it to physically blow up the internet (hide spoiler)] , it's kind of a fun little diversionary road-trip. Three stars for decent entertainment value, with the repeated caveat that everything about the plot is completely unbelievable at face value.

  12. 5 out of 5

    JeanD

    Probably more of a 3.5 star rating but I couldn't figure out how to do that. Overall, this is a fun and exciting read with a deeper message warning about our society's over-dependence on technology. I enjoyed the characters and the idea of Abraham Lincoln coming from the past to save the day. The story kept me engaged although at times the author via the main character seemed to go off these political rants. While they were in line with the character, I felt they were a bit over the top, a bit o Probably more of a 3.5 star rating but I couldn't figure out how to do that. Overall, this is a fun and exciting read with a deeper message warning about our society's over-dependence on technology. I enjoyed the characters and the idea of Abraham Lincoln coming from the past to save the day. The story kept me engaged although at times the author via the main character seemed to go off these political rants. While they were in line with the character, I felt they were a bit over the top, a bit of an annoying interruption to the action of the story, and left no doubt in my mind about the author's political slant. That said the overall theme of the book certainly makes one think about our future as technology continues to advance.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I was immediately intrigued by the combination of a dystopian future with time-travel and history. Cameron’s story didn’t disappoint. The book gives a unique flair to the concept of fighting an overpowering dystopian government with the addition of time-travel and a historical figure that makes it engaging and highly readable. The futuristic setting is both well-imagined and evoked in a non-intrusive, showing not telling way. It is easy to relate to Jacob immediately on his walk to work, and the I was immediately intrigued by the combination of a dystopian future with time-travel and history. Cameron’s story didn’t disappoint. The book gives a unique flair to the concept of fighting an overpowering dystopian government with the addition of time-travel and a historical figure that makes it engaging and highly readable. The futuristic setting is both well-imagined and evoked in a non-intrusive, showing not telling way. It is easy to relate to Jacob immediately on his walk to work, and the futuristic elements are introduced gradually. It helps that Jacob is a bit of a luddite, as it gives him a bit of an outsider’s perspective to describe things to the reader. The futuristic tech described in the book is well-imagined. High tech contact lenses are definitely the wave of the future, and jumping from that to a neural interface makes total sense. Cameron also takes into account other elements of the future beyond the science, such as climate, politics, and trends. It’s a fun world to visit in spite of it being a dystopia. Jacob and Bryce start out a bit two-dimensional but grow to be three-dimensional over the course of the story. The addition of the female biologist who assists them manages to add both diversity and a romance, which is nice. She also much more quickly takes on a three-dimensional quality. Having her and the romance around really kick the whole story up a notch. Abraham Lincoln was probably the most difficult character to handle, since he is obviously based on a real person. He is presented respectfully, yet still as a flawed human being. When he speaks, his words are accessible yet sound just different enough to provide the reader with the consistent cue that he is a man out of time. The plot mostly works well, moving in a logical, well thought-out manner. The end has a bit of a deus ex machina that is rather disappointing. (view spoiler)[ A main character is saved from death via time travel, thus making all of the main character “good guys” survive the battle with the Company. Stories about battles of one ideal against another are generally better if at least some casualties are had. I do not count a minor secondary character who dies, since that is akin to killing off a red shirt in Star Trek. (hide spoiler)] Some readers may be bothered by the level of anti-tech found in the book. The Interface isn’t just bad because the new neural version will give the Company control over people. It also is bad because it supposedly inhibits the development of the users’ brains, rendering them to an elementary level of intelligence. The book also strongly argues the idea that friends in virtual reality aren’t real friends, and that old tech, such as print books, are better. Even television is lauded as better than any virtual reality activity. I’m fine with not agreeing 100% with the protagonists in a story. It’s not necessary for me to enjoy it, and I appreciate seeing their perspective and the freedom fight that follows. However, this perspective may bother some readers, so they should be aware it exists within the story. Overall, this is a well-written, original take on the idea of fighting a dystopian future with an advisor ripped out of time. The book is weakened a bit by a deus ex machina ending. Some readers may not like or enjoy the anti-tech position of the protagonists. It is still a fun frolic through a richly imagined possible future. Recommended to fans of dystopian scifi and US History. Check out my full review. Note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marked By Books

    The book starts off with a prologue, thus introducing us to Jacob Wentworth, a Humanities professor at The University. In a world full of people who are addicted to "The Interface," the futuristic version of the Internet, only more advanced and addicting, Professor Wentworth is just about the only man alive who does not find himself submerged in a world full of digital, virtual, mind-numbing fantasies. Everywhere he goes, he sees people with headphones plugged in, lost in the trance of being soc The book starts off with a prologue, thus introducing us to Jacob Wentworth, a Humanities professor at The University. In a world full of people who are addicted to "The Interface," the futuristic version of the Internet, only more advanced and addicting, Professor Wentworth is just about the only man alive who does not find himself submerged in a world full of digital, virtual, mind-numbing fantasies. Everywhere he goes, he sees people with headphones plugged in, lost in the trance of being socially and virtually active. Think of it as being permanently connected to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or LinkedIn. This is the world he is surrounded by. No one values knowledge, history, or books anymore. Until he meets Bryce Trent, the one pupil who seems engaged in actually learning something. From there, we are introduced to the genius that is Bryce Trent. He is the University's finest student who goes to perfect the Interface. He and the Professor become fast friends and Bryce is taught the value of true living, not the virtual, brain-washing lives he and his fellow citizens are living. John Cameron lets his readers truly capture the plot. He describes everything with an exquisite detail that is refreshing to read. He puts into perspective what our lives could be like five decades into future. The plot isn't just something fantasy related; it's also something that could quite possibly occur. He makes his readers wonder, perceive, and formulate their own individual thoughts regarding the future. Would it be good to walk around with the Internet seen literally in our mind's eye? Would we be human or would we merely be robots controlled by social media - more so than we are today? These are questions I asked myself as I read. In all my years of reading, I'd yet to have read not just a science fiction book I enjoyed, but one that actually had me contemplating my future in a world where technology overrules books, knowledge, and the old art of verbal communication. The book is also filled with suspense, romance, and scientific advancements. The book is a page turner that will keep you on your toes. The plot thickens as Professor Wentworth, Bryce, Julia Swan, Abraham Lincoln, and Brianna race to try and bring down The Company, the government formed to rule and brainwash the citizens of America. Repairing a time machine, the genius Professor, student, and his girlfriend plan to bring Abraham Lincoln back to the future to try and repair the broken society. They succeed. A page turner to the very end, I highly recommend this book. Just when you expect the book to end a certain way, the epilogue throws everything haywire. The final ending, I say final because there seems to have been two, is startling and seemingly incomprehensible. Until it's actually finished. A highly fast-paced, suspenseful, and energetic futuristic novel, it's one that merits all the praise received. Good job, Mr. Cameron. Gabby For the original review and more, please visit Marked By Books.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    The Second Lives of Honest Men seems based on a preposterous premise: sometime in the future, by manipulating molecules and time, one of the few remaining honorable and honest men and a few comrades can bring back Abraham Lincoln, an honest man by any accounting, and with his help, save the world. And, indeed, it is preposterous, but this is fiction, and it really works. We first meet Jacob, whose wife, Rebecca, died young. He is a curmudgeonly professor firmly entrenched in a society where techn The Second Lives of Honest Men seems based on a preposterous premise: sometime in the future, by manipulating molecules and time, one of the few remaining honorable and honest men and a few comrades can bring back Abraham Lincoln, an honest man by any accounting, and with his help, save the world. And, indeed, it is preposterous, but this is fiction, and it really works. We first meet Jacob, whose wife, Rebecca, died young. He is a curmudgeonly professor firmly entrenched in a society where technology does not rule instead of the society he lives in, in which all humanity is controlled by the "company controlled" Interface. The Interface is a giant internet into which everyone is connected (as long as they wear the required Interface glasses, which Jacob refuses to wear). The Interface controls individual choice; people are no more than robots, save for a few intrepid rebels like Jacob, his scientist friend Bryce who works in the Neural Interface Lab. All around them the world is crumbling to the ultimate control of the interface, and Jacob and Bryce are determined to stop it by any means. So, they build a strange time travel/cloning technology to bring Abraham Lincoln into their world. President Lincoln is of course flabbergasted when he his transported several centuries later than the 19th century of his death, and the efforts of Jacob to explain what transpired in the intervening centuries is laugh-out-loud funny. When he arrives, he says, "Hello? ... I've been sitting here pondering a while now, and have concluded that I'm either dead and in Heaven, and if this is Heaven, it's the damnedest odd choice for it." And then they are off and running. Combining dystopia and utopia, a lot of the story is a not completely unbelievable leap of faith into a universe that is totally tethered by technology. This is a cautionary tale that reminds us to not take our freedoms for granted and to exercise critical thinking when we read something - because what our internet and news media tell us is skewed and we have to understand how to find reliable sources - because without critical thinking, our society could ultimately evolve into one controlled and managed very much like the Interface-controlled society in this story. I won this book from Goodreads in exchange for a review, and I am glad I did. I would not have chosen this book if I were out browsing as the genre, until I read this book, did not appeal to me. The Second Lives of Honest Men opened my eyes to a new literature genre and broadened my literary horizons. And I think that is just what the author intended. Mr. Cameron wants us to think about the past, the immediate future, and what the future might hold for the next generations.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Al

    The Second Lives of Honest Men is a typical dystopian novel in many ways. In others, it’s not. Dystopian is a subgenre of science-fiction with a future (sometimes near future) world that often incorporates advances in technology which might be used as one of the tools to keep the populace under control. (The classic dystopian novel, 1984, is one obvious example.) The typical dystopia also usually projects a current political direction down the slippery slope far enough for it to become a big pro The Second Lives of Honest Men is a typical dystopian novel in many ways. In others, it’s not. Dystopian is a subgenre of science-fiction with a future (sometimes near future) world that often incorporates advances in technology which might be used as one of the tools to keep the populace under control. (The classic dystopian novel, 1984, is one obvious example.) The typical dystopia also usually projects a current political direction down the slippery slope far enough for it to become a big problem. This book is typical in these respects, but atypical in that it adds a time travel element that while typical sci-fi fare, isn’t what you’d expect in this branch of the genre, and the way this figures into the work as a whole was kind of clever or at least unique. I’ll read dystopians where the political direction the book is warning against is one I personally think is a good direction and disagree with the author’s take on where it might lead us (if nothing else, recognizing that most slippery slope arguments are one big logical fallacy, helps). But I’ll also realize their vision isn’t completely unreasonable, that this is fiction, and I’ll still enjoy the read and the thoughts it provokes. In this book, I was on board for at least some of the political parts, but the story seemed to put a lot of blame for the negative changes in the world on several generations of kids who are comfortable with and use technology. (At the time in the near future when the story happens there is an advanced form of the internet. People use special contact lens to interact with this system, called “The Interface,” which means it is more or less available to anyone at any time.) The protagonist is a Luddite and much of his attitude that permeates the story struck me as the same old generational differences that have probably been happening since time began and definitely have since the pace of technological change has accelerated. It’s the same argument many parents and teachers made when I was a kid half a century ago, that those new fangled electronic calculators are going to make us so lazy we won’t even be able to do math. I suspect a couple hundred years prior, parents said the same about the invention of the slide rule. This attitude I felt from the protagonist and as a subtext to much of the story(a virtual “kid, get off of my lawn”) was something I haven’t experienced in a dystopian novel before. Not even when I’ve disagreed with the premise. But I’m not sure whether it matters that I don’t buy into all the arguments The Second Lives of Honest Men appears to be making. The point, to make the reader think about current directions and possible futures still happened (not to mention the entertainment value). **Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy. **

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gaby

    I was sent an e-pub copy of this book from the author in exchange for a review. There is also currently a giveaway posted on Goodreads for a paperback copy that ends March 25. This book is a dystopian, character driven plot that aims to look at the future of social media and what our constant reliance on technology could do to humanity in the future. Honestly, I wasn't entirely sure how I would feel about the book going into it, but I'm glad I read it! Sure, there were a few details that I had p I was sent an e-pub copy of this book from the author in exchange for a review. There is also currently a giveaway posted on Goodreads for a paperback copy that ends March 25. This book is a dystopian, character driven plot that aims to look at the future of social media and what our constant reliance on technology could do to humanity in the future. Honestly, I wasn't entirely sure how I would feel about the book going into it, but I'm glad I read it! Sure, there were a few details that I had problems with: Jacob is in arguably too excellent of health considering his age, the antagonists' personalities are all over the place- bordering on bipolar at times. The points of view could sometimes switch in a way that- with the epub at least- it was sometimes difficult to keep up, making the story seem chaotic for a bit. The timelines were a little off- Jacob and Bryce speak as if they've known each other longer than they have...as well as Bryce and Julia for that matter. While Briana- while completely dependent on tech. seemed a little overdone in her mental underdevelopment. Finally, Abraham seemed to take the shocking news of his new life very well- perhaps too well considering what a change it w All of those things were minor details that I noted kept the book from being perfect, but I think the author did a good job regardless of those little things- that I picked up on because I was reading the book with a critic's eye. Unlike some other books, the plot kept me intrigued enough that those little issues didn't bother me at all. The characters as well, I had some problems with them, but I still cared about them. I think the book gives a lot of insight into a very possible potential future by taking some elements of the past to compare the two almost extremes. I gave the book three stars on Goodreads, but I think it deserves a 3.5. What kept it from being four stars was purely the fact that I was so interested, and the world was so vast that I would have loved for the book to be longer! To see a little more development in how the world came to be the way it was in the story, to see the characters together more....I think the book easily could have been at least fifty pages longer without dragging on. I think out of everything, that is my main critique: I wished there had been more! I definitely recommend the book and will be interested to see what other stories the author comes up with!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Esmira Serova

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well, I have mixed feelings about this book. The near future it pictures is appallingly realistic and makes you remember that there was a time when you actually knew many things about many things and not just how to google whatever you need to know right now and then forget it as easily. The book is also well written... but it's too smooth, it's so smooth that I can't feel for the characters... and not all of them are three-dimensional, by the way. While I can imagine why Bryce and Julia are in Well, I have mixed feelings about this book. The near future it pictures is appallingly realistic and makes you remember that there was a time when you actually knew many things about many things and not just how to google whatever you need to know right now and then forget it as easily. The book is also well written... but it's too smooth, it's so smooth that I can't feel for the characters... and not all of them are three-dimensional, by the way. While I can imagine why Bryce and Julia are in love (they are both young, intelligent and attractive, at least they're supposed to be), I can't see why Professor loves his wife or why she loves him. Sex scenes are rather awkward. That's okay, more importantly, I don't really feel the characters' inner struggle about what they intend to do, about this greater good they are about to bring upon the world... I don't quite understand why they had to bring Abraham Lincoln from the past, him of all people - maybe you have to be American to get it. All I can say is that if I were addicted to the Interface and then cut off, I would probably tear apart the persons responsible for that, Lincoln or no Lincoln. And if there's a crowd of people like me, inspiring speeches from the 19th century would hardly be of any help... well, I guess the author prefers to see good in people and I might be a soulless Interface junkie)). I liked the ending the least, it seems... fanfiction-ish, a bit Utopian. And that's the problem with this book - the moment you start getting emotionally involved, the plot twist is untwisted safe and clean. As I said, the best part of this book is its message - not exactly unique or subtle, but it's strong and... alarming. I even have a favorite extract, I copied it and saved into my journal - remember when Professor and Lincoln stop a woman at the mall to ask her questions in exchange for a scarf? THAT was chilling. I almost cried myself, so chillingly realistic it was. That alone was worth reading this book. And, of course, Fahrenheit 451 on fire.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Create With Joy

    Imagine a world, perhaps in the not-too-distant future, where technology has completely taken over our lives. The world as we know it has changed; the United States of America no longer exists. Individuals no longer govern themselves; there is no independent thought. Instead, individuals are connected by neural interfaces and run by the Company. Most people no longer remember – or care – what the world was once like and what they have lost – but one man still does. His name is Jacob Wentworth. Jaco Imagine a world, perhaps in the not-too-distant future, where technology has completely taken over our lives. The world as we know it has changed; the United States of America no longer exists. Individuals no longer govern themselves; there is no independent thought. Instead, individuals are connected by neural interfaces and run by the Company. Most people no longer remember – or care – what the world was once like and what they have lost – but one man still does. His name is Jacob Wentworth. Jacob is the head of the Humanities department at a university that is forcing him to retire him at the end of the term. A chance encounter with one of his students – academic genius Bryce Trent – changes the paths of both of their lives. When Bryce graduates and is forced by the Company to work on a project that will have devastating consequences for humanity upon its completion, the two friends begin to wonder how they can bring about change… And then, a penny catches Jacob’s eye. “So…wait, let me get this straight,” Bryce said, in disbelief. “You want to bring Abraham Lincoln from 1865 to the present?” The Second Lives Of Honest Men by John R. Cameron provides us with a prescient vision of where society’s dependence on technology could be taking us. It’s a character driven story about love, redemption, and hope, with deep philosophical underpinnings related to how we think, feel, and reason in a world where it’s ironically easy to feel disconnected. If you like books that make you think – if you dig novels that include dystopian, sci-fi and time-travel elements – if you enjoy unique tales – than I highly recommend The Second Lives Of Honest Men to you! To read my review in its entirety, please visit Create With Joy. Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. However, the opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    I received The Second Lives of Honest Men as a free e-Book from the author. The cover illustration and typeface smack distinctly of self-publishing. The manuscript is well edited and produced. The summary of the plot of The Second Lives of Honest Men is most certainly preposterous and is only presentable under the genre of Science Fiction and Historical Fantasy. If you are the type of reader that enjoys positing that the Third Reich didn't really die out with the end of WWII but is alive and well I received The Second Lives of Honest Men as a free e-Book from the author. The cover illustration and typeface smack distinctly of self-publishing. The manuscript is well edited and produced. The summary of the plot of The Second Lives of Honest Men is most certainly preposterous and is only presentable under the genre of Science Fiction and Historical Fantasy. If you are the type of reader that enjoys positing that the Third Reich didn't really die out with the end of WWII but is alive and well in huge sweeping military bases located on the dark side of the moon, then you are a front-row candidate for the dystopic time-traveling tale that is The Second Lives of Honest Men. In an all too near and plausible-sounding future, people are more integrated than ever into an internet that thinks for them and the corporations that control their lives. The solution? Travel back in time, swap out Abraham Lincoln with a replicant moments before assassination and bring him to the future to sort it all out for us. Or start it all over. Or blow it all up. And in all fairness, the first half of The Second Lives of Honest Men is quite ambitious. The writing is concise and complete, the plot-points well thought-out, the premise giving off the faint glow of promise of fun delivered from other such improbable, time-traveling, make-right-what-was-once-wrong kind of stories such as Quantum Leap or Sliders. Unfortunately, The Second Lives of Honest Men is sorely imbalanced between setup and delivery. Between the let-down of improbable and one-dimensional supporting characters, erratic narrative technique, and a devolving into more of a rant then delivering on the premise of the plot, the second half of The Second Lives of Honest Men turns something hoped for into something expected. Recommended for lovers of avant-garde science and fantasy fan-fiction.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    What a great book this was-I enjoyed reading every second of it! The future and the past is blended perfectly in this fictional account of what the world will be like in the future; and how just a couple of people were able to "save" the world from corporate and political greed and the technology which allowed it all to happen! We have all seen people walking around attached to their phones, ipads etc; children sit dazed in front of screens and adults mindlessly ignoring everything while listenin What a great book this was-I enjoyed reading every second of it! The future and the past is blended perfectly in this fictional account of what the world will be like in the future; and how just a couple of people were able to "save" the world from corporate and political greed and the technology which allowed it all to happen! We have all seen people walking around attached to their phones, ipads etc; children sit dazed in front of screens and adults mindlessly ignoring everything while listening to their favorite tunes. Well-take this a bit further and imagine that there is no more human interaction-the computers are virtually in our brains and we just have to think in order to get answers-history -well-no one is the slightest bit interested in that. Answers to questions pop up in front of our eyes via the internet. No one uses books anymore. Corporations have taken over and consumerism is exploited. There is only one history professor left-and he is soon to be retired-who has attempted to hoard all the old real books. He knows that only a truly honest man can get the world back on track--Abraham Lincoln. But Honest Abe has been dead for centuries-how is he going to help--sorry people-you will just have to read this book to find out!!The Second Lives of Honest Men

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    The author of this intriguing novel gave me a free digital copy in exchange for an honest review, for which I am thankful. In a not-so-distant future setting where people are completely dependant upon technology, a scientific prodigy is on the brink of inventing neurological devices that will allow their leaders ("The Company") complete control of the population. This same prodigy has also invented a super-secret time machine. Teaming up with his former professor ( seemingly the only one left th The author of this intriguing novel gave me a free digital copy in exchange for an honest review, for which I am thankful. In a not-so-distant future setting where people are completely dependant upon technology, a scientific prodigy is on the brink of inventing neurological devices that will allow their leaders ("The Company") complete control of the population. This same prodigy has also invented a super-secret time machine. Teaming up with his former professor ( seemingly the only one left that reads books), and a rebellious lab assistant, they devise a scheme to take down The Company. As a reader with little interest in time travel I have to say I really enjoyed this book. While things move a little slowly through the middle the beginning intrigued me from the start and I couldn't read the ending fast enough. The characters are relatable and it's a story that makes you think. Do I completely understand the need to bring Abraham Lincoln to the future? No. Do I feel like the author skipped out on the ending in favor of a happy ending epilogue? Yes. I think it would have been better to end it leaving the reader wondering- what are they going to do now? Opening up for a sequel to describe the revolution.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Srivardhan

    I got this book long back from the author. I couldn't read it until now. While the concept is good, the author fails to build a story around that. When you are bringing Abraham Lincoln from past, then either he should be the protagonist doing the action or the lead-character doing something very important to the story, but neither happens! It's just they brought him to get a go ahead to execute their plan! This is what happens: The protagonists bring Lincoln from past, explains the current scenar I got this book long back from the author. I couldn't read it until now. While the concept is good, the author fails to build a story around that. When you are bringing Abraham Lincoln from past, then either he should be the protagonist doing the action or the lead-character doing something very important to the story, but neither happens! It's just they brought him to get a go ahead to execute their plan! This is what happens: The protagonists bring Lincoln from past, explains the current scenario to him. Lincoln asks wats the solution, protagonists tell him one adding that that's the only solution and Lincoln agrees! That's it! After that protagonists continue and execute there plan and Lincoln help them in some menial jobs! I want to ask the author "Seriously! You couldn't think anything else?" Till the end I was hoping the story would justify the Lincoln by giving him something, but I was left wondering! The book ended! It's the end of the story which had lot of scope for Lincoln; bringing humanity back on track. But the story ends and Bryce will tell professor that they were able to bring humanity on track! Seriously!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erik Twisk

    John R. Cameron asked me to read this: The second lives of honest Men and write a review, so he send me an e-book which I could read on my Ipad. i have to say that I really liked the book but that I prefer a real book. The book is telling a story about the future of our modern time. And I think John did a great job, If you start reading the book you recognize a lot of the technology and you will have a feeling that the story can be reality in the future. When I started the book i didn't read any John R. Cameron asked me to read this: The second lives of honest Men and write a review, so he send me an e-book which I could read on my Ipad. i have to say that I really liked the book but that I prefer a real book. The book is telling a story about the future of our modern time. And I think John did a great job, If you start reading the book you recognize a lot of the technology and you will have a feeling that the story can be reality in the future. When I started the book i didn't read any review etc and for sure nothing about what the book was about and I think you all should do that because that will give you the opportunity to go for it and have a wonderful experience with this book. this book is good for two groups of people the first group is the group that loves modern technology and the other group will be the group of people that don't like all those modern technology and i think that it doesn't matter to which group you belong but that you will like the book. so i recommend to buy the book, it's available as e-book and as a paperbook. Have fun with The second lives of honest men by john R. Cameron

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ivana

    First, I would like to thank the author for writing this amazing book and giving me the chance to read it for free. I must admit, I was a little skeptical when I read a description of the book. It just wasn't something I would usually read, even though I read all kinds of books and don't have a favourite genre. I'm so glad that I've read it. It doesn't happen often that a book manages to suprise me, and I mean that in a good way. You can usually predict pretty early what will happen towards the First, I would like to thank the author for writing this amazing book and giving me the chance to read it for free. I must admit, I was a little skeptical when I read a description of the book. It just wasn't something I would usually read, even though I read all kinds of books and don't have a favourite genre. I'm so glad that I've read it. It doesn't happen often that a book manages to suprise me, and I mean that in a good way. You can usually predict pretty early what will happen towards the end, but not this time. I enjoyed every moment of it. There's everything: action, amazing selfless deeds, a very realistic love story... There's also a very obvious parallel with the world we live in and we probably need our own Honest Abe to remind us what is actually important in life. It's really captivating right to an amazing and pretty unexpected epilogue. I also loved the characters who were interesting and realistic even if the book is about the future and involves time machines. If you're looking for an interesting, history related story that happens in the future, you should definitely read it. :-)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    Free Kindle book copy from the author. It's about a future world where we are dependent on Interface to survive. We no longer use our minds but we live off technology. We forget what books are or even the simple daily tasks, We become hook on the next new thing even when we don't need it aka excess consumption. Thus we need to get back to our roots. We are thrown onto three people who sees the need to reconnect with a simple world as they transport (time travel) President Lincoln into their world a Free Kindle book copy from the author. It's about a future world where we are dependent on Interface to survive. We no longer use our minds but we live off technology. We forget what books are or even the simple daily tasks, We become hook on the next new thing even when we don't need it aka excess consumption. Thus we need to get back to our roots. We are thrown onto three people who sees the need to reconnect with a simple world as they transport (time travel) President Lincoln into their world against odds. Back to basics learning to grow and sustain themselves with him as a presence even though him life in the future was short. A telling tale what life can be in the future if we let technology engulf us wrong and lose of our written history.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Inna

    First of all I want to thank John for an opportunity to read the book. I really enjoyed it. It is science fiction and some elements of this future is known from other sources such as time machine, glasses-lenses for contacting to Interface-Internet, bringing people from the past to present and so on. But it is put together so nicely and you can believe that this story may happen rather sooner. My daughter finished the book before me, and she did not want to spoil it for me by telling how it will First of all I want to thank John for an opportunity to read the book. I really enjoyed it. It is science fiction and some elements of this future is known from other sources such as time machine, glasses-lenses for contacting to Interface-Internet, bringing people from the past to present and so on. But it is put together so nicely and you can believe that this story may happen rather sooner. My daughter finished the book before me, and she did not want to spoil it for me by telling how it will end. And this book was such a page-turner, that even during holidays and parties and guests I was making sure to find time to read to find out what is next, how everything will turn out. Thank you John for remanding us that old is not necessarily bad, that fast and modern is not always best.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tijana

    I must admit that the reading in e-form is a little bit difficult to me, and then I'm reading it slow. So it's obvious that I really like the book's theme :) There is some naive parts for me, but I don't mind, I like the book. All acclamations for the idea :) One futuristic book, but unusual futuristic book. It's scary how technology dispart us. It is good and bad in the same time. I'm thrilled that there is a book about that. This is a good scenario for some movie or series. Thanks to John Came I must admit that the reading in e-form is a little bit difficult to me, and then I'm reading it slow. So it's obvious that I really like the book's theme :) There is some naive parts for me, but I don't mind, I like the book. All acclamations for the idea :) One futuristic book, but unusual futuristic book. It's scary how technology dispart us. It is good and bad in the same time. I'm thrilled that there is a book about that. This is a good scenario for some movie or series. Thanks to John Cameron for giving me a chance to take a little peek in potential future and his idea how it's going to look like. Oh yeah, I forgot this :D https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Et9b7...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kate Gentry

    I was given a free digital copy by the author, for which I am grateful. This was a quick and compelling read, but not a light one. It is equal parts philosophy and science fiction, neither aspect entirely new, but each combining into a very readable story that leaves you thinking, imagination wandering, and wanting more. The main character is a gentleman born in the same year I was, living in a future that is entirely imaginable...and super creepy. The Second Lives of Honest Men is certainly fla I was given a free digital copy by the author, for which I am grateful. This was a quick and compelling read, but not a light one. It is equal parts philosophy and science fiction, neither aspect entirely new, but each combining into a very readable story that leaves you thinking, imagination wandering, and wanting more. The main character is a gentleman born in the same year I was, living in a future that is entirely imaginable...and super creepy. The Second Lives of Honest Men is certainly flawed (like most first novels, I think) but it is a good read and definitely one I recommend. I'm looking forward to the sequel!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hyacinth

    What a book! I wish history books could be written like this. The author had the ability to pull on many different emotions in this walk through history turn futuristic ironic book of the past and the future. The irony is that in many ways that's where we are today with modern technology at our fingertips, ever changing at lightning speed. At times, I am concerned to think of the future if we don't get in the habit of committing to memory more and relying on the internet less before we forget ho What a book! I wish history books could be written like this. The author had the ability to pull on many different emotions in this walk through history turn futuristic ironic book of the past and the future. The irony is that in many ways that's where we are today with modern technology at our fingertips, ever changing at lightning speed. At times, I am concerned to think of the future if we don't get in the habit of committing to memory more and relying on the internet less before we forget how to function...an excellent story. I loved Honest Abe. I just sat back and exhaled like I had a fine meal, lol!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.