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The Malloreon Boxed Set: Guardians of the West / King of the Murgos / Demon Lord of Karanda / Sorceress of Darshiva / The Seeress of Kell

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The second half of the Belgarian universe, this is the sequel series to The Belgariad.


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The second half of the Belgarian universe, this is the sequel series to The Belgariad.

30 review for The Malloreon Boxed Set: Guardians of the West / King of the Murgos / Demon Lord of Karanda / Sorceress of Darshiva / The Seeress of Kell

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Schoerner

    Fairly standard fantasy that nonetheless manages to differantiate itself from the crowd by way of it's light, often humorous and self-aware tone. The Malloreon is in many ways very, very similar to it's predecessor, the Belgariad. In another series, this could be a crippling weakness, but seeing as Eddings has a tendancy to poke fun at the plots anyways, it becomes less of a problem than one would think. Also, while the plot is generally familiar, new themes are introduced via new characters. Al Fairly standard fantasy that nonetheless manages to differantiate itself from the crowd by way of it's light, often humorous and self-aware tone. The Malloreon is in many ways very, very similar to it's predecessor, the Belgariad. In another series, this could be a crippling weakness, but seeing as Eddings has a tendancy to poke fun at the plots anyways, it becomes less of a problem than one would think. Also, while the plot is generally familiar, new themes are introduced via new characters. All in all, while not revolutionary in any sense, certainly worth picking up for a good read, provided you're a fan of the genre.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mayank Agarwal

    One of the most pointless series I have come across, it’s a repetition of the previous series based in the same universe. With the same plot and even the same characters only the jokes are worse. The meanest form of money making an author can do, only my perseverance made me finish the series. As a teenager I was a big fan of the Belgarian universe, on my second read after a decade I realized how lame these books are. David Eddings got a flare for writing but without any plot, world making or ch One of the most pointless series I have come across, it’s a repetition of the previous series based in the same universe. With the same plot and even the same characters only the jokes are worse. The meanest form of money making an author can do, only my perseverance made me finish the series. As a teenager I was a big fan of the Belgarian universe, on my second read after a decade I realized how lame these books are. David Eddings got a flare for writing but without any plot, world making or character growth it’s no fun reading the series. My advice is to stick to the first Belgariad series (even that was a three time as long as it should have been) and skip this one.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Darin

    A great finish to the Belgariad - well worth the read. The story becomes more complex and the impending showdown with Kal Torak is great.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh Handy

    This was my first Fantasy series that I really got into and I have re-read the series multiple times. If you love dialog in this style of writing, you will love this series!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Milopeinemann

    Cardboard derivative fantasy at its less-than- finest. If you've read the Belgariad three times by now, then it's time to read the Mallorean. Cardboard derivative fantasy at its less-than- finest. If you've read the Belgariad three times by now, then it's time to read the Mallorean.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mic Parker

    A continuation of the story of the characters introduced in the Belgariad (with a few additions). Perfect fantasy - not too ridiculous; funny and imaginative.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rich Julien

    still one of my favorite extended series, Eddings stories have been with me for decades. I reread them every few years, and always enjoy them. yes, they are tropes, but so well written you will consume them regardless.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Edith De kroon

    Couple of days off, food and drink at hand. Not going anywhere until they’re all finished (except toiletbreaks and sleep...)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maurine Tritch

    The Mallorean is a harder series for me to review than the Belgariad. The four stars are somewhat of an average, because I do think it has a stronger story and the characters included are more interesting than the Belgariad, but it has a LOT more flaws. And some of those are pretty dreadful. First let's talk about the thread of sexism that runs through it. It's present in The Belgariad too, but it is more explained as a idiosyncrasy of the time or an opinion expressed by characters who have an o The Mallorean is a harder series for me to review than the Belgariad. The four stars are somewhat of an average, because I do think it has a stronger story and the characters included are more interesting than the Belgariad, but it has a LOT more flaws. And some of those are pretty dreadful. First let's talk about the thread of sexism that runs through it. It's present in The Belgariad too, but it is more explained as a idiosyncrasy of the time or an opinion expressed by characters who have an old fashioned view in a changing world (except the bit with Merel and Barak their first night at Val Alorn. I'm not really sure how to interpret that one). In the Mallorean it is much more entrenched. Every major battle, the women--several of whom are perfectly competent in a fight--are led away while the men take care of the battle, and comments surface frequently on the frailty and perfidy of women. This is underscored by the complete transformation of Ce'Nedra from the strong young woman who raised an army across several nations in the Belgariad to a weepy, needy, mess who is treated like a child by her own husband. A couple of the romances depicted are determined young women who "snare" their much older men; I also found the idea of the best place for a husband to be during the birth of his baby is away from his laboring wife appalling. Then, there are the out and out contradictions. One of the few rules Eddings has imposed on his sorcerers is that a sorcerer can't unmake anything--to say "be not" or "vanish" with will behind it means that he himself is obliterated. This is a major plot point in the first series. Then, in one of the opening scenes of the second, our venerated companion does exactly that without consequence. There also seems to be some discussion about creating things: can you create from thin air, or do you need to alter an existing object? We see them doing both, and many, many reader questions occur if the "thin air" option is valid. The use or not use of magic is MUCH more arbitrary in this series than the first. The plot has more gruesome elements than the first, and more than a little de ja vu may occur. This does become a plot point here, but do keep in mind that every David Eddings novel or series has the same archetypical characters in the same basic story. I found that this was pounded into the ground in later books, but here it still works for me. The details are what elevate it. And the individual surprises along the way. So why four stars? The characters and the dialogue. Really. In the Belgariad, all the members of the questing group have distinct personalities that are part of the fun of the series, but they are also mostly fighters--straightforward and completely trustworthy. Arguably the best character is Silk who is a thief, spy, and a prince. In the Mallorean he is joined by two others much like him that serve as foil and partners and bring their own brand of scheming to the table. The little in jokes that are carried throughout the story really make it. In this new select group, the new characters bring an added complexity sorely needed, and their somewhat obscure motives help stir the interest and actions of their fellow party members. Even the others we meet along the way are riveting. Urgit, King of the Murgos in particular, is fantastic. And the bad guys are better drawn here. So if you enjoyed the Belgariad I would recommend The Mallorean. With reservations.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    Okay, these books are good. However, while what I said about the first series of books by the same author, 'The Belgariad', holds true with this series; that Eddings is masterful at creating interesting new fantasy cultures and societies, the plot in these five books are exactly the same as in the first five. And I really mean that they are exactly the same, that characters in the book even comment on it... So, while there are intersting new ideas, there is no new story here. Which makes the seri Okay, these books are good. However, while what I said about the first series of books by the same author, 'The Belgariad', holds true with this series; that Eddings is masterful at creating interesting new fantasy cultures and societies, the plot in these five books are exactly the same as in the first five. And I really mean that they are exactly the same, that characters in the book even comment on it... So, while there are intersting new ideas, there is no new story here. Which makes the series itself rather anti-climactic. Unless you're desperate, read the first series and let it go. You'll only be disappointed in the end...

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Montagne

    I read these in my younger years - and enjoyed them. Eddings character development is very strong, and his description of the actions are top-notch, with a magic system that makes sense in its way (with notable cause-and-effect consequences). The only reason I gave it 3 stars is because after awhile, it seemed like the same villains repeated. Not to say I still didn't enjoy these villains, but the world itself started to seem 'limited', and the arch-villains rather shallow. The main characters t I read these in my younger years - and enjoyed them. Eddings character development is very strong, and his description of the actions are top-notch, with a magic system that makes sense in its way (with notable cause-and-effect consequences). The only reason I gave it 3 stars is because after awhile, it seemed like the same villains repeated. Not to say I still didn't enjoy these villains, but the world itself started to seem 'limited', and the arch-villains rather shallow. The main characters themselves are quite interesting... if I had the time, I would consider re-reading them (but there are so many good 'new' books out there :)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mary-Beth

    Blah blah, new evil, blah blah Zandramas. You will hear about the Light and the Dark until your head spins. The relationship between Zakath and Garion is one of the high points of the series. Garion actually stops being such a goody-goody, but replaces it with the angst of a thousand suns over his son's kidnapping, which is all well and good. I am sure it would be depressing, and it would even be supportable if not drawn out for this long. Blah blah, new evil, blah blah Zandramas. You will hear about the Light and the Dark until your head spins. The relationship between Zakath and Garion is one of the high points of the series. Garion actually stops being such a goody-goody, but replaces it with the angst of a thousand suns over his son's kidnapping, which is all well and good. I am sure it would be depressing, and it would even be supportable if not drawn out for this long.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    The Mallorean is the next series of five books following the Belgariad. It follows many of the same characters from the Belgariad while adding a few new ones. I hold the value of this series as equal to the Belgariad, though some readers tend to lean towards liking either the younger, or the older Belgarian that we see in each of the series respectively.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Loved this sequel to the Belgariad. Eddings managed to create a universe and characters that you can totally immerse yourself in, and adds a generous dollop of his own dry humor. I have read these two series over and over again and always leave the world of the Alorns and Angaraks with a regretful sigh.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Callie

    This is the second part of the Belgariad story, and again, they aren't great. It has some interesting ideas, but one gets the feeling they the author was trying too hard to make a mediocre story into something great. This is the second part of the Belgariad story, and again, they aren't great. It has some interesting ideas, but one gets the feeling they the author was trying too hard to make a mediocre story into something great.

  16. 5 out of 5

    J.W. Parente

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A powerful end to the decology featured Garion, who grew from a farmboy, into the mighty King Belgarion. The series lends magnificent storytelling and all culminates in the birth of a new god from the most unlikeliest person.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Wendi

    Though I didn't like these books quite as much as the first ones that make up the Belgariad, I still loved them, and enjoyed the continued adventures with beloved characters. Though I didn't like these books quite as much as the first ones that make up the Belgariad, I still loved them, and enjoyed the continued adventures with beloved characters.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Noah Stacy

    More sword and sorcery fun from the Eddings.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tami Reed

    David Eddings is a wonderful storyteller. Very entertaining. Not as good as the Belgariad series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lydiaf

    I enjoyed this series too! It was very similar to the Belgariad in plot. However, it was never boring!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Wyyknot

    Demon lord of Karanda by David Eddings (1988), 1st ed

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicole MacDonald

    A great continuation from The Belgarid. Again love this set. Re-read these books constantly

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    See review of The Belgariad. Overall--really liked it, but hated the grotesque scenes of the evil god and his followers.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Max

    While not as prolific as its prior series (The Belgariad), the Malloreon is a worthy successor to this famous franchise of fantasy novels.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Culbertson

    continuation of the story begun in the Belgariad.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Josh Redlich

    This 5 book series was literally just a rewrite of the Belgariad, with the same plot and everything. But it was great! Even better than the first series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Annie Morecambe

    This was a terrific series. I began with The Malloreon and never looked back. From that first day I was hooked. I read all of David Eddings books and have them in my private library.

  28. 4 out of 5

    The Book Goblin

    Some brief comments as part of my Seven Deadly Sins Book Tag Video https://youtu.be/b1RWu3ULbxg?t=3m32s Some brief comments as part of my Seven Deadly Sins Book Tag Video https://youtu.be/b1RWu3ULbxg?t=3m32s

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    Completes the series, good sci-fi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kandice

    This is the second group after the Belgaraid series. I loved them just as much.

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