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The Untold Story of Eva Braun: Her Life beyond Hitler

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This is what readers have previously been told about Eva Braun: that she was a cute, fashion-conscious, athletic, and vivacious 17-year-old salesgirl when she met Hitler in 1929. At that time, Hitler was a flabby little 40-year-old man with a comical mustache who wore the same baggy blue suit every day of the week. Hitler was unemployed, but he dreamed of entering politics This is what readers have previously been told about Eva Braun: that she was a cute, fashion-conscious, athletic, and vivacious 17-year-old salesgirl when she met Hitler in 1929. At that time, Hitler was a flabby little 40-year-old man with a comical mustache who wore the same baggy blue suit every day of the week. Hitler was unemployed, but he dreamed of entering politics; Eva had no interest in politics whatsoever. Even though the two of them had virtually nothing in common, they became romantically involved, according to previous biographies, while Eva was still living at home with her strict Catholic parents. Throughout the course of their relationship, Eva only saw Hitler on rare occasions. When Hitler was away, Eva passed the time by reading movie magazines, exercising, and holding parties for her friends at her house in Munich. Hitler had bought her the house in response to two feigned suicide attempts by Eva. While Eva was never allowed to appear in public with Hitler, Hitler openly enjoyed the company of dancers, opera singers, and actresses. Previous biographers would have one believe that, after 16 years of being ignored by Hitler, Eva went to Berlin of her own free will to marry and then to commit suicide alongside Hitler in his underground bunker. Readers will agree that this cannot be the full story of Eva Braun. There must be more to it. Thanks to the author’s 15 years of intensive research, we now know that Eva Braun was the product of a broken home, that her father was an alcoholic, and that she suffered from depression and Mayer-Rokitansky Syndrome or "MRKH," the congenital absence of a functioning vagina and uterus, a condition which affects one in every 4,000-5,000 women. Now, 65 years after Eva’s death, this book finally sets the record straight on Eva Braun.


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This is what readers have previously been told about Eva Braun: that she was a cute, fashion-conscious, athletic, and vivacious 17-year-old salesgirl when she met Hitler in 1929. At that time, Hitler was a flabby little 40-year-old man with a comical mustache who wore the same baggy blue suit every day of the week. Hitler was unemployed, but he dreamed of entering politics This is what readers have previously been told about Eva Braun: that she was a cute, fashion-conscious, athletic, and vivacious 17-year-old salesgirl when she met Hitler in 1929. At that time, Hitler was a flabby little 40-year-old man with a comical mustache who wore the same baggy blue suit every day of the week. Hitler was unemployed, but he dreamed of entering politics; Eva had no interest in politics whatsoever. Even though the two of them had virtually nothing in common, they became romantically involved, according to previous biographies, while Eva was still living at home with her strict Catholic parents. Throughout the course of their relationship, Eva only saw Hitler on rare occasions. When Hitler was away, Eva passed the time by reading movie magazines, exercising, and holding parties for her friends at her house in Munich. Hitler had bought her the house in response to two feigned suicide attempts by Eva. While Eva was never allowed to appear in public with Hitler, Hitler openly enjoyed the company of dancers, opera singers, and actresses. Previous biographers would have one believe that, after 16 years of being ignored by Hitler, Eva went to Berlin of her own free will to marry and then to commit suicide alongside Hitler in his underground bunker. Readers will agree that this cannot be the full story of Eva Braun. There must be more to it. Thanks to the author’s 15 years of intensive research, we now know that Eva Braun was the product of a broken home, that her father was an alcoholic, and that she suffered from depression and Mayer-Rokitansky Syndrome or "MRKH," the congenital absence of a functioning vagina and uterus, a condition which affects one in every 4,000-5,000 women. Now, 65 years after Eva’s death, this book finally sets the record straight on Eva Braun.

30 review for The Untold Story of Eva Braun: Her Life beyond Hitler

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elwin

    This book postulates that Eva Braun, Hitler's wife, had the condition Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH) which means that she was born without a uterus or vagina, and had surgery in her teens to give her a vagina and hide her condition. I was interested to read this because I have the same condition, and the parts of the book that were about MRKH were somewhat interesting (if sounding somewhat like the survivor stories that you can easily find on the internet about MRKH), but I felt This book postulates that Eva Braun, Hitler's wife, had the condition Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH) which means that she was born without a uterus or vagina, and had surgery in her teens to give her a vagina and hide her condition. I was interested to read this because I have the same condition, and the parts of the book that were about MRKH were somewhat interesting (if sounding somewhat like the survivor stories that you can easily find on the internet about MRKH), but I felt so much more could have been done with her inner thoughts and feelings about her life. The book ended up being mostly a rehash of historical fact, and we don't really get any sense of what Eva actually thought or felt, just bland factual detail. She ends up being more of a mystery to the reader than she started out as. The timeline skipping was also confusing and didn't really work. It broke any engagement in one part of the story to be constantly skipping back and forward in time - I would have preferred to read it in the order her life went in.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erika Nerdypants

    I’ve long been interested in Eva Braun Hitler. And I’ve learned a lot from this book. Growing up in Austria, very near Braunau, and with both my grandfathers injured in battle, one might assume I would be familiar with most of this. Not so, talk about Hitler and the war was strongly discouraged. It was like a great blanket of silence that covered the years between 1933 and 1945. I’ve often wondered how complicit the women in Austria were. This book answered that question. You could not have live I’ve long been interested in Eva Braun Hitler. And I’ve learned a lot from this book. Growing up in Austria, very near Braunau, and with both my grandfathers injured in battle, one might assume I would be familiar with most of this. Not so, talk about Hitler and the war was strongly discouraged. It was like a great blanket of silence that covered the years between 1933 and 1945. I’ve often wondered how complicit the women in Austria were. This book answered that question. You could not have lived there in ignorance of what was going on. Eva Braun Hitler continues to remain shrouded in mystery. She seems elusive, fake and as unreachable as ever. Maybe we can’t discern who she really was, because she so completely erased herself for Adolf Hitler? Their relationship is one of the best examples of codependency and narcissism I have ever seen. Codependent on Hitler, all she could think of was how not to lose his meagre supply of attention. I did not enjoy the switching between times. Chapters alternated which became stale fairly quickly, and in addition the transitions felt abrupt, like ending a conversation prematurely. Reading this account in chronological order would have made for a more consistent and rounded story.

  3. 5 out of 5

    yolanda trogolo

    Eva Braun’s personality I don’t know how the author came to known of so many details of Eva Braun’s life, but as you read, it’s like watching a movie, and a real goo one at that!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    This book took me a long time to read as i found it hard going. Eva was not as interesting person as I had hoped, although the book did give me some insight into Hitler and a nazi perspective of Germany and the war. I found the style of the book, jumping forward and back in time confusing and the translations were poor. I have never read any other books about either Eva or Hitler so I have nothing to compare against so this book was worth reading because it was a new subject area for me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Stanley

    This really did take some reading!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ashika Charan

    Exceptionally insightful and well written.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah C

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hilda

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cris Lovan

  10. 5 out of 5

    David James

  11. 4 out of 5

    karen johns

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elisa Pesta

  14. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Lough

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ethel R Hurst

  16. 4 out of 5

    guy johnstone

  17. 5 out of 5

    John

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Halstead

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linds

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mikayla Bowlin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Coberly

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jean Spang

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mitzi Springfield

  24. 4 out of 5

    Addy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Andersen

  26. 5 out of 5

    June Ramsay-Tesoriero

  27. 4 out of 5

    david john finlyson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  29. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Barberis-Carson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aki

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