web site hit counter Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2

Availability: Ready to download

Sir Anthony Kenny continues his magisterial new history of Western philosophy with a fascinating guide through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy from the founders of Christian and Islamic thought through to the Renaissance.The middle ages saw a great flourishing of philosophy, and the intellectual endeavour of the era r Sir Anthony Kenny continues his magisterial new history of Western philosophy with a fascinating guide through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy from the founders of Christian and Islamic thought through to the Renaissance.The middle ages saw a great flourishing of philosophy, and the intellectual endeavour of the era reaches its climax in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, with the systems of the great schoolmen such as Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus. Specially written for a broad popular readership, but serious and deep enough to offer a genuine understanding of the great philosophers, Kenny's lucid and stimulating history will become the definitive work for anyone interested in the people and ideas that shaped the course of Western thought.


Compare

Sir Anthony Kenny continues his magisterial new history of Western philosophy with a fascinating guide through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy from the founders of Christian and Islamic thought through to the Renaissance.The middle ages saw a great flourishing of philosophy, and the intellectual endeavour of the era r Sir Anthony Kenny continues his magisterial new history of Western philosophy with a fascinating guide through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy from the founders of Christian and Islamic thought through to the Renaissance.The middle ages saw a great flourishing of philosophy, and the intellectual endeavour of the era reaches its climax in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, with the systems of the great schoolmen such as Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus. Specially written for a broad popular readership, but serious and deep enough to offer a genuine understanding of the great philosophers, Kenny's lucid and stimulating history will become the definitive work for anyone interested in the people and ideas that shaped the course of Western thought.

54 review for Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Xander

    After reading Ancient Philosophy (2004) by Anthony Kenny, and not liking it (at all), one might wonder: Why, then, do you read Medieval Philosophy (2005), written by the same author? Well, the simple answer is: I had already bought both books. The more complicated answer: years ago I started reading the original works by philosophers and scientists, because I wanted to gain a proper understanding of the philosophical and scientific developments and their interaction with culture, politics, etc. I After reading Ancient Philosophy (2004) by Anthony Kenny, and not liking it (at all), one might wonder: Why, then, do you read Medieval Philosophy (2005), written by the same author? Well, the simple answer is: I had already bought both books. The more complicated answer: years ago I started reading the original works by philosophers and scientists, because I wanted to gain a proper understanding of the philosophical and scientific developments and their interaction with culture, politics, etc. In short: I wanted to understand intellectual history. The problem with such an approach is that one can read all of the original works, but this lacks structure. So once in a whole, I'd like to systematize all my knowledge, putting all the pieces together, and to be able to do this I read modern books that offer an overview and integration. So, anyway, that's why I chose to read Medieval Philosophy. From the outset, I have to admit that the book is slightly better than the first Volume (Ancient Philosophy) in Kenny's series. Medieval Philosophy has the same structure as the first book: 1/3 of the book chronological developments (roughly 400-1400), 2/3 thematic discussions. This division is still flawed: the developmental part is easy to follow, but once Kenny enters thematic discussions, it pretty soon becomes hard to follow. One problem is the artificially chopped-up subjects. So the coherent philosophical systems and ideas of Augustine, Averroes, Aquinas & co. are cut up into pieces and these fragments are then placed - chronologically - into each thematic chapter. This is problematic primarily because these philosophers didn't wrote their works for it to be chopped up. So, when Kenny divides the second part of his book into themes like: language & logic, knowledge, physics, metaphysics, soul & mind, ethics, and God, this means, in effect, that to understand, for example, Aquinas' view on some subject has to be referenced with Aquinas' views on other subject. For instance, when dealing with metaphysics, Kenny asserts that, since Augustine's metaphysics is intimately tied to his theology, it is better to explain Augustine's views in the chapter on God. The truth is, for these writers, there simply was no such distinction as Kenny makes. Augustine wrote a book, City of God, which deals with all of the themes that Kenny distinguishes. Another problem, connected with the first one, is the multitude of references to other chapters. This is a consequence of Kenny's thematic division. This was already problematic in the first Volume, but now Kenny references not just to parts in the same book, but also to parts in the earlier book. Which makes following the main arguments very hard and one is constantly hindered from continuing, which reduces the reading experience (for me, at least) to a minimum. A third problem, also present in the first Volume, is Kenny's approach in explaining the philosophies involved. He has a peculiar style of explanation, and one gets the impression that Kenny wants to be the popular teacher - trying to offer accessible introductions to less accessible information. This is laudable, especially since Medieval philosophy is pretty abstract and esoteric, but there's something with Kenny's way of expressing himself that completely blocks me from gaining any insights from his texts. I simply can't follow his explanations and this becomes irritating after the two first thematic chapters. A big plus in this book, as compared to the first Volume, is the interesting material Kenny can work with. Ancient philosophy is pretty chewed up (I mean, who didn't get this subject in school), while Medieval philosophy is, by comparison, much less known. Which makes it a more interesting historical period in philosophy and science to write a book about. Unfortunately, this advantage is only partially exploited by Kenny. In the chronological part of the book, Kenny is able to offer readers new insights and to connect Ancient philosophy (pre-Augustine) to Modern philosophy (post-Descartes) in an informative way. Yet, in the thematic part of the book (which, again, is about 2/3 of the entire book), the material becomes pretty dull at times. To be honest, this is not Kenny's fault. St. Augustine was the last original thinker up to René Descartes - anything in between is - generalizing, I know, I know - translation of old works, disputing about these works and trying to solve puzzles that were brought up by these old works. Frankly, Medieval philosophy was one big attempt to philosophize theology - in the sense that Christian theology was given as ultimate truth, and that philosophy was used as a tool to support theological doctrines, to understand nature in order to know God's works better, and to help resolve theological problems. The Middle Ages saw philosopers and theologians - the distinction is, frankly, a modern one - attempting to make sense of old works in light of Scripture and to fit in these old works where friction between both fields arose. For example, the universally hailed St. Thomas Aquinas did nothing more (nor less) than working out how Aristotle's metaphysics and philosophy could be adjusted so that it would fit neatly within a Scriptural framework. And, in general, the whole period of the Middle Ages, saw philosophers clinging obsessively to logic as a way to truth. Logic, epistemology, ethics, psychology and metaphysics were all branches of the same tree, which was theology. God had given us a revelation - through the prophets, and, ultimately, Jesus Christ - and this was the primary and only truth. Anything else (like philosophy) had to acknowledge this scriptural truth, or at least not contradict it. There's a charicature that the Medieval period saw theologians arguing how many Angels could dance on the head of a pin. This might be a bit unfair, but the gist of the joke is absolutely true. The Middle Ages were a period in which philosophers and theologians (again, the distinction only makes sense in retrospect) would argue both for and against propositions, review the arguments on both sides, and then pick the argument that would fit best within the existing Christian edifice. This is, frankly, not the road to knowledge. For one, knowledge requires that preconceived notions go out the window: a priori truths have no place in a quest for knowledge. So, theology is, in that sense (and to me in any possible sense), incommensurable wih both philosophy and science. Second, Aristotle's axiomatic-deductive system of knowledge is severly handicapped and, ultimately, will hinder us in our quest for knowledge. To know the world, experience of the world is a necessary (although not sufficient) condition. Logic, in that sense, is only a tool for us to build our theories and hypotheses. Empirical science is needed to discover new truths - and this simply didn't have a place in the framework of Medieval philosophy. It was only when René Descartes overthrew both Christian theology and the Aristotelean axiomatic-deductive system, and when Francis Bacon emphasized the need for empirical science and inductive truths, that the minds of intellectuals were opened up to alternative approaches to the quest for knowledge. We, moderns, are steeped solely in inductive reasoning and empirical science, and it is extremely hard for us to enter the minds of people who think in terms of Aristotelean concepts and theological a priori's. It feels unnatural, and it feels awkward, and a lot of times it simply doesn't make any sense. I think this is why I couldn't enjoy Kenny's second Volume in his series, like the first Volume - it simply doesn't make sense to me. I understand what he's saying and what the original works were about, but I simply don't get it. It looks to me like Medieval philosophy is - for modern day readers, at least - nothing but a way to enjoy leisure time. Getting familiar with old ways of thinking, without drawing any implications from them - or rather: without being able to draw any implications from them. Nevertheless, even though both the content and the structure of the book don't speak to me, I can see Kenny is a knowledgable author and he does his best to present the material as best as he can. This book is also slightly more interesting than the first book, so that's a plus.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Daniel1974nlgmail.com

    The Chronological part was good. The thematic part was not so good.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Felten De meulenaere

    The first part is chronological written and offers a historical insight of medieval philosophy. The second part is ordered thematically and explains and deepens into individual topics of the medieval thinking, such as logics, language, epistemology, ethics, God.. This book showed me that the medieval times we're not dark ages in which nothing of interesting happened. It's a vivid and complex period of time where various thinkers had discussions about natural theology. The first part is chronological written and offers a historical insight of medieval philosophy. The second part is ordered thematically and explains and deepens into individual topics of the medieval thinking, such as logics, language, epistemology, ethics, God.. This book showed me that the medieval times we're not dark ages in which nothing of interesting happened. It's a vivid and complex period of time where various thinkers had discussions about natural theology.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Betawolf

    Something of a mixed review, here. I found the second book in Kenny's ambitious series to be less impressive than the first, certainly, but I can't rule out that the main reasons for this were largely out of the author's control. The philosophy of the medieval period itself seems to be at fault, more than anything else, for how uninteresting I find vast portions of the book. Kenny does anticipate some of this in his introduction, although he makes what I think are finally unjustified efforts to Something of a mixed review, here. I found the second book in Kenny's ambitious series to be less impressive than the first, certainly, but I can't rule out that the main reasons for this were largely out of the author's control. The philosophy of the medieval period itself seems to be at fault, more than anything else, for how uninteresting I find vast portions of the book. Kenny does anticipate some of this in his introduction, although he makes what I think are finally unjustified efforts to defend the period. The majority of the philosophy expounded upon _does_ seem to be an offshoot of theology or apologetics for the Christian faith, and what thought there is of value amongst that seems to be fundamentally bankrupted by having to share its space with dogma. The one area where this might not be said to apply is that of logic, where scholastic thinkers made some strides to pull apart purely linguistic confusions inherent in the still confused systems of deduction -- but this topic was painful to read for another reason, in that so much of the analysis seems to flounder painfully on the shores of clarity, and without the charm similar flaws had in the texts of the ancients. Other areas were hopeless. The less said about the ethics of the Christian philosophers, the better. Moving the problems with the content aside, with some difficulty, I think there is still a justified criticism of the way Kenny reports on it, in comparison to the first volume. The chronological section of the first volume seemed like an edifying trip through the history of philosophy, but the same section of this volume felt less rewarding -- too crowded with argumentative figures who did not flourish with the same detail as the ancients. Several times I felt I was told that some development was important, without being given an opportunity to understand the significance for myself. However, I cannot charge that the book was not informative, opening up at least an overview of the period that lets me situate some shards from other reading. I am conflicted now in my expectations for the further volumes. On one hand, the modern philosophers probably escape the worst of the apologetics and theology, and so my problems with content might be alleviated, but on the other I suspect the cast of characters is going to get much larger, and if Kenny hopes to cover the figures with the same pagecount I might find the descriptions becoming intolerably short and crowded.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mario_Bambea

    Secoli tutt'altro che bui Secondo tomo della grande opera dedicata alla Filosofia Occidentale: alla fine della lettura concordo con la scelta di Kenny di dedicare un volume intero (e della stessa estensione) al periodo Medioevale. Ben lungi dall'essere un tempo privo di cultura e di pensatori rilevanti (come una superficiale cultura di massa suppone) è invece ricco di grandi menti e di tesori del pensiero. Solo come esempio ho scoperto con sorpresa che i primi tentativi di fisica "sperimentale" Secoli tutt'altro che bui Secondo tomo della grande opera dedicata alla Filosofia Occidentale: alla fine della lettura concordo con la scelta di Kenny di dedicare un volume intero (e della stessa estensione) al periodo Medioevale. Ben lungi dall'essere un tempo privo di cultura e di pensatori rilevanti (come una superficiale cultura di massa suppone) è invece ricco di grandi menti e di tesori del pensiero. Solo come esempio ho scoperto con sorpresa che i primi tentativi di fisica "sperimentale" sono opera di Roberto Grossatesta, che i 25 anni che intercorrono tra la Summa di san Tommaso e la Lectura di Duns Scoto sono un momento decisivo per la storia globale della filosofia, che il concetto di "mondi possibili" di Leibniziana memoria sono stati introdotti da Duns Scoto e che la questione della predestinazione nasce con Agostino. Che dire, poi, dei passi fatti nella logica dai molti pensatori scolastici (e non solo)? solo che molte delle loro riflessioni sono poi state recuperate dai pensatori del XX secolo e sono state la base delle rivoluzioni filosofiche-scientifiche con protagonisti Russell, Frege, Godel. Una lettura a tratti difficile, anche se il livello di complessità è per studenti universitari: quindi un minimo di preparazione in filosofia è necessario, ma anche i non addetti ai lavori possono apprezzare questo testo.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anderson Paz

    Nesse segundo volume de sua obra, Kenny abrange o período da conversão de Agostinho ao início da Renascença humanista. Os capítulos um e dois têm uma apresentação cronológica dos autores, e do três ao nove são apresentados vários temas (lógica, linguagem, conhecimento, física, metafísica, mente e alma, ética e Deus), articulando-se as respectivos interpretações dos autores do período para tais temas. Nesse volume, destacam-se as interpretações de Kenny sobre o pensamento de Tomás de Aquino e de Nesse segundo volume de sua obra, Kenny abrange o período da conversão de Agostinho ao início da Renascença humanista. Os capítulos um e dois têm uma apresentação cronológica dos autores, e do três ao nove são apresentados vários temas (lógica, linguagem, conhecimento, física, metafísica, mente e alma, ética e Deus), articulando-se as respectivos interpretações dos autores do período para tais temas. Nesse volume, destacam-se as interpretações de Kenny sobre o pensamento de Tomás de Aquino e de Agostinho de Hipona. É uma obra a ser consultada várias vezes, já que em vários momentos o autor faz inserções filosóficas importantes e aprofundadas na filosofia do medievo que, em geral, não é tão bem conhecida.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Arttu Malek

    The second installment of the New History of Western Philosophy series that covers the medieval period and its thinkers. It's written in the same structure as the other books of the series - historic succession first, after that a breakdown of ideas on main topics of God, ethics, metaphysics, etc. It's written in eloquent and clear language, covers most of the interesting topics and main figures in the era, and conveys the feel of this epoch rather nicely. A good introductory textbook on the his The second installment of the New History of Western Philosophy series that covers the medieval period and its thinkers. It's written in the same structure as the other books of the series - historic succession first, after that a breakdown of ideas on main topics of God, ethics, metaphysics, etc. It's written in eloquent and clear language, covers most of the interesting topics and main figures in the era, and conveys the feel of this epoch rather nicely. A good introductory textbook on the history of philosophy, complete with an extensive bibliography and a map.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Patris

    A brief overview of medieval philosophy....

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Quackenbush

    This book is the second in a four part series on the history of western philosophy. Following from the first volume on the progression of ancient philosophy, this addition to the series spans the progression of western philosophical thought from the conversion of Augustine to the beginnings of the Renaissance. Like its predecessor, the first two chapters of this book cover a general summary of the major philosophers of the time, with the final seven chapters analyzing the development of philosop This book is the second in a four part series on the history of western philosophy. Following from the first volume on the progression of ancient philosophy, this addition to the series spans the progression of western philosophical thought from the conversion of Augustine to the beginnings of the Renaissance. Like its predecessor, the first two chapters of this book cover a general summary of the major philosophers of the time, with the final seven chapters analyzing the development of philosophical thought in regards to specific issues such as god, ethics, and logic. My major complaint with this volume is the same one I discussed in my review on the first book of the series; I found the organization sometimes difficult as, opposed to discussing a philosopher’s views as a whole, their views were individually discussed by topic through each of the last seven chapters. This organization has its upsides, I’m sure, but I couldn’t help but find it difficult to organize the wealth of separately discussed views under any single philosopher, leaving me with only a few facts about each philosopher that I can accurately remember. So, while I feel like I walked away from this book with a good understanding of the major philosophical questions of this era, I can’t say I recall very much about any one specific philosopher. Despite this, I did learn quite a good deal from this book. If nothing else, I feel as if I now understand much more clearly the academic and religious atmosphere of the time much better. While I have not studied philosophy in any depth before, I have done a fair share of reading on history and prior to reading this I sometimes found it difficult to understand the general climate of the times in comparison with my own modern day life. Exactly how the church managed to sway such influence throughout history seems much clearer to me now that I’ve read through the types of philosophical dilemmas that absorbed the great minds of the time, and learned of the sometimes vitriolic backlash that occurred to even the silliest seeming bits of heresy. So, definitely continue this series if you have begun it; there is a wealth of information to be had. For those looking to get more out of it than I myself did, I recommend utilizing Wikipedia and google to recap about specific philosophers as you read through it. I also wish I had read a little more on formal logic before beginning this tome as it would have made numerous sections much more clear to me. All and all, this series is shaping up to be a rather solid introduction to western philosophical thought, although it is definitely worth it to through in a little extra effort to get the most out of it. If you liked this review, you can read others as well as anumber of articles on the topic of self-education at my blog

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sam Eccleston

    Interesting, clear, and sufficiently detailed without being tedious. In other words, typical of Kenny. This ought to make it a brilliant work, and there isn’t anything I can find wrong with it, but there is just something very plodding about Kenny’s approach that takes the life out of the subject somewhat- one feels that he is reciting from memory rather than teaching with passion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    IWB

    A good introductory survey of philosophical topics as they were treated by various medieval thinkers throughout the entire period, from late antiquity and the commentators of Aristotle, to the inception of the humanists. The survey combines what is properly called intellectual history and philosophy proper. The historical aspect is kept to a minimum (as it ought to be in a philosophy book) without sacrificing salient features of the historical context in which the topic under discussion occurred A good introductory survey of philosophical topics as they were treated by various medieval thinkers throughout the entire period, from late antiquity and the commentators of Aristotle, to the inception of the humanists. The survey combines what is properly called intellectual history and philosophy proper. The historical aspect is kept to a minimum (as it ought to be in a philosophy book) without sacrificing salient features of the historical context in which the topic under discussion occurred. The philosophy, on the other hand, is more developed and Kenny has an emphasis on concept explanation, as opposed to explicating arguments; though he does do both at times. This includes the following topics: God, Mind and Soul, Logic and Language, Knowledge, Physics, Metaphysics, Ethics, as well as an excellent treatment of philosophy and religious belief from Augustine to Maimonides,and scholasticism from the twelfth century renaissance (Abelard and the 'nominales' school) to the so-called renaissance proper (roughly 1360-1550), at which point scholasticism began to give way to the new schoolman, the humanists. Kenny is especially good at explaining the intellectual current of a given period and how such a current has bearing on the topic at hand, this is particularly seen in his discussion of physics. As such, the historical context of each topic and its subsequent development is presented thoroughly but briefly; however, little attention is given to the explication of any particular thinker's arguments on any given topics. For that reason, you will find little critical analysis of is presented. All in all it is an excellent work, written clearly and informatively, by a very capable philosopher. It's a good introduction for undergraduates at the freshman and sophomore level. But if you've had more than a survey course in medieval philosophy, you need something with a bit more depth.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John

    This fine book, the second volume in Kenny's A New History of Western Philosophy, provides an overview of the major figures and issues in the philosophy of the European Middle Ages. Kenny takes an "intellectual history" approach in the opening section to provide necessary historical context and biographical information on the major figures he will be discussing. In the longer second part of the book, he turns to philosophical issues per se, tackling, in turn, "Logic and Language," "Knowledge," " This fine book, the second volume in Kenny's A New History of Western Philosophy, provides an overview of the major figures and issues in the philosophy of the European Middle Ages. Kenny takes an "intellectual history" approach in the opening section to provide necessary historical context and biographical information on the major figures he will be discussing. In the longer second part of the book, he turns to philosophical issues per se, tackling, in turn, "Logic and Language," "Knowledge," "Physics," "Metaphysics," "Mind and Soul," "Ethics," and "God." Kenny organizes this discussion around a who's who of the major medieval philosophers, including Augustine, Boethius, Avicenna, Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and Ockham. The chapters on ethics and God, topics so important in the Christian philosophical matrix of the Middle Ages, are very good, but it is the chapter on logic and language that stood out to me as being particularly interesting--Kenny highlights the ways in which medieval thinkers were anticipating issues in the philosophy of language that have been very hot topics among philosophers of the last century. Kenny's book will be useful to anyone with a more-than-casual interest in philosophy or in medieval intellectual history. It may prove too difficult for absolute beginners with no philosophical background. Non-specialist academics and students, among others, will relish the book both for the helpfulness of its content and for the charm and grace of Kenny's writing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    An excellent introductory and thematic text, usefully organized into thematic chapters (metaphysics, logic, ethics, etc.) following a couple of useful chapters on the intellectual history of the period. Kenny's discussions of various topics are nicely balanced between explanatory glosses and more detailed explications of knotty problems. I read this book because, despite half a lifetime as a student of philosophy, my knowledge of the subject after Aristotle but before Descartes was woeful, limit An excellent introductory and thematic text, usefully organized into thematic chapters (metaphysics, logic, ethics, etc.) following a couple of useful chapters on the intellectual history of the period. Kenny's discussions of various topics are nicely balanced between explanatory glosses and more detailed explications of knotty problems. I read this book because, despite half a lifetime as a student of philosophy, my knowledge of the subject after Aristotle but before Descartes was woeful, limited to Boethius and some Augustine. While the overwhelming context of Christian theology and doctrine unavoidably colors the book, Kenny does a nice job contextualizing the debates and developments and highlights the importance of Al-Farabi, Averroes, Avicenna, and other non-Christian thinkers of the era. Having read this, I doubt that I'll read any further into the philosophy of the period, because (under the crushing imperium of the Catholic Church) the era was not replete with interesting developments in ethics or political philosophy, my primary areas of philosophical interest. It's nice to feel like I did take a sip before dismissing the drink as not to my taste.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shoaib Nagi

    A very informative and well-written introduction to Medieval Philosophy from St. Augustine to William Ockham. The thematic division of the book helps the reader understand different branches of philosophy in a more coherent manner. To take an example, the author describes the ethical philosophy of St. Augustine under the chapter dedicated exclusively to Medieval Ethics and his theology under the chapter dedicated to God. In this manner, the entire voluminous philosophical output of a philosopher A very informative and well-written introduction to Medieval Philosophy from St. Augustine to William Ockham. The thematic division of the book helps the reader understand different branches of philosophy in a more coherent manner. To take an example, the author describes the ethical philosophy of St. Augustine under the chapter dedicated exclusively to Medieval Ethics and his theology under the chapter dedicated to God. In this manner, the entire voluminous philosophical output of a philosopher is not crammed down the reader's throat in an instant. Moreover, Anthony Kenny also gives an insight into Islamic philosophy. He introduces the reader to the theology of Al-Kindi, the metaphysics of Avicenna and the logic of Averroes. It isn't as detailed as it should be (e.g. Kenny doesn't mention Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Arabi or Al-Ghazali), but compared to other books on the history of philosophy, it is still a good start.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    This is the second volume of the history of philosophy. It deals with the history of philosophy and the concepts of it during the Hellenistic era going through to St. Augustine, Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, Okham, and some Islamic and Jewish philosophers as well. Even though my interest is in the Ethics portion of this I enjoyed reading the whole book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Lovatt

    This is an interesting introduction to medieval philosophy and some of the philosophers of the time. It studies the concepts of St. Augustine, Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, and Okham, along with a few others, exploring topics such as Ethics, Physics, Metaphysics, Logic and Language. I found it to be a bit confusing at times, however it was informative and well-written.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Saul

    Read chronological survey, see Philosophy and Philology nb (p. 67-86) for notes

  18. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Dodson

    I finally finished this book! I'm ready for the agent intellect to beam me up! I finally finished this book! I'm ready for the agent intellect to beam me up!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Second part of a four volume set: medieval philosophy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ali Usman

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael A.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jb

  23. 5 out of 5

    Arne Six

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tiago Torres

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jia Loong

  26. 5 out of 5

    Artur Olczyk

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jim Parker

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nick Pelonia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  31. 4 out of 5

    Vitali

  32. 4 out of 5

    Frank

  33. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas Shump

  34. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jaena Rae

  36. 4 out of 5

    Monty

  37. 5 out of 5

    Mauz15

  38. 4 out of 5

    Leonardo

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

  40. 4 out of 5

    Krysta

  41. 4 out of 5

    Steven1972

  42. 4 out of 5

    Rkq

  43. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Lungu

  44. 5 out of 5

    Russell

  45. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  46. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  47. 5 out of 5

    Yakking Yogini

  48. 5 out of 5

    John David

  49. 4 out of 5

    Hatfield

  50. 5 out of 5

    Sašo

  51. 4 out of 5

    Niratisaya Niratisaya

  52. 5 out of 5

    Hakija

  53. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  54. 5 out of 5

    Kirk Stifle

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.