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Success can be yours with Susan Jeffers's Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway The world's foremost producer of personal development and motivational audio programs gives you the tools to face the fears that hold you back.We're all afraid of something: beginnings, endings, changing, getting stuck. But fear doesn't have to hold you back from happiness or success. You can change Success can be yours with Susan Jeffers's Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway The world's foremost producer of personal development and motivational audio programs gives you the tools to face the fears that hold you back.We're all afraid of something: beginnings, endings, changing, getting stuck. But fear doesn't have to hold you back from happiness or success. You can change your relationship with fear -- and in this dynamic, inspirational program, Susan Jeffers, Ph.D., teaches compassionate concepts and highly effective exercises that help you unravel the complexities and reverse the effects of fear.You'll learn: * The five truths about fears * How to weed negatives out of your words and thoughts * How to develop goals that help extend your self-imposed limitationsDon't be prisoner of you own insecurities. Career growth, personal harmony and financial rewards can by yours -- when you learn to Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway.


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Success can be yours with Susan Jeffers's Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway The world's foremost producer of personal development and motivational audio programs gives you the tools to face the fears that hold you back.We're all afraid of something: beginnings, endings, changing, getting stuck. But fear doesn't have to hold you back from happiness or success. You can change Success can be yours with Susan Jeffers's Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway The world's foremost producer of personal development and motivational audio programs gives you the tools to face the fears that hold you back.We're all afraid of something: beginnings, endings, changing, getting stuck. But fear doesn't have to hold you back from happiness or success. You can change your relationship with fear -- and in this dynamic, inspirational program, Susan Jeffers, Ph.D., teaches compassionate concepts and highly effective exercises that help you unravel the complexities and reverse the effects of fear.You'll learn: * The five truths about fears * How to weed negatives out of your words and thoughts * How to develop goals that help extend your self-imposed limitationsDon't be prisoner of you own insecurities. Career growth, personal harmony and financial rewards can by yours -- when you learn to Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway.

30 review for Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway®: Dynamic techniques for turning Fear, Indecision and Anger into Power, Action and Love

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katya Kean

    I was afraid to leave this review, but I did it anyway. Kidding. Really, though, this book is probably really important for some people. Women, especially. Women leaving relationships, I'd imagine. The first two chapters are pretty neat. They highlight an important truth that you can't wait for the fear to go away before you do something. I know that this book influenced a lot of other books I've liked. The 3 stars instead of 4 or 5 is partially because of sentences like these: [This] "Higher Self i I was afraid to leave this review, but I did it anyway. Kidding. Really, though, this book is probably really important for some people. Women, especially. Women leaving relationships, I'd imagine. The first two chapters are pretty neat. They highlight an important truth that you can't wait for the fear to go away before you do something. I know that this book influenced a lot of other books I've liked. The 3 stars instead of 4 or 5 is partially because of sentences like these: [This] "Higher Self is capable of a high degree of sensitivity and attunement to a harmonious flow within the universe." I just have a hard time reading sentences like that, sober. And actually I never finished the last chapter, largely because the above sentence was in the beginning of it, and I have a lot of other things to read. I was afraid to return the book unfinished, but I did it anyway. So, I guess it worked.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tommy

    A girlfriend in grad school gave me this book, shortly before we parted ways, in fact. It was a real eye-opener to me that I lived much of my life hovering around the perimeter of the pool rather than jumping in with both feet. Most eye-opening for me, though, was it was the first time I had been taught that fear was fine - embrace it, don't dodge it. Then, walk through the fire anyway. I'm not saying I turned into Russell Crowe from "Gladiator" because of it. I'm still more Woody Allen from "Ann A girlfriend in grad school gave me this book, shortly before we parted ways, in fact. It was a real eye-opener to me that I lived much of my life hovering around the perimeter of the pool rather than jumping in with both feet. Most eye-opening for me, though, was it was the first time I had been taught that fear was fine - embrace it, don't dodge it. Then, walk through the fire anyway. I'm not saying I turned into Russell Crowe from "Gladiator" because of it. I'm still more Woody Allen from "Annie Hall", but the book did fuel me toward some braver choices in life, and I think it's a great read - not too clinical, not too esoteric - just good guidance through learning to live with the beast that resides in everyone's anxiety closet.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Greg Stearns

    The book starts off with a pretty decent premise which is entirely summed up in the title. Things will always be scary until you master them, then there will be something new to be afraid of so instead of eliminating your fear you should be working on pushing through. There are some decent ideas and suggestions in the first couple chapters, but it goes downhill for the rest of the book. Between the constant ads for her other products (Inspirational Audios, books of affirmations, etc) and the unaba The book starts off with a pretty decent premise which is entirely summed up in the title. Things will always be scary until you master them, then there will be something new to be afraid of so instead of eliminating your fear you should be working on pushing through. There are some decent ideas and suggestions in the first couple chapters, but it goes downhill for the rest of the book. Between the constant ads for her other products (Inspirational Audios, books of affirmations, etc) and the unabashed brute-force self-brainwashing there are tidbits of insight wrapped thickly in late 80s psychospiritual nonsense. "Saying 'Yes' to your Universe." Ok, I agree: you should accept the fact that no matter what happens to you, you always have the next move. But it was enough that I just couldn't finish reading last chapter. It's about intuition, and after going through Pragmatic Thinking and Learning: Refactor Your Wetware and having a solid understanding of my brain's L and R modes there was a great deal of eye rolling. In fact, she stopped just shy of making a mini version of The Secret. I don't think this book deserves 1 star, as it does make some good points. If you really don't mind self acutalization being put in terms of magic and mystery you can probably take this book at face value. But if you value reason I would suggest reading the first 3 chapters in a book store and start building the skill of Doing it Anyway ®.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rori Rockman

    Man. How do you rate a book that steadily devolves from five stars down to one star? This starts out as a five star book. The first few chapters of this book have probably altered my world view permanently. Here's the gist of what really hit home for me: At the heart of every fear we have is one single fear: "I can't handle it." This is an absolute revelation, at least to me, because it means that there is one reliable (though still not easy) formula to be used for overcoming fear: convince yourse Man. How do you rate a book that steadily devolves from five stars down to one star? This starts out as a five star book. The first few chapters of this book have probably altered my world view permanently. Here's the gist of what really hit home for me: At the heart of every fear we have is one single fear: "I can't handle it." This is an absolute revelation, at least to me, because it means that there is one reliable (though still not easy) formula to be used for overcoming fear: convince yourself that you can handle it. She goes on to explain that the more we do things we're afraid of, thus proving to ourselves that we CAN handle danger, uncertainty, loss, loneliness, etc., the more we can feel confident that we will be able to handle similar experiences in the future. In other words, facing our fears is something we can practice and get better at, even if we can never completely obliterate fear from our lives. She goes on to talk about decision making. Decision making often induces fear because we're scared that if we make the wrong decision it can have disastrous consequences. She suggests that instead of thinking of a decision in terms of a "right choice" and a "wrong choice," we think of them simply as different choices, and that with the right attitude, we can experience growth and fulfillment in our lives regardless of which choice we make. She points out how even in horrible circumstances (losing a job, being diagnosed with cancer, losing a loved one), we are given tremendous opportunities to experience personal growth, and it gives us confidence to emerge triumphant from difficult circumstances. All great, great advice that I will definitely take to heart. She then goes on to talk about positive affirmations, achieving balance in life, choosing to love those who we feel have wronged us. This is where the book started to take a turn for the worse. I actually agreed with a lot of what she was saying. I don't deny that it's good to surround yourself with supportive people. I agree that it's good to identify goals in our lives and work towards them. But ... read the summary of this book: "Are you afraid of making decisions . . . asking your boss for a raise . . . leaving an unfulfilling relationship . . . facing the future? Whatever your fear, here is your chance to push through it once and for all. In this enduring guide to self-empowerment, Dr. Susan Jeffers inspires us with dynamic techniques and profound concepts that have helped countless people grab hold of their fears and move forward with their lives." Around Chapter 3 (only 15% into the book!), Jeffers starts veering pretty far away from the subject of facing your fears. A book should not be marketed as "Learn to face your fears!" if the majority of the book is only tangentially related to that subject. And then there was chapter 11. Allow me to post an excerpt from chapter 11: "I believe that what all of us are really searching for is this divine essence within ourselves. When we are far from our Higher Self, we feel what Roberto Assagioli has so aptly called 'Divine Homesickness.' When you are feeling this sense of being lost, or off course, the thing to do to find your way home again is simply to use the tools that will align you with your Higher Self--and thus allow the good feelings to flow once again." This is the point at which, in my mind, the book became a one star book. In summary, I think this book idea would have made an excellent essay or pamphlet. The first two chapters were invaluable. The rest were filler.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ladan

    Neglecting all the ads and promises, the first chapters were helpful in making some self-improvement. The last two chapters are enough to put the book in a sci-fi category, I suffered scanning them.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jj873

    Having lived most of my life with debilitating Panic Disorder (google it if you're curious) this book has done more to put me in charge of my life than all the years of medications, therapy, and all the other self-help books I've read combined. I encountered this book at the worst point in my mental health struggle (being nearly housebound by agoraphobia - again, google if needed) and truly found it to be a sanity saver! If it has helped me pull myself back from the brink of desolation too deep an Having lived most of my life with debilitating Panic Disorder (google it if you're curious) this book has done more to put me in charge of my life than all the years of medications, therapy, and all the other self-help books I've read combined. I encountered this book at the worst point in my mental health struggle (being nearly housebound by agoraphobia - again, google if needed) and truly found it to be a sanity saver! If it has helped me pull myself back from the brink of desolation too deep and dark to put into words, then surely it will do amazing things for those struggling with the typical fears that all of us face on this journey we share.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Moira

    "Should be required reading for every person who can read," says Jack Canfield (author of Chicken Soup for the Soul) and I concur. Jeffers has a PhD in Psychology, and her book is full of inspiring calls to action and powerful, accessible techniques to help one take charge of one's life. There are many practical, simple (although not necessarily easy) things one can do to confront fear. Jeffers suggests ways to take small steps, and then what was scary isn't as much, as you gain experience. "Should be required reading for every person who can read," says Jack Canfield (author of Chicken Soup for the Soul) and I concur. Jeffers has a PhD in Psychology, and her book is full of inspiring calls to action and powerful, accessible techniques to help one take charge of one's life. There are many practical, simple (although not necessarily easy) things one can do to confront fear. Jeffers suggests ways to take small steps, and then what was scary isn't as much, as you gain experience.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Well... specifically not entirely finished, but finished as much as I wish to. It was ok, but too too many others to be read. Also working in an academic library and being offered real life friend recommendations left right and centre makes for many books to be had, and not a lot of time to have them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I finished reading this book 2 weeks ago, and feel compelled to review it. A few short months ago i took the steps needed to change my life for the better. I was not happy living how i was, i hated my body, i hated myself, all because i was scared of the truth. That truth is that i am transgender. I admitted to myself that i needed to seek medical help, to rectify my situation, which includes taking hormones and having gender reassignment surgery in the future. I went to the doctor in december 201 I finished reading this book 2 weeks ago, and feel compelled to review it. A few short months ago i took the steps needed to change my life for the better. I was not happy living how i was, i hated my body, i hated myself, all because i was scared of the truth. That truth is that i am transgender. I admitted to myself that i needed to seek medical help, to rectify my situation, which includes taking hormones and having gender reassignment surgery in the future. I went to the doctor in december 2011, and by march the 19th i had seen a psychiatrist, who is now referring me to the gender identity clinic at charing cross, in london. Progress, yes, but there were still people close to me who know nothing about my intentions of transitioning from male to female. Reading this book however, has given me the courage to face my fears head on. Seconds before coming online to type this i rang my dad and told him i have something to talk to him about, as well as one of my brothers and his wife. Everyone else knows but i was scared to death to tell my dad and brother. I told my mum, her reaction was not good but we have since moved on and she supports me in whatever i decide is best for me. I have wanted to tell my dad about it since december 2011, when i told my mum, my other brothers and their spouses, friends, clients etc, but i put it off because i was fearful of rejection, arguments, possibly even violence, my dad thinks with his fists and not his brain. Now however, i am strong enough emotionally to be able to face him and was able t tell him how i feel, of my intentions to change gender, to live my life as any other woman would. Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway is one of those rare books which instantly speak to you, deep inside, on a subconscious level, even reading it makes you feel stronger, more powerful than before. The techniques in this book are simple ones that all of us can use every day of our lives. Susan Jeffers writes brilliantly, clearly and concisely, and is so inspirational that its hard to feel anything but positivity when reading this particular book. I have now told my father i am transgender, and last week i actually went to the dentist to have teeth pulled out. Me! At the dentist! The last time i went was in the mid 90's, and then i freaked out big time, not allowing the dentist to do anything, i was so scared, but 3 days ago i found the strength t get those teeth pulled out, and by jingo i did it. I intend to read this book again and again, and as an added bonus i also have another book by Susan, the little book of confidence, which now goes with me everywhere. If you want to overcome your fears, and if your reading this review, you obviously do, then please buy this book, it is simply sublime, and you will feel divine =) Alexandra ★

  10. 5 out of 5

    L

    The only way to conquer fear is to face it! In life, we encounter many trials and tribulations (these may be internal or literal realities) yet the only way to overcome our struggles is to be ‘a tryer’ and try until you overcome the obstacle. There is never a more perfect time than when you’re broken and hit rock bottom, than to give it a crack [uncertain and expectant of failure] is the only way. Whilst reading this illuminating, informative book I thought about – how everyone seems to judge th The only way to conquer fear is to face it! In life, we encounter many trials and tribulations (these may be internal or literal realities) yet the only way to overcome our struggles is to be ‘a tryer’ and try until you overcome the obstacle. There is never a more perfect time than when you’re broken and hit rock bottom, than to give it a crack [uncertain and expectant of failure] is the only way. Whilst reading this illuminating, informative book I thought about – how everyone seems to judge things on the literal/ what they ‘see’.. Not everything is as it seems. It is so easy to assume or pre-judge (which leads to bitterness or twisted notions). People seem to care so much about others and their appearance/ attitudes/ reactions and actions on face value.. But what about those sparkling facets that dwell beneath the surface? Someone may seem grumpy with you – but is it you or are they suffering inside? You may be scared shitless about something [ie. Public speaking for instance], yet sometimes ‘faking it till you make it’ is the next best thing, until you gain more confidence in yourself that actually everything will be okay. Life is too short to dwell in jealousy, bitterness, resentment, insecure of self, assumptions of negative impressions etc.. My Christian faith has always guided me, even when I’ve fallen into the abyss and lingered in loneliness. I truly believe that courage takes time and you have to stop worrying what others might say/ think etc. Remember you’re not alone, for there is a kingdom of invisible spirits all around you, guarding over you *Quote Jane Eyre/ religious connotations/ or in reality – other people* Life is for loving Nothing is as bad as it seems and if you keep on endeavouring to learn, grow, experience, learn from lessons and mistakes, be honest and if something doesn’t work out then don’t dwell in darkness and animosity – be HAPPY cause’ life is special, precious and full of memories.. the good, the bad, the tough, the unforgettable and the wondrous!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tilda

    I'd call it a bag of pebbles and pearls. Some stuff a bit overly simplistic and unrealistic, but some real pearls of wisdom as well. It goes beyond the subject of "fear" and encourages a positive attitude and lifestyle in general. As I mentioned in an earlier review, I'm not a fan of affirmations, and I believe that the underlying problem should be addressed, not masked. And I think her expectations for people to choose to feel positive even under the most dire circumstances (e.g. bereavement or I'd call it a bag of pebbles and pearls. Some stuff a bit overly simplistic and unrealistic, but some real pearls of wisdom as well. It goes beyond the subject of "fear" and encourages a positive attitude and lifestyle in general. As I mentioned in an earlier review, I'm not a fan of affirmations, and I believe that the underlying problem should be addressed, not masked. And I think her expectations for people to choose to feel positive even under the most dire circumstances (e.g. bereavement or cancer) is a bit severe and unforgiving. Some people need longer than others to heal emotionally from such traumatic experiences. I agree that we must own responsibility for our emotions, but it isn't always as straightforward to choose to feel positive, as the author seems to imply. Nevertheless, I did find myself quoting parts of the book to other people whilst reading it, so obviously I found several parts to offer helpful advice. The chapter about how to cope with family members and friends who are trying to hold you back during your self-growth is very helpful, as well as other topics that she covers. I'd say that the 2nd half of the book is excellent but the first half, a bit simplistic. Like I said, pebbles and pearls, but worth it for the pearls considering that it is such an easy read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    A friend of mine recommended this book to me and at first I was a bit skeptical but fell in love after the first 10 pages. It seems to cover every issue you come across without actually pinpointing one certain issue. It's a good book to fall back on as a quick picker-upper if you're having a bad day or just feel discouraged. It's helped with my personal life alot and it's something I'm sure to have memorized within the next 10 years. A friend of mine recommended this book to me and at first I was a bit skeptical but fell in love after the first 10 pages. It seems to cover every issue you come across without actually pinpointing one certain issue. It's a good book to fall back on as a quick picker-upper if you're having a bad day or just feel discouraged. It's helped with my personal life alot and it's something I'm sure to have memorized within the next 10 years.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Sir Ken Thompson recommended this book in his, The Element. I picked it up with some trepidation, because the whole idea sounded so simple. But it's a top-notch self-help book, about a whole lot more than just fear. Jeffers covers the whole waterfront of ineffectual behavior and patiently tells you how to stop it and replace it with better behavior. If you're stuck at any point with fears, resentments, bottled up anger, and so on, this book will help (if you let it). Sir Ken Thompson recommended this book in his, The Element. I picked it up with some trepidation, because the whole idea sounded so simple. But it's a top-notch self-help book, about a whole lot more than just fear. Jeffers covers the whole waterfront of ineffectual behavior and patiently tells you how to stop it and replace it with better behavior. If you're stuck at any point with fears, resentments, bottled up anger, and so on, this book will help (if you let it).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elicia

    A great book for everyone even if you don't think the title applies to you. Sometimes the only way to overcome the fear and feel better about yourself is to just go out and do it. But it also talks about taking more control of your life instead of indecision ruling because of being afraid of making mistakes. Tells you how to move from a position of pain ("It's not my fault, I'm never satisfied, It's terrible") to one of power ("I'm totally responsible, I want to learn and grow, It's a learning e A great book for everyone even if you don't think the title applies to you. Sometimes the only way to overcome the fear and feel better about yourself is to just go out and do it. But it also talks about taking more control of your life instead of indecision ruling because of being afraid of making mistakes. Tells you how to move from a position of pain ("It's not my fault, I'm never satisfied, It's terrible") to one of power ("I'm totally responsible, I want to learn and grow, It's a learning experience"). Making your life well-rounded and "whole". Basically just having a great attitude and how that changes everything. Some of it reminded me very much of "The Secret".

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty ❤️

    To shake things up a bit for our radio book club shows we decided to read a regular book but also some kind of factual one My copy proudly declares it’s a 20th anniversary edition so my first concern was if it would still be relevant in today’s society and after reading through it I would say yes. The only really out of bit parts are technological. In one chapter she mentions picking up the phone or writing a letter and getting in touch with people. While still positives to do these days you’re To shake things up a bit for our radio book club shows we decided to read a regular book but also some kind of factual one My copy proudly declares it’s a 20th anniversary edition so my first concern was if it would still be relevant in today’s society and after reading through it I would say yes. The only really out of bit parts are technological. In one chapter she mentions picking up the phone or writing a letter and getting in touch with people. While still positives to do these days you’re more likely to text, tweet or email. The first part of the book asks you to list your fears in general but suggests that they fall into different levels. Level 1 fears are things that may happen such as being alone. Level 2 is why that fear may happen so being alone due to rejection or vulnerable and then the deepest fear of all, Level 3, is based on your negativity to these fears “I can’t handle it”. There are a few exercises in the book (not enough for me, I would’ve preferred more but it may be enough for others) and one is to create your “Pain to Power” chart. Basically a line where you mark off where you stand so if you are happy in your job you may mark that closer to the Power point but unhappy with your love life then mark closer to the Pain point. There’s a good section following on from that which helps you turn negative phrases into more positive ones and how to speak & think in a more positive, honest way. For example “I can’t go to the party” could be “I can go to the party but I don’t want to as I’d rather stay at home and watch the new series of Sherlock Holmes”. Ok that may be a bit negative to the one throwing the party but it will apparently help you break down your own fears. Might be something to just think rather than say out loud! One of the things I found reading through the book and listing my own personal fears is that the book helped me to actually focus on all these and I managed to find a common denominator so rather than several issues I really only have the one but it impacts on several areas of my life. The question now is to work on that fear and break it down into smaller areas I can work on that will eventually get rid of the fear in its entirety. Chapter 6 “When “they” don’t want you to grow” was one I found fascinating. It describes how on your positive journey you will meet people that resist your growth and try and sabotage it with lots of ways in which you can learn to deal with them. Some are simple but there are harsher elements such as ridding your life of these people including an example of a woman that did just that and got a divorce! All in all despite its age it is still probably one of the better self help books on the market with suggestions that stand the test of time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    NancyJ

    I first read Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway when I was a young manager, and it made a big difference in how I approached my life and career. I still refer to key points in the book when coaching leaders, students, and anyone facing a change in their life. Susan Jeffers was teaching about crucial aspects of emotional intelligence before Goleman's book popularized the term. I first read Feel the Fear and Do it Anyway when I was a young manager, and it made a big difference in how I approached my life and career. I still refer to key points in the book when coaching leaders, students, and anyone facing a change in their life. Susan Jeffers was teaching about crucial aspects of emotional intelligence before Goleman's book popularized the term.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sara Kindlan-Arnison

    After suffering from severe almost crippling anxiety, I was giving this book to help me cope and it was the best thing that I ever read. It changed my relationship with anxiety, fear and future dreams. If you do the exercises in the book, it helps change your understanding and except the many issues you believe are holding you back.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Save yourself the time; you're much better off with Tony Robbins or Brian Tracy. Save yourself the time; you're much better off with Tony Robbins or Brian Tracy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    1.5 stars

  20. 5 out of 5

    Louie Jordan

    I was recommended this by my Dad multiple times over the last decade and never got time to purchase it. Today I decided to give the audiobook a go and it was fantastic. It embodies a lot of the morals I try to live by, and helps you readjust your thinking into a more positive sense. It is only short, but contains some key motivation for positive living. I personally think given the current situation with the Coronavirus pandemic this is a great little listen for those trying to refocus their min I was recommended this by my Dad multiple times over the last decade and never got time to purchase it. Today I decided to give the audiobook a go and it was fantastic. It embodies a lot of the morals I try to live by, and helps you readjust your thinking into a more positive sense. It is only short, but contains some key motivation for positive living. I personally think given the current situation with the Coronavirus pandemic this is a great little listen for those trying to refocus their mind on the positives.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Originally published in 1987, this self-help classic was reissued in a 25th anniversary edition in 2012. I looked over it for a proposed comparison article with How to Win Friends and Influence People (later cancelled, alas) and found this one to be more relevant and readable. Jeffers says that at the base of every fear is a belief that “I can’t handle it.” Our fears are either of things that can happen to us (ageing and natural disasters) or of actions we might take (going back to school or Originally published in 1987, this self-help classic was reissued in a 25th anniversary edition in 2012. I looked over it for a proposed comparison article with How to Win Friends and Influence People (later cancelled, alas) and found this one to be more relevant and readable. Jeffers says that at the base of every fear is a belief that “I can’t handle it.” Our fears are either of things that can happen to us (ageing and natural disasters) or of actions we might take (going back to school or changing jobs). The only way to increase your trust in your ability to handle things is to go out and do it. Everyone is afraid in new situations, but you can choose to hold fear with either pain (leading to paralysis) or power (leading to action). Jeffers recommends reciting affirmations and changing your vocabulary to be less negative. A positive attitude needs constant reinforcement. This is a very reader-friendly book: the take-home messages are set out in capital letters and each chapter ends with a summary of the main principles and a testimonial letter (in my copy, mostly UK-specific). There are also case studies as well as anecdotes from the author’s own life – she has survived divorce and cancer. The most helpful thing of all to me was the “Whole Life” grid of nine elements: work, relationship, family, friends, hobbies, leisure time, alone time, personal/spiritual growth and giving back (e.g. volunteerism). Give yourself 100% to each one, Jeffers advises, and set goals or to-do list items related to each one.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    A self-help book addict, I've read a ton of them and was pleasantly surprised and "fearless" by the time I finished Feel the Fear.... Hoping for solutions or a "how to" to let go of or conquer "a" fear, I realized this book was much bigger than "a" fear. You will be relieved to know that Jeffers does not believe that our fears are psychological--phew! Rather she believes our fears are, in most cases, an educational problem, and her book is loaded with ways to help us reeducate our mind. Not heavy, A self-help book addict, I've read a ton of them and was pleasantly surprised and "fearless" by the time I finished Feel the Fear.... Hoping for solutions or a "how to" to let go of or conquer "a" fear, I realized this book was much bigger than "a" fear. You will be relieved to know that Jeffers does not believe that our fears are psychological--phew! Rather she believes our fears are, in most cases, an educational problem, and her book is loaded with ways to help us reeducate our mind. Not heavy, but practical Jeffers puts a lot of focus on saying, "Yes", seeing the possibilities for change and growth, and choosing love and trust. It's all about committing to and learning how to push through the fears and becoming more than you are, because as Jeffers points out "so much of the joy in life is the challenge of figuring it all out".

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Susan Jeffers has a lot of sound, practical advice for taking the step to overcome the nagging fears that are standing in the way of getting to the places you want to be in your life and career. The first year I was teaching at a university I was really nervous and anxious whenever I stepped into the classroom. I loved what I was doing, but hated not being an expert with years of experience yet. What if a student asked me a question I didn't know the answer to? I used to read a little bit of thi Susan Jeffers has a lot of sound, practical advice for taking the step to overcome the nagging fears that are standing in the way of getting to the places you want to be in your life and career. The first year I was teaching at a university I was really nervous and anxious whenever I stepped into the classroom. I loved what I was doing, but hated not being an expert with years of experience yet. What if a student asked me a question I didn't know the answer to? I used to read a little bit of this book every morning in the car before going in to class to psych me up. It was good to have a reminder that I could handle whatever situation I was placed in, even if it was new and unfamiliar.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Liam

    So, this was an alright book. It has some good ideas and good tools for being able to live your life how you want and not being held back by irrational fears, etc. The pacing wasn't the best, most of the useful info is in the first 3rd but there was still bits to glean the rest of the way, which is better than a lot of other self-help books I've read. You can definitely tell it was written in the 80's and targeted at women, but it's useful for everyone. I wouldn't mind a modern day revision, per So, this was an alright book. It has some good ideas and good tools for being able to live your life how you want and not being held back by irrational fears, etc. The pacing wasn't the best, most of the useful info is in the first 3rd but there was still bits to glean the rest of the way, which is better than a lot of other self-help books I've read. You can definitely tell it was written in the 80's and targeted at women, but it's useful for everyone. I wouldn't mind a modern day revision, personally.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Great book, it was an easy, quick read. I actually read it a few times. The author brings up some good points on how we see fear. How even as children we are told to "be careful" and we see an optimist as a Pollyana and their positive view as unrealistic even though most of our fears of negative things never actually happens. The author gives you a few strategies to try to keep out of the negative/fearful mindset and gives great examples of how she overcame her fears. Great book, it was an easy, quick read. I actually read it a few times. The author brings up some good points on how we see fear. How even as children we are told to "be careful" and we see an optimist as a Pollyana and their positive view as unrealistic even though most of our fears of negative things never actually happens. The author gives you a few strategies to try to keep out of the negative/fearful mindset and gives great examples of how she overcame her fears.

  26. 4 out of 5

    T.L. Clark

    This book truly changed my life. I read it whilst training to be a counsellor, and it impacted me greatly. Many years on I still hear this phrase when faced with a new and/or daunting situation. Truly one of the best books I ever read. I have become a fiercely independent woman, and I have to thank in part, this gem of a book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Suzie

    Can everyone do themselves a favour and read this book...thankyouplease!

  28. 4 out of 5

    JChipol

    "Take your life in your own hands, and what happens? A terrible thing: no one to blame. " Erica Jong One of my favourite quotes of all time sums up what this book is trying to say; basically we cannot blame situations around us for the state of our own lives. This book brings up some very interesting thoughts; we are in control of our own attitudes and decisions. We may not be able to control the hand that life has dealt us, but we certainly are in control with what decisions we make in order to "Take your life in your own hands, and what happens? A terrible thing: no one to blame. " Erica Jong One of my favourite quotes of all time sums up what this book is trying to say; basically we cannot blame situations around us for the state of our own lives. This book brings up some very interesting thoughts; we are in control of our own attitudes and decisions. We may not be able to control the hand that life has dealt us, but we certainly are in control with what decisions we make in order to be successful with the challenges that we face. This book does make a lot of sense; but as an English person you first have to get over the 'American' style of writing. Naturally more reserved and possibly more inclined to be negative and cynical, it is sometimes difficult to just open up the mind, without the little voice of mocking. Jeffers is right; why do we think that a negative attitude is more 'reality' than a positive one that believes that it will be ok? To quote Henry Ford, "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right." Or as Buddha once said, "All that we are is the result of what we have thought." Jeffers highlights that all we have to do in life to change our world is change the way we view it; when others upset us it is not necessarily their fault, but rather our reactions to them. Even not taking a risk is a decision, so why do we stay with the partner who makes us unhappy? It is usually because we gain something from it. If we are alwayscomplaining of illness, is that because we gain sympathy and attention? Jeffers accepts that as someone who suffered cancer, she did not choose to become ill, but how she decided to react as a consequence was entirely her doing. Jeffers is an inspiration, however, my only issue is that she quotes herself in her own book - and although that is her inner strength, my reaction to it was a very English one; I thought it was just a touch arrogant.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    This is the second time I've read this book. I barely remember the first time, so I thought I'd read it again before putting it here on the Goodreads. The book is okay. It has some helpful, true ideas, but nothing I haven't read elsewhere. I like her outlook on fear, especially how at the root of it is often the feeling that, "I can't handle it." Turning that into, "I will handle it," or even "I'll survive, it will be okay, and there may be positives," is a helpful way to deal with fearful probl This is the second time I've read this book. I barely remember the first time, so I thought I'd read it again before putting it here on the Goodreads. The book is okay. It has some helpful, true ideas, but nothing I haven't read elsewhere. I like her outlook on fear, especially how at the root of it is often the feeling that, "I can't handle it." Turning that into, "I will handle it," or even "I'll survive, it will be okay, and there may be positives," is a helpful way to deal with fearful problems. I like how she talks about the "no bad decisions" concept, her thoughts on action and trust, and her thoughts on having a positive outlook and energy. After a while I just felt done reading, but pushed myself to finish. I'm not sure what turned off my interest. Maybe it is the continual promotion of her other books. Maybe I began to feel weary since some of what she says toward the middle to the end of the book feels cliche. I guess I've read a lot of self-help books. Maybe I'm just in a non-receptive mood today.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alana Muir

    It was a good book that reinforced a lot of the ideas I've been given in both individual and group therapy, and I'd recommend it to anyone with anxiety. The one complaint I have is that the author has some very irritating attitudes towards disability and chronic illness. In more than one anecdote, she implies that a patient was faking or making up an illness and once they adopted a positive attitude, all their symptoms disappeared. For people with chronic illness, we already face doctors and pee It was a good book that reinforced a lot of the ideas I've been given in both individual and group therapy, and I'd recommend it to anyone with anxiety. The one complaint I have is that the author has some very irritating attitudes towards disability and chronic illness. In more than one anecdote, she implies that a patient was faking or making up an illness and once they adopted a positive attitude, all their symptoms disappeared. For people with chronic illness, we already face doctors and peers telling us we're just hypochondriacs and it's all mental. Having a positive attitude can help deal with illness and disability, but it is not a magical cure for real physical illnesses and disabilities, and those anecdotes felt dismissive and insulting.

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