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The Philip K. Dick MEGAPACK ®: 15 Classic Science Fiction Stories

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The Philip K. Dick Megapack assembles no less than 15 classic science fiction stories by Philip K. Dick. Included are: INTRODUCTION: PHILIP K. DICK EXHIBIT PIECE BEYOND LIES THE WUB THE DEFENDERS THE CRYSTAL CRYPT BEYOND THE DOOR SECOND VARIETY THE EYES HAVE IT THE GUN THE VARIABLE MAN TONY AND THE BEETLES THE HANGING STRANGER THE SKULL PIPER IN THE WOODS MR. SPACESHIP STRANGE EDEN And don The Philip K. Dick Megapack assembles no less than 15 classic science fiction stories by Philip K. Dick. Included are: INTRODUCTION: PHILIP K. DICK EXHIBIT PIECE BEYOND LIES THE WUB THE DEFENDERS THE CRYSTAL CRYPT BEYOND THE DOOR SECOND VARIETY THE EYES HAVE IT THE GUN THE VARIABLE MAN TONY AND THE BEETLES THE HANGING STRANGER THE SKULL PIPER IN THE WOODS MR. SPACESHIP STRANGE EDEN And don't forget to search this ebook store for "Wildside Megapack" (or just Megapack if Wildside Megapack doesn't work) to see all the entries in the Megapack series -- including volumes of science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, westerns, and much, much more!


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The Philip K. Dick Megapack assembles no less than 15 classic science fiction stories by Philip K. Dick. Included are: INTRODUCTION: PHILIP K. DICK EXHIBIT PIECE BEYOND LIES THE WUB THE DEFENDERS THE CRYSTAL CRYPT BEYOND THE DOOR SECOND VARIETY THE EYES HAVE IT THE GUN THE VARIABLE MAN TONY AND THE BEETLES THE HANGING STRANGER THE SKULL PIPER IN THE WOODS MR. SPACESHIP STRANGE EDEN And don The Philip K. Dick Megapack assembles no less than 15 classic science fiction stories by Philip K. Dick. Included are: INTRODUCTION: PHILIP K. DICK EXHIBIT PIECE BEYOND LIES THE WUB THE DEFENDERS THE CRYSTAL CRYPT BEYOND THE DOOR SECOND VARIETY THE EYES HAVE IT THE GUN THE VARIABLE MAN TONY AND THE BEETLES THE HANGING STRANGER THE SKULL PIPER IN THE WOODS MR. SPACESHIP STRANGE EDEN And don't forget to search this ebook store for "Wildside Megapack" (or just Megapack if Wildside Megapack doesn't work) to see all the entries in the Megapack series -- including volumes of science fiction, fantasy, horror, mystery, westerns, and much, much more!

30 review for The Philip K. Dick MEGAPACK ®: 15 Classic Science Fiction Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bar Reads

    Like a chocolate box of science fiction

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pavan Dharanipragada

    I picked this up because I enjoyed Blade Runner, Total Recall, Minority Report and Adjustment Bureau. Even Paycheck is not that bad. Plot-wise at least. These were all based on novels written by PKD. So I picked this collection of short stories. And I found that, among these, I liked the longer stories better. Also, while these stories might be the first to present these kind of ideas they have been infinitely copied in the sci-fi movies since so the sense of wonder they would have given to someo I picked this up because I enjoyed Blade Runner, Total Recall, Minority Report and Adjustment Bureau. Even Paycheck is not that bad. Plot-wise at least. These were all based on novels written by PKD. So I picked this collection of short stories. And I found that, among these, I liked the longer stories better. Also, while these stories might be the first to present these kind of ideas they have been infinitely copied in the sci-fi movies since so the sense of wonder they would have given to someone not exposed to any modern sci-fi was lost in me. 1. Exhibit Piece: Man of future really wants to live in the 50s; makes it up. 4* 2. Beyond Lies the Wub: A giant pig that's sentient and talks. Quirky. 5* 3. The Defenders: Cold war with robots. This is one of those predictable stories I mentioned. 3* 4. The Crystal Crypt: Earth vs. Mars espionage thriller. Kinda gimmicky. 2* 5. Beyond the Door: A cuckoo clock that's actually cuckoo? This read more like horror. 2* 6. Second Variety: One of the longer stories. Cold war again; America builds super smart robots that start building themselves. 4* 7. The Eyes Have It: A guy does not get metaphors at all. Reads aliens in everything. They don't actually exist though. Or don't they? 3* 8. The Gun: A ship lands on a desolated planet that was destroyed by its own inhabitants. Starts great but fizzles out with a bit of moralising. 2* 9. The Variable Man: Sounds like something Arnold Schwazenegger could star in. An industrious man from the 20s is pulled into the futue in the middle of a long war between Sol system and Proxima Centauri system. Longest in the collection, I think. Follows a proper story arc and everything. Too Hollywood though. 3* 10. Tony and the Beetles: Deals with racism, xenophobia. Between humans and beetle-people. Humans are the bad guys here. Felt too simplistic. 3* 11. The Hanging Stranger: Aliens mind control some of us. Town after town. One of the predictable-due-to-modern-sci-fi stories. Great execution though. 4* 12. The Skull: Predestination. Assassin going back in time to kill someone important. Too convoluted. Predictable-due-to-modern-sci-fi. 2* 13. Piper in the Woods: I'm not sure what happens in this story. Marines start behaving like trees? Unsatisfactory. 2* 14. Mr. Spaceship: A moralising tale, bit with an intriguing idea. Transcendence style. A human brain is attached to a spaceship as its central computer to better adapt to space battles. 2* 15. Strange Eden: Circe from Homer's Odysseus. Instead of a witch, she's an immortal alien. 2*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Benjyklostermann

    There are any number of these collections of early PKD shorts, with all nearly the same content. I think I most enjoyed The Variable Man, The Crystal Crypt, and The Skull. What are your favorites?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    I've never been a huge short story fan. But, Philip Dick is making me reconsider! There's always some bizarre possibility in his writing...something my mind would have never dreamed. For instance, capturing a city in a snow globe and then using it for ransom. Reading these stories so many years after writing has been interesting. He's got everyone flying on spaceships, but they're still smoking! They're also visiting Mars, blowing up Mars and interacting with Martians. But Mars is hardly our focu I've never been a huge short story fan. But, Philip Dick is making me reconsider! There's always some bizarre possibility in his writing...something my mind would have never dreamed. For instance, capturing a city in a snow globe and then using it for ransom. Reading these stories so many years after writing has been interesting. He's got everyone flying on spaceships, but they're still smoking! They're also visiting Mars, blowing up Mars and interacting with Martians. But Mars is hardly our focus nowadays. His vidphones were certainly an appropriate prediction. Other of his speculations may be yet to come. Will we ever "man" spaceships by removing and then plugging in the brain of an elderly professor? I also enjoy how he uses his writing as a venue for his personal views on social issues, such as war. There's frequently some lesson on how we've run amok and will pay a dire price.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hobson

    Everyone in the future smokes in space.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne Seebach

    I've always enjoyed Philip K Dick's short stories much more so than his novels - and this was no exception. Somehow PKD seems to pack a huge wallop into his shorts, that gets a little lost in his longer works for me. So I was pleased to re-discover a few old favourites in this anthology, and happily discover some new. A very interesting selection too. Even though the writing is a little dated, with a heavy space opera flavour which might be sneered at by some of today's readers, the unferlying t I've always enjoyed Philip K Dick's short stories much more so than his novels - and this was no exception. Somehow PKD seems to pack a huge wallop into his shorts, that gets a little lost in his longer works for me. So I was pleased to re-discover a few old favourites in this anthology, and happily discover some new. A very interesting selection too. Even though the writing is a little dated, with a heavy space opera flavour which might be sneered at by some of today's readers, the unferlying themes are still very relevant and enjoyably readable. I think for my pick I'm going to select 'Beyond Lies the Wub' as one of my enduring favourites from this collection, which I think I first read at around 12 or 13 years of age. The question of whether to eat a sentient, talking animal has rarely been so horrifyingly, charmingly humerous! Of the stories I hadn't read before, I think 'The Variable Man' will endure longest, or perhaps 'The Skull' - interesting commentaries on some of our less attractive cultural habits of thought.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Big fan of Philip K. Dick. This collection has a strong slant to time travel, space travel, space wars and the like. Amazing that a lot of these short stories were written 50+ years ago. For me, they hold up pretty well. Probably liked the Variable Man and the Hanging Stranger best.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    Highly entertaining and fun, comparable perhaps to the Sherlock Holmes stories - there are themes, subplots, morals, and always a twist. These stories seem entirely fit to be screen-adapted and turned into Twilight Zone episodes.... if we could just step back a few decades and hook up Mr. Dick and Mr. Serling.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    A great little collection of stories and a much appreciated introduction to Philip K. Dick. Will definitely be on the look out for more by him!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Darren Sant

    Great stories from a master of the genre. Like any collection some are stronger than others but this is a great value buy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Edwin Lowe

    Classic Science Fiction-Five Star Read!!!! Philip K Dick (PKD), was, in my opinion, one of America's greatest science fiction writers. I have read a number of reviews on Amazon and Goodreads that have less than favorable things to say about PKD. However, few of those reviews enunciated concerns beyond the prattle of an immature or vacant mind. If you will excuse a pun, they didn't know (let alone understand) Dick! Admittedly, he is not as well known as Bradbury, Heinlein, Huxley; Asimov, Clark, K Classic Science Fiction-Five Star Read!!!! Philip K Dick (PKD), was, in my opinion, one of America's greatest science fiction writers. I have read a number of reviews on Amazon and Goodreads that have less than favorable things to say about PKD. However, few of those reviews enunciated concerns beyond the prattle of an immature or vacant mind. If you will excuse a pun, they didn't know (let alone understand) Dick! Admittedly, he is not as well known as Bradbury, Heinlein, Huxley; Asimov, Clark, King, or Koontz. However, I believe, PKD holds his own with the giants of the science fiction genre. He specializes in the exploration of mankind's struggle to maintain their humanity in a technological, machine dominated future world, He loves to explore the sociological, political, and metaphysical issues mankind will confront in brave new future worlds, dominated by greedy corporate empires and\or tyrannical authoritarian governments. He asks the questions about what will happen to the soul and humanity of future men and women as they are thrust into deep space, for extended voyages of discovery, conquest, and colonization. Or as they explore unimaginably strange, alien worlds and encounter all manner of extraterrestrial beings. His stories often draw upon his own life experiences and address his own, life long personal struggles with drug abuse, paranoia, and schizophrenia. PKD published over 40 novels and over 120 short stories during his 30 year writing carrer, most of which appeared in science fiction magazines. Although he spent most of his life as a writer in near-poverty, he failed to garner any wealth from ten popular films based on his works. These movies include Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Pay Check, Next, Screamers, and The Adjustment Bureau. Stories included in this collection include: "Beyond the Door"; "Beyond Lies the Wub"; "The Crystal Crypt"; "The Defenders"; "The Gun"; "The Skull"; "The Eyes Have it"; "Second Variety"; "The Variable Man"; "Mr. Spaceship"; and "The Piper in the Woods". Every story is wonderful and a joy to read. I especially recommend: "Second Variety"; "The Variable Man"; "The Defenders"; "The Skull"; "Beyond Lies the Wub"; and "Piper in the Woods". As long as you, the reader, have a reasonable amount of imagination, can comprehend the nuance of meanings of written English words, and have enough experience to not take American politics, society, or yourself real serious, I guarantee you will enjoy this collection!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Derek Davis

    These stories from Dick's 1950s years were published mostly in the second-tier SF magazines of the time. They reflect an intense, vivid, wide-ranging imagination with much less of the shattered-reality that characterizes his later novels. Though some endings may seem predictable, they would not have felt that way at the time: This was the period that created that kind of "surprise" ending. Dick, like so many '50s SF writers, saw the world as likely to end in nuclear cataclysm (rather than dying t These stories from Dick's 1950s years were published mostly in the second-tier SF magazines of the time. They reflect an intense, vivid, wide-ranging imagination with much less of the shattered-reality that characterizes his later novels. Though some endings may seem predictable, they would not have felt that way at the time: This was the period that created that kind of "surprise" ending. Dick, like so many '50s SF writers, saw the world as likely to end in nuclear cataclysm (rather than dying the slow death of strangulation that's happening today). He seems especially apocalyptic in outlook, his populations living underground or in exile while the surface of Earth has been reduced to ash. Sometimes there's an outside savior to bring optimism, as often, not. "The Second Variety" is one of the stories with a "predictable" ending but still extremely engaging; the Americans and Russians try to reach accommodation against a weapon that has gone rogue, threatening to annihilate both sides. "The Variable Man" mixes time travel, individual intuitive genius, treachery and a panoply of horrifying weaponry to create a basis for galactic peace. "The Skull," another time-travel romp, also has an ending that would be easily guessed-at today, but it's how the hero gets there that matters most. "The Hanging Stranger" is closer to classic horror than SF; "Tony and the Beetles" is the most modern story in tone, dealing with prejudice and ethnic hatred on a far, far distant planet. And lest we forget Dick's humorous side, there's the snickering "Beyond Lies the Wub," along with the shortest story in the collection, "The Eyes Have It," which may well be one of the funniest things ever written in the English language, a side-splitting howler based on a very simply premise carried to its ridiculously logical conclusion.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lostaccount

    The ideas in this collection are a bit dated now (been done to death) but I appreciated PKD's ability to take me along for the ride. Exhibit Piece was my favourite, about a guy who works for a “History Agency” in a dystopian future where individuality is discouraged, even criminal. Main character is obsessed with the past, the exhibit he’s working on in the history museum. His exhibit becomes a gateway to the past, a life as a 1950s suburbanite. Story develops with PKD’s typical twists and mindp The ideas in this collection are a bit dated now (been done to death) but I appreciated PKD's ability to take me along for the ride. Exhibit Piece was my favourite, about a guy who works for a “History Agency” in a dystopian future where individuality is discouraged, even criminal. Main character is obsessed with the past, the exhibit he’s working on in the history museum. His exhibit becomes a gateway to the past, a life as a 1950s suburbanite. Story develops with PKD’s typical twists and mindphucks. You can see the seeds of Blade Runner (“Do androids...”) in Second Variety. Variable Man lost me – the writing turned into a bit of a confused mess. Tony and the Beetles has an obvious message about (reverse) racism, colonialism, racial resentment etc. The Hanging Stranger, my second favourite of the lot, is a great example of PKD’s paranoia. Piper in the Woods and Strange Eden are space opera silliness of the time. The others didn’t make much of an impression on me bu I enjoyed them. I’ve seen lots of reviews and analyses of PKD’s stories over the years and I think even the most apolitical writer will get credited with clever political views once someone starts (anal)ysing their stories for messages and symbols. That’s not to say I don’t think they are present sometimes. I just think it’s a lot of shit most of the time. It has more to do with the reviewer projecting their political views than what the writer intended. I enjoyed these stories for what they are, escapism (something I need right now).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joao Nicolodi

    This collection should actually take 3.5 stars, with a bunch of 4-5 stars stories and a few 2s. As already stated, usually the longest the better for PKD's stories, as he can develop better the characters and plot. This 15 pack mixes a nice variety of themes, even though they are mostly focused on war (either internal or interplanetary) and outer space colonization. Some misses of ancient futuristic predictions are constant and bothering, like the absence of internet and computers and the mainte This collection should actually take 3.5 stars, with a bunch of 4-5 stars stories and a few 2s. As already stated, usually the longest the better for PKD's stories, as he can develop better the characters and plot. This 15 pack mixes a nice variety of themes, even though they are mostly focused on war (either internal or interplanetary) and outer space colonization. Some misses of ancient futuristic predictions are constant and bothering, like the absence of internet and computers and the maintenance of XX century's traditions in habits (smoking, newspaper, women are the housekeepers) and food. Also the fact that all natures in planets everywhere are similar to earth (trees, rivers, "dog/pig/men-like creatures"). Those understandable points aside, he does bring up nice reflections on wars and technology, human relations and work/society organization, and even his takes on time travel (The Skull) are better than a few nowadays sci-fy. All things considered, the book is easily and quickly read, cheap ($1,99 ebook) and well worth the while.

  15. 5 out of 5

    James Staiti

    Awesome Science Fiction and Fantasy Have been a fan since reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep ages ago. There is a Gnostic quality to Dick's writing, and Gnosticism was an interest of his. He was a master of plot twists with surprising and yet inevitable endings. A bit of a libertarian, he was definitely a visionary, and it is no wonder that so many of his works have been adapted for the screen. There is not a single story in this collection that I don't like. A favorite perhaps is The Va Awesome Science Fiction and Fantasy Have been a fan since reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep ages ago. There is a Gnostic quality to Dick's writing, and Gnosticism was an interest of his. He was a master of plot twists with surprising and yet inevitable endings. A bit of a libertarian, he was definitely a visionary, and it is no wonder that so many of his works have been adapted for the screen. There is not a single story in this collection that I don't like. A favorite perhaps is The Variable Man. It speaks to themes that were dear to PKD: individualism and courage. In his own way Duck was a philosopher.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tony Fitzpatrick

    A collection of short stories by the US science fiction writer, who died in 1982. I have read two of his longer novels (Ubik and Do Andoids Dream of Electric Sheep) and were fairly ambivalent about them. This collection of fifteen tales of varying length all seem united by one common theme - war. They all have either human beings at war with alien races, or living with the consequences of nuclear fallout (and sometimes both). Lots of weird ideas as well - in the future everyone smokes, sexism is A collection of short stories by the US science fiction writer, who died in 1982. I have read two of his longer novels (Ubik and Do Andoids Dream of Electric Sheep) and were fairly ambivalent about them. This collection of fifteen tales of varying length all seem united by one common theme - war. They all have either human beings at war with alien races, or living with the consequences of nuclear fallout (and sometimes both). Lots of weird ideas as well - in the future everyone smokes, sexism is rife, and aggression in politics tolerated if not openly encouraged. This dystopian view of the future is depressing beyond belief. The only encouraging story was the common sense shown by a man of 1913 accidentally brought into the 23rd century by a time machine, and who manages to save the universe. Even he was nearly killed by a phosphorus bomb for doing so however!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Robert Bagnall

    If PKD is The Beatles and the likes of A Scanner Darkly, The Man in the High Castle, and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep are akin to his Revolver, Rubber Soul and Sgt Pepper’s, then these stories are Please, Please me and With the Beatles: some great ideas, but set within a standard verse, chorus, verse, chorus, middle eight, verse, chorus structure. There’s a man in a rubber suit in a black and white 50s TV series vibe to the writing, people just stand and have explanatory conversations, as If PKD is The Beatles and the likes of A Scanner Darkly, The Man in the High Castle, and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep are akin to his Revolver, Rubber Soul and Sgt Pepper’s, then these stories are Please, Please me and With the Beatles: some great ideas, but set within a standard verse, chorus, verse, chorus, middle eight, verse, chorus structure. There’s a man in a rubber suit in a black and white 50s TV series vibe to the writing, people just stand and have explanatory conversations, as if PKD is warily working within the genre conventions of the time. This is him learning his craft. More than a curio, but less than what he’ll become.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike Becker

    As a Data Scientist I really enjoyed the story "THE VARIABLE MAN." Like a lot of PKD's writing he was ahead of his time with his predictions for the future. The theme of a lot of these stories was nuclear armageddon which I suppose is just a sign of the times these works were written in. However with Trump and Kim trading insults and threats of total annihilation they hit a little too close to home for me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    This is a nice variety of PKD's early short stories. As one would expect, the quality ranges all over the map, but overall, most of the stories are entertaining and many are thought provoking. Some of the gimmick stories are easy to figure out. These stories are generally not typical of the kind of stories PDK wrote later in life, but rather typical of the space operas of the 1950s.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    A 15 story collection of Dick's 1950's shorter tales. Funny how 60-odd years later, his material still has the power to make one look at the world from a wider, if not happier, perspective. Essential reading.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    😊 Jeez this man could write! A few of these stories I had read before but enjoyed 're reading them. My fave stories were the invariable man, beyond lies the wub and the hanging stranger. A must read for sci do fans.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Galván

    Fast Reads And Entertaining A collection of interesting fast reads that will entertain the reader. There’s a slight interest on most of the main characters in young girls which might raise some concerns, but obviously it was written in a different time frame than ours.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Great selection Great selection of short science fiction from the great Philip K Dick. This is great for those unfamiliar with Dick's work as the stories are short and easily digestible for new Dick readers

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Eige

    Interesting Stories Sci fi but on the fantasy side. Quite a variety. I would prefer all more possible, but well written anyway.

  25. 5 out of 5

    kevin taylor

    The master!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Rew

    Especially liked "The Variable Man." Dick changes your understanding of what's going on AT LEAST seven times.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Mediocre collection of 1950s science fiction.

  28. 4 out of 5

    redbird_fan

    Great stuff! So readable and original. Highly recommended!

  29. 5 out of 5

    SaintOfSpiders

    Very enjoyable collection of short stories that range in topics from alien world's, man's obsession with war and robots.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    Excellent collection An excellent and original collection of stories, no boring stuff from beginning to end, I'm looking to read second pack soon

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