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NIV Holy Bible, New Testament (Red Letter Edition)

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The Bible is the bestselling book in history, and the New International Version (NIV) Bible is the bestselling version year after year. This bestselling modern-English Bible has sold more than 400 million copies since its first full publication in 1978. It is also the bestselling modern-English Bible eBook, and now it's available in a New Testament edition, designed for an The Bible is the bestselling book in history, and the New International Version (NIV) Bible is the bestselling version year after year. This bestselling modern-English Bible has sold more than 400 million copies since its first full publication in 1978. It is also the bestselling modern-English Bible eBook, and now it's available in a New Testament edition, designed for an intuitive user experience. The font is crisp and clear, and readability is great on both E-Ink screens and color screens. With quick page turns and a numbered footnoting system that allows you to easily jump from Bible text to footnote and back again, as well as a 'How to Use This Bible' page, navigating the Bible has never been easier. Read the NIV New Testament on your device just as if you were reading a physical book. Make the NIV New Testament eBook one of your favorite reads today. NIV 2011. The New International Version (NIV) translation of the Bible is the world's most popular modern-English Bible---easy to understand, yet rich with the detail found in the original languages.


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The Bible is the bestselling book in history, and the New International Version (NIV) Bible is the bestselling version year after year. This bestselling modern-English Bible has sold more than 400 million copies since its first full publication in 1978. It is also the bestselling modern-English Bible eBook, and now it's available in a New Testament edition, designed for an The Bible is the bestselling book in history, and the New International Version (NIV) Bible is the bestselling version year after year. This bestselling modern-English Bible has sold more than 400 million copies since its first full publication in 1978. It is also the bestselling modern-English Bible eBook, and now it's available in a New Testament edition, designed for an intuitive user experience. The font is crisp and clear, and readability is great on both E-Ink screens and color screens. With quick page turns and a numbered footnoting system that allows you to easily jump from Bible text to footnote and back again, as well as a 'How to Use This Bible' page, navigating the Bible has never been easier. Read the NIV New Testament on your device just as if you were reading a physical book. Make the NIV New Testament eBook one of your favorite reads today. NIV 2011. The New International Version (NIV) translation of the Bible is the world's most popular modern-English Bible---easy to understand, yet rich with the detail found in the original languages.

30 review for NIV Holy Bible, New Testament (Red Letter Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jules

    I've done it! I've read the whole of the Bible from cover to cover. I didn't manage to read it within a year, as I'd initially intended to do. It's taken me almost exactly 6 years to achieve (with some very large gaps in between). Better late than never, I guess. I preferred the New Testament to the Old Testament. MY BIBLE CHALLENGE: In January 2015 I set myself the challenge to read the complete Bible within a year. I discovered that was an unrealistic challenge, and decided to pick up my Bible I've done it! I've read the whole of the Bible from cover to cover. I didn't manage to read it within a year, as I'd initially intended to do. It's taken me almost exactly 6 years to achieve (with some very large gaps in between). Better late than never, I guess. I preferred the New Testament to the Old Testament. MY BIBLE CHALLENGE: In January 2015 I set myself the challenge to read the complete Bible within a year. I discovered that was an unrealistic challenge, and decided to pick up my Bible as and when I felt ready to read more of it. Here is a link to all the reviews in my Bible challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zoie

    Revelations certainly freaked me out, but other than that, I really enjoyed reading (listening to) the New Testament in this format. I have to say, I don't think I've ever gone through the full New Testament front to back in one go (don't judge me). It was really refreshing, and I have found myself with answers to questions I wasn't even looking for. Since the structure of the Latter-Day Saint church is the structure of the church that Jesus created, I was able to find out the origins of many of Revelations certainly freaked me out, but other than that, I really enjoyed reading (listening to) the New Testament in this format. I have to say, I don't think I've ever gone through the full New Testament front to back in one go (don't judge me). It was really refreshing, and I have found myself with answers to questions I wasn't even looking for. Since the structure of the Latter-Day Saint church is the structure of the church that Jesus created, I was able to find out the origins of many of our practices. It was an educational experience. Now, on to the Old Testament Audiobook? We'll see...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sherri Smith

    This is my second read-thru of the New Testament (restart it again in a week or two)! Each re-reading shows me different passages that give me hope, strength and encouragement. Whatever your religious background or inclination, reading the New Testament is highly recommended!! There is so much in there that can give you peace during difficult days!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rakayle

    Great read. Never stop reading the Bible!

  5. 5 out of 5

    James

    When I had finished the Qur’an a little while back I wondered how a straight through reading of the New Testament would compare. What I really wanted to accomplish is to approach the New Testament the same way I approached the Quran. I wanted to interpret it as simply as possible from just a plain reading. I wanted to really approach it critically, taking into consideration contemporary concerns as to what it might say. Like I said when reading the Qur’an, all this to say where I am coming from When I had finished the Qur’an a little while back I wondered how a straight through reading of the New Testament would compare. What I really wanted to accomplish is to approach the New Testament the same way I approached the Quran. I wanted to interpret it as simply as possible from just a plain reading. I wanted to really approach it critically, taking into consideration contemporary concerns as to what it might say. Like I said when reading the Qur’an, all this to say where I am coming from as I try to be blunt and perfectly honest about what I thought. Compared to reading the Qur’an it was a totally different experience; not only having been raised in a “bible believing” household but also being a part of a culture where the bible and its imagery are everywhere. Having now done completed the New Testament in about 11 days, one of the more interesting aspects is to go through it so quickly. I have read the entire New Testament in the past, but only over a period of months. Never within a week or two. I really got a feel for each book/epistle and could easily contrast and compare it to the others. I reviewed the Qur’an as a single long book but as the New Testament is written by multiple authors I am going to break this review into parts and give some short thoughts on each part, then I’ll deal with it as a whole at the end with some thoughts on contemporary issues. The Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John) This was fascinating when I went through it. I had grown up being taught that each author had a different perspective or purpose; although I didn’t find what I was taught to be the theme of each book by just reading it. And it really stands out going through all of them in a period of a few days. Matthew is barely a story, it is just a collection of Jesus quotes with some events (that come off as totally made up) to give some context of those quotes. Mark is to miraculous events in the life of Jesus as to what Matthew is to his quotes. Luke then stands out because it is the first “story” being told. Then John almost comes off as a contradiction in how Jesus acts. For example, in Matthew, Mark, and Luke, Jesus is constantly hiding the fact that he is the messiah and the son of God. The demons call him out and he shuts them up or he tells people who have figured it out not to say anything. Then in John he proclaims it all over the place! Matthew was also very unique (in the context of the gospels) in what Jesus’ teaching is. He really focuses on how important it is to do good, and that following the Mosaic Law is doing good but not to favor the Law over doing good. For example, his healing on the sabbath. But he really harps on following the law. He also really harps on the power of belief. There are a number of stories where the power to perform miracles is directly correlated to how much you believe. And Jesus seems to really harp on that as well in Matthew. Both those themes do not come up in the other gospels. Acts It is interesting going back to a story format similar to Luke, but it feels WAY more disjointed. The three sections where the perspective changes to “we” where the story all of a sudden feel “legitimate”. Like it was being told as a historian, “we went to such and such place and did something then went to such and such place” as opposed to the rest of the book where it feels more like an epic story of preaching and surviving and teaching. My understanding is that any authorial attribution to the gospel and Acts did not come about til 100s of years after they were written and that there is evidence of quite a bit of revision along the way (some manuscripts have whole sections of Mark added or missing, John 8 is generally considered added much later, etc). Acts feels the most like it was written by multiple authors and piecemealed together but that may also be because it didn’t have other sources to copy from (like Luke did with Mark). Romans Paul’s theology feels like a next logical step from the quotes from Jesus in Matthew. He is really dealing with the fact that the Law comes from God but doesn’t have to followed but avoiding “sin” without the Law as guidance to what “sin” exactly is. This issue is quickly touched on in Acts where the Apostles tell the Gentiles that they do not have to follow the Law except not to commit sexual immorality (a theme that comes up in almost every single one of Paul’s letters, it feels like) and to not eat meat sacrificed to idols… which Paul contradicts in this letter (and Peter contradicts in his letter). Rest of Paul’s Letters In the Gospels Jesus really focused how people should behave and he focused on “unbelievers” (for lack of a better term; ie the wicked, the rich, the pharisees, etc). Paul only focuses on how people should behave, which makes sense since he is writing to believers. Again, he seems to really struggle with encouraging people to not be “sinners” without using the Law. He is very critical of those who, because they are “free” from the Law, feel they can do whatever they want. But Paul has nothing to appeal to other than this vague “sin”. So he understandably has to keep correcting people for following the Law or sinning all the time. I imagine no one understood where Paul was saying to draw the line. Hebrews I have never heard a good reason as to why this book is in the bible (and is indicative of the lack of reasoning for why anything in the New Testament is in the bible from a lot of people I’ve talked to) other than it sounds good. It is interesting how “mystical” the book is compared to the previous books. It describes some of the other worldly aspects of Jesus and what His salvation is supposed to mean. Other Letters There is a strange mix here. The book of James, which Martin Luther criticized because it didn’t agree with his theology of “Grace Alone”. 2 Peter is considered to not have been written by Peter but is claimed to have been written by Peter. 3 John which is super short, only trashes some one, and is also considered to not have been written by John; which is super strange that a book, whose basic purpose is to trash someone (Diotrephes) and is kind of a lie, is included in scripture. Jude which quotes extra biblical books as prophecy, one of which is in the Apocrypha and another we don’t have any more. Revelation This shouldn’t be listened to in a single day. I wasn’t rushing or anything, just listening while I was driving. But it makes no sense outside of any sort of historical context with its imagery being devoid any sort of modern meaning. I will say it is total “violence porn” on some new level; that is it really delights in the violence it is inflicting upon its character (kind of like the enjoyment we all got watching Joffrey suffer and die in Game of Thrones…. spoiler alert). The great lengths the book goes to in order to describe the amount of pain and blood there will be for those people who are not Christians is quite disturbing. I thought I’d deal with a few contemporary issues as it relates to what I read in the New Testament. Does the New Testament say that Homosexuality is a sin? From just a plain straight through reading, it is pretty clear it does. I have read quite a bit into the subject and I’ve learned it is much more complicated than just what a plain reading says (from my understanding many places where the word “homosexual” is used in the NIV translation is not really an accurate translation) but even then considering Paul’s attitude towards homosexuality in Romans, Paul’s and Act’s attitude toward sexuality in general, plus no clarification about homosexuality when it comes to the law (meaning the authors never contradict those parts of the Old Testament Law like they do with the sabbath or unclean foods), I think the evidence is still in favor of the idea that the authors of the New Testament generally condemn homosexuality. Some people take that further by thinking that people who practice homosexuality must then be treated differently, either personally or legally. But the New Testament takes a grim view on false religions as well so to be consistent one must also be against the Freedom of Religion as well by, say, taking away different tax advantages that all religions in the US enjoy. (or taking away the tax advantages of any church that may interpret the bible “incorrectly” or different from orthodox). If the New Testament contains a list of rules that the government should follow, it definitely contradicts the Constitution. I am unsure if it does and that view is highly dependent upon your theology. I don’t think it ever crossed the authors’ minds that their religion would one day become the world’s largest religion, let alone the dominant religion of a country. What does the New Testament say about women? Again, a plain straight through reading, it is pretty clear that Paul (the only author that talks about women) thinks women should be treated differently. I’ve heard some ways around this growing up in the church where women were allowed to speak. That Paul’s admonitions were towards a specific church for specific reasons, but I have never heard where they got that reasoning from as we have no records from that time concerning the churches Paul was writing to other than Paul’s writings. How does the New Testament compare to the Qur’an when it comes to how others who are not a member of their belief system? In the Qur’an there seemed, to me, to be three different types on the believer/unbeliever spectrum. There is the believer, the antagonistic unbeliever, and the unbeliever that lives in peace with the believer. The antagonistic unbeliever was someone the believer should fight against because they are attacking the believer. But there is that other type of unbeliever that there were a number of places to treat them with respect and peace as long as they remain peaceful (which left open some loop holes legalistically, I’m sure). The New Testament is an interesting contrast because it is much more black and white, “if you are not with me, you are against me”. There are only believers and unbelievers, and the unbelievers are terribly wicked and antagonistic. I was kind of shocked to see that so prominent in Jesus’ quotes in Matthew. The letters don’t really deal with that because their main point is to direct the believers, but it comes up again in full force in Revelation. At the same time any sort of fighting against these terrible unbelievers is supposed to be left up to God and that God will rain down judgement and blood on them. To humble oneself before this enemy is to humble oneself before God because the believer is going to let God handle it. And to be humble enough to love these enemies is notable as well and a sharp contrast to the punishment that God is going to inflict upon them. There was one passage I found interesting in this context, in 2 Timothy. “If we disown him, he disowns us. If we are faithless, he remains faithful. For he cannot disown himself.” I’d be interested in knowing how Paul differentiates between someone who disowns and someone who is faithless. The other thing of note to me as it compares to the Qur’an is the extensive use of the Old Testament and other writings. The Qur’an always seemed to expand upon Old Testament stories similar to many extra-biblical (and most likely inaccurate) sources. The New Testament had three different types of quotes. It would sometimes quote early church/pre-New Testament/post Jesus (or what I understand from scholars as being) sayings or hymns. It’ll quote extra writings such as in Jude and 2 Peter that we know about (as noted above) or it’ll quote things that we don’t know about; such as some prophecies that the gospels tell about Jesus do not exist in the Old Testament used as proof that Jesus is the Messiah. Or it’ll quote directly from the Old Testament; which also gets strange for me, especially when those quotes are considered prophecies about Jesus. A brief reading of those selected passages and I would have never thought that some of those quotes were about a Messiah and I don’t know how the authors of the gospels (mainly) got that. There are certain things that are going to stand out to me in the bible that would not in the Qur’an. For example, I could not tell you what I read about women in the Qur’an but I totally noticed in the New Testament. This is a prime example of my own culture and upbringing influencing what I notice in what I’m reading; that is, what is familiar to me in the New Testament and how foreign the Qur’an was having me not focus on similar things. So the Qur’an I thought was kind of boring, with the author never being able to stay on any one topic or follow any structure. The books in the New Testament were much better written, had an agenda/purpose that one could follow. But again, I’m not sure religious texts are supposed to be “entertaining”. And neither my reading of this or the Qur’an constitutes some sort of “study” or even a real effort into figuring out what is really meant by the authors. Just a cursory glance and my initial impressions, thoughts, and feelings.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lon

    The formatting, passage headings, navigation tools, and editorial notes in this Kindle edition make reading a pure pleasure. A word about translation. I've read the New Testament numerous times in the King James Version (used exclusively in my faith community), and I suppose my ear is conditioned towards more magisterial renderings and rather biased against contemporary, informal phrasing. So I was surprised how much I responded to the immediacy and intimacy in this NIV translation. I can't comm The formatting, passage headings, navigation tools, and editorial notes in this Kindle edition make reading a pure pleasure. A word about translation. I've read the New Testament numerous times in the King James Version (used exclusively in my faith community), and I suppose my ear is conditioned towards more magisterial renderings and rather biased against contemporary, informal phrasing. So I was surprised how much I responded to the immediacy and intimacy in this NIV translation. I can't comment on accuracy; I'm not a biblical scholar. My foremost criterion is that the potency and savor is conveyed. I want the language to recreate the experience in the fullest ways possible. In this aspect, the NIV helped me connect in new ways to the The Gospels, and The Acts of the Apostles. For a full five stars, I'd want study materials, resources, and scholarly commentary made available.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    I've read the New Testament multiple times, but I've always used the King James Version from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I thought it would enrich my study to look at a different translation, and it was enlightening to read this one cover to cover. I particularly noticed that in some of Paul's letters I was able to make more sense of the meaning. I still much prefer my usual scriptures, though, as the LDS footnotes and concordance are so much more extensive. So many times I I've read the New Testament multiple times, but I've always used the King James Version from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I thought it would enrich my study to look at a different translation, and it was enlightening to read this one cover to cover. I particularly noticed that in some of Paul's letters I was able to make more sense of the meaning. I still much prefer my usual scriptures, though, as the LDS footnotes and concordance are so much more extensive. So many times I went to the NIV footnotes and found them not at all useful. Still, I am glad to also own this version, as in the future when I struggle with KJV passages I will look to the NIV.

  8. 5 out of 5

    M.L.S. Weech

    I didn't actually read this specific book. I read the New Testament half of the NIV Holy Bible. I wanted to feed my faith from the source. I'm still trying to reach a stronger place of faith and gain a closer relationship with God, and this was a step I wanted to take in that direction. I'll post more of my thoughts on this on my blog at some point. What mattered to me was getting the word from the source and not people who say they know or even should know. Reading this helped. I didn't actually read this specific book. I read the New Testament half of the NIV Holy Bible. I wanted to feed my faith from the source. I'm still trying to reach a stronger place of faith and gain a closer relationship with God, and this was a step I wanted to take in that direction. I'll post more of my thoughts on this on my blog at some point. What mattered to me was getting the word from the source and not people who say they know or even should know. Reading this helped.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Patricia P. Bass

    This Bible for Kindle was very good. At times the search function was not as user-friendly as I would have liked. I do enjoy reading the NIV Bible; it is my favorite version. I do recommend this book to anyone who wants a good Kindle Bible.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Zekesmom10 JodiGalland

    What Christian would give the Bible fewer than 5 stars?! LOL I read the New Testament through in a year. It was easier than reading the entire Bible in one year. :) I felt I got a lot more out of it. I recommend it to anyone.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Olvera

    A easy to read and digest rendition of the New Testament. Offering the teachings of the early Christian faith and the foundations built upon Jesus and His apostles.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Terry Conrad

    I just finished the New Testament again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Begins with a newborn of mysterious origin. Filled with peace and love. Ends with unbelievable hope. Great read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dave Weiss

    The greatest story ever told.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I already own three Bibles but they are all Old and New Testament together and hence quite thick. I wanted a small Bible I could travel with easily and I definately got that with this book. It is not necessary to read the Old Testament in order to be a Christian so I don't see why I should carry around a book that weighs more than twice what it should do by including the Old Testament in it. This is a lovely little book I bought whilst on a recent pilgrimage to York in the North of England. Some I already own three Bibles but they are all Old and New Testament together and hence quite thick. I wanted a small Bible I could travel with easily and I definately got that with this book. It is not necessary to read the Old Testament in order to be a Christian so I don't see why I should carry around a book that weighs more than twice what it should do by including the Old Testament in it. This is a lovely little book I bought whilst on a recent pilgrimage to York in the North of England. Some of the features I am particularly impressed with are at the beginning. This Bible includes a little information about who wrote each book, who it was aimed at and the differences in the writings (if you have not read the Bible before you will see there are some noticable differences between the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and particularly John) This version also explains how to read the Bible; this may seem unnecessary but the Bible isn't a book you can just pick up and read cover to cover, it needs to be broken down, read in small segments and digested carefully. This version includes some prayers to say to God before attempting to make sense of its contents. It even includes a plan of reading the Bible in stages Day 1, Day 2 etc which I found helpful, although of course you can ignore this advice and jump straight in but the advice is worth following in my opinion. All in all an excellent buy you won't regret, very valuable to the travelling Christian due to its small size and light weight. The New International Version is a good translation and this copy in the UK has been 'Anglicanised' too. This New Testament is not expensive either (I got mine from Borders for £3)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joan Haughton

    The New Testament that was purchase by the blood of Jesus. Speaks to the birth, ministry, death, burial and resurrection of Jesus my Lord and savior. Who is now on seated at the right hand of God in majesty. The other books written by other saints instruct Christians on how to live and our inheritance through Christ. Bless the name of Jesus!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Over 200 scholars retranslated the new testament from original text in the mid seventies, and this is the result. Better than King James, significantly different, and yet still I usually only read Jesus's attributed quotes and skip his students. Over 200 scholars retranslated the new testament from original text in the mid seventies, and this is the result. Better than King James, significantly different, and yet still I usually only read Jesus's attributed quotes and skip his students.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    While going to school at Westmont, my New Testament teacher was working on this and handed out a copy to everyone. We used it while taking the class. The translation is very easy to read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Scripture.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Incredible.

  21. 5 out of 5

    B

    This is not the actual book I read but read the NIV edition, New Testament of the serendipity bible for groups.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ash

    The Bible version I read and owned as a little girl.

  23. 4 out of 5

    April Vaughn

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wrata Drabek

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lara Cassity-Lovell

  27. 5 out of 5

    Autumn Victoria

  28. 5 out of 5

    Renee Martin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn Smith

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Roland

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