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KING JAMES BIBLE with VerseSearch - Red Letter Edition

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The Kindle VerseSearch Bible with improved navigation and a more organized format. *New Search Feature* - Book List, Chapter List, JumpToVerse. Indexed Verses and Chapters. Interactive Table of Contents. Expanded Chapter Links for easy access. One Year Reading Plan. Arrow Tabs are fully utilized. Red Letter Edition.


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The Kindle VerseSearch Bible with improved navigation and a more organized format. *New Search Feature* - Book List, Chapter List, JumpToVerse. Indexed Verses and Chapters. Interactive Table of Contents. Expanded Chapter Links for easy access. One Year Reading Plan. Arrow Tabs are fully utilized. Red Letter Edition.

30 review for KING JAMES BIBLE with VerseSearch - Red Letter Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kaelin Murphy

    The Bible is to be read and re-read. One is never truly finished with it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    The Final Word Of God . AMEN I Recommend. THE BIBLE TO EVERYONE.WHOM. SHALL Glorify GOD FOREVER AND FOR 1000 YEARS LIVE IN PEACE WITH OUR KING,JESUS CHRIST .

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shelby Borst

    Yay! I love it!A bible that isn't fake! I love how in can search for things...Amen! I cAn use it in my devotions Yay! I love it!A bible that isn't fake! I love how in can search for things...Amen! I cAn use it in my devotions

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Leskey

    ~Review of the Bible: Well, first off, this most excellent collection of prophesy, psalm, and story, is something that is abnormally large. That is why I was reading it at some point throughout two and sevenscore days. As you can perhaps tell, I was reading it rather slowly as well, so hopefully that means I remember more. More likely, however, I am ridiculously clueless in some points. More's the pity. But, now that you know that, how about I get about to the reviewing? I've actually been meanin ~Review of the Bible: Well, first off, this most excellent collection of prophesy, psalm, and story, is something that is abnormally large. That is why I was reading it at some point throughout two and sevenscore days. As you can perhaps tell, I was reading it rather slowly as well, so hopefully that means I remember more. More likely, however, I am ridiculously clueless in some points. More's the pity. But, now that you know that, how about I get about to the reviewing? I've actually been meaning to write this review for a year or so, so I'd name myself late but in earnest, but I shan't to avoid lawsuit by the ghosts of ancient Kerr's. *cough, cough* Now, to render a dignified review. I'm feeling too thrilled with the concept of restfulness to review all the different versions [of the Bible] [that] I’ve read, so I'll review the entire sort of thing. (You can tell I was able to quickly call to mind terminology pertaining to this situation.) Now, from a literary perspective, the Bible is quite suitable. I mean, I’m not a professional judge of ancient Israelite poetry (I like things to rhyme myself); nor am I an authority of prophetic verse. All the chronological and historical narrative is very interesting, if not sometimes horrendously bloody and generally messy, but the latter descriptions are simply what you should expect if you read history. So yippee! From the distinct perspective of one who wishes to be entertained, well, much of the Bible is, in fact, entertaining, especially if you’re the sort of person who would get entertained by it. However, the sole purpose of reading the message of Salvation, the history of the universe (and Israel), and the prophesied future is not necessarily to derive entertainment. Don’t correct me if I am wrong. This is a personal opinion. The Apostle Paul had personal opinions too, I hope you understand, so you can’t blame me for following his example. But, so as not to get you mildly confused, I am entertained whilst I read the Bible. Especially when I read things like Job 40, Genesis 1-X IF X = X, Jude, and Psalms something or the rather. From the theological POV, well… One might say that the Bible is rather important. In it you can fetch yourself an abundance of very distinctly theological concepts. In fact, if one derives theological concepts from any source that is not ultimately descended from those in the Bible, the study thereof may or may not cease to be theology, if you take my meaning correctly. And then there’s the matter of divine inspiration and you can’t get much better than that theologically. AND I SHOULD KNOW BECAUSE I EXPRESS INTEREST IN THEOLOGY, I HOPE YOU UNDERSTAND. I also just washed dishes. And, finally, as an historical and prophetic account, let’s just say the Bible does quite nice for itself. Overall themes, the eternal plans of God, and all the complicated history and politics… I really do enjoy all this stuff. It reminds me of world building. And one can be brilliantly happy as said individual recognizes cause and effect and long term effect. It’s really all quite thrilling. In the Bible, we see the doom and the cause of doom, swords and the use of swords, an ark and a floating ark, giants, of course blood (as I noted afore), the Creation of the world (which is mildly important), Simon being renamed “Rock,” all the advanced history of Redemption (which is very important; note the capitalization—of course I capitalized “Rock” too, so that doesn’t mean much. Forgive me the transgression I enacted against your time), and Paul (more on him later, if I feels like it). Um… where’s all the prophecy in this, you say? “Ah ha!” I say wisely. “It’s present. Oh, it’s present. Just because your mortal eye can’t detect it doesn’t mean it isn’t present. Note the first item in this list–‘doom and the cause of doom.’ That right there is the essence of prophecy, save if it is pertaining to Redemption. And then we have Revelation. More on that later, too. But what about the point of view that we have all yearned for? The perspective we need to fuel the continuation of our thought. The essential viewpoint which we have suffered through this review to see? BEHOLD: THE PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE OF ONE, Joseph Leskey: Ha ha ha. What a joke. Me, give you my personal perspective on things? Well, of course I will, but it’s still hilarious to the well functioning contents of my cranium. My personal opinion has been displayed throughout all the review. So really all that remains to do is to review each individual book included in this massive compilation. Or probably I won’t, if my fortitude turns traitor. If I do review all the books, that means I’m really going to be glaring at myself in the mirror some time because of the 66 plus paragraphs I may be going to write. Of course, I’d do that anyway, but that’s as beside the point as the obvious fact that I’m just doing the Protestant canon, seeing as I don’t feel like doing anything else. Ahem, let’s get a format going here. Genesis: Ah, now here’s a fine book. Especially the first two chapters, in which we get the creation of the world and all that dwells within it, and a nice garden. After that the human race is just a little bit messed up and they start sweating while they work. Grant, they also started wearing clothes, so good things happen alongside the bad. We also get to see the story of Abraham, with whom the Old Covenant was made, and who is mentioned more than a couple times in the rest of the Bible. And the history of Israel begins to unfold, which is really fun. Further, Redemption is first alluded to in Genesis. As for how much I like the book, I like the first two chapters best. And I like the scattered thrilling concepts like Nephilim and the like. Congratulate me on a brilliant feat. I forgot all about the Flood. That’s also in Genesis. It’s really interesting. I like those chapters too. Also, Genesis is a very key element in the whole Origins Controversy or whatever they call it these days. And I do like a good controversy. Not that a controversy is by definition a good thing, but I sure do like the debate that arises out of it. Exodus: Exodus isn’t entirely sunflower seeds, prunes, cold wintery days and chocolate (I purposely excluded the serial comma—which I strongly believe in—here. Those last two things wanted each other’s company). In fact, Exodus is more like people wandering around in wildernesses and other people getting overrun by grasshoppers. Still, it’s an excellent historical account. Have a recommendation. Leviticus: Well, I, er, um, ew? Just a tiny bit bloody and just a small amount of mess. Or a little bit more than that. Or the entire book is dedicated to blood and messiness, garments, skin conditions, and concentration consecration of priests. And how to purify things, if that helps. But, of course, it’s actually a very important book—to the Levitical priests at the very least. You just have to get past your original impression. That’s it. Or, if you can’t get past it, just kind of ignore it [your original impression]. Or just go read John, but that’s beside the point. Numbers: The title explains it all. I’m not going to call it boring; I’ll just recommend it to the people who want to know the dimensions of things and how many people were in such and such. There’s some interesting history, mayhap? Deuteronomy: The law over again (I’m referring to its existence in Exodus) and history. Quite good if you’re in the mood for that sort of thing. I think that there’s some details which are just really captivating, but I’m afraid I’ve forgotten most of Deuteronomy. It was an accident. Joshua: Ah ha! Joshua. Great things lie in here if you’re interested in military conquests and stuff, as I am. And a wall takes a tumble due to a distinctly different military conquest. Judges: Detailed history in here about Judges and stuff. Not bad, not bad. Although really some things could have gone better. Entirely riveting stuff though, I’m sure. Ruth: Here’s one of the books that is actually one complete, concentrated story the whole way through. It’s not bad at all. Gives you a peek at ancient Israelite culture. 1st & 2nd Samuel: (Psst… DID YOU SEE ME CHEAT? <= <— <=) Very interesting history in here. Also, Samuel’s a prophet. Of course, there’s some mess. Too, King Saul enters the scene, and David is really relevant. People make a couple bad choices. 1st & 2nd Kings: (I like this cheating I’m doing here.) Well, either a king pleased God and did some nice things, or they really, really, really didn’t. Though sometimes they played switcheroo. Lots of interesting history. Evil times. Evil, evil, evil, and not only evil, but wicked as well. Ah ha. Sounds a lot like most of the world’s history. **Here I fell asleep and stopped writing this review for a time, but that is of no consequence.** 1st & 2nd Kings, continued: You also can find yourself some interesting prophets and droughts and stuff in the two chronicles of the Kings. (I guess that was all I was going to say about it…) 1st & 2nd Chronicles: Genealogy, genealogy, and more genealogy. And some extended family history too. Basically, chronicles. Ezra: Well, my brain has failed to produce words for some reason, but basically, a temple gets built and Jews move about. I think. *laughs derisively at self* But it’s a fine book. Nehemiah: Ah ha. I totally forgot what happened in Nehemiah. Tells you how well I read it. *grins with no real humor and quickly refreshes my memory* Well, that was easy. It turns out I hadn’t forgotten after all. Nehemiah’s the cupbearer who did all that construction. Obviously. I’m affronted at the slothfulness of my mind. Anywho, I like Nehemiah well. It’s superbly interesting, reading about all those people doing all that work. Gives you another look into ancient culture, does it. Esther: Well, this is another book that is definitely a story, and a fine one at that. We get to see great pending conflict and old culture and whatnot. So it is, by definition, fine, just fine. Job: Ah, now I am right fond of Job. It does a body good to intake all the mesmerizing information manifesting through it, like stuff pertaining to Leviathans and stuff. (“And stuff” is so useful. I recommend it.) I do—like you should if a) you have a heart that’s much softer than petrified cabbage, or j) you just happen to—feel sorry for poor ole Job. He really had it kinda rough, y’know? Job (the book)’s exceedingly interesting, but it is possible for it to excite commiserating thoughts with the object of the main character. You really do feel bad for the feller. Unless if you aren’t in the mood too. That too is not my fault. (I’m just assuming that I’ve already said something isn’t my fault in this review. It seems like I did.) Psalms: Now this is a laudable compilation if ever there was one. The title describes the content very well. Conversely, the content fulfills the tile very well. Isn’t it nice that we have the laws of logic? (You can get quite philosophical with the laws of logic, you know, just so long as you can think of a “why” question, such as “why does order exist?” But that’s not relevant. Actually, it is, but I don’t feel like connecting thoughts at the moment.) In Psalms, you can find anything you feel like. No need to verify this statement; I’m generalizing. There’s agony, grief, depression, misery, mourning, sorrow, anguish, and remorse, but there’s also joy, exultation, happiness, gaiety, elation, and my internal thesaurus got stuck, so that’s it. There’s long psalms and there’s short psalms. There’s psalms that don’t rhyme and there’s psalms that don’t remotely rhyme, but they both aren’t meant to rhyme, so I can’t complain. There’s ancient literary devices by the dozens. There’s pleas and thanksgivings. There’s the numerous works of David’s pen. Proves that a king must have education, no? And there’s even a large hint of prophecy. Proverbs: Proverbs is an alright thing. I mean, kind of odd to expect sensible instruction by somebody who had seven hundred wives, but there you have it. Politics, that’s what it is. When someone has seven hundred wives, you say “politics” to yourself and move thyself onwards. But, in all actuality, there’s some good advice in here, such as: “Give not sleep to thine eyes, nor slumber to thine eyelids” (Proverbs 6:4, KJV (so I don’t accidentally work against copyright laws; unlike some, I don’t believe that the King James Version is THE version. It’s a marvelous work, and it’s the most fun to read, but it’s a bit archaic if you follow me.)) Actually, though, that verse could be taken out of context, so how about, “The heart of him that hath understanding seeketh knowledge: but the mouth of fools feedeth on foolishness.” (Proverbs 15:13, KJV (see above for an Explanation of my choice here)) Any which way, Proverbs is quite nice, if you feel like you could use half a pearl of wisdom and/or a grim thinking session upon the ways of the fool. Ecclesiastes: A brilliant work about the futility of all that is done under the sun. Just marvelous. Labour, profit, it’s all futile, don’t you see, unless if there is an ultimate truth, some great absolute behind it all. Or, if you want to eat, it’s a good idea to labour and get profit, because profit is exchangeable for food. But that’s not being properly philosophical. Anyway, I do really enjoy this book. Song of Solomon: Well, it’s a little bit mushy. And one should definitely compare their fiancée’s nose to a tower. And her neck to “the tower of David builded for an armoury, whereon there hang a thousand bucklers, all shields of mighty men.” And then of course, let’s not forget that Solomon’s legs were like pillars of marble. Isiah: Ah, now this is more like it. As we all know, a book by a prophet is usually equivalent to a book full of prophecy, and guess what sort of person it was that wrote this book? Exactly. And he prophesies about the Messiah, so that’s all very nice. Jeremiah: Ah, yes, the prophet they describe as “Weeping.” The fact of the matter is, he had some fairly depressing prophecies. Not a unenjoyable book though, if you’re speaking in an absolute sense. Lamentations: Same sort of thing. Ezekiel: Some fascinating prophesy and visions here. Seeing as there is an absolute and the original impressions of Ecclesiastes don’t apply, it’s well worth reading. Daniel: Entirely too enthralling. And Lions and furnaces and Messianic implications. - Okay, believe it or not, I feel as if I’d rather be done reviewing, so let’s just take Amos, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, and assume they’re all full of rich prophecy. You can further assume that I enjoyed them. With that assumption made, I hope you realized I did not include Jonah in all that. Here’s it: Jonah: Jonah contains the well known story of the prophet being swallowed by a great big fish. I don’t mind reading it one bit. Those two sentences definitely deserved me sacrificing my valuable time to exclude Jonah from the list of exclusions. — But now, enter, The New Testament!!!! — Matthew: I like Matthew. I really do. It’s got the Wise Men in the Christmas story and just different important things like the Sermon on the Mount. Mark: Excellent account of Jesus’ life, even if somewhat lacking in the Christmas story area. Luke: Ah ha! Now here is a very fine account of the Christmas story, though without the Wise Men. Of course, telling the Christmas story is not the sole purpose of the Gospels, but one likes to know where it is. Luke is also very well researched and detailed. John: John is my favorite of the Gospels, I’ve discovered. It does, in fact, cover the Christmas story, if a little briefly: “And the Word was made flesh…” (John 1:14, KJV (so as to avoid copyright infringement)). John, the Gospel of, is just really an overall excellent work. And it reveals the deity of Jesus quite emphatically. Acts: I am passing fond of Acts. All the earliest history of the church, right there. Ha. Who knew? ALL PAUL’S NUMEROUS LETTERS (My entire being delights in this great efficiency.) I like all of Paul’s letters well. Too bad so much confusion went and sprang out of them. A pity, that’s what it is. The letters are simply rolling in theological information and instruction as to the proper conduct of the church, which hasn’t entirely been followed in every case, may I just say briefly… Hebrews: This might be Paul’s letter or it might not, but any which way, it’s a good example of things written by pen an’ ink. Very exhilarating concepts to be found in it, there are. And also, by means of reading commentary on Hebrews, I got the word “apostasy” stuck in my head. It’s actually very fun to say, but it is not very good taste to go around bellowing it. Which doesn’t mean I didn’t do so, but that’s beside the point… What is good taste, anyway? … Who defines it, I wonder… James: Brilliant points are made within James’ letter and I like it well, despite Martin Luther’s misgivings. 1 & 2 Peter: Actually, I’m seriously getting tired of my review here… Peter’s epistles, like the rest of all of them, are quite fine and excellent and nice and, if you feel like it, thought-provoking, and stuff… The enormity of the dullness I feel in relation to this review is singularly enormous. 1, 2, & 3 John: Now here are some direly grand letters, if “direly grand” is a thing (it technically could be but it’s not what I meant). They contain good stuff like assurance of salvation and ink pens. Jude: A commendable missive. I have oft found myself appreciating the constituent sentences quite nicely. It quite compels one’s head to think. Which is a good action for a head to preform. Revelation: Ah ha! The book entitled—by the author, may I add—The Revelation of Jesus Christ. It happens to be a really great book, especially in this particular instance of the morphing fourth dimension, seeing as it is the last book in the Bible and A whooo hooo! For done with my review, Shall I be, And I so merrily, Shall shout exuberantly! Okay… In truth, I didn’t expect that. *ahem* *glares suspiciously at the above extemporaneous horror and carefully continues reviewing* Aside from *cough* that *cough* *is still suspicious*… I say, aside from that, Revelation is just brilliant in and of itself. I mean, sure, it’s a prophecy of some of the greatest destruction that ever happened in the universe’s time, but that’s inconsequential. One has to admit, the fact that it is a prophecy of disastrous happenings lends it quite a bit more interest. Further, whoever reads it (and doesn’t on it preform the old action represented by the sign ± ) is blessed. Proof: Blessed is he that readeth, and they that hear the words of this prophecy, and keep those things which are written therein: for the time is at hand. (Revelation 1:3, KJV (still to avoid legal warfare)) So, yes, it’s automatically a particularly nice book. Please note that if you hear it you’re blessed too. I just noticed the full force of that phrase. And then there’s the fact that the happenings in Revelation haven’t happened yet. That there really makes a difference. It means the Bible covers it all, from the exact moment time began (Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning…”) to when the present world ends as we know it (Revelation 21:1, “…for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away…”). Which is, one might say, right nifty. And you get quite a interesting new type of locust. And I’m done.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Pelczynski

    I love this bible but there is no progress of finishing it! You never finish the bible you start over or choose books of the bible for devotions. This is our as I call it. My book of life that I follow every day!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Posey Hansen

    P A must read for every home Also vital for a blessed,happy marraige and so necessary for raising godly, productice children

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I have read all the way through, but I go back daily, especially when searching for answers that pertain to what I see going on in the world today. I will never be finished reading this book. I advise the King James Bible because it is the most accurate I have come across when looking up what certain words mean in the original texts.

  8. 5 out of 5

    dallen

    Excellent! Best Bible app I've.found l have tried several Bible apps, and this one is by far the best. Finding verses is easily done,and I love the 1-year Bible reading guide. Excellent! Best Bible app I've.found l have tried several Bible apps, and this one is by far the best. Finding verses is easily done,and I love the 1-year Bible reading guide.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Travis Fasko

    If there is one book that needs to be read, or you are going to only read one book. This is it!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nooilforpacifists

    Two things 1). You don’t need this book. Search “bible concordance” to get nearly complete set of Bibles in English—I always use KJV; and 2). Read about the crafting of the KJV—possibly the sole government committee to have produced a profound and lasting product: God's Secretaries : The Making of the King James Bible by Adam Nicolson https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1... Two things 1). You don’t need this book. Search “bible concordance” to get nearly complete set of Bibles in English—I always use KJV; and 2). Read about the crafting of the KJV—possibly the sole government committee to have produced a profound and lasting product: God's Secretaries : The Making of the King James Bible by Adam Nicolson https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lorrie Hammond

    Two years of reading, studying and praying. Life changing and awe inspiring, I will continue trusting in God's word. Tenth time I've read in it's entirety. I'm 62 and will continue reading my Bible. Two years of reading, studying and praying. Life changing and awe inspiring, I will continue trusting in God's word. Tenth time I've read in it's entirety. I'm 62 and will continue reading my Bible.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Bollinger

    This is the King James Version Of the Bible. I don't really think there is anything to say about it, except it is and easily used edition on my Kindle.I'm able to jump from one book to another quickly and find the chapter and verse I am looking for. This is the King James Version Of the Bible. I don't really think there is anything to say about it, except it is and easily used edition on my Kindle.I'm able to jump from one book to another quickly and find the chapter and verse I am looking for.

  13. 5 out of 5

    april bonilla

    Great Awesomeness ... Greatest bible of all time just perfect ... Easy to maneuver .... Good good good good good good

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rowan

    One of the most fascinating collection of books I've ever read. One of the most fascinating collection of books I've ever read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Fred Fanning

    This is a great history book as well as a self-help book. The writing is well done and the chapter organization rolls out a long but informative story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia Howell

    Great edition of King James Bible Easy to navigate. Red letter edition highlights everything Jesus said. Reading the Bible helps prioritize what is really important. Highly recommended!

  17. 5 out of 5

    hector silva

    Great features. Each verse has chapter and verse number. Great navigation. Sometimes I loose my stop following links which is distracting and frustrating

  18. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis Robinson

    Excellent Excellent , inspiring , spiritual food for the soul. Should be on everyone's list of required reading for young and old. Excellent Excellent , inspiring , spiritual food for the soul. Should be on everyone's list of required reading for young and old.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Careful

    Of course, this book wonderful to have on my tablet, but there are easier ways to have the Bible read aloud, such as by Alexa with You-Version Bible.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael Nattrass

    GOD IS GOOD!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tesalin

    Well, it's the bible what else am I supposed to rate it? It's da bible no n x d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d Well, it's the bible what else am I supposed to rate it? It's da bible no n x d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d

  22. 4 out of 5

    April L. Brown

    Awesome Word of God! This is a wonderful version on Kindle! I have been enjoying very much and am extremely satisfied. It is also very navigation-friendly!

  23. 5 out of 5

    William

    A useful tool.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    The best Bible ever I have never seen a Bible like this one. With my Braille display and this VerseSearch KJV, if I am given a passage to read, I can easily and quickly find and read it aloud. I hope to find other versions of the Bible with this same layout. Very well done!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cade Kimbrough

    I love the bible The bible is the best book that there has ever been. Best book ever. I love the bible. The lord is good.

  26. 4 out of 5

    janet b. medlin

    DISHONEST to GOD'S WORK--MISSING A LOT OF VERSES ONLY MY SECOND REVIEW out of a hundred plus books on my Kindle. Gave one star so I would be allowed to give a review. When I would get to the bottom of the Kindle page then swipe to go to the next, several verses would be missing. At first I thought it might be just one or two incidents but it was the same throughout the entire book. I started to say throughout the entire BIBLE, but it would be dishonest to God's work. DISHONEST to GOD'S WORK--MISSING A LOT OF VERSES ONLY MY SECOND REVIEW out of a hundred plus books on my Kindle. Gave one star so I would be allowed to give a review. When I would get to the bottom of the Kindle page then swipe to go to the next, several verses would be missing. At first I thought it might be just one or two incidents but it was the same throughout the entire book. I started to say throughout the entire BIBLE, but it would be dishonest to God's work.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Corley

    Good I like it's what I would like to have to study windy with and Luton more of Of God word by this bible I think I can understand better then any other Bible study I like it I can understand it better than any other bible and I like it I would come Colette stint than any other Good I like it's what I would like to have to study windy with and Luton more of Of God word by this bible I think I can understand better then any other Bible study I like it I can understand it better than any other bible and I like it I would come Colette stint than any other

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marbeth Skwarczynski

    I finished my yearly read-through early, but enjoyed it immensely. I went a little out of order this time, using a devotion app to help me get more depth in my studies. 2020 update: this year's reading was good, but I think next year I'll go back to individual book studies as part of my daily devotions. There is always much to learn and to apply. But more than that is the comfort of God's Word. I finished my yearly read-through early, but enjoyed it immensely. I went a little out of order this time, using a devotion app to help me get more depth in my studies. 2020 update: this year's reading was good, but I think next year I'll go back to individual book studies as part of my daily devotions. There is always much to learn and to apply. But more than that is the comfort of God's Word.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ron J. Sonnier

    The Word The Word is the best letter ever written. I thank God for his divine intervention inspiring his house of human writers. My heart and soul well refreshed every time I open it and turn the pages with discernment seeking the truth. I highly recommend kjv1611 to everyone - no exceptions.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert Phipps

    Great version of the Bible. Excellent ! I prefer the King James version over any other version that I have read. If I read something that I don't fully understand I will check it out using another version. Great version of the Bible. Excellent ! I prefer the King James version over any other version that I have read. If I read something that I don't fully understand I will check it out using another version.

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