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Electrifying, highly acclaimed, and intensely personal, this new and updated version of Myra Friedman's classic biography of Janis Joplin teems with dramatic insights into Joplin's genius and into the chaotic times that catapulted her to fame as the legendary queen of rock. It is a stunning panorama of the turbulent decade when Joplin's was the rallying voice of a generati Electrifying, highly acclaimed, and intensely personal, this new and updated version of Myra Friedman's classic biography of Janis Joplin teems with dramatic insights into Joplin's genius and into the chaotic times that catapulted her to fame as the legendary queen of rock. It is a stunning panorama of the turbulent decade when Joplin's was the rallying voice of a generation that lost itself in her music and found itself in her words. From her small hometown of Port Arthur, Texas, to San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury, from the intimate coffeehouses to the supercharged concert halls, from the glitter of worldwide fame to her tragic end in a Hollywood hotel, here is all the fire and anguish of an immortal, immensely talented, and troubled performer who devoured everything the rock scene had to offer in a fatal attempt to make peace with herself and her era. Yet, in an eloquent introduction recently written by the author, Joplin emerges from her "ugly duckling" childhood as a woman truly ahead of her time, an outrageous rebel, a defiant outcast and artist of incomparable authenticity who, almost in spite of herself, became to so many a symbol of triumph over adversity. This edition also contains an afterword detailing the whereabouts of a large and colorful cast of characters who were part of Joplin's life, as well as "We Remember Janis," a new chapter of poignant and affectionate anecdotes told by friends.


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Electrifying, highly acclaimed, and intensely personal, this new and updated version of Myra Friedman's classic biography of Janis Joplin teems with dramatic insights into Joplin's genius and into the chaotic times that catapulted her to fame as the legendary queen of rock. It is a stunning panorama of the turbulent decade when Joplin's was the rallying voice of a generati Electrifying, highly acclaimed, and intensely personal, this new and updated version of Myra Friedman's classic biography of Janis Joplin teems with dramatic insights into Joplin's genius and into the chaotic times that catapulted her to fame as the legendary queen of rock. It is a stunning panorama of the turbulent decade when Joplin's was the rallying voice of a generation that lost itself in her music and found itself in her words. From her small hometown of Port Arthur, Texas, to San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury, from the intimate coffeehouses to the supercharged concert halls, from the glitter of worldwide fame to her tragic end in a Hollywood hotel, here is all the fire and anguish of an immortal, immensely talented, and troubled performer who devoured everything the rock scene had to offer in a fatal attempt to make peace with herself and her era. Yet, in an eloquent introduction recently written by the author, Joplin emerges from her "ugly duckling" childhood as a woman truly ahead of her time, an outrageous rebel, a defiant outcast and artist of incomparable authenticity who, almost in spite of herself, became to so many a symbol of triumph over adversity. This edition also contains an afterword detailing the whereabouts of a large and colorful cast of characters who were part of Joplin's life, as well as "We Remember Janis," a new chapter of poignant and affectionate anecdotes told by friends.

30 review for Buried Alive: The Biography of Janis Joplin

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    Many of the false and fanciful notions I had about Janis Joplin were formed after watching Bette Midler’s rendition of her life in the movie, The Rose. In the midst of a large project involving photographs of my family in the 1960s, I came to this book seeking answers to questions that had arisen during my research. It was the lack of mention about the information I sought that brought me greater understanding in the end. Specifically, I wanted to know if Joplin ever recorded the song "The Rose. Many of the false and fanciful notions I had about Janis Joplin were formed after watching Bette Midler’s rendition of her life in the movie, The Rose. In the midst of a large project involving photographs of my family in the 1960s, I came to this book seeking answers to questions that had arisen during my research. It was the lack of mention about the information I sought that brought me greater understanding in the end. Specifically, I wanted to know if Joplin ever recorded the song "The Rose." She didn't write it: it was written by Amanda McBroom in 1977. Joplin died in 1970. So I took the long way 'round to figure this out. I understand there is to be a feature-length documentary premiering in September 2015 entitled Janis that uses a voice-over by Cat Powers reading letters Janis wrote to friends and family, and concert footage. Myra Friedman was Joplin’s publicist, and as such was a person that knew her as well as anyone but perhaps did not have the writing skills to handle a significant and enduring biographical record. What I did learn from this was to look for Joplin’s intelligence and her ambition. I already knew about her talent. Worldwide fame took Joplin for a ride, but at least in the beginning she was complicit in that. She allowed herself to be sucked into the crazy whirlwind that forces a gifted person to the top and then sends other gifted people right behind. Wanting to stay on top is the meat grinder. One has to allow the wind to pass one by or it never ends. It is so physically and psychologically taxing to keep the commitments that are required at the top that drugs and alcohol become a way to both handle the strain and to make it more fun. Friedman’s lack of polish in presenting her knowledge of Joplin’s life paradoxically gives us insights: we hear the cadence of Joplin’s conversations with others, and can see the types of people she worked and partied with. Not everyone was on the lookout for Joplin’s best interests, and one might make the argument that no one was. Joplin lived as she sung: full out, with everything she had.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Krista Danis

    Buried Alive was originally published in 1973, less than three years after Janis Joplin's death. As her publicist and personal friend, Friedman cannot and should never be expected to be objective or unbiased in her account of Janis's life. While it is impossible to remove any writer from their subjective place in the world, it remains an absurd demand of any biographer who is as close to their subject as Friedman was. Once the writer makes their place in the story clear, it is irresponsible for Buried Alive was originally published in 1973, less than three years after Janis Joplin's death. As her publicist and personal friend, Friedman cannot and should never be expected to be objective or unbiased in her account of Janis's life. While it is impossible to remove any writer from their subjective place in the world, it remains an absurd demand of any biographer who is as close to their subject as Friedman was. Once the writer makes their place in the story clear, it is irresponsible for anyone consuming biographical works to assume otherwise. In Buried Alive, the raw ambivalence Friedman seems to feel about Janis is exactly what makes this biography remarkable and its refusal to betray the author's position within the social and cultural framework from which her friend operated is part of the work's overall integrity. It is in the spaces of feeling and experience, interpretation and perspective, that both biographies and autobiographies accomplish what other historical accounts cannot (and, honestly, should not). Friendships and love are hardly ever felt in the "this or that" of binary philosophical relationship, as Friedman indicates, "Janis lit my life in innumerable ways for almost three years, as she dominated it too. If the zany creature that the public saw, all that campy, trivial bluster, was real enough it its way, it was far from the substance of her deeper glow...She was my friend; I loved her" (254-255). What the author saw and what the consuming counterculture wanted to believe may be at odds, she suggests, and it would be a disservice to Janis to emphasize only what the public already believed, saw, or wanted to know. The realities of her life illustrate the unreachable mirage of hippie cultural philosophy and the construction of Woodstock idealism that could only disappoint. Pointing this out, for Friedman, is hardly a conservative jab at a meaningful youth movement. Her discussion of Powder Ridge should calm any concerns about right wing agendas, as they are today or were then. I relish her accounts of such events and the ways the Joplin crew had to maneuver through the cultural and political obstacles that started littering her shows. The characters with which Janis surrounded herself were invited to play in this book and were generously developed with a devoted afterword updating their whereabouts. All in all, Buried Alive offers a nuanced alternative to the dominant Joplin narrative offered in other contexts.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Read for my Women's Lit class at Alma. Meant to be a study of the biographer's emphasis of certain aspects of a pioneering woman’s life; but as a junior English major who was not very well read at all, I seriously couldn’t think of anyone. I remember hearing “Bobbie McGee” playing at a party or on the radio and thought, “Hey, there’s my assignment. That’ll work, and I’ll get to read about Janis.” And it is actually quite true – despite the fact that admittedly I was looking for something easy an Read for my Women's Lit class at Alma. Meant to be a study of the biographer's emphasis of certain aspects of a pioneering woman’s life; but as a junior English major who was not very well read at all, I seriously couldn’t think of anyone. I remember hearing “Bobbie McGee” playing at a party or on the radio and thought, “Hey, there’s my assignment. That’ll work, and I’ll get to read about Janis.” And it is actually quite true – despite the fact that admittedly I was looking for something easy and interesting to read – that she was a pioneer in her field, the first woman rock star in a field dominated by men; and even by the criteria of the Femi-Nazi class (sorry... but seriously... 28 girls ready to hang everyone with a penis and me and one other guy charged with defending all the atrocious behavior of the centuries in two 90 minute classes per week? It was a bit awkward, and I felt the wrath of the vulva everyday...) Joplin qualified as a "significant and leading woman in a man's world." Some pretty cool stuff, some sad stuff, but Fuckin' A, Pearl, she rocked it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Teena

    Where do I begin with this one? When I noticed this book on the library e-book website I was excited. I was sure that a story about a celebrity that was "larger than life" would make for a good read. A book about Janis Joplin? A no brainier, right? How could you go wrong? Well, here's how: First of all, the book read more like a text book to me rather than a novel. There was so much information ( a lot of it with little relevance) just thrown on the pages that it was almost chaotic to me. I think Where do I begin with this one? When I noticed this book on the library e-book website I was excited. I was sure that a story about a celebrity that was "larger than life" would make for a good read. A book about Janis Joplin? A no brainier, right? How could you go wrong? Well, here's how: First of all, the book read more like a text book to me rather than a novel. There was so much information ( a lot of it with little relevance) just thrown on the pages that it was almost chaotic to me. I think the writer had difficulty deciding what to include and what to exclude, so she decided to throw it all in. Did I need to read four pages on the history of Woodstock? Did I need to read the entire interviews of people that barely knew Janis? Second, the book seemed to be more of a biography of the writer, Myra Friedman than of Janis Joplin. If I had to break it down, it would look like this: Of the 400 pages: 100 pages dedicated to Janis Joplin 100 pages dedicated to useless data (filler), and lengthy interviews 200 pages dedicated to the life of Myra Friedman The only reason that I finished this one, is that I really wanted to learn more of Janis' life. I did get the entire story, but unfortunately, it took a lot of skimming through the Myra Friedman information to get it. That made it a little painful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Letitia

    I had a bit of difficulty getting into this book at first. To me, the author came off as almost bitter. Skimming over the big events of the sixties, such as Monterey, I was starting to wonder what was the point. Just as I was beginning to wonder if I'd even get through it, as I was becoming certain the story was more about the author than Janis, it turned a corner. From that point on, I was intrigued. The author knew a softer, gentler and more ambitious side to Janis than what is usually thought. I I had a bit of difficulty getting into this book at first. To me, the author came off as almost bitter. Skimming over the big events of the sixties, such as Monterey, I was starting to wonder what was the point. Just as I was beginning to wonder if I'd even get through it, as I was becoming certain the story was more about the author than Janis, it turned a corner. From that point on, I was intrigued. The author knew a softer, gentler and more ambitious side to Janis than what is usually thought. It is a shame Janis' letters are excluded, due to being denied permission from her estate, but it doesn't take away from the book. Towards the end, I thought the author might be working up to accusations of suicide, but this is not the case. Yet, she does paint a very sad picture of the end of Janis' time. The poor girl was so very fragile underneath all that bluster. Good work, Myra. RIP Janis Joplin.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    Of all the rockers who died young -- including Jimi Hendrix -- Janis Joplin has always been my favorite. This biography of her, written by her publicist and close friend, says explicitly what we already know from Joplin's music: that she was a tortured soul who had many, many demons. What's incredible with Joplin was that she was able to channel all that heartache to create something beautiful and lasting, which most people plagued by the self-doubts that she had are, obviously, are unable to do Of all the rockers who died young -- including Jimi Hendrix -- Janis Joplin has always been my favorite. This biography of her, written by her publicist and close friend, says explicitly what we already know from Joplin's music: that she was a tortured soul who had many, many demons. What's incredible with Joplin was that she was able to channel all that heartache to create something beautiful and lasting, which most people plagued by the self-doubts that she had are, obviously, are unable to do. It was really sad to read about Joplin's formative years, and how poorly she was treated for being different. Her drug addiction -- not just heroin, but also her alcoholism -- add to that tragedy, especially considering that from today's perspective, they lack any of the romanticism that once may have infused them.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Janis, my favourite artist of all time. Sooner or later, I had to read this. I didn't mind the first-person narrative. Myra Friedman had a unique insight into Janis's life, and decided to share it, lovingly and respectfully, with the world who in the 1970s was still wondering... and wonders to this day. One of the most powerful and depressing reads of my life. Freaky coincidences, heartbreaking words, and beautiful music. Janis, my favourite artist of all time. Sooner or later, I had to read this. I didn't mind the first-person narrative. Myra Friedman had a unique insight into Janis's life, and decided to share it, lovingly and respectfully, with the world who in the 1970s was still wondering... and wonders to this day. One of the most powerful and depressing reads of my life. Freaky coincidences, heartbreaking words, and beautiful music.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura Edwards

    The writing is so atrocious, I could not finish this book. Too bad because I really wanted to find out more about Janis Joplin's life. Not only does Ms. Friedman have trouble putting a sentence together, but she inserts herself into the story waaaaaaaay too often for a biography. You see, I wanted to read a book about Janis Joplin, not how Myra Friedman was a part of Joplin's life. Friedman just doesn't possess the talent to smoothly transition interviews into a narrative, either. And if the aut The writing is so atrocious, I could not finish this book. Too bad because I really wanted to find out more about Janis Joplin's life. Not only does Ms. Friedman have trouble putting a sentence together, but she inserts herself into the story waaaaaaaay too often for a biography. You see, I wanted to read a book about Janis Joplin, not how Myra Friedman was a part of Joplin's life. Friedman just doesn't possess the talent to smoothly transition interviews into a narrative, either. And if the author doesn't care for the person being interviewed (example: Janice Knoll), she makes sure to use ridiculous spelling and emphasis to be certain the person sounds like an idiot. Way to be unbiased, Ms. Friedman. I never saw so many exclamation points in a biography in my life. What is the author's problem? I had debated between reading "Buried Alive" and another biography written by Janis Joplin's sister. I went with "Buried Alive" because I feared her sister's book might be biased favorably because of their familial connection. I think I chose wrong. The other book can't be any more biased or awful. I'll have to check it out. The one thing I got out of this book before I stopped was the fact that Janis Joplin was what I refer to nowadays as an "attention whore". I think she would have loved today's world of social media. If that impression is wrong, I'll blame it on the awful writing in this book. Note: After reading Ellis Amburn's biography on Janis, I had to bump the rating up a couple of stars on Myra Friedman's book. I thought her writing was bad, but Amburn's is atrocious. His book made me appreciate "Buried Alive" so much more. Also, Myra offers a much more nuanced account. I did eventually finish the book in order to compare it to the book by Amburn. I definitely got the feeling Friedman cared about Janis. I also felt she offered a fair portrait of the woman despite her feelings. However, I can't go higher than a 3 rating because the points above still stand. Too much about Myra Friedman in a biography meant to be about Janis Joplin. And why would you make fun of people (which Ms. Friedman does) in a book about a woman who endured mental anguish because of the bullying she suffered? Seems a little callous to me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Oddly (since I read this book) I was never really a Joplin fan. I liked some of her music...found humor in the use of her "Lord won't you buy me a Mercedes Benz" in a Mercedes Benz commercial, was conscious of her as an artist, was aware of her as one of the 4 who died '69 through '71 (Brian Jones, Jim Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and Joplin). I wasn't however one who really cared for the majority of her music, or the style of music she represented. I was however touched by the tragedy and waste of/in Oddly (since I read this book) I was never really a Joplin fan. I liked some of her music...found humor in the use of her "Lord won't you buy me a Mercedes Benz" in a Mercedes Benz commercial, was conscious of her as an artist, was aware of her as one of the 4 who died '69 through '71 (Brian Jones, Jim Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and Joplin). I wasn't however one who really cared for the majority of her music, or the style of music she represented. I was however touched by the tragedy and waste of/in her short life and death. So many of these wasteful pointless deaths among talented, but misled, lonely, and sad people. Surrounded by selfishness and involved in it themselves not living long enough to have the wisdom to escape the trap/traps that kill them. Very sad. Joplin was headed for death for a while and I wonder...was there nothing that could have been done to wake her, before she was found, dead and alone. Janis was born in a blue collar town and was not the product of a "really bad" marriage or any of the other cliches that show up so often. She just never seemed to fit in. She struggled with booze and drugs, carried gonorrhea and was found dead in her panties and t-shirt wedged between her bed and the dresser (upon which she struck her head while falling from the bed) by a band member. The book and the life were and are sad. be aware. I read it back in 1974 when it came out...almost 4 years after Joplin's death. I'd say run it down if you're a Janis Joplin fan...it's not, and indeed couldn't be a light read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    It's been over 30 years since I read this book but I loved it when I read it and would consider reading it again. I recently saw a documentary on Janis Joplin which refreshed my memory regarding this book. It's been over 30 years since I read this book but I loved it when I read it and would consider reading it again. I recently saw a documentary on Janis Joplin which refreshed my memory regarding this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Great story and detailed description of Janis Joplin's life and misery. Truly showed her emotions and the despair and loneliness she felt. Great story and detailed description of Janis Joplin's life and misery. Truly showed her emotions and the despair and loneliness she felt.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liv-Elin

    This book is a bible for each and every Janis Joplin fans! Myra Friedman lets you know everything there is to know about this fantastic musician. Very up close and personal!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Cordasco

    This biography deserves ten stars. Moving, poignant, beautifully-written.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    I think the author Myra Friedman did a great job writing buried alive biography book about Janis Joplin, mostly because she did know Janis personally, the biography talks about how she grew up in Port Arthur, TX and how much of a rebellious teen she was. it also talks about how she became the amazing singer she was. she was such a free spirit and this biography really tells you about that. I think Myra Friedman wrote this biography because she wanted to tell the world about what are amazing pers I think the author Myra Friedman did a great job writing buried alive biography book about Janis Joplin, mostly because she did know Janis personally, the biography talks about how she grew up in Port Arthur, TX and how much of a rebellious teen she was. it also talks about how she became the amazing singer she was. she was such a free spirit and this biography really tells you about that. I think Myra Friedman wrote this biography because she wanted to tell the world about what are amazing person Janis Joplin really was. she wrote it so people could get a better perspective on Janis, she really wasn't some rock star druggie she was more then that, she was the kindest person ever. there really wasn't a theme in this book because it was a biography, But I'd there was the theme would of been about inner peace, Janis always said she was the " ugly duckling" compared everybody else but later she learned that being beautiful doesn't mean having a pretty face it also means how you treat people, what you stand for and being kind to anyone and everyone, that is what makes you beautiful. I think the style of buried alive was very effective it talked about all the Adventure she went on, places she traveled, where she was born and even talked about her as a teenager. it wasn't very narrative just talks about her struggles and how she rose to fame. The quote by Janis " we don't forgive people because they deserve it, we forgive them because they need it. we need it, we all need it" shows how inspirational the book really was. I did really like the book buried alive, I give it 4 stars because she really wrote it well and actually knew Janis Joplin, I loved how inspirational it was and how much it moved me, through out the book I was always looking forward to finding out about new thing about her. I recommend this book for anyone that is feeling down or is just looking for a good read because this book is a emotional rollercoaster.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Keith Parrish

    Janis Joplin was one of the most compelling figures of the 1960's. Her unforgettable voice and stage presence made her an electrifying performer and her lifestyle epitomized the ethos of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. In this biography, her publicist, Myra Friedman sets out to tell the full story of this woman who so personified what many people think the 60's were all about. Friedman paints a picture of Janis as a tragic figure chronically misunderstood; perpetually seeking love and acceptance Janis Joplin was one of the most compelling figures of the 1960's. Her unforgettable voice and stage presence made her an electrifying performer and her lifestyle epitomized the ethos of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. In this biography, her publicist, Myra Friedman sets out to tell the full story of this woman who so personified what many people think the 60's were all about. Friedman paints a picture of Janis as a tragic figure chronically misunderstood; perpetually seeking love and acceptance while embarking on a self-destructive path that almost inevitably would lead to her death of a heroin overdose in 1970 at age 27. Friedman, who depicts herself as the closest thing Janis had to a friend, was certainly a sounding board and served as a shield between the press and for that matter, the real world and Janis. The job was certainly a daunting one. In many ways, Janis had the emotional development of a child, and her moods and whims would have taxed any sane person. According to Friedman, Janis was surrounded by parasites and sycophants. It was only through her music that Janis was truly able to be a fully developed person. The main problem with the book is that in many ways, Friedman was too close to write this book. At points, she gets distracted with her own situation and life. She also lacks the objectivity to be fair to Janis and to the people around her. However, this book allows for an inside view of Janis and her world. Well worth a read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    As an insider-outsider in Janis Joplin's terribly short life and career,Myra Friedman brings a bracing mix of skepticism and affection to the world of rock and roll, circa late Sixties. She offers a convincing portrait of a woman trying to find herself as an artist while battling a host of private demons. Joplin comes across as a stormy, endlessly needy and demanding personality, wounded by early rejection and all too willing to play into the hot mama stereotype presented to her by the sexist cu As an insider-outsider in Janis Joplin's terribly short life and career,Myra Friedman brings a bracing mix of skepticism and affection to the world of rock and roll, circa late Sixties. She offers a convincing portrait of a woman trying to find herself as an artist while battling a host of private demons. Joplin comes across as a stormy, endlessly needy and demanding personality, wounded by early rejection and all too willing to play into the hot mama stereotype presented to her by the sexist culture of the time. Friedman's waspish opinions alienated a great many readers, but her clear-eyed takedowns of swinish musicians, early rock criticism, predatory business practices, and Woodstock mythology have plenty of kick. A lot of the people Friedman smacks around here deserved a lot worse. Stay alert and you'll catch a glimpse of future rock priestess Patti Smith on the fringes of this world. It wouldn't surprise me if Smith had taken notes and used Joplin as an example of what not to do in order to secure a long life and career.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brad Matthews

    Back in the early 1980’s, I was stationed in the the San Francisco Bay Area, and became interested in the late 60’s counter culture movement and its music. To be quite truthful, it was more about the music though. I loved (and still do) the music of this era. While in a local San Francisco book store I happened across this book, and purchased it. From the moment I started reading it till the end, it captivated me, just as her music did and still does to this day. I was a very inexperienced reade Back in the early 1980’s, I was stationed in the the San Francisco Bay Area, and became interested in the late 60’s counter culture movement and its music. To be quite truthful, it was more about the music though. I loved (and still do) the music of this era. While in a local San Francisco book store I happened across this book, and purchased it. From the moment I started reading it till the end, it captivated me, just as her music did and still does to this day. I was a very inexperienced reader at the time, and it has been a long time since I read the book, so my review my be very weak. I thought the author did a good job of describing Janis to the reader. I could tell that she knew Janis well, and was very sympathetic of what was happening during this time. I see now that this book has been updated and expanded, I guess it’s time that I should read it again. I recommend this book to anyone interested in the era, the movement, the music and especially Janis. Enjoy!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    1st Read: July 9, 1996 - October 28, 1996 (** Rating) Another book which took a long time to read. I could relate with Janis' disposition a lot. Overall, it wasn't a bad book. 2nd Read: July 23, 2017 - July 26, 2017 (*** Rating) Absorbed myself into this one at every break at work and at home before bed. Enjoyed it very much this time around. I saw a lot of similarities to Jim Morrison in Janis and I believe all she really needed - more than love - was a psychiatrist and someone to keep her spi 1st Read: July 9, 1996 - October 28, 1996 (** Rating) Another book which took a long time to read. I could relate with Janis' disposition a lot. Overall, it wasn't a bad book. 2nd Read: July 23, 2017 - July 26, 2017 (*** Rating) Absorbed myself into this one at every break at work and at home before bed. Enjoyed it very much this time around. I saw a lot of similarities to Jim Morrison in Janis and I believe all she really needed - more than love - was a psychiatrist and someone to keep her spirit alive and positive. I found the bio to jump around often, but absorbed as I was, it didn't make me lose track of what was going on in the life of Janis. I'm really confused why her band members never tried to help her and threw it all on Myra Friedman's lap. To be a friend is a two way street!

  19. 4 out of 5

    justablondemoment

    Let me start by saying Janis is my hero..my idol. Not because of her choices in her drug use but because she was "herself". This book was an awesome look into her life and it was believable as it comes from someone who was close to her and there in friendship and business matters. Having said all that it was written way to formally for me. I loved what I was being told but the words left me trying to figure out what exactly was being said. I am a pretty intelligent person and mostly was able to Let me start by saying Janis is my hero..my idol. Not because of her choices in her drug use but because she was "herself". This book was an awesome look into her life and it was believable as it comes from someone who was close to her and there in friendship and business matters. Having said all that it was written way to formally for me. I loved what I was being told but the words left me trying to figure out what exactly was being said. I am a pretty intelligent person and mostly was able to figure out the writing style, however, when I'm reading I don't want to be in a classroom...studying. And that is what this book felt like. A textbook look at her life. Love Janis...Loved the insight I was given from the author...Hated the way I was given it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mkittysamom

    I borrowed this book thinking it was one I read as a kid and my Grandma threw in trash because it had lesbianism in it and drugs..can't remember what the title was.. I got half way through and really thought this biography was stupid and contradictory. Plus the version I got.. Was all messed up and I literally had to guess as to what the words were..the font didn't transfer to overdrive I guess. Total waste of time.. And then all of a sudden like 3 ppl were on the list to borrow it..wow. It talk I borrowed this book thinking it was one I read as a kid and my Grandma threw in trash because it had lesbianism in it and drugs..can't remember what the title was.. I got half way through and really thought this biography was stupid and contradictory. Plus the version I got.. Was all messed up and I literally had to guess as to what the words were..the font didn't transfer to overdrive I guess. Total waste of time.. And then all of a sudden like 3 ppl were on the list to borrow it..wow. It talked about the town Janis grew up in..more than anything Port something.. No real details. See I don't even remember.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jill Green

    Myra Friedman had mountains of knowledge, both personal and professional, about Janis Joplin, and did a good job illuminating a sad, crazy, charismatic life. I just wish she had shown more than told about Janis' personal experiences both on and off stage. A little more interaction both sexual and personal, with her friends, colleagues, lovers and fans would have added tremendously to my understanding of this touching, talented woman. Being of that age I loved the fervor and excitement she brought Myra Friedman had mountains of knowledge, both personal and professional, about Janis Joplin, and did a good job illuminating a sad, crazy, charismatic life. I just wish she had shown more than told about Janis' personal experiences both on and off stage. A little more interaction both sexual and personal, with her friends, colleagues, lovers and fans would have added tremendously to my understanding of this touching, talented woman. Being of that age I loved the fervor and excitement she brought to her concerts. Good voice or not she laid it all on the line barring nothing, f---in 100%.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darcia Helle

    Buried Alive is a moving and disturbing account of Janis Joplin's life. Written by her publicist, who knew Janis well, this book definitely shines a spotlight on Janis' erratic behavior and personality. I was somewhat disappointed that the author glossed over Woodstock and Janis' participation there. However, it was well written and filled with personal observations and experiences with Janis as she traveled to stardom. Buried Alive is a moving and disturbing account of Janis Joplin's life. Written by her publicist, who knew Janis well, this book definitely shines a spotlight on Janis' erratic behavior and personality. I was somewhat disappointed that the author glossed over Woodstock and Janis' participation there. However, it was well written and filled with personal observations and experiences with Janis as she traveled to stardom.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    It was a very interesting read. Myra may have known Janis better than anyone so it is fitting that she should write Janis' biography. It wasn't the most well-written book, but Myra did a great job capturing the real Janis Joplin. I wished she would have expressed more of her feelings about Janis' death at the end. I wanted to know more about what happened after her death as well. I thought it ended very abruptly. Great, interesting read though. It was a very interesting read. Myra may have known Janis better than anyone so it is fitting that she should write Janis' biography. It wasn't the most well-written book, but Myra did a great job capturing the real Janis Joplin. I wished she would have expressed more of her feelings about Janis' death at the end. I wanted to know more about what happened after her death as well. I thought it ended very abruptly. Great, interesting read though.

  24. 4 out of 5

    KennyO

    More in the vein of a memoir than of a biography Buried Alive does a really good job of telling Janis' story. Too many reviewers have an idealized notion of who Janis was but Friedman lived through much of it and doesn't wear the rose-colored glasses the others do. She brings out the person behind the personna, a characteristic that's key to a good biography. I thought it worthy of three stars but Friedman's setting aside the conventional idol worship earned the fourth. More in the vein of a memoir than of a biography Buried Alive does a really good job of telling Janis' story. Too many reviewers have an idealized notion of who Janis was but Friedman lived through much of it and doesn't wear the rose-colored glasses the others do. She brings out the person behind the personna, a characteristic that's key to a good biography. I thought it worthy of three stars but Friedman's setting aside the conventional idol worship earned the fourth.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vita

    This was a well written account of Janis Joplin's life written by someone who knew her. It contained interesting information. The author did not glorify her. She told the good, the bad, and the ugly. I found it to be a bit wordy at times. I did have moments when I couldn't put it down, but I also felt like it took forever to get to the point. This was a well written account of Janis Joplin's life written by someone who knew her. It contained interesting information. The author did not glorify her. She told the good, the bad, and the ugly. I found it to be a bit wordy at times. I did have moments when I couldn't put it down, but I also felt like it took forever to get to the point.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    The amazon reviews of this book are very disdainful, but the reviews here seem a bit more positive. Hmm. Well, I'll give it a go... ---------------------------------------------- I'd say this is the most evocative biography of Janis Joplin I've read. But it's also the most negative. So... I'm torn. The amazon reviews of this book are very disdainful, but the reviews here seem a bit more positive. Hmm. Well, I'll give it a go... ---------------------------------------------- I'd say this is the most evocative biography of Janis Joplin I've read. But it's also the most negative. So... I'm torn.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emma Ramos

    Written by a woman who knew Janis well, Buried Alive is a harrowing account of the short career. Though brilliant, Joplin was a profoundly unhappy person. She, nevertheless, left an unmatched legacy. Friedman introduces music lovers to the woman who was tender, vivacious and, at the same time, self-destrictive. A moving and honest portrait.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julie_ian_curtis

    This is another sell out bio with not much substance - lots of filler about the times, not much actual detail. Sam Andrew has stated as such and he would know. Go for Alice Echols as the definitive, David Dalton for the every day functioning on the road, Echols or Ellis for interviews with the key players. 9 feb 2015 6 dec 2015

  29. 4 out of 5

    carrie

    I'm reading this book now for my Janis Joplin research. Does anyone know how this compares to the Alice Echols book, and the personal details that Love, Janis, relates? This book was written a couple years after her death, and there are lots of interviews with friends and family in here. I'm reading this book now for my Janis Joplin research. Does anyone know how this compares to the Alice Echols book, and the personal details that Love, Janis, relates? This book was written a couple years after her death, and there are lots of interviews with friends and family in here.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A great account of this musician's life and unfortunate demise with a peek into the music culture at the time. Read out of curious interest not because I'm a big fan, if you like music, worth a read. A great account of this musician's life and unfortunate demise with a peek into the music culture at the time. Read out of curious interest not because I'm a big fan, if you like music, worth a read.

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