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The Todd Glass Situation: A Bunch of Lies about My Personal Life and a Bunch of True Stories about My 30-Year Career in Stand-Up Comedy

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A hilarious, poignant memoir from comedian Todd Glass about his decision at age forty-eight to finally live openly as a gay man—and the reactions and support from his comedy pals, from Louis CK to Sarah Silverman. Growing up in a Philadelphia suburb in the 1970s was an easy life. Well, easy as long as you didn’t have dyslexia or ADD, or were a Jew. And once you added gay in A hilarious, poignant memoir from comedian Todd Glass about his decision at age forty-eight to finally live openly as a gay man—and the reactions and support from his comedy pals, from Louis CK to Sarah Silverman. Growing up in a Philadelphia suburb in the 1970s was an easy life. Well, easy as long as you didn’t have dyslexia or ADD, or were a Jew. And once you added gay into the mix, life became more difficult. So Todd Glass decided to hide the gay part, no matter how comic, tragic, or comically tragic the results. It might have been a lot easier had he chosen a profession other than stand-up comedy. By age eighteen, Todd was opening for big musical acts like George Jones and Patti LaBelle. His career carried him through the Los Angeles comedy heyday in the 1980s, its decline in the 1990s, and its rebirth via the alternative comedy scene and the explosion in podcasting. But the harder he worked at his craft, the more difficult it became to manage his “situation.” There were the years of abstinence and half-hearted attempts to “cure” himself. The fake girlfriends so that he could tell relationship jokes onstage. The staged sexual encounters to burnish his reputation offstage. It took a brush with death to cause him to rethink the way he was living his life; a rash of suicides among gay teens to convince him that it was finally time to come out to the world. Now, Todd has written an open, honest, and hilarious memoir in an effort to help everyone—young and old, gay and straight—breathe a little more freely. Peppered with anecdotes from his life among comedy’s greatest headliners and tales of the occasionally insane lengths Todd went through to keep a secret that—let’s face it—he probably didn’t have to keep for as long as he did, The Todd Glass Situation is a front-row seat to the last thirty plus years of comedy history and a deeply personal story about one man’s search for acceptance.


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A hilarious, poignant memoir from comedian Todd Glass about his decision at age forty-eight to finally live openly as a gay man—and the reactions and support from his comedy pals, from Louis CK to Sarah Silverman. Growing up in a Philadelphia suburb in the 1970s was an easy life. Well, easy as long as you didn’t have dyslexia or ADD, or were a Jew. And once you added gay in A hilarious, poignant memoir from comedian Todd Glass about his decision at age forty-eight to finally live openly as a gay man—and the reactions and support from his comedy pals, from Louis CK to Sarah Silverman. Growing up in a Philadelphia suburb in the 1970s was an easy life. Well, easy as long as you didn’t have dyslexia or ADD, or were a Jew. And once you added gay into the mix, life became more difficult. So Todd Glass decided to hide the gay part, no matter how comic, tragic, or comically tragic the results. It might have been a lot easier had he chosen a profession other than stand-up comedy. By age eighteen, Todd was opening for big musical acts like George Jones and Patti LaBelle. His career carried him through the Los Angeles comedy heyday in the 1980s, its decline in the 1990s, and its rebirth via the alternative comedy scene and the explosion in podcasting. But the harder he worked at his craft, the more difficult it became to manage his “situation.” There were the years of abstinence and half-hearted attempts to “cure” himself. The fake girlfriends so that he could tell relationship jokes onstage. The staged sexual encounters to burnish his reputation offstage. It took a brush with death to cause him to rethink the way he was living his life; a rash of suicides among gay teens to convince him that it was finally time to come out to the world. Now, Todd has written an open, honest, and hilarious memoir in an effort to help everyone—young and old, gay and straight—breathe a little more freely. Peppered with anecdotes from his life among comedy’s greatest headliners and tales of the occasionally insane lengths Todd went through to keep a secret that—let’s face it—he probably didn’t have to keep for as long as he did, The Todd Glass Situation is a front-row seat to the last thirty plus years of comedy history and a deeply personal story about one man’s search for acceptance.

30 review for The Todd Glass Situation: A Bunch of Lies about My Personal Life and a Bunch of True Stories about My 30-Year Career in Stand-Up Comedy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    Well, it's pretty clear to me now that a great stand-up comic doesn't ALWAYS write the best autobiography. Sometimes, like in "The Todd Glass Situation," the story told is, for the lack of a better word, unspecial. That he is funny is his specialty; that he misreads & misinterprets his situation has all the coming-out story elements which have found a home in the past but in modernity are actually dull and mega uninteresting. Todd Glass like 12% of the population is blessed with being gay, but l Well, it's pretty clear to me now that a great stand-up comic doesn't ALWAYS write the best autobiography. Sometimes, like in "The Todd Glass Situation," the story told is, for the lack of a better word, unspecial. That he is funny is his specialty; that he misreads & misinterprets his situation has all the coming-out story elements which have found a home in the past but in modernity are actually dull and mega uninteresting. Todd Glass like 12% of the population is blessed with being gay, but like those annoying members in that select group, he digs his heels to the floor in refusing to come out. Like, really, who cares. There are devastatingly little laughs in this, and no real drama. So, it's just middle of the road, with small insight and what seems like a cascade of excuses. This is the verdict: Glass had the job at 20 of opening for myriad awesome performers on Broadway; his busy schedule impeded any social or sexual interactions with members of the same sex. It is the price you must pay, but no one has ever told Glass this. Instead, we get the "situation," a hybrid that doesn't quite gel, that's neither funny nor remotely interesting. The celeb stories are scant, the details muddled. Yes, written even with the assistance of a ghost writer, the anecdotes fall somewhere between "Mega Indifference" & "Total Whatev".

  2. 4 out of 5

    furious

    this book was excellent. clearly very heartfelt & emotionally driven. i've heard a lot of this material before, whether on the WTF episode in which he "busted out of the shed," or the subsequent CBB he did, or on his own podcast, the Todd Glass Show, or even in his hour special (there are several bits in the book that are straight out of his act). nonetheless, it was nice to hear him tell his own story in his own voice at his own pace & with his own emphasis. Todd Glass is a treasure: he's funny this book was excellent. clearly very heartfelt & emotionally driven. i've heard a lot of this material before, whether on the WTF episode in which he "busted out of the shed," or the subsequent CBB he did, or on his own podcast, the Todd Glass Show, or even in his hour special (there are several bits in the book that are straight out of his act). nonetheless, it was nice to hear him tell his own story in his own voice at his own pace & with his own emphasis. Todd Glass is a treasure: he's funny, he's silly, he's sweet, he's compassionate, he's filthy. what more could you want from a comic? read his book, then go see Todd Glass live, then go up to him after the show & give him a big hug & say "thank you." he deserves it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads First Reads. FTC guidelines: check! I enjoy reading memoirs. It's a great way to get to know someone and what they consider important. Plus, since he's a comic, Todd's memoir has funny and poignant moments mixed together to create a wonderful narrative. He had a remarkably difficult childhood. His family was Jewish and he encountered a lot of prejudice (his parents moved from neighborhood to neighborhood trying to find a place where their tire I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads First Reads. FTC guidelines: check! I enjoy reading memoirs. It's a great way to get to know someone and what they consider important. Plus, since he's a comic, Todd's memoir has funny and poignant moments mixed together to create a wonderful narrative. He had a remarkably difficult childhood. His family was Jewish and he encountered a lot of prejudice (his parents moved from neighborhood to neighborhood trying to find a place where their tires wouldn't get slashed). Todd has ADD and dyslexia so kindergarten through (some) high school was a nightmare for him. He's so fortunate that he found comedy and an outlet for his creativity and intellect. On top of all of these other issues, the biggest struggle of Todd's life is what he calls his "situation." He knew from a very young age that he was gay, but he wasn't able to share that with his family and friends. Todd carried that secret until he was in his upper 40's. I can't even imagine the heartbreak that goes along with that type of decision and I applaud his choice to go public with his lifestyle. The first three-quarters of the book deals with his history and decision to announce his sexual preference to the world. I enjoyed that part. The last couple of chapters felt rather heavy handed to me, but it is clear that Todd is trying to provide a voice to those who don't have one, specifically the young, homosexual community who may be being shunned by their parents or peers. He even provides a letter that he encourages these young people to give to their parents if they are being rejected. Personally, I have a friend whose father threw him out of the house when he told his family that he was gay. I know that these things really happen to people and I'm very proud of Todd for providing that emotional and (literally) literal assistance. Every issues needs a champion and Todd Glass is a wonderful defender and promoter of the rights of all people (no matter their sexual preferences) and for social equality and acceptance. I disagreed with his stance that you should confront ignorant people with their prejudices in front of others in order to shame them and to prove to other people what you believe. Issues of hate and fear cannot be overcome with more hate and fear. We must, lovingly, somehow find a way to evolve together. I see his confrontational approach as a way to push an agenda, but also to create a lot of animosity in the process. What you fight, fights back... That being said, I didn't ask society or anyone's permission to be in the relationship that I am in and I believe that everybody should have that freedom. My choice to be married or not wasn't legislated... I think that this is an issue that Todd and I agree on, completely. Now, how we convince others to believe the same way- I don't know. If we could create roads across the division of opinion constructed of clear communication and uplifting education through books (like this one), shows, and pod casts that model a world filled with acceptance and equality, that might be a good place to start. This is a great read for anyone struggling with living authentically (be it sexual preference, addictions, whatever) or who just wants a glimpse into the life of someone who lived through it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Larry H

    Full disclosure: I received an advance readers copy of this book from NetGalleys in exchange for an unbiased review. I've been a huge fan of Todd Glass for years, ever since I saw him appear on Star Search in the 1980s. I watched his appearances on televised stand-up comedy shows, attended a few of his shows at the DC Improv over the years, and rooted for him on one of the early seasons of Last Comic Standing. If I were funnier, I'd want to be just like him. After reading his memoir, The Todd Glas Full disclosure: I received an advance readers copy of this book from NetGalleys in exchange for an unbiased review. I've been a huge fan of Todd Glass for years, ever since I saw him appear on Star Search in the 1980s. I watched his appearances on televised stand-up comedy shows, attended a few of his shows at the DC Improv over the years, and rooted for him on one of the early seasons of Last Comic Standing. If I were funnier, I'd want to be just like him. After reading his memoir, The Todd Glass Situation: A Bunch of Lies about My Personal Life and a Bunch of True Stories about My 30-Year Career in Stand-Up Comedy, not only do I still find him hysterically sarcastic, but I'm touched by his heart as well. This is an account of his growing up in Pennsylvania, struggling with school and trying to find a way still to fit in, which he did by making people laugh. It's the story of how his comedy career started—the ups and downs, the advice he was given from fellow comedians, the lessons he's learned along the way, and how comedy has changed through the years. As a huge fan of stand-up comedy (particularly in the 1980s and 1990s), I found this really fascinating. But this book is also about Glass' coming to terms with being gay, something he only acknowledged recently. Although Glass had always inherently known he was gay, he was truly affected by the attitudes of those around him toward gay people—those who called people "fag" or weird things "gay." He also didn't want audiences or his friends to treat him differently. The book recounts his trying to reconcile his "situation" with being the regular funny guy, trying to find a relationship while simultaneously hiding his true self from those around him, and how doing so for so long really shaped his life. (Glass finally chose to speak out after a rise in suicides of young gay people.) This book is uproariously funny (I could almost hear Glass narrating it as I read it) and truly heartfelt. I definitely identified with his struggles since we're only a few years apart, and so much of what he had to say in the book I have either said to people or felt myself. I had to be careful not to laugh out loud (I was on a plane while reading this) and I also tried to keep my emotions in check. This is a terrific look at the world of a stand-up comedian and the simultaneous struggle for self-acceptance. I'm glad Todd Glass was finally willing to share his story. Hopefully what he has to say will not only amuse others, it will perhaps make them think differently as well. That's the way the world changes.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I received The Todd Glass Situation as part of a Goodreads giveaway. Growing up in the suburbs of Philadelphia, Todd Glass suffered from learning disabilities that hampered his academic development and anti-Semitic harassment that kept his family on the move from neighborhood to neighborhood. Compounding these difficulties was the fact that Glass could increasingly no longer deny: he was gay. Finding his escape in stand-up comedy, Glass became a well-known figure in the business, who eventually c I received The Todd Glass Situation as part of a Goodreads giveaway. Growing up in the suburbs of Philadelphia, Todd Glass suffered from learning disabilities that hampered his academic development and anti-Semitic harassment that kept his family on the move from neighborhood to neighborhood. Compounding these difficulties was the fact that Glass could increasingly no longer deny: he was gay. Finding his escape in stand-up comedy, Glass became a well-known figure in the business, who eventually came out after a spate of suicides of young GLBTQ people. This is his story, told in his own words, with a comedian's sense of humor and the heart of someone who has faced challenges on many levels, but has managed to succeed. This was a very quick ready, but a powerful one. Glass' sense of humor shines through, yet he still poignantly describes the struggles growing up as a gay, learning disabled Jewish kid. At times, I felt it was a bit too light and could use more meat, but I can understand why Glass took the approach he did; he is, after all, a comedian. Very enlightening, and a timely read for me as I am personally struggling with issues of GLBTQ discrimination in an arena near and dear to my heart.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben Renz

    I love Todd Glass and this book captures him perfectly. Usually books by comedians can be quite dull. As much as comedians like talking about comedy, I don't necessarily like hearing about it, but Todd writes about all the people who helped him with such generosity and sincerity that I couldn't find much fault. Very inspiring. Glad I picked this one up. I love Todd Glass and this book captures him perfectly. Usually books by comedians can be quite dull. As much as comedians like talking about comedy, I don't necessarily like hearing about it, but Todd writes about all the people who helped him with such generosity and sincerity that I couldn't find much fault. Very inspiring. Glad I picked this one up.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marla

    I won this book through Goodreads giveaways. It's really sad that Todd Glass had to hide his sexuality from his friends and family because that was the way it was in the 80s and 90s for gays. Todd does a great job talking about what he went through in a humorous way. Hopefully it will help other people who are worried about coming out. I won this book through Goodreads giveaways. It's really sad that Todd Glass had to hide his sexuality from his friends and family because that was the way it was in the 80s and 90s for gays. Todd does a great job talking about what he went through in a humorous way. Hopefully it will help other people who are worried about coming out.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Plants

    I can see how some people would read this and go, “meh...it was alright”, but to those of us (me) who grew up hating themselves (myself) and their desires (my desires) and hiding it from everyone on the planet, including themselves (myself), this book was like shining a light on the pain they (I) hadn’t seen in a long while (because I buried it so far down, it couldn’t even be seen). ALSO, yes, I get it, some people don’t “get” his comedy, so some reviews will say, “he’s not funny”, but that’s b I can see how some people would read this and go, “meh...it was alright”, but to those of us (me) who grew up hating themselves (myself) and their desires (my desires) and hiding it from everyone on the planet, including themselves (myself), this book was like shining a light on the pain they (I) hadn’t seen in a long while (because I buried it so far down, it couldn’t even be seen). ALSO, yes, I get it, some people don’t “get” his comedy, so some reviews will say, “he’s not funny”, but that’s bullshit. Todd Glass is hilarious. Some people don’t get or appreciate his humour. I think that goes for everyone on this planet, though... Don’t believe those reviews that tell you this book isn’t funny. I fucking LOVED it (but I strongly dislike / don’t understand) lots of things that other people like/love 🤷🏻‍♀️). I love Todd glass (I know that’s silly to say about someone I don’t know and will never know). I guess I mean, “I love what he stands for and what he puts into the world”. I like that he acknowledged he has things he needs to improve on (eg. understanding transgender people)—I have noticed a few things I’ve heard him say on podcasts that have made me cringe. I just love that he’s willing to admit he needs work and isn’t perfect. That’s ALL of us; It’s not just older people. Nobody is perfect. DUH. This book was such a breath of fresh air in my life. It took me months to finally find a copy of it, looking in every book shop I could, multiple times, (until eBay became the last resort) and I’m so glad I kept looking. Though he’s older than me, and we have very different stories, I feel like that struggle is universal: “the world doesn’t accept me... I need to hide myself away.” I related to his words SO much. Anyway, yeah, I loved this. For fans of “growing up as a self-loathing, hidden-from-the-world faggot”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bradley Morgan

    Glass, with the help of Jonathan Grotenstein due to Glass’ ADD and dyslexia, recounts his life and career living as a closeted gay man with learning disabilities. Throughout his adolescence and nearly three decades into his career as a stand-up comedian, Glass refused to be open about his homosexuality with friends, family, and colleagues. Instead, he chose to hide that part of his life despite the emotional, physical, and health issues it had caused him including a heart attack. After surviving Glass, with the help of Jonathan Grotenstein due to Glass’ ADD and dyslexia, recounts his life and career living as a closeted gay man with learning disabilities. Throughout his adolescence and nearly three decades into his career as a stand-up comedian, Glass refused to be open about his homosexuality with friends, family, and colleagues. Instead, he chose to hide that part of his life despite the emotional, physical, and health issues it had caused him including a heart attack. After surviving his heart attack, Glass was motivated to deal with what he referred to as his “situation” after hearing about the seemingly endless stories of gay teenagers taking their own lives for being bullied by classmates. Glass then realized that it was time to come out and own his identity in the hope it would help the lives of gay teenagers struggling with their own identities. At the age of forty-eight, Glass came out to Marc Maron on Maron’s podcast “WTF.” Glass discusses the relief he felt and the support he received once he came out as well as the messages from gay teenagers who felt inspired by Glass’ decision. Glass’ book is a fun, chaotic, and heartwarming story about finding yourself after living a 1970s childhood where learning disabilities weren’t understood and homosexuality was taboo.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ang

    Only real gripe about this book is that I wish it was longer and we got to hear more stories. Todd is the most interesting person I don't know, I realized this when I heard him on Scott Aukerman and Adam Scott's Podcast U Talkin U2 2 Me? So I wish we had more side stories about things that happened in his life, even in the book - the whole Patti LaBelle story, I wish there was more! Great but quick read, hope Todd writes another book because I'd for sure read it. Only real gripe about this book is that I wish it was longer and we got to hear more stories. Todd is the most interesting person I don't know, I realized this when I heard him on Scott Aukerman and Adam Scott's Podcast U Talkin U2 2 Me? So I wish we had more side stories about things that happened in his life, even in the book - the whole Patti LaBelle story, I wish there was more! Great but quick read, hope Todd writes another book because I'd for sure read it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christopher McQuain

    **1/2 VERY light summer reading; pleasant, amusing, nondescript enough in style and structure to render it somewhat interchangeable with other standard-issue coming-out stories/comedian autobios.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Flynn

    todd glass's episode of WTF is one of the things that saved my life so I'm a little bit biased, but i really enjoyed this book! todd glass's episode of WTF is one of the things that saved my life so I'm a little bit biased, but i really enjoyed this book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Really good read about the life and trials of my favorite gay, dyslexic comedian.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Meriah Metzger

    Todd Glass... what can I say? I love your book like I love you -- on instinct, with fervor, and only wishing for more Aristotle

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I like Todd Glass and was familiar with a lot of this, but it was still fun to read it with his voice in my head.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charlene

    I don't think I've ever read through a memoir so fast. This book is on the short side so that helped, but I found it wonderfully illuminating, thoughtful and compassionate which made it very easy to read. And of course it's also really funny. I am a fan of Todd Glass's comedy and his socially forward thinking so I was very happy when I heard he was writing a book because he always has interesting things to say. I'm hoping that people who are not as familiar with Todd's work will also pick this u I don't think I've ever read through a memoir so fast. This book is on the short side so that helped, but I found it wonderfully illuminating, thoughtful and compassionate which made it very easy to read. And of course it's also really funny. I am a fan of Todd Glass's comedy and his socially forward thinking so I was very happy when I heard he was writing a book because he always has interesting things to say. I'm hoping that people who are not as familiar with Todd's work will also pick this up because it has a lot that can appeal to readers who are interested in people's lives and how they overcome their personal issues. The flow of the writing was one of the things I found really noteworthy about this book. It moved so seamlessly between aspects and anecdotes about Todd's life to his commentary and asides about each event. The neuroses Todd details from his preoccupation with cleanliness and a neat house and lawn, to his phobias about being homosexual was so honest and told with such humor, that I found it easy to empathize and understand. Todd also talks about comedy and how he got into the business which was a fascinating glimpse into the comedian world. The major takeaway from this book is Todd's journey to accepting his sexuality and embracing an honest and open way to living his life. I think that message can be helpful to any reader, and reading how Todd works to achieve personal happiness is more inspiring than most self-help books in my opinion because he doesn't tell you what to do, just shows you what worked for him. There is a section near the end where Todd explains his personal thoughts on social issues in more depth, and while it is full of compelling arguments, and great points, it did feel a little like an info-dump of ideas and viewpoints which I thought could have worked better if it was integrated more into the flow of the story of his experiences so far. But I still felt enlightened by his views, so I think that section was very important. This is a highly enjoyable read because Todd is a great narrator and his life experiences have been so varied and colorful to give this book a lot of interest. If you are unfamiliar with Todd Glass, then maybe a listen to his podcast, or a search on youtube to find some comedy clips will make you interested in reading what he has to say on a variety of topics. If you are already a fan, then it is completely worth reading this book for the in-depth look into his distinctive character and comedic mind. (I received this book from the publisher or author in exchange for a fair and honest review. I was not compensated for this review.)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I have to start by admitting that I chose this title not because I am a fan of Glass as a comic, but because it was highlighted on The Daily Show. It is a memoir that looks at what it was like to grow up as a Jewish, gay, and person with ADHD & dyslexia. Glass tries to imbue humor into the presentation. The book starts as Glass is having a heart attack right after a standup routine at a local club. He is at first resistant to go to the hospital, but his friends convince him to do so. In the end, I have to start by admitting that I chose this title not because I am a fan of Glass as a comic, but because it was highlighted on The Daily Show. It is a memoir that looks at what it was like to grow up as a Jewish, gay, and person with ADHD & dyslexia. Glass tries to imbue humor into the presentation. The book starts as Glass is having a heart attack right after a standup routine at a local club. He is at first resistant to go to the hospital, but his friends convince him to do so. In the end, he realizes how weird it is that he had to tell them to call his "girlfriend" what was happening when he had been living with his boyfriend Chris for a number of years. This is the start of his process at re-examining his "situation." And what exactly is that, you ask? It is the fact that he is an adult who still lived in the closet while living in a liberal part of the country and working in a very liberal profession. The heart attack alone wasn't all that it took though. He really started to reevaluate the "situation" after a one-week period in which 3 young men committed suicide as a result of being outed. Glass started to realize that our culture needed people like him to come forward and be honest about who they are so young people will not be shamed about their sexuality. After preparing, Glass was able to come out on a podcast organized by one of his comic friends. The book is definitely honest. While admitting that he didn't have the most difficult life experiences, he does highlight that it was not easy. His biggest challenges in life seemed to be tied to his behavioral and learning disabilities. He grew up in a time when we really didn't diagnose those conditions, and he ended up dropping out of high school. He is willing to highlight the great attempts a lot of his teachers made, even if they weren't able to help him. I thought the book was refreshing in his honesty, though I must admit that there were times when I wished he had cut back a bit on trying to be funny. It wasn't necessarily inappropriate, but it did feel off for me. I didn't want to laugh when I read some of this stuff. I wanted to feel for him. I am not sure this would have a broad appeal, but it was interesting. I really liked how he talked about getting into the stand-up comic field. He really has worked with a great number of well known comics, and a part of me missed the 1990s when you could find stand-up at clubs and on television pretty easily. I have always been a fan of this format, and now, it seems like it has been pushed to the wayside. This is definitely worth a try, though.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Star

    I was thrilled when I went to get the mail and saw that my pre-order of The Todd Glass Situation had been delivered a day early!! I am a huge fan of Todd Glass and his podcast The Todd Glass Show and have been looking forward to the book for awhile now. Todd is hilarious but he is also very kind and gentle and he is just a joy to listen to every week. If you haven’t heard his podcast, go to iTunes and search for The Todd Glass Show. It is always the highlight of my week. You can tell by listenin I was thrilled when I went to get the mail and saw that my pre-order of The Todd Glass Situation had been delivered a day early!! I am a huge fan of Todd Glass and his podcast The Todd Glass Show and have been looking forward to the book for awhile now. Todd is hilarious but he is also very kind and gentle and he is just a joy to listen to every week. If you haven’t heard his podcast, go to iTunes and search for The Todd Glass Show. It is always the highlight of my week. You can tell by listening that his friends love him so much. This book gives some insight into Todd’s life and how he got to where he is today. If you follow him closely, you may have heard some of the stories before, but the way he words things makes me laugh no matter how many times I have heard it. Todd goes into depth about his childhood and some of his struggles with school and fitting in. He doesn’t usually talk much about being gay and it is nice to see that he went into depth on that a little more in this book. I sort of expected it to be something he briefly addressed but considering he has been gay for his whole life, it ends up coming up a lot. I appreciated this deep look into his life when it comes to this subject that he still has a hard time talking about. I hate to say anything negative but I don’t really think this book had enough reverb. He really cheaped out on that. I would’ve paid more to get the reverb I deserve. Todd Glass has a google alert setup to notify him anytime someone mentions reverb so I know he will read this. Are you hearing me Todd??? Have your ghostwriter put that in his notes for your next book! Use some of this book money and give us some reverb next time! Anyways… I loved reading about some of those experiences that Todd had when he was just starting out in comedy. I can hear him telling these stories as I read. Jonathan Grotenstein did a great job ghostwriting. The Todd Glass Situation made me laugh till I was crying and cry till I was laughing. Todd Glass is truly a national treasure and I have a massive lesbian crush on him.

  19. 5 out of 5

    WriteKnight

    3.0/5 – Sometimes Funny Story with Some Moving GLBTQ Moments. (I'm excited to have won this as a Goodreads First Read – so thanks, Simon & Schuster!) The Todd Glass Situation is a revealing memoir that mixed some humor in with the ups and downs of life experiences. I love memoirs, and I was moved the most when Glass was talking about his experiences and struggles, both internal and external, of his coming to terms with, his coming out as, and his being gay. Those last parts could be enlightening t 3.0/5 – Sometimes Funny Story with Some Moving GLBTQ Moments. (I'm excited to have won this as a Goodreads First Read – so thanks, Simon & Schuster!) The Todd Glass Situation is a revealing memoir that mixed some humor in with the ups and downs of life experiences. I love memoirs, and I was moved the most when Glass was talking about his experiences and struggles, both internal and external, of his coming to terms with, his coming out as, and his being gay. Those last parts could be enlightening to those who are not as familiar with such struggles, and they can be relatable and emotional to those who have had to go through that. I liked Glass’ (with Jonathan Grotenstein) writing style, which was generally light, honest, and easy-to-read style, even with some of the more serious moments. This especially comes through with his humorous quips and anecdotes, and he has other interesting episodes in there as well. I do have to admit, though, that I expected a little more on the humorous part, with this not reaching some of the LOL moments I’ve had with some other comedians’ memoirs. And near the last I felt he got a little preachy; he had already made his point earlier by relating personal experiences. But I can at least appreciate, and even identify with, his passion on the subject and his wanting to take this opportunity to stand the soap box for a bit. Bottomline, I appreciate Glass’ work both on stage and in this writing, and I grew to appreciate and respect him as a person as well.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I purchased this from Audible quite some time ago, after hearing the WTF With Marc Marcon podcast episode from 2010 in which Todd came out publicly...in his late 40s, having hidden his sexual identity from most of his family and friends for nearly 30 years. This memoir is funny and poignant...you can only try to imagine the effort it must have taken to keep such a secret for so long. Oh, and add to that the fact that Todd is severely dyslexic and has ADD...growing up and going to school in the '6 I purchased this from Audible quite some time ago, after hearing the WTF With Marc Marcon podcast episode from 2010 in which Todd came out publicly...in his late 40s, having hidden his sexual identity from most of his family and friends for nearly 30 years. This memoir is funny and poignant...you can only try to imagine the effort it must have taken to keep such a secret for so long. Oh, and add to that the fact that Todd is severely dyslexic and has ADD...growing up and going to school in the '60s and '70s, when learning disabilities--and more importantly the treatments for learning disabilities--were not clearly understood, was in many respects torture. Fortunately, his family was supportive and his teachers were kind, which is not something everyone who suffered these difficulties during that time period can say. Discovering comedy in his early teens was his saving grace. I gave it four stars only because I thought it went on a little too long with acknowledgements at the end. Though if I'd been reading, as opposed to listening, I probably would just have skimmed or skipped them entirely.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Fumo

    I first saw Todd Glass on Last Comic Standing and immediately loved him. Since then I've seen him perform a bunch of times and I was one of the first listeners of his podcast. Something about the guy really connects with me. Perhaps it's cause he's from Philly, maybe it's cause of the way he seems so super nice and thoughtful. Who knows? I'm a fan. So I was excited to buy his book. I didn't know the content, I just liked the guy and wanted to support him and his career. What I didn't expect was a I first saw Todd Glass on Last Comic Standing and immediately loved him. Since then I've seen him perform a bunch of times and I was one of the first listeners of his podcast. Something about the guy really connects with me. Perhaps it's cause he's from Philly, maybe it's cause of the way he seems so super nice and thoughtful. Who knows? I'm a fan. So I was excited to buy his book. I didn't know the content, I just liked the guy and wanted to support him and his career. What I didn't expect was a really tightly told story of his life, his dyslexia (who knew?) and his struggles with keeping his sexuality a secret inside. I remember hearing him come out on WTF and I was like : interesting, but not a big deal. I just liked the guy. Who cares if he was gay or not? But after reading this I have a new perspective on him and what he went through and I see what a huge deal it was for him. I'm glad I read it. I recommend this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Greg Allan Holcomb

    Three or four star book. Glass is a great storyteller, and this was written like a 250 page stand up act. The problem with a book having call backs is the ' Is sort of remember this character before from like 180 pages ago.' I read this in a day. Was entertained, saw some philosophy in it- Nobody likes everything - or whatever the subchapter was called. That can be summed up by the joke: ' I was peeing next to my girlfriend in the airport's public bathroom." If that bothers you skip this book. O Three or four star book. Glass is a great storyteller, and this was written like a 250 page stand up act. The problem with a book having call backs is the ' Is sort of remember this character before from like 180 pages ago.' I read this in a day. Was entertained, saw some philosophy in it- Nobody likes everything - or whatever the subchapter was called. That can be summed up by the joke: ' I was peeing next to my girlfriend in the airport's public bathroom." If that bothers you skip this book. One thing I thought there should've been more of where his observations on the attitude differences of people just a handful of years younger or older. In this changing world we have generation gaps, and gaps even shorter than that. Although every chapter seems to start 10% of the way into the story. My reaction was - He started something new. What did I miss? For the star obsessives- 3 stars means "I liked it"

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I've been a huge Todd glass fan for a few years now when I discovered his silly podcast, the Todd Glass show. This book dives deep into his life and shares with you the hardship Todd had to go through as a gay Jew with learning disabilities and him struggling through this situation. While this book may not be as funny as some other comedian memoirs its incredibly insightful and very humble as he thanks people along the way for helping him with his "situation." I highly recommend it if your a fan I've been a huge Todd glass fan for a few years now when I discovered his silly podcast, the Todd Glass show. This book dives deep into his life and shares with you the hardship Todd had to go through as a gay Jew with learning disabilities and him struggling through this situation. While this book may not be as funny as some other comedian memoirs its incredibly insightful and very humble as he thanks people along the way for helping him with his "situation." I highly recommend it if your a fan and want to learn more or if you have a situation of your own and need some guidance. This book is honestly good for anyone to read...unless your an anti Semitic homophobe then you should probably read Mein Kampf instead...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    A compelling narrative of the struggle of comedian Todd Glass to come out of the closet at the age of 44, and how he had to overcome all the internalized ridicule and loathing of gays through most of his life. It's also a really funny book, with mentions of other well-known comedians and his interactions with them. My favorite was when Todd had a heart attack and fell to the floor of the club where he was performing. He said not to call an ambulance, because he didn't think it was that serious, A compelling narrative of the struggle of comedian Todd Glass to come out of the closet at the age of 44, and how he had to overcome all the internalized ridicule and loathing of gays through most of his life. It's also a really funny book, with mentions of other well-known comedians and his interactions with them. My favorite was when Todd had a heart attack and fell to the floor of the club where he was performing. He said not to call an ambulance, because he didn't think it was that serious, and then Sarah Silverman said, "Oh, we'll pay for it, Todd, but it will count as both your Christmas AND your birthday present." Glass is really a hilarious comedian, and he describes how creative and funny comedians are when they get together.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris G Gillotti

    Fun, quick and sometimes inspiring I've been a Todd Glass can for years, so I had heard many of the anecdotes and nuggets of The World According To Todd on podcasts like Never Not Funny, Comedy and Everything Else and the Todd Glass Show. That's the thing about the book: Todd fans are going to be the ones who buy it, but it'll be even more fun and affecting to those who haven't already heard his philosophy. All said, it's a conversational, funny and touching book that is beautifully and simply hon Fun, quick and sometimes inspiring I've been a Todd Glass can for years, so I had heard many of the anecdotes and nuggets of The World According To Todd on podcasts like Never Not Funny, Comedy and Everything Else and the Todd Glass Show. That's the thing about the book: Todd fans are going to be the ones who buy it, but it'll be even more fun and affecting to those who haven't already heard his philosophy. All said, it's a conversational, funny and touching book that is beautifully and simply honest about the trials of those being to true to themselves: artistically and romantically.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Ferry

    I received this book at part of a Goodreads giveaway. This book makes you feel like you sat down with Todd in his living room with a couple of beers and he told you some stories about his life. While he does cover some heavy topics, even those are handled with Todd's trademark humor. It's very easy to see yourself in many of the situations Todd outlines in the book. Much of his life he seems like an outsider who uses stand up as a way to make himself part of the crowd. The book has quick easy to r I received this book at part of a Goodreads giveaway. This book makes you feel like you sat down with Todd in his living room with a couple of beers and he told you some stories about his life. While he does cover some heavy topics, even those are handled with Todd's trademark humor. It's very easy to see yourself in many of the situations Todd outlines in the book. Much of his life he seems like an outsider who uses stand up as a way to make himself part of the crowd. The book has quick easy to read chapters and I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys biographies of comedians or similar entertainers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Miller

    If you are a comedy wonk - like I am. this book is amazing. If you're not, it seems like a very belabored coming out story. The (very) short chapters make it an easy read, but there isn't too much depth. Todd clearly is conflicted about coming out, but there is little information about the angst he must have been feeling. He talks about fights with Chris, but there is no explanation, no depth. His coming out was a tremendous moment in stand-up (the WTF interview was awesome) but, to the average p If you are a comedy wonk - like I am. this book is amazing. If you're not, it seems like a very belabored coming out story. The (very) short chapters make it an easy read, but there isn't too much depth. Todd clearly is conflicted about coming out, but there is little information about the angst he must have been feeling. He talks about fights with Chris, but there is no explanation, no depth. His coming out was a tremendous moment in stand-up (the WTF interview was awesome) but, to the average person, not much seems dramatic. Todd, I admire you. love your comedy and thank you for coming out. But I just don't think your autobiography does your challenge(s) justice.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Hentyal

    This review is probably a bit biased because I love Todd Glass. However, fans of his can probably agree that the things that make his stand up great are the same that made this book so enjoyable. He's genuinely nice and funny and willing to share his struggles (but, you know, not in an annoying, whiny way). He makes every issue relatable, whether or not it's something the reader has actually gone through. We've all had things we couldn't admit to our loved ones, things that we've struggled with, This review is probably a bit biased because I love Todd Glass. However, fans of his can probably agree that the things that make his stand up great are the same that made this book so enjoyable. He's genuinely nice and funny and willing to share his struggles (but, you know, not in an annoying, whiny way). He makes every issue relatable, whether or not it's something the reader has actually gone through. We've all had things we couldn't admit to our loved ones, things that we've struggled with, etc. This book talks about those things in a very open, funny way. It also makes you appreciate the good things. Loved the quote he used at the end.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Will

    Great book by a comedian about his life before and after coming out as a gay man in his late 40s. In this modern age (and living in a liberal city, as I do) this seems like a really late age to come out, but his experience gives a really unique perspective on this issue. His messages of tolerance are both hilarious and true. I love Todd as a comedian, and the only thing that kept me from giving it 5 stars was because of a lot of this material had been covered in his podcast before. I read it two Great book by a comedian about his life before and after coming out as a gay man in his late 40s. In this modern age (and living in a liberal city, as I do) this seems like a really late age to come out, but his experience gives a really unique perspective on this issue. His messages of tolerance are both hilarious and true. I love Todd as a comedian, and the only thing that kept me from giving it 5 stars was because of a lot of this material had been covered in his podcast before. I read it two days of air travel and loved it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Georgette

    I put it under humor..because he is a comedian. I just did not mesh with this book at all. There are some true moments of levity amongst the "humor" but a lot of it, well, just didn't strike me as funny. I guess this is what I get for reading a book by a comedian whose material I am not very familiar with. I'm sure his true fans will enjoy this look inside and behind the scenes of the comedy scene, I just didn't dig it. I think his deciding to come out at age 48 is inspiring and definitely was o I put it under humor..because he is a comedian. I just did not mesh with this book at all. There are some true moments of levity amongst the "humor" but a lot of it, well, just didn't strike me as funny. I guess this is what I get for reading a book by a comedian whose material I am not very familiar with. I'm sure his true fans will enjoy this look inside and behind the scenes of the comedy scene, I just didn't dig it. I think his deciding to come out at age 48 is inspiring and definitely was one of the best parts of his biography...but again, it just wasn't my aquarium of exotic fish.

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