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Amazing Spider-Man: Peter Parker - The One and Only

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It's a celebration of the world's greatest super hero as some of Marvel's most talented creators spin tales of the original Spider-Man: Peter Parker! With a blizzard crippling New York City, Spider-Man must protect the city - but Aunt May's life is in danger! What is the Black Lodge? And how has Spider-Man been trapped there, surrounded by his deadliest foes? Spider-Man te It's a celebration of the world's greatest super hero as some of Marvel's most talented creators spin tales of the original Spider-Man: Peter Parker! With a blizzard crippling New York City, Spider-Man must protect the city - but Aunt May's life is in danger! What is the Black Lodge? And how has Spider-Man been trapped there, surrounded by his deadliest foes? Spider-Man teams up with his old flame the Black Cat to bust an international art thievery ring! A young boy learns that he can't rely on super heroes like Spider-Man to stand up against bullies! Spidey and the Human Torch must stop an apocalyptic future by fighting - the Fantastic Four?! Finally, it's a touching tale as a young child risks his life to save Spider-Man's! COLLECTING: Amazing Spider-Man 700.1-700.5


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It's a celebration of the world's greatest super hero as some of Marvel's most talented creators spin tales of the original Spider-Man: Peter Parker! With a blizzard crippling New York City, Spider-Man must protect the city - but Aunt May's life is in danger! What is the Black Lodge? And how has Spider-Man been trapped there, surrounded by his deadliest foes? Spider-Man te It's a celebration of the world's greatest super hero as some of Marvel's most talented creators spin tales of the original Spider-Man: Peter Parker! With a blizzard crippling New York City, Spider-Man must protect the city - but Aunt May's life is in danger! What is the Black Lodge? And how has Spider-Man been trapped there, surrounded by his deadliest foes? Spider-Man teams up with his old flame the Black Cat to bust an international art thievery ring! A young boy learns that he can't rely on super heroes like Spider-Man to stand up against bullies! Spidey and the Human Torch must stop an apocalyptic future by fighting - the Fantastic Four?! Finally, it's a touching tale as a young child risks his life to save Spider-Man's! COLLECTING: Amazing Spider-Man 700.1-700.5

30 review for Amazing Spider-Man: Peter Parker - The One and Only

  1. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    This came out right when Peter Parker returns after the entire Superior Spider-Man run and for something the should be celebrating the return, it's pretty lame. There are multiple stories but none of them really feel like they are reminding you of why Peter is a hero or what makes him so special. They just felt like "regular" Spider-Man stories with maybe the exception of the second arc. It has almost a horror movie feel to it, at least in the first issue, when SM is trapped in a secret hospital This came out right when Peter Parker returns after the entire Superior Spider-Man run and for something the should be celebrating the return, it's pretty lame. There are multiple stories but none of them really feel like they are reminding you of why Peter is a hero or what makes him so special. They just felt like "regular" Spider-Man stories with maybe the exception of the second arc. It has almost a horror movie feel to it, at least in the first issue, when SM is trapped in a secret hospital only for criminals. In another one, SM is barely even in it! In the end, this just seemed like a way for Marvel to get more cash, banking on a special event.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hannah K

    My random intro to the world of superhero comics did not particularly inspire me to fandom. They weren't bad (apart from some mild language), just not that great. I'm now wavering between digging up a better one and giving up on the genre altogether. Any suggestions, superhero fans? My random intro to the world of superhero comics did not particularly inspire me to fandom. They weren't bad (apart from some mild language), just not that great. I'm now wavering between digging up a better one and giving up on the genre altogether. Any suggestions, superhero fans?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    While Doc Ock was inhabiting Spidey's body, Marvel decided to appease fans who wanted Peter Parker back with a couple of one-off stories with Peter Parker fully in control of things. The result is this collection of stories that feature Peter Parker front and center as the Amazing Spider-Man. The first two stories in the collection are the highlight, including one in which Pete must resort to his secret identity and web across town to try and save Aunt May during a blizzard. Along the way, Peter While Doc Ock was inhabiting Spidey's body, Marvel decided to appease fans who wanted Peter Parker back with a couple of one-off stories with Peter Parker fully in control of things. The result is this collection of stories that feature Peter Parker front and center as the Amazing Spider-Man. The first two stories in the collection are the highlight, including one in which Pete must resort to his secret identity and web across town to try and save Aunt May during a blizzard. Along the way, Peter encounters several others who need the help of his famous secret identity and is forced to weigh whether stopping to help them could mean that Aunt May will die because of his delay (a tree broke a window at her house and her power and furnace are out due to the weather). In many ways, this feels like the classic Peter Parker dilemma of who does he feel a "great responsibility" to the most. Combine a great story with some terrific art work (Spidey really stands out against the mostly white background of the blizzard) and you've got an intriguing little story that feels like the early days when Smilin' Stan Lee was writing Spidey stories. The next story is just as good, looking at just how the various villains Spidey and company go up against get health care and patched up. A black market hospital specializing in the treatment of super villains has opened up and Spidey lands there following a battle in which he gets burns to over 80% of his body. It's one of those questions that seems so obvious -- once someone else has asked it, of course. The big problem I have with this one is that it's a two-part story and it feels a bit stretched thin by the time we get to the second installment. There's a lot of your typical Spider-Man trading of punches that help fill out the second installment and after a few pages it begins to wear a bit thin. But again, the art work is good and solid enough and the idea intriguing enough that I give them props for shining a light into an unexplored area of the Spidey universe. The rest of the stories here aren't quite up to the standards of these two, though the last one about a young boy who asks himself "What Would Spider-Man Do?" is of particular note. I will warn you that it's a bit melancholy in tone and a downer to end the book. But don't let that put you off this collection. It's a nice reminder of just what makes Spider-Man Spider-Man.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ernest

    This volume has several self-contained stories involving Spider-Man in various situations, written in universe but not being tied to then-current storylines. One story sees Spider-Man struggle with the dilemma of helping others verses helping Aunt May, another has Spider-Man inadvertently taken to a treatment facility for injured supervillains, yet another involves a young boy, bullies and a ‘what would Spider-Man do’ motto. The art is fine and writing nothing to complain about, but there is just This volume has several self-contained stories involving Spider-Man in various situations, written in universe but not being tied to then-current storylines. One story sees Spider-Man struggle with the dilemma of helping others verses helping Aunt May, another has Spider-Man inadvertently taken to a treatment facility for injured supervillains, yet another involves a young boy, bullies and a ‘what would Spider-Man do’ motto. The art is fine and writing nothing to complain about, but there is just nothing substantial in this volume. It is not that every volume must have significant consequences, or explore the depths of the character (although the first story attempted to do that). Rather, it is just that this volume felt lacking in substance, to be read if once came across it without being memorable or even worth seeking out.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brini

    The blizzard story was exceptional. No villains, just forces of nature and the impulse to save people despite the possibility of severe consequences. The simplicity of it made it brilliant. Same goes for the story with the bullied kid. [It was also interesting to look behind the scenes and learn a few things about the creation of a comic book.]

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    A whole bunch of really small very personal Peter Parker stories that are also Spider-man stories. Not really a through story, not really a day-in-the-life and not necessarily exactly in a continuity frame. But just really good. And a bonus kind of similar Black Cat story as well. And a kind of silly FF/Spider-man team up that is done seriously. Just a real simple good book. 4.5 of 5.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rocky Sunico

    Wasn't sure how this comic was going to play out but I'm still a Spider-Man fan so I took the plunge. The stories in this book all have a somewhat poignant edge to them - and yes even the story about the hospital for super-villains. At the end of the day, the focus of the stories is all about Peter Parker's individual resilience and perseverance in the face of adversity. Even when he's up against the wall with no one in a position to help him and with limited resources, he keeps on fighting and Wasn't sure how this comic was going to play out but I'm still a Spider-Man fan so I took the plunge. The stories in this book all have a somewhat poignant edge to them - and yes even the story about the hospital for super-villains. At the end of the day, the focus of the stories is all about Peter Parker's individual resilience and perseverance in the face of adversity. Even when he's up against the wall with no one in a position to help him and with limited resources, he keeps on fighting and ends up being a model for other people to do better. This is not about a complicated super-villain plot to take over the world. In the end, it's about a man doing the right then whenever he can each and every day.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    Rather than an epic storyline, this edition is a collection of shorter Spider-Man tales, consciously harkening back to the earlier days of the series when multi-part adventures were the exception rather than the rule. As such, this serves as a great reminder of what initially made Spider-Man such fun to read in the first place. Here’s hoping that Marvel can continue to remember that on occasion.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    A series of short stories showing off why Peter is a hero. I particularly liked the blizzard one, where he does everything he physically can to help people. Bearing in mind his suit isn't very warm, this is even more impressive. Spiderman also helps a kid who is bullied. This is a great book that will remind you why you like Spiderman so much. A series of short stories showing off why Peter is a hero. I particularly liked the blizzard one, where he does everything he physically can to help people. Bearing in mind his suit isn't very warm, this is even more impressive. Spiderman also helps a kid who is bullied. This is a great book that will remind you why you like Spiderman so much.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    An anthology celebration hampered by none of the stories quite catching. Such little vignettes can be lovely done right, and some of these (Klaus Janson's blizzard, Emma Rios' Black Cat) are at least pleasing to the eye, but the scripts feel more like filler than fresh insights. Even the promising set-up of Joe Casey writing a secret supervillain hospital, with Parker an incognito patient, somehow falls flat. An anthology celebration hampered by none of the stories quite catching. Such little vignettes can be lovely done right, and some of these (Klaus Janson's blizzard, Emma Rios' Black Cat) are at least pleasing to the eye, but the scripts feel more like filler than fresh insights. Even the promising set-up of Joe Casey writing a secret supervillain hospital, with Parker an incognito patient, somehow falls flat.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Some modest heroics (courtesy of David Morrell, who also authored the very good 'Captain America: The Chosen'), the usual wisecracks / humor, suspense, and heartfelt moments -- this was a fine web of Spidey tales. Some modest heroics (courtesy of David Morrell, who also authored the very good 'Captain America: The Chosen'), the usual wisecracks / humor, suspense, and heartfelt moments -- this was a fine web of Spidey tales.

  12. 4 out of 5

    B

    This is just a bunch of short stories. The one about evil Night Nurse was the most intriguing but I do not think I wound up liking it that much in the execution.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Not particularly a fan of this book as an overall. Some were fun but most of them just were lacking. Frost: 2 stars A storm is coming to hit New York and an exhausted Peter needs to make some potentially life-altering decisions in the face of its actions. I found this one severely lacking in how it was executed. Peter spends half of this strip cold, far too cold, when not anybody else really is. He's affected more than usual making it seem like something more must be going on. (Spoiler, it's not!) Not particularly a fan of this book as an overall. Some were fun but most of them just were lacking. Frost: 2 stars A storm is coming to hit New York and an exhausted Peter needs to make some potentially life-altering decisions in the face of its actions. I found this one severely lacking in how it was executed. Peter spends half of this strip cold, far too cold, when not anybody else really is. He's affected more than usual making it seem like something more must be going on. (Spoiler, it's not!) The Black Lodge: 2 stars When injured in a fight Peter accidentally gets taken in by the villains version of The Night Nurse. While healing in this hospital he is in grave danger. This strip was just really odd. The doctors and nurses never really sold themselves in their jobs for me and I can't believe Peter didn't just slip out a window when the time came. Cat and Mouse: 3 stars Black Cat is looking into who is stealing masterpiece paintings and then destroying them, leaving them in Central Park. When there she runs into someone unexpected. This one was interesting fast and well....fast. Wished it had two parts this time. Maybe with the actual Spidey in the second part. Casey Mitchell: 2 stars A boy getting bullied seeks out Spider-Man for help. I liked how this captured the true desperation of someone bullied, how you begin to think that anything to get out can be reasonable, until you go that bit to far and start to wonder. I also liked how the kid got out of getting his ass kicked at the end- though I found the solution a little naive. Save The Universe: 5 stars Johnny Storm comes to Peter with a case and a problem- if Reed gets a hold of that case today the world will end! This one was a lot of fun. With the interactions between Peter, the Fantastic Four, and MJ, it was really light, interesting, and fun to read. The ending was also really amusing. A truly well executed one off and my favourite in this book! WWSD: 4 stars When stopping a bank robbery a kid gets shot in an attempt to protect Spider-Man. This one was the most emotionally heavy of the entire book. Playing on Peter's classic fear of others getting hurt- and no less this time it was someone he didn't know, someone that wouldn't have been hurt if they had let him do his job. Spidey visits the hospital where he brought the kid and is very distraught, uncertain of how to approach this- why would the kid try to save him when he was alright? Did he need to watch out for bystanders being 'idiots' when he tried to save anyone? The conversations are the lifeblood of this one and they are pretty heavy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Edoardo Albert

    Comics, and specifically Marvel Comics, filled my life when I was young - or they did so far as I was able to get hold of them. This was the 1970s: pre-internet, pre distribution networks, pre globalised content providers. It was no easy task finding Marvel Comics in a north London suburb. There was the Marvel British imprint, which reprinted the American originals in a weekly black-and-white format and which was my first exposure to Marvel comics, but of the American colour monthlies, there was Comics, and specifically Marvel Comics, filled my life when I was young - or they did so far as I was able to get hold of them. This was the 1970s: pre-internet, pre distribution networks, pre globalised content providers. It was no easy task finding Marvel Comics in a north London suburb. There was the Marvel British imprint, which reprinted the American originals in a weekly black-and-white format and which was my first exposure to Marvel comics, but of the American colour monthlies, there was often no sign. From visiting the newspaper shops around me - there were a lot more them then, before the internet decimated print - I found one or two that occasionally stocked original Marvel comics. Some of these had been minimally rebranded for the British market - their price was in pence rather than cents (which should give you an idea of how much prices have increased) - but some were available in the exotic dollar format. These were the ones I prized, with their stamp-sized label affirming that they were Approved by the Comics Code Authority. I could never tell which comics would come in on any given month, which made my collection rather haphazard, but Spider-Man was one of the most regular and the adventures of Peter Parker - geeky, science obsessed, shy - became mine because I was also geeky, science obsessed and shy. But, slowly, comics slipped into the past. Only for me to find, many years later, that comics have come round again and those people who grew up with are busy rediscovering them, while children seeing the Marvel and DC films are absorbing the comic book universes without even, necessarily, reading any comics. So, I thought I'd take a read backwards. Nowadays, the easiest way to do so is via the book size reissues of a collection of comics, but I've found those frustrating. For some reason, Marvel and DC both have a tendency to publish part of a multi-part story, only for the book to finish before the story does. Is this to make readers buy the next part? For my part, this reader finds the practice annoying and, rather than buying the continuation, it puts me off going anywhere near the story again. So it was good to find, in this collection of Spider-Man stories, a number of complete, self-contained stories that didn't go anywhere, that didn't want to do anything other than to tell a good story and finish it off. And they did. The issue by thriller writer David Morrell was particularly good.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Collections like this always make me wary, because they're by multiple writers/artists, and as a result it's really difficult to review them overall. This collection contains the anniversary issues #700.1-700.5 which were released last year to commemorate Peter Parker whilst Otto Octavius was running around as the Superior Spider-Man, and it's really nice to say that I can recommend almost every story in this collection for a change. The opening story, Frost, is excellent, really heartfelt and yo Collections like this always make me wary, because they're by multiple writers/artists, and as a result it's really difficult to review them overall. This collection contains the anniversary issues #700.1-700.5 which were released last year to commemorate Peter Parker whilst Otto Octavius was running around as the Superior Spider-Man, and it's really nice to say that I can recommend almost every story in this collection for a change. The opening story, Frost, is excellent, really heartfelt and you can feel the pain that Peter is going through - the artwork by the masterful Klaus Janson is a big part of that, but the script is strong and the story itself is very straight forward and doesn't require supervillains to make it better. The second story, The Black Lodge, explores a really good idea, although it does devolve into a standard superhero slug-fest later on. I'd like to see this place pop up again in the main series, but I have a feeling it won't. The art here is serviceable but nothing special from Timothy Green II. Next comes a Black Cat short story which is quite good but kind of defeats the point of a series about Peter Parker when he's not in it at all, but it's all penciled by the superb Emma Rios, so it gets a pass for that. And bringing up the rear are some short stories featuring the Fantastic Four (which is daft, but enjoyable), a child who needs Spider-Man's help for the most unorthodox reason (which is alright, but a little far-fetched), and then a very sad story to close the volume called 'What Would Spider-Man Do?'. It's rare that an anthology book will be this good - even the short stories aren't that bad, and the longer stories, especially Frost, are well worth the price of admission here. I can see most people skipping this trade because it's hardly important in the grand scheme of things, but it's worth a look if you fancy it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Figueroa

    These tales appeared when we were starting a period with Otto Octavius as the Superior Spider-man. They were a small mirage with Peter Parker as Spider-man (there is actually one story were Felicia Hardy is the protagonist) for those that threatened to kill Dan Slott because of what he had just done. Not really transcending, but hey, you get art from Klaus Janson in the first one, and authors that are different form the norm.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    celebrating Peter Parker's Spider-man (looking back at a time when Doc Oc was in control of Parker's body.....it's a comic book, man!) celebrating Peter Parker's Spider-man (looking back at a time when Doc Oc was in control of Parker's body.....it's a comic book, man!)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Simone

    Se volete leggere la mia recensione, cliccate qui! http://ascwblog.blogspot.it/2016/03/u... Se volete leggere la mia recensione, cliccate qui! http://ascwblog.blogspot.it/2016/03/u...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Individual issues on marvel unlimited

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Carlson

    David Morrell story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Very enjoyable not just Spider-Man facing off against baddies. Well spaced out with use of images and space to tell the story not just endless text. I like space in my stories.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David

    Contains a funny Spidy/Torch team up story. The rest, aside from a terrible tale by the great thriller author Morrel, is decent but not worth the ticket price.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claudio

    Much like Daredevil: Dark Nights, this book takes us through self-contained adventures featuring everyone's favorite webhead. Much like Daredevil: Dark Nights, this book takes us through self-contained adventures featuring everyone's favorite webhead.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Louis Lipp

  25. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bill Bryant

  29. 4 out of 5

    Clay

  30. 5 out of 5

    G

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