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The Graveyard Book, Volume 1

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The first volume of a glorious two-volume, four-color graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman's #1 New York Times bestselling and Newbery Medal-winning novel The Graveyard Book, adapted by P. Craig Russell and illustrated by an extraordinary team of renowned artists. Inventive, chilling, and filled with wonder, Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book reaches new heights in this st The first volume of a glorious two-volume, four-color graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman's #1 New York Times bestselling and Newbery Medal-winning novel The Graveyard Book, adapted by P. Craig Russell and illustrated by an extraordinary team of renowned artists. Inventive, chilling, and filled with wonder, Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book reaches new heights in this stunning adaptation. Artists Kevin Nowlan, P. Craig Russell, Tony Harris, Scott Hampton, Galen Showman, Jill Thompson, and Stephen B. Scott lend their own signature styles to create an imaginatively diverse and yet cohesive interpretation of Neil Gaiman's luminous novel. Volume One contains Chapter One through the Interlude, while Volume Two will include Chapter Six to the end.


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The first volume of a glorious two-volume, four-color graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman's #1 New York Times bestselling and Newbery Medal-winning novel The Graveyard Book, adapted by P. Craig Russell and illustrated by an extraordinary team of renowned artists. Inventive, chilling, and filled with wonder, Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book reaches new heights in this st The first volume of a glorious two-volume, four-color graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman's #1 New York Times bestselling and Newbery Medal-winning novel The Graveyard Book, adapted by P. Craig Russell and illustrated by an extraordinary team of renowned artists. Inventive, chilling, and filled with wonder, Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book reaches new heights in this stunning adaptation. Artists Kevin Nowlan, P. Craig Russell, Tony Harris, Scott Hampton, Galen Showman, Jill Thompson, and Stephen B. Scott lend their own signature styles to create an imaginatively diverse and yet cohesive interpretation of Neil Gaiman's luminous novel. Volume One contains Chapter One through the Interlude, while Volume Two will include Chapter Six to the end.

30 review for The Graveyard Book, Volume 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jesse (JesseTheReader)

    OH MAN. I loved this so much! I read it in one sitting. I love the fact that several artists contributed to this book! It made for an interesting graphic novel full of beautiful artwork.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adam Silvera

    So good. I bought Volume 2 before I was even finished with this one. Excited to go back one day and read the actual novel. This is my favorite Neil Gaiman story! And I believe there's a Coraline graphic novel out there as well by the same team I want to check out. Starting Volume 2 tomorrow! So good. I bought Volume 2 before I was even finished with this one. Excited to go back one day and read the actual novel. This is my favorite Neil Gaiman story! And I believe there's a Coraline graphic novel out there as well by the same team I want to check out. Starting Volume 2 tomorrow!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Korrina (OwlCrate)

    Really great companion for the original novel. I especially loved the depiction of Silas.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    The book by Neil Gaiman is one of my top 10 all time favorite books. There is nothing like it out there. Unique and fresh and gothic. Now, it has been adapted into a graphic novel. What I like about this, is I can read it in much shorter time and enjoy it. A few details had already begun to fade from my mind and now they are back. Bod is an orphan taken in by residents of a graveyard. He has their protection as well. Silas is his guardian and he is a Vampire. Bod is short for Nobody Owens. He is The book by Neil Gaiman is one of my top 10 all time favorite books. There is nothing like it out there. Unique and fresh and gothic. Now, it has been adapted into a graphic novel. What I like about this, is I can read it in much shorter time and enjoy it. A few details had already begun to fade from my mind and now they are back. Bod is an orphan taken in by residents of a graveyard. He has their protection as well. Silas is his guardian and he is a Vampire. Bod is short for Nobody Owens. He is a boy that lives among tombstones and ghosts and other things. He gets lessons and advice from dead people. It is a wonderful little story. It's funny, my mom read this after I told her how good it was and she did not like the story. I can't understand. We like many of the same stories and she was not a fan. I guess I have a bit darker streak than she does at times. I can't wait to finish the story with Vol. 2. I think my favorite part of the whole thing was the Danse Macabrae. Many people wouldn't have put that in the story, but it takes it to a whole new level and adds something special and magical. It is so memorable. This is Gaiman at this best in my opinion. I can go on and on, but I will leave it at this. If you don't want to read the whole book, this is a great way to read the story. How do the Brits have such a great literary history. I guess 2,000 years of history does help or so. I also think it's in the water.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Dawn

    4,5* - I absolutely loved this! Both the art and the story were so entertaining and the atmosphere was perfect. I'm really looking forward to part 2. I already ordered it lol. 4,5* - I absolutely loved this! Both the art and the story were so entertaining and the atmosphere was perfect. I'm really looking forward to part 2. I already ordered it lol.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    Much like The Graveyard Book, the graphic novel is told through vignettes of Nobody Owens' life. Sometimes the characters were beautiful, sometimes ugly and sometimes very "meh" in appearance. The thing is, I could be talking about the same person. Each vignette had a different artist , which was slightly disconcerting. As soon as I get used to one portrayal of a character - we'd be on to the next artist. I like consistency. A few times the characters appeared so differently that I needed cont Much like The Graveyard Book, the graphic novel is told through vignettes of Nobody Owens' life. Sometimes the characters were beautiful, sometimes ugly and sometimes very "meh" in appearance. The thing is, I could be talking about the same person. Each vignette had a different artist , which was slightly disconcerting. As soon as I get used to one portrayal of a character - we'd be on to the next artist. I like consistency. A few times the characters appeared so differently that I needed context clues to match their image to their persona. Other than that - this was a true book-to-graphic novel adaption. I enjoyed experiencing the book through a new media. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com I thought this graphic novel was awesome! I loved the fact that Bod (Nobody Owens) lived in the graveyard! Through some unfortunate events his family were killed, but he had wandered off to the graveyard before he could be killed. He was still just a toddler. The ghosts from the graveyard and Silas, whom I'm assuming is a vampire, take him in and raise him! :) I totally love it! The graphics were awesome! Bod got into some hairy situations but always got out o www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com I thought this graphic novel was awesome! I loved the fact that Bod (Nobody Owens) lived in the graveyard! Through some unfortunate events his family were killed, but he had wandered off to the graveyard before he could be killed. He was still just a toddler. The ghosts from the graveyard and Silas, whom I'm assuming is a vampire, take him in and raise him! :) I totally love it! The graphics were awesome! Bod got into some hairy situations but always got out of them with the help of some friends. I'm afraid the way this first volume ended that something bad or sad is coming up in the next one. I look forward to reading it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    It takes a village graveyard to raise a child. A little live boy is taught the ways of the world by the spectral residents of a cemetery. I've not read Gaiman's original book, but I really enjoyed this graphic adaptation of the story. Can't wait to start volume II. It takes a village graveyard to raise a child. A little live boy is taught the ways of the world by the spectral residents of a cemetery. I've not read Gaiman's original book, but I really enjoyed this graphic adaptation of the story. Can't wait to start volume II.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I absolutely ADORED every single page in this graphic novel adaptation of The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. It's like holding magic in your hands! P. Craig Russell has managed to perfectly capture Gaiman's story in this illustrated form and reunites the reader once again with Nobody Owens (aka Bod), his mysterious guardian, Silas, the equally mysterious Miss Lupescu and the witch, Liza Hempstock (who may be related to Lettie from The Ocean at the End of the Lane). This graphic novel ticks all of I absolutely ADORED every single page in this graphic novel adaptation of The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. It's like holding magic in your hands! P. Craig Russell has managed to perfectly capture Gaiman's story in this illustrated form and reunites the reader once again with Nobody Owens (aka Bod), his mysterious guardian, Silas, the equally mysterious Miss Lupescu and the witch, Liza Hempstock (who may be related to Lettie from The Ocean at the End of the Lane). This graphic novel ticks all of the boxes: great story line, fantastic illustrations, wonderful dialogue, brilliant characterisation, etc. What makes this adaptation even more special is the number of illustrators who have lent their artistic ability to this book (each chapter has been illustrated by a separate artist). Now, usually, this could mean a varied depiction of the same characters/setting which some readers might find distracting. This is not the case here. The artists have all managed to convey the characters in an incredibly similar way creating continuity throughout. Each chapter was perfect in its own way; it starts with the man Jack searching for Nobody Owens (who is a baby when the story opens), how Bod makes a friend who visits the graveyard from time to time, his adventures upon leaving the graveyard (which he is forbidden to do since it isn't safe for him (Bod goes not realise that the man Jack is after him)) and finally the danse macabre, uniting the living and the dead for one night. Out of all of the chapters, my favourite one has to be Chapter 3 - The Hounds of God, which was a perfect story in itself and was reminiscent of Gaiman's Sandman in places. This was the story which touched me the most and left me feeling like I had been on a great adventure. The quality of the storytelling is something else entirely and is very poetic and dream-like. I can see why it is so popular! Overall, a fantastic visual read which certainly won't disappoint. The nice thing about this adaptation is that you don't have to read Gaiman's book first to understand it - the graphic novel stands alone and is a complete entity in itself (well, relatively complete). All that remains is for me to delve straight into volume 2!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett Readz and Runz....Through Novel Time & Distance

    Saw this on the shelf at the local library and just picked it up. It looked like the perfect little read for in between and the change of weather. This is an adaptation by P. Craig Russell of Neil Gaiman’s award winning novel ‘The Graveyard Book’. It contains chapter one through the interlude. Volume two includes chapter six through the end. Though the concept seemed a bit strange at first, I enjoyed Nobody Owens character and his little adventures around the graveyard. His primary care taker Si Saw this on the shelf at the local library and just picked it up. It looked like the perfect little read for in between and the change of weather. This is an adaptation by P. Craig Russell of Neil Gaiman’s award winning novel ‘The Graveyard Book’. It contains chapter one through the interlude. Volume two includes chapter six through the end. Though the concept seemed a bit strange at first, I enjoyed Nobody Owens character and his little adventures around the graveyard. His primary care taker Silas is really one of the reasons I picked this graphic novel up. He appears to resemble Dracula in many ways and I am still trying to figure out his role, abilities and secrets. The read was entertaining and peaked my interest to pick up volume two as well as the original novel. As this one ended on a cliffhanger, I am sure it won’t disappoint.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    One night, a man murders a family with a knife, except for a toddler who manages to escape to a nearby graveyard. There, he is kept safe, named Bod (short for Nobody) and raised by an Addams Family assortment of ghosts, vampires, and werewolves. The story follows his adventures as a 10 year old exploring the graveyard and its curious inhabitants as he learns Important Life Lessons. I like Neil Gaiman’s comics and short stories but I’ve never really enjoyed his novels in the way a lot of other rea One night, a man murders a family with a knife, except for a toddler who manages to escape to a nearby graveyard. There, he is kept safe, named Bod (short for Nobody) and raised by an Addams Family assortment of ghosts, vampires, and werewolves. The story follows his adventures as a 10 year old exploring the graveyard and its curious inhabitants as he learns Important Life Lessons. I like Neil Gaiman’s comics and short stories but I’ve never really enjoyed his novels in the way a lot of other readers have. American Gods was interminably long, so much so that I ended up abandoning it, while I’ve finished a few of his other novels - Anansi Boys, Stardust, Neverwhere - without really being that impressed with them. This trend continued with the award-winning bestseller, The Graveyard Book, which was much too slow and mundane for my taste so I dropped it after a few chapters. But I was able to get through P. Craig Russell’s graphic adaptation of Gaiman’s celebrated story which divides up the book into two volumes. And “get through” it is about the best I can say for this book because, though the adaptation features the work of many excellent artists, my problems with the pacing and unremarkable nature of the story itself still persist so I can’t say I loved it - but I did finish this time. The story is episodic with each chapter drawn by a different artist taking in a different adventure. Bod meets another human girl and the two meet an ancient ghost in the oldest grave. Bod’s protector, the vampire Silas, temporarily leaves him in the care of Miss Lupescu and suddenly a large wolf is seen skulking around the graveyard (d’you think they might be connected!?) before he’s captured by some ghouls and taken to their blighted home of Ghulheim. Later he tries to give a witch’s ghost her own headstone but finds trouble with a pair of shady antiques dealers. The book ends with the living and the dead dancing the Danse Macabre at midnight. A lot of the stories felt like Enid Blyton-esque tales given the most superficial of “edges” by having the inclusion of gothic horror staples that are nevertheless rendered totally safe. I can see this appealing to younger readers if only for perhaps not having had much experience with occult books - like a primer for Stephen King, Shirley Jackson, etc. - but for older readers like myself, I think the stories are a bit too simplistic to fully engage. The stories are also strangely uncreative with Gaiman taking bits and pieces of folkloric detail and meshing them with his dreary cast. Details like how “witches” were killed hundreds of years ago, how the Romans buried their dead, and names like Danse Macabre are all fairly well known in a general kind of way, so reading about them here isn’t terribly interesting or revelatory. The main “character” – a term I use for convenience only - is a blank canvas. Maybe that was Gaiman’s intent, having named him Nobody to perhaps focus on the rest of the seemingly more colourful cast, but unfortunately none of the other characters especially stand out. The vampire is a dull kindly vampire, as is the werewolf, and the ghosts are just ghosts who act like people. There’s no original creation here and no memorable characterisation. The art is better than the lacklustre narrative and writing. P. Craig Russell leads a talented roster of artists that includes Jill Thompson, Tony Harris, Galen Showman, Kevin Nowlan, Scott Hampton, and Stephen B. Scott, all of whom produce some lovely art. Curiously though, with the exception of Harris and Hampton’s contributions on the Miss Lupescu/Ghulheim story, the art is almost uniformly similar - a peculiar quality as you’d think the artists would all have different styles. Having seen some of the artists’ previous works, Thompson’s art in particular feels restrained as does Russell’s, perhaps to match the others’ art and lend the book a stable look – again, a very safe approach. Lovern Kindzierski, the colourist, does fine work, giving the pages a bright, lively quality despite the settings being mostly nocturnal and potentially drab. In the end, The Graveyard Book, Volume 1 is a self-conscious attempt at being a graphic novel, rather than a comic. In adapting Gaiman’s novel, P. Craig Russell has decided to put as much of the original into his version and as such it loses the energy and pace that a comic can have over a prose novel. A lot of the stories could’ve benefitted from a less strenuous adherence to the source material to become its own thing. Russell could’ve trimmed Gaiman’s prose and storytelling to become leaner and allowed for pictures to inform the story rather than relying on words - a bizarre critique to make of an experienced artist who should know this better than anyone. Russell could’ve limited the chapter stories to fit 20 pages and the adaptation could’ve been one volume rather than two. As it is, The Graveyard Book, Volume 1 succeeds in being slightly less plodding than Gaiman’s sluggish story, and as such is only a decent adaptation when it could’ve been greater if Russell had loosened his grip on the reins and taken some chances. It does have some delightful art though and if you want to read The Graveyard Book, I would definitely recommend the graphic version over the original novel.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    "It is neither fair nor unfair. It simply is." I love Bod and Silas so much for different reasons, of course. I fell in love with that animal too. And all the strange characters, ghosts, the friendship between Bod and Scarlett. I love how the story started. Gruesome but gripping. Gaiman knows how to keep you hooked. Granted I haven't completed the original book (I started it months ago but gave it up because I was in a book hangover. But yes, read this book with Gaiman narrating the audiobook. It's am "It is neither fair nor unfair. It simply is." I love Bod and Silas so much for different reasons, of course. I fell in love with that animal too. And all the strange characters, ghosts, the friendship between Bod and Scarlett. I love how the story started. Gruesome but gripping. Gaiman knows how to keep you hooked. Granted I haven't completed the original book (I started it months ago but gave it up because I was in a book hangover. But yes, read this book with Gaiman narrating the audiobook. It's amazing!). I got really curious about the story. And yes, I got the graphic novels yesterday, so why not?! This is the story of a boy brought up by paranormal beings in a graveyard. The boy was content with whatever he had until a new world of education and knowledge was opened up to him by unexpected friends and acquaintances. It also represented well the pangs and anxiety resulting from separation. The graphics is amazing! The story and the art sequence is one of the best in graphic novels I have read so far. (Do not expect dialogue bubbles and the general artstyle as in comics.) For me, this book is more than just a horror story. It defines found family, friendship and, most importantly, it defines fears that are not real but we constantly live with and facing your enemies which promise the greatest pleasures in life but actually wait to gobble you up. Most importantly it defines hope. The later half is filled with so much adventure that it's just impossible to calm down. It's a world of nightmarish entertainment! ***Favourite lines: *Miss Lupescu: Name the different kinds of people. *Bod: The living. Er, the dead. Cats? (🤦☺️☺️☺️☺️☺️😆) *"You are ignorant. And you are content to be ignorant, which is worse." *"I will have died with all my memories." "But at least if I die, I will have died as myself." *"Everything in its season." *"Joy filled his chest and his head, leaving no room for anything else." I love his writing. Filled with rhythm and so fantastical! Ghosts and ghouls?! Sign me in for more! (Let's move on to Part 2 🖤) ⛵⛵⛵⛵⛵⛵⛵

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patricija - aparecium_libri

    3.5 I think I'd like the book more. 3.5 I think I'd like the book more.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    I haven't had the chance to read The Graveyard Book in its original form and I was happy enough to have read it in the graphic novel adaptation first. The story, an orphaned boy raised in the unlikeliest of communities, is Neil Gaiman at the height of his powers. The story is dark, cold, warm and tender all at the same time. Truly, only a writer with talent such as Gaiman's could have accomplished thus. P. Craig Russell is one of the few talents able to work with Gaiman and turn his script into b I haven't had the chance to read The Graveyard Book in its original form and I was happy enough to have read it in the graphic novel adaptation first. The story, an orphaned boy raised in the unlikeliest of communities, is Neil Gaiman at the height of his powers. The story is dark, cold, warm and tender all at the same time. Truly, only a writer with talent such as Gaiman's could have accomplished thus. P. Craig Russell is one of the few talents able to work with Gaiman and turn his script into both the vision of the writer and the artist. It helps Russell is himself capable of writing at a top level to be able to turn The Graveyard Book into a true melding of both men's individual gifts.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steph Sinclair

    The artwork is breathtaking and I just couldn't look away from it. What's even cooler is that a different artist illustrates for each new chapter. Highly recommended, especially if you are a fan of the original book. The artwork is breathtaking and I just couldn't look away from it. What's even cooler is that a different artist illustrates for each new chapter. Highly recommended, especially if you are a fan of the original book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    One of the writers that inspire me is Neil Gaiman. I am envious of the way he masterfully creates worlds and tells his tales. The Graveyard Book is no exception. I wish I had in my possession the second volume, because you are definitely left wanting more. I could just read the actual book, lets be honest for a second, but then I would miss out on the wonderful illustrations. It must be said (in my opinion) that the imagery in this graphic novel isn’t my favourite. I put this down to it being ill One of the writers that inspire me is Neil Gaiman. I am envious of the way he masterfully creates worlds and tells his tales. The Graveyard Book is no exception. I wish I had in my possession the second volume, because you are definitely left wanting more. I could just read the actual book, lets be honest for a second, but then I would miss out on the wonderful illustrations. It must be said (in my opinion) that the imagery in this graphic novel isn’t my favourite. I put this down to it being illustrated by several wonderful people. Each style on their own is again, wonderful, but together and mixed throughout the novel..well it doesn’t go unnoticed. So far, since I haven’t actually completed the whole novel, I am really enjoying it. I know I would have a greater appreciation if I actually read the book as it definitely reads as short stories rather than chapters in a novel. The world is fantastic, with unique and historical elements embedded flawlessly. The characters are incredibly unique and you just marvel at Gaiman’s creativity. I have many a theory about what is really going on, but shouldn’t share them because of spoilers. And also, you should go and pick this one up. If not this version, then definitely the novel. I know I will.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Chung

    It was so nice to re-read this book in graphic novel form. Loved being able to see the illustrations while the story unfolded. I read this book a few years ago and was surprised while reading this graphic novel that I remembered so little of it the first time around. 4 stars for being a good story and for the illustrations. The Graveyard Book is about a boy named Bod (Nobody) Owens. When we first meet our protagonist he is a toddler who wanders into the graveyard. He was at the right place at the It was so nice to re-read this book in graphic novel form. Loved being able to see the illustrations while the story unfolded. I read this book a few years ago and was surprised while reading this graphic novel that I remembered so little of it the first time around. 4 stars for being a good story and for the illustrations. The Graveyard Book is about a boy named Bod (Nobody) Owens. When we first meet our protagonist he is a toddler who wanders into the graveyard. He was at the right place at the right time, because just before his trek up hill his family was murdered by the man Jack. The inhabitants of the graveyard decided that the baby could remain in the Graveyard and live among them. We go along with Bod's days as a child learning to read and write. We meet his friends and learn the histories of the dead around him. There are several main points of this story that I just completely forgot about the last time I read this book. I'm so happy to dive back into this world. Can't wait for volume 2.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tilly Booth

    I have been wanting to read The Graveyard Book for so long and when I saw the graphic novel edition I basically screamed. It was beautiful. I didn't even think twice before I bundled it up in my arms and proceeded to hand over money I shouldn't be spending. It was just as I imagined it would be. Perfect. I loved reading this book. The detail, the story line, the dialogue, the characters, it was all easy. It was all entertaining and it kept your attention. The only reason this book got 4 stars for I have been wanting to read The Graveyard Book for so long and when I saw the graphic novel edition I basically screamed. It was beautiful. I didn't even think twice before I bundled it up in my arms and proceeded to hand over money I shouldn't be spending. It was just as I imagined it would be. Perfect. I loved reading this book. The detail, the story line, the dialogue, the characters, it was all easy. It was all entertaining and it kept your attention. The only reason this book got 4 stars for me was because at some, small areas, i felt that it dragged out a little and i got slightly bored but it sure enough, sucked me back into the pages soon after. 4 out of 5!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    The most amazing thing about this book, besides the writing (of course!) is how every chapter features a different artist. The story is fluid and enjoyable and the changing artwork marks little Bod's change and growth throughout the novel. This is like Jungle Book but for ghosts and ghouls and witches and vampires and werewolves and all else. Fun, intriguing and packed with loads of empathy and relatability. So we'll crafted is the story you don't for one second discount it as being a tall tale. The most amazing thing about this book, besides the writing (of course!) is how every chapter features a different artist. The story is fluid and enjoyable and the changing artwork marks little Bod's change and growth throughout the novel. This is like Jungle Book but for ghosts and ghouls and witches and vampires and werewolves and all else. Fun, intriguing and packed with loads of empathy and relatability. So we'll crafted is the story you don't for one second discount it as being a tall tale. Bravo! On to the next part, can't wait to see what the man Jack has in store for us.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Manisha

    Could the dead BE more dramatic? This was... I have no words. What a crazy, unexpected, fantastical journey this was. An adventure that would have caused anyone to sit a moment and wonder if life was truly like this. And to think, it all started with a very graphic murder in the beginning. What a fun ride!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Michael

    I read the novel a few years back and really loved it. This was a great way to reread a favorite and I highly recommend it to those who have or have not read the novel alike. The art is really good and it was fun reliving the story through a different take

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    I wasn't really into the art, but all in all it is great to go through this book again! I wasn't really into the art, but all in all it is great to go through this book again!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

    Do you know those moments when you're in a bookshop and you're feeling kind of down, so you just by the thing that would make you happiest just then? I read "The Graveyard Book", the novel, when it came out, so I normally wouldn't buy the graphic novel volumes, too. But this time I did, and I'm really happy, because this volume is lovely. "The Graveyard Book", in any incarnation, is a series of short stories about a boy who grows up raised by ghosts and a vampire, and has the freedom of the grave Do you know those moments when you're in a bookshop and you're feeling kind of down, so you just by the thing that would make you happiest just then? I read "The Graveyard Book", the novel, when it came out, so I normally wouldn't buy the graphic novel volumes, too. But this time I did, and I'm really happy, because this volume is lovely. "The Graveyard Book", in any incarnation, is a series of short stories about a boy who grows up raised by ghosts and a vampire, and has the freedom of the graveyard, which allows him to see in the dark, and pass by unseen by mortals. He has adventures there, too, discovering ancient treasure, or being kidnapped by ghouls. It's intentionally like "The Jungle Books" (the ones by Kipling, not the Disney version), and if you read one, you can recognize episodes in the other - but they're also very different beasts, and not just because "The Jungle Books" take place in the lush wilds of India, whereas this takes place in the cold, dark world of cemeteries at night. The illustrations in the graphic novels aren't necessarily the best I've ever seen, but they're appealing enough in their way, making the two volumes a pleasure to own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diamond

    Review originally posted on my blog, Review originally posted on my blog,

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I love The Graveyard Book, the original novel. I've read it, oh, four times or so. And I'm not much for re-reading, so that's saying quite a bit. Not surprisingly, I liked the comic adaptation, but not as much as the original. For the adaptation, the book has been divided into two volumes. The script isn't bad, but I don't think the original book is very well suited for the graphic novel treatment. Very little of Gaiman's work is, actually. There's so much in the narration, which leads to a lot o I love The Graveyard Book, the original novel. I've read it, oh, four times or so. And I'm not much for re-reading, so that's saying quite a bit. Not surprisingly, I liked the comic adaptation, but not as much as the original. For the adaptation, the book has been divided into two volumes. The script isn't bad, but I don't think the original book is very well suited for the graphic novel treatment. Very little of Gaiman's work is, actually. There's so much in the narration, which leads to a lot of huge, word-filled text boxes on virtually every page. The art is pretty good, overall. Every chapter is done by a different artist, but everybody's styles are so similar that it looks more like a single, inconsistent artist than several talented but diverse artists. It was probably a smart idea to get many artists on the project, because otherwise it would take a long time to do. But getting more varied styles would have been better. As an adaptation of a work that I love, this is more than just serviceable. But the original is, in my opinion, far better. But isn't that always the case?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte van den Berg

    4/5 Stars It was fun to see one of my favorite books come alive (haha) in this graphic novel. The artwork was amazing. Nearly everything was exactly the way I imagined it while I read The Graveyard Book years ago, especially Silas. I would recommend this if you liked the original book and like graphic novels. 4/5 Stars It was fun to see one of my favorite books come alive (haha) in this graphic novel. The artwork was amazing. Nearly everything was exactly the way I imagined it while I read The Graveyard Book years ago, especially Silas. I would recommend this if you liked the original book and like graphic novels.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

    Terrific fantasy tale. Much better than I expected. Need to go read the original prose novel.

  28. 4 out of 5

    blissful and bookish

    I didn't super enjoy it, to be honest. I should have probably read the book first. I'm not sure. Some parts felt boring to me, but some I really found entertaining and fun to read. I really liked the artwork, though. It's interesting, overall. 3.5 stars! I didn't super enjoy it, to be honest. I should have probably read the book first. I'm not sure. Some parts felt boring to me, but some I really found entertaining and fun to read. I really liked the artwork, though. It's interesting, overall. 3.5 stars!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eugenia (Genie In A Book)

    *This review also appears on the blog Genie In A Book* Note: This is a review for both volume 1 and 2 Thank you to Bloomsbury Publishers Australia for sending me copies of these books in exchange for an honest review Although I'm still a newbie when it comes to the realm of graphic novels, I can say with confidence that I thoroughly enjoyed reading this visual representation based on the original novel 'The Graveyard Book' by Neil Gaiman. In both volume one and volume two, I could definitely see th *This review also appears on the blog Genie In A Book* Note: This is a review for both volume 1 and 2 Thank you to Bloomsbury Publishers Australia for sending me copies of these books in exchange for an honest review Although I'm still a newbie when it comes to the realm of graphic novels, I can say with confidence that I thoroughly enjoyed reading this visual representation based on the original novel 'The Graveyard Book' by Neil Gaiman. In both volume one and volume two, I could definitely see the appeal of the story, aided by wonderful illustrations which are both atmospheric and captivating. Reading these two books felt almost cinematic - the way that the story flows with the minimal dialogue and flourishing images meant that the pages simply flew by. In volume one Nobody's journey through learning about the graveyard and being raised by ghosts was an interesting one. With each page and new 'section' of the book by the different illustrators - everything flowed effortlessly. Although each new artist in different chapters still held their own distinct qualities, the overall effect was not only satisfactory; but enchanting at the same time. When it comes to the storyline itself, Neil Gaiman did a fantastic job in creating something multifaceted and intriguing. Each new development which occurs and different element which converges adds to the overall enjoyment of the books for me - as it blended fantasy, reality and hints of the supernatural with a slight horror undercurrent at times that makes it appealing to many reading audiences out there. What I especially appreciated while reading this was the use of different colours to create a particular mood that suited the events happening in the book. While the graveyard was typically presented in blue tones which heightened the mystical element, others in the outside world were brighter and highlighted the difference between the two. In graphic novels especially, these visual components are what can carry the story through. In this case I found everything to be executed really well. FINAL THOUGHTS In all, both volume one and two of this adaptation really impressed me. I'll definitely be reading more from Neil Gaiman in the future, and will be on the lookout for some more graphic novels as well.

  30. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    It's hard to believe the author of Sandman would create this terrible mess of a book but he sure did. I have no idea why but he did. What's it about? This kid's family was killed when he was a baby and he was the only survivor. He wandered into a graveyard when the door of the family's house was open and now he's being raised by ghosts and a vampire. Pros: The art is just wonderful! All the artists did an amazing job! I love the art and can't help but talk about how wonderful it is! The first chapter It's hard to believe the author of Sandman would create this terrible mess of a book but he sure did. I have no idea why but he did. What's it about? This kid's family was killed when he was a baby and he was the only survivor. He wandered into a graveyard when the door of the family's house was open and now he's being raised by ghosts and a vampire. Pros: The art is just wonderful! All the artists did an amazing job! I love the art and can't help but talk about how wonderful it is! The first chapter is predictable but the rest of the book isn't so that's always a good thing. Cons: The story is uninteresting and slow. I remember exactly 1 exciting thing happening throughout the entire book which is a pretty wordy book. The characters are awful. We got the kid who... let's face it, is not interesting and a bunch of ghosts and other folks who treat him like s***. I actually feel bad for him not being dead because if he was killed with the rest of his family he may have gotten some respect from the other characters. Yeah, I shouldn't be sitting here thinking poor kid wasn't killed off but these characters (except for a few) are that s***ty! This could have been called The Plot Hole Book because that's what most of this thing is. I'm not gonna go into them (there's too many and I'd probably miss a few) but oh my gosh, sooo many! It often seems a bit pretentious and I hate that. I mentioned wordy (mainly for the sake of being pretentious) and boring, I just want to make it clear that those are cons. Overall: This book with beautiful art that had potential to be a pretty sweet horror story (which I guess it still sort of is, the horror part that is, not the sweet part) is ruined by pretentiousness, slow pace and a terrible case of characters (which if it weren't for the fact the ghosts were already dead, I would say they should have been killed off). It's not the worst book I've read (see books I've given 1 star) but I definitely have a very strong disliking for it. 2/5

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