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An American Library Association “Best Books for Young Adults” A VOYA “Best Books for Young Adults” For Rand al’Thor and his pals, life in the sleepy village of Emond’s Field has been pretty dull. Until the appearance on festival night of Moiraine, a mysterious woman who claims to be an Aes Sdeai—a magician who can wield the One Power. Soon after, the village is attacked by T An American Library Association “Best Books for Young Adults” A VOYA “Best Books for Young Adults” For Rand al’Thor and his pals, life in the sleepy village of Emond’s Field has been pretty dull. Until the appearance on festival night of Moiraine, a mysterious woman who claims to be an Aes Sdeai—a magician who can wield the One Power. Soon after, the village is attacked by Trollocs—a savage tribe of half-men half-beasts. Rand’s father is nearly killed. But for Rand, the news gets worse. It was not the village the Trollocs were after, Moiraine tells him. It was you, Rand. Rand and his friends are forced to flee. But his escape will bring him face to face with the Dark One...the most powerful force of evil in the universe.


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An American Library Association “Best Books for Young Adults” A VOYA “Best Books for Young Adults” For Rand al’Thor and his pals, life in the sleepy village of Emond’s Field has been pretty dull. Until the appearance on festival night of Moiraine, a mysterious woman who claims to be an Aes Sdeai—a magician who can wield the One Power. Soon after, the village is attacked by T An American Library Association “Best Books for Young Adults” A VOYA “Best Books for Young Adults” For Rand al’Thor and his pals, life in the sleepy village of Emond’s Field has been pretty dull. Until the appearance on festival night of Moiraine, a mysterious woman who claims to be an Aes Sdeai—a magician who can wield the One Power. Soon after, the village is attacked by Trollocs—a savage tribe of half-men half-beasts. Rand’s father is nearly killed. But for Rand, the news gets worse. It was not the village the Trollocs were after, Moiraine tells him. It was you, Rand. Rand and his friends are forced to flee. But his escape will bring him face to face with the Dark One...the most powerful force of evil in the universe.

30 review for From the Two Rivers: The Eye of the World, Part 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    This book is exactly the first half of the first novel of the Wheel of Time series: The Eye of the World except with additional prolog; considering this fact I will only comment on the said prolog. It is short - around 22 pages. The main idea can be expressed in just one sentence: Egwene carries water during village sheep shearing. She is only 9 year old here which means the future ta'veren boys are all 10 year old and Nynaeve is around 17 - she is an apprentice to the old Village Wisdom. While n This book is exactly the first half of the first novel of the Wheel of Time series: The Eye of the World except with additional prolog; considering this fact I will only comment on the said prolog. It is short - around 22 pages. The main idea can be expressed in just one sentence: Egwene carries water during village sheep shearing. She is only 9 year old here which means the future ta'veren boys are all 10 year old and Nynaeve is around 17 - she is an apprentice to the old Village Wisdom. While not much happens, there are still some interesting glimpses on The Two Rivers characters. We finally get to see Perrin's family and learn that Nynaeve was an orphan - I do not recall it being mentioned elsewhere explicitly. If you want to hunt down every single Wheel of Time related piece Robert Jordan wrote, this would most probably be the last one you find. I also need to mention that the short story written by Brandon Sanderson in Unfettered anthology is not considered canonical. You do not need to search for the whole book, the prolog is available online. The rating comes from the one for The Eye of the World. This review is a copy/paste of my BookLikes one: http://gene.booklikes.com/post/862580...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    T started this thinking it might assuage my Game of Thrones series withdrawals since I have read all five of Martin's books. Are they both mamy-volumed epics set in what could easily be medieval times with knights and lords and ladies and common folk? Are they both awaiting the arrival of some kind of "savior" for their respective worlds who will restore history in some way? Are they both written by men who are masters at world building? Yes!! And I look forward to reading the entire Wheel of Ti T started this thinking it might assuage my Game of Thrones series withdrawals since I have read all five of Martin's books. Are they both mamy-volumed epics set in what could easily be medieval times with knights and lords and ladies and common folk? Are they both awaiting the arrival of some kind of "savior" for their respective worlds who will restore history in some way? Are they both written by men who are masters at world building? Yes!! And I look forward to reading the entire Wheel of Time series--am not certain how this series escaped my attention in the past! However, Wheel of Time is NOT Game of Thrones. Of course, the writing is definitely different, but there are also lots more arcane references in Jordan than in Martin and magic skulks around the edges of Thrones while it is almost another character in Wheel. A better comparison would be to Frank Herbet's Dune series. While I started reading that series back when Dune was the ONLY book, I haven't kept up with its many descendants. The mystery and the darkness in Dune eventually bothered me. And I have to say that the Wheel series is also very dark, as well. There is an underlying sense of shadow, for lack of a better word, in Dune and Wheel that I just don't find in Thrones. I read other professional reviewers who say that Jordan purposefully used Tolkien's Lord of the Ring Trilogy as a model for Wheel of Tine. I see the similarities, of course, but I've also heard Martin called the American Tolkien, and I have to agree with that. Even in the darkest moments in LOTR, there isn't the sense of sheer hopelessness and powerlessness that one feels when reading Dune and also, frankly, when reading Wheel of Time. Admittedly, I have only read the first part of the Wheel series, so check back with me when I'm about 4 books into it. :) A word of warning if you are looking at delving into this....do NOT buy the partiular book I have reviewed here!!! The Two Rivers is just the first half, word for word, of the REAL first book of the series, The Eye of the World. Save yourself time and money and just start with Eye. You won't miss out on anything by doing so. Turns out Two Rivers was just part of a repackaging of the first book, with a new prologue by Jordan which does nothing to enhance the story line. Finally, does anyone know how to change when one STARTS a book, datewise?? I am always forgetting to add my books until after I have finished them and then it looks like I read and finished them all in a day. And does anyone know WHERE on, the Goodreads Nook App for tablet, you can add new books? Can't find that anywhere. Thanks for the help in advance!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenna St Hilaire

    I've enjoyed this. Robert Jordan breaks almost every known rule of proper writing and still tells a fascinating, engaging story. What's up with his naming scheme that appears to be a merging of Arabic and Welsh? Who cares? I'm loving it. This reads a little easier than Tolkien for me so far, probably because the female characters are more complex and interesting (apologies, Professor Tolkien, sir--I do love your books). The pacing could definitely have been tightened up and the sudden influx of P I've enjoyed this. Robert Jordan breaks almost every known rule of proper writing and still tells a fascinating, engaging story. What's up with his naming scheme that appears to be a merging of Arabic and Welsh? Who cares? I'm loving it. This reads a little easier than Tolkien for me so far, probably because the female characters are more complex and interesting (apologies, Professor Tolkien, sir--I do love your books). The pacing could definitely have been tightened up and the sudden influx of POV jumps at the end annoyed me a little, but it holds my attention and I've jumped straight into The Eye of the World, Part 2. Must. Know. What. Happens. Rand and Egwene have me pretty much in love with the both of them. If they don't get married, despite what Min said, I am not likely to be happy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    I'm dropping this a star because of the new prologue. This is obviously an attempt by the publisher to appeal to younger adult audiences. The problem is, it really doesn't do the rest of the novel justice. The existing prologue was excellent, and you really couldn't beat it. This prologue slows the story down a lot, and doesn't add anything relevant. It has to many characters to remember. Furthermore, the series was already pretty friendly to young adults. This added prologue of the main charact I'm dropping this a star because of the new prologue. This is obviously an attempt by the publisher to appeal to younger adult audiences. The problem is, it really doesn't do the rest of the novel justice. The existing prologue was excellent, and you really couldn't beat it. This prologue slows the story down a lot, and doesn't add anything relevant. It has to many characters to remember. Furthermore, the series was already pretty friendly to young adults. This added prologue of the main characters when they were around nine years old is unnecessary. It could've been added as a side story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    I was always intimidated by the size and number of books in this series... but they halved the first one! And now I'm hooked. *sigh*. And I'm already attached to all of the characters, despite the fact that I'm sure some of them, if not all, will die from horrible prophecy-related injuries. I was always intimidated by the size and number of books in this series... but they halved the first one! And now I'm hooked. *sigh*. And I'm already attached to all of the characters, despite the fact that I'm sure some of them, if not all, will die from horrible prophecy-related injuries.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aparna

    Too much world-building, less enchanting in doing so than Tolkien (whom the author tried to emulate). The only line I liked in the entire book was "Him they called the dragon." That was a great end to the chapter, but the characters are flat and uninteresting. Too much world-building, less enchanting in doing so than Tolkien (whom the author tried to emulate). The only line I liked in the entire book was "Him they called the dragon." That was a great end to the chapter, but the characters are flat and uninteresting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kevrum Rummage

    I couldn't finish this book. I got halfway through and was bored then I discovered that there were 12 more books in the series and the last one was written by the author. I couldn't finish this book. I got halfway through and was bored then I discovered that there were 12 more books in the series and the last one was written by the author.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Veronica Morfi

    Rating: 5/5 Review of the full Book #1: here Rating: 5/5 Review of the full Book #1: here

  9. 5 out of 5

    Avery

    If Tolkien is the god of fantasy writing, then Robert Jordan is the king. Robert Jordan was the author of the very influential Wheel of Time series, and prior to his passing in 2007, was a prolific writer whose mark on fantasy can still be seen to this day. He was an exquisite world builder whose ability to write relatable and realistic character driven stories was like no other through charming dialogue and unique. It all started with The Eye of the World, the first book in the Wheel of Time s If Tolkien is the god of fantasy writing, then Robert Jordan is the king. Robert Jordan was the author of the very influential Wheel of Time series, and prior to his passing in 2007, was a prolific writer whose mark on fantasy can still be seen to this day. He was an exquisite world builder whose ability to write relatable and realistic character driven stories was like no other through charming dialogue and unique. It all started with The Eye of the World, the first book in the Wheel of Time series. The Eye of the World takes place in a high fantasy setting with magic, knights, mythical beasts, and the like. It is easy to compare it to the likes of the Forgotten Realms or Lord of the Rings book series because of this; however The Eye of the World incorporates new ideas and concepts into its world in order to make it both more fantastical and somehow more grounded than that of the LOTG or FR universes. The Wheel of Time series takes place in the land of Andor, and every one of our main characters come from the “rustic” village of Emond’s Field which is in the Two Rivers region. The home of the heroes in this story is incredibly important to me as a reader, as it sets up the world as a place that is populated by regular, salt of the earth people that seem insignificant in the grand scheme of things. You get a glimpse into the lives of the people that inhabit the land of Andor without having to meet any characters at all. If anything, this is a testament to the brilliant world building that Jordan was known for. He builds a high contrast between the very reality grounded people of Emond’s Field with the fantastical nature of the rest of the world. A setting is no good without memorable characters, and Jordan excels at creating a cast that is both relatable and likeable. The story follows Rand al’Thor and his two friends, Matrim Cauthon and Perrin Aybara. Without spoiling too much about the background of each character, they’re all from the Two Rivers and share a common past with each other. Jordan writes in such a way so that all three characters bounce off each other’s strengths and weaknesses. They all share a very dynamic relationship that is ever changing due to outside forces and the rapidly changing world around them. It is really easy to see the chemistry between the trio; it is believable that they are friends and have been for a while. Dialogue exchanges between the three characters range from childish and lighthearted to heavy and thoughtful. This is entirely because of the vivid writing style that Jordan uses, which incorporates a lot of lines that almost feel like improvised ad libs. Jordan has a philosophy of subtlety, and refuses to hit his reader over the head with exposition and unnecessary details. However, as a rule of thumb, he goes through a lot of hoops in order to completely describe characters, events, or settings that ultimately do not matter a whole lot. I could see how this would annoy a lot of people, however I think it is a charming nuance of his. At the beginning of the story, it caught me off guard how many characters are described in great detail, only to serve a purpose for a page or so and never appear again. Out of this nuance however come with the problem of trying to keep track of all the events, characters, and settings. As the reader, I was constantly barraged with names of secondary and tertiary characters that I struggled to keep tabs on. As a side note, this issue only gets worse and worse throughout the series. The plot is a troublesome subject that is tough to touch on as this is supposed to only be a review of the first book in the fourteen book series. However, to summarize, the story follows our three main characters as they leave their homeland in order to put a stop to the impending darkness that threatens their home. Against them stands the forces of Shai’tan, the “Dark One,” an intriguing villain with dynamic motives and a rich history that is explained in a prologue centuries before the story begins. Along their path to stop Shai’tan, our heroes must travel the lands of Andor, meeting new allies and fighting powerful enemies along the way. As typical as it sounds, it is anything but. Among the many fantasy tropes that you or I have come to know, there’s great political intrigue, plot twists, and powerful revelations in play that lead into a great ending that sets up the series for the next few stories. Ultimately, there is little to complain about in the first book in the Wheel of Time series. The character driven story that is complemented by Jordan’s subtle yet vivid writing style makes for a unique reading experience. As the first book in the series, it fulfils its purpose of setting up the rest of the universe, and only made me want to read the rest of the series. Naturally, I have read up to book seven, and plan to finish the series over the summer. I love this book, and if I were forced to give an arbitrary rating to it, I would give it an 8/10 due to it suffering from very few issues all the while being a very enjoyable read. Definitely pick this book up if you have the chance.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chromium Kitty

    I actually am not sure what exactly I feel about this book. It was originally published in 1990, and so it's nearly 30 years old at the time of this review. Given that, I try not to be too hard on books like this, because 30 years really is a long time, however short it felt to me living through it. At any rate, I was torn between a 2 or a 3 star rating on this. My version seems to be a new format for this book. Apparently the original work was cut into 2 books, from my understanding, which acco I actually am not sure what exactly I feel about this book. It was originally published in 1990, and so it's nearly 30 years old at the time of this review. Given that, I try not to be too hard on books like this, because 30 years really is a long time, however short it felt to me living through it. At any rate, I was torn between a 2 or a 3 star rating on this. My version seems to be a new format for this book. Apparently the original work was cut into 2 books, from my understanding, which accounts for why this one feels like it ended abruptly. Endings like this are more typical in today's book series and not something I saw much on books released in the 90's like this was. I suppose it was an attempt to get more money from readers. The abruptness of the ending leaves you really unsatisfied, though. I'm unsure why the author didn't choose to get a little more graphic with certain details. Because he didn't, this book NOW would fall into the "young adult" realm, but that wasn't really a thing when the book was new. I rather wish he had. Getting more graphic and a little darker would've done a lot of good, in my opinion, rather than dancing around such things. This book seems like a set up. As such, it's lacking in some places. There's a decent amount of world building, but also not enough. There's nearly no character development. We're introduced and then thrown into the fray, but we're never really allowed time to get to know these people. The attention to personalities seems good, but you're never given much chance to learn what makes any given character really tick. That's bothersome. The pacing is a little wonky. Sometimes it's good with the proper balance of action and calm, but often it gets boggy and almost boring. Or there's too much action all at once. And, gods above and below! Why are fantasy heroes always kids?? The lack of life experience isn't endearing, as far as I'm concerned. These boys were doing stupid things even I wouldn't have ever done when I was that young. Not even just once, either, so apparently they can't learn their lessons. What a pain! That's really not fun, that's plain irritating. At any rate, this series is considered a fantasy classic, and I'm disgustingly late to the party, but I may as well get on the bus now. Better late than never. I hope this series gets better, though, or this is going to be a very uncomfortable ride.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Frank Vasquez

    Fun and fast-paced thrill ride, if lacking in style and containing characters that mostly read as if they won’t depart from their D&D sheets until they’ve tried to DM a couple of times themselves. I attempted the first Wheel of Time novel a few years back, and thought then that the negatives outweighed the positives: hamfisted dialogue scenes, plotting that gives more illusion of world building than actual world-building would render, and a cliché story drenched in the potential for anything to Fun and fast-paced thrill ride, if lacking in style and containing characters that mostly read as if they won’t depart from their D&D sheets until they’ve tried to DM a couple of times themselves. I attempted the first Wheel of Time novel a few years back, and thought then that the negatives outweighed the positives: hamfisted dialogue scenes, plotting that gives more illusion of world building than actual world-building would render, and a cliché story drenched in the potential for anything to happen because the reader is only told story elements as they become available/necessary to the immediate plot point. Now? I’m a fan. This is fun and if it isn’t superior fantasy then I must be forgetting what a wash most of the epic fantasy genre is because what more need an epic fantasy be than fun and sprawling? I’m looking forward to reading these books and seeing for myself what Jordan (and eventually Sanderson!) has in store for his readers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    It took me about 5 chapters to really get into this book, but once I did I couldn't put it down. Jordan writes in a manner that completely draws you into another world. Initially I wasn't sure if it was dystopian in the sense that it was written as if this is many years after the 'end' of our current world but as I got further in the book there were no references to our current time and it is more of an ulterior fantasy world instead which I liked even better. The only thing I didn't like is tha It took me about 5 chapters to really get into this book, but once I did I couldn't put it down. Jordan writes in a manner that completely draws you into another world. Initially I wasn't sure if it was dystopian in the sense that it was written as if this is many years after the 'end' of our current world but as I got further in the book there were no references to our current time and it is more of an ulterior fantasy world instead which I liked even better. The only thing I didn't like is that as this is the young adult version the original version is just divided into two and so it ends quite abruptly so I will most definitely be looking to get the second part of the book this week. I want to know what happens!!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Me, impatiently waiting for this book to arrive: Been hearing so many positive things about the Wheel of Time series! I can’t wait to get my hands on this copy I got from eBay. It’s just so that there’s no parcel tracking service available atm so I’ve been literally switching up standing in front of the window or the door, not daring to leave the apartment before 6pm beCAUSE THIS BOOK WAS SUPPOSED TO BE DELIVERED THE LAST TWO DAYS. As you can see, I’m not handling book deliveries very well... Me, impatiently waiting for this book to arrive: Been hearing so many positive things about the Wheel of Time series! I can’t wait to get my hands on this copy I got from eBay. It’s just so that there’s no parcel tracking service available atm so I’ve been literally switching up standing in front of the window or the door, not daring to leave the apartment before 6pm beCAUSE THIS BOOK WAS SUPPOSED TO BE DELIVERED THE LAST TWO DAYS. As you can see, I’m not handling book deliveries very well...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Berkeley Andrus

    I really enjoyed this book. It has a lot of the elements that I loved from The Lord of the Rings and The Kingkiller Chronicles, albeit not quite as refined. Jordan creates an immersive experience with well-thought out places, characters, and magic, and sets the scene on a world that I'm excited to spend another dozen(ish) books in. The plot was gripping, with multiple perspectives adding weight to the events that take place. Would definitely recommend. I really enjoyed this book. It has a lot of the elements that I loved from The Lord of the Rings and The Kingkiller Chronicles, albeit not quite as refined. Jordan creates an immersive experience with well-thought out places, characters, and magic, and sets the scene on a world that I'm excited to spend another dozen(ish) books in. The plot was gripping, with multiple perspectives adding weight to the events that take place. Would definitely recommend.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    I would call this an interesting foray into epic fantasy. Tolkein influences are abound in this work, but at the same time there is much that seems to be original to this work: magic as a source from which springs many methods of interaction, many eastern philosophy elements that caused genuine curiosity in the ideas that the setting's conceits spring from, and the culture! So much culture! So much of the main characters is from their view of the world. If I do have to say there is one small drawb I would call this an interesting foray into epic fantasy. Tolkein influences are abound in this work, but at the same time there is much that seems to be original to this work: magic as a source from which springs many methods of interaction, many eastern philosophy elements that caused genuine curiosity in the ideas that the setting's conceits spring from, and the culture! So much culture! So much of the main characters is from their view of the world. If I do have to say there is one small drawback, it does seem like the book reiterates to assure the reader has exactly the understanding of how something like ten or twelve characters feel about any particular event, but compared to how many books gloss over certain details I can't help but feel a sense of investment. When the book decides to split the main characters a little I feel we can both explore more of the world and cannot help but think about how the main characters would feel given a switch in the situations: How would Rand feel about x as opposed to Mat, etc. This is sort of 'Tolkein but a little more' and that little more is how the characters are exposed to the world, how their experience stacks against the experience of a wide world they aren't quite prepared for, and how characters with more or less learning explain their views. It feels more real in this sense, but I can also see certain proto-YA trappings in how certain views are given. Either way I'm already on To The Blight. Jordan's work has been sold to me for certain by this introduction.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    If you look past all the similarities to Lord of the Rings, it’s a good book (Spoiler Alert): Fellowship, Check! Four friends, from a small out-of-the-way place going on an adventure, Check! Ranger (Warder), Check! Wizard (Aes Sedai), Check! Army of creatures crafted for war (Trollocks), Check! Dangerous place, abandoned long ago, where the wizard fears to go and where the party eventually gets separated, Check!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eric Fritz

    Tor did a fantastic re-release of this in a small hardcover format, perfect for carrying around. This remains the introduction to one of my favorite fantasy series of all time, but it also has noticeable issues(weird male-female interaction, constant braid tugging and arm folding, etc).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Edward Farnham

    This is the first of a 13? book fantasy series that is incredible in its scope and size. The final books had to be finished by another author, Brandon Sanderson, with the outlines drawn by Jordan. An amazing achievenment, it has spawned whole worlds of fandom.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kavi Mazumdar

    Robert Jordan has created a very well fleshed out world. The fantasy is well written, magic is treated with maturity and our characters behave like people, not as plot devices. I am a sucker for plots revolving around fantasy, chosen ones, darklords and epic adventure. This fits the bill perfectly!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Annie J

    This was amazing. I really didn't expect to love it as much as I did. The only thing that bothered me was that it was written in a way that was kinda hard to read. But it's an adult book so it doesn't really matter that much. This was amazing. I really didn't expect to love it as much as I did. The only thing that bothered me was that it was written in a way that was kinda hard to read. But it's an adult book so it doesn't really matter that much.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Micah

    The book is boring at first, but as you read more, it gets better. Really long read though.

  22. 5 out of 5

    McNeil Inksmudge

    Interesting blend of eastern culture in a western fantasy, but I couldn’t marry them well enough in my reading of it. I wish I liked this better than I did.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julia Walker

    A good start to a wonderful journey

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    great book

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brenna

    I always love these books. I don't know why I had this copy. I guess I picked it up somewhere because of the new prologue. Now I have to finish 'book 1' by switching to the real book 1. I always love these books. I don't know why I had this copy. I guess I picked it up somewhere because of the new prologue. Now I have to finish 'book 1' by switching to the real book 1.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    Off to a great start! I enjoy the direct parallels to the Tolkien model. Jordan gives it a more modern and commercial spin.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The main character is pretty bland and I am more interested in the other characters' stories rather than Rand. I want to more about Egwene and Perrin, but it is refreshing. The main character is pretty bland and I am more interested in the other characters' stories rather than Rand. I want to more about Egwene and Perrin, but it is refreshing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bo0kSLoth

    Wheel of Time was my first taste of a true epic high-fantasy story. What a story it is. It is one that I read with a thirst when there were just three books in the series. As the series expanded, I eagerly re-read each book starting from the beginning of the series each time because the story is so complex and convoluted. With each re-read, I felt like a new secret was revealed. I was one of them on that journey, a part of the the characters' growth and overall development. I grew as they did an Wheel of Time was my first taste of a true epic high-fantasy story. What a story it is. It is one that I read with a thirst when there were just three books in the series. As the series expanded, I eagerly re-read each book starting from the beginning of the series each time because the story is so complex and convoluted. With each re-read, I felt like a new secret was revealed. I was one of them on that journey, a part of the the characters' growth and overall development. I grew as they did and it is an amazing thing to be able to create not only a world but such characters and a story that can span so many books without losing its appeal. It's wonderful series

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alena

    The character development of some characters really made this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    New content! So cool

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