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The Secret Histories novels deliver “a terrific, adventurous blend of genres...[and] high-octane heroism,” (SFRevu) wrapped up in a thrilling and dangerous supernatural world that only New York Times bestselling author Simon R. Green could dream up.... Call me Drood, Eddie Drood. Some know me as Shaman Bond and most simply don’t want to know me at all. For centuries, my fam The Secret Histories novels deliver “a terrific, adventurous blend of genres...[and] high-octane heroism,” (SFRevu) wrapped up in a thrilling and dangerous supernatural world that only New York Times bestselling author Simon R. Green could dream up.... Call me Drood, Eddie Drood. Some know me as Shaman Bond and most simply don’t want to know me at all. For centuries, my family has been keeping the things that lurk on the darker side of existence as far away as possible from humans like you, without you even knowing we’re there. Unfortunately for us, not everybody appreciates what we Droods do. Recently, I personally managed to survive yet another attempt on my life, but the rest of my relatives weren’t so lucky. My parents are missing in action. My grandfather has been murdered. And the future of my family lies in the iron grasp of the Lady Faire, an incredibly seductive, mysterious, and powerful being. She possesses an ancient object that can save them. I have to steal it from her. Easy enough to say, difficult—and very, very dangerous—to do...  


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The Secret Histories novels deliver “a terrific, adventurous blend of genres...[and] high-octane heroism,” (SFRevu) wrapped up in a thrilling and dangerous supernatural world that only New York Times bestselling author Simon R. Green could dream up.... Call me Drood, Eddie Drood. Some know me as Shaman Bond and most simply don’t want to know me at all. For centuries, my fam The Secret Histories novels deliver “a terrific, adventurous blend of genres...[and] high-octane heroism,” (SFRevu) wrapped up in a thrilling and dangerous supernatural world that only New York Times bestselling author Simon R. Green could dream up.... Call me Drood, Eddie Drood. Some know me as Shaman Bond and most simply don’t want to know me at all. For centuries, my family has been keeping the things that lurk on the darker side of existence as far away as possible from humans like you, without you even knowing we’re there. Unfortunately for us, not everybody appreciates what we Droods do. Recently, I personally managed to survive yet another attempt on my life, but the rest of my relatives weren’t so lucky. My parents are missing in action. My grandfather has been murdered. And the future of my family lies in the iron grasp of the Lady Faire, an incredibly seductive, mysterious, and powerful being. She possesses an ancient object that can save them. I have to steal it from her. Easy enough to say, difficult—and very, very dangerous—to do...  

30 review for Property of a Lady Faire

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Davie

    Eighth in the Secret Histories urban fantasy series and revolving around Edwin Drood, a secret agent who rarely plays by the book. My Take As crazy as ever — how Green manages to think up such out-of-this-world characters and these scenarios… Using first person protagonist point-of-view, it’s Eddie’s perspective all the way, as he and Molly continue to confound the family and grow their relationship. And Green keeps adding to the cast of Droods. The theme is vengeance. So many want retribution for m Eighth in the Secret Histories urban fantasy series and revolving around Edwin Drood, a secret agent who rarely plays by the book. My Take As crazy as ever — how Green manages to think up such out-of-this-world characters and these scenarios… Using first person protagonist point-of-view, it’s Eddie’s perspective all the way, as he and Molly continue to confound the family and grow their relationship. And Green keeps adding to the cast of Droods. The theme is vengeance. So many want retribution for murder, for bad choices, for bad parenting, for power, and it will require saving the world, but up against one of the family with a terrifying and unbeatable weapon. It’s also an example of greed and shortsightedness that demonstrates why you shouldn’t try to have your cake and eat it too. With all the experience the Drood family has, I’d think they’d have learned something. Hmmm, then again, maybe that’s why they’re trying to do both. It’s a conundrum. Green does make me laugh with this spoof of James Bond…and that “nice” differentiation between Edwin Drood and Seamus Bond, lol. Not so nice is the lengths to which a government organization will go to gain power. Speaking of lengths, it’s not all one-sided, as the family also has its public and private face, quite explicitly in Property of a Lady Faire. It makes for a nice bit of tension in the story, as the family adjusts to the passing of the guard. And not a family I'd trust. Of course, Molly isn't a nice person, part of what makes her so much fun, lol, and I do enjoy how she tweaks the family. It could be my poor memory, but I think this is the first time Green revealed why the series is named Secret Histories, for the secret history of the world as preserved by Droods through the ages. Edwin thinks Ethel might be raising Droods as pets, and after the example of the Heart in the earlier Secret Histories stories…eek! Still, I can’t help loving Ethel for her enthusiasm and appreciation for Eddie. Of course, I adore Uncle Jack — he's one of the more reasonable Droods, ahem, in spite of the mayhem that occurs in the Armoury. He's James Bond's Q with an unlimited imagination and ability. One of Uncle Jack’s T-shirts reads: “Yes I do hear voices, and they all know your name.”Others on the Lady Faire’s guest list include the usual celebrities and politicians who espouse different agendas behind closed doors other than the ones they shout out to the public, aliens, ex-popes, and more. It’s when you think of why these, um, people are on the Lady Faire’s guest list (and the concept of what she is) that I got creeped out. And amazed at what a busy lady she’s been, *laughter*. Always a fun and out-of-this-world read, I do enjoy Green’s Secret Histories. The Story It’s all about the secrets, but Molly is determined to find out who gave the order to kill her parents. And the Wulfshead club management is as determined to find out who is telling tales out of the club. But that can't matter now. Eddie's parents are being held hostage. His grandfather has been murdered. And the future of his family, of the world, lies in the iron grasp of the Lady Faire, an incredibly seductive, mysterious, and powerful being. The Characters Edwin Drood is one wild secret agent, always crossing the family, always doing what’s right. His alias is the always-welcome Shaman Bond. Molly Metcalf, the Wild Witch of the Wood, is his love and a “former” terrorist hated by the Droods. The Merlin Glass, created by Merlin Satanspawn, allows Eddie to create portals on the run. Isabella and Louisa are Molly’s even worse sisters. Their parents (Trammell Island had been their home) had been part of the White Horse Faction that even makes Molly shudder. The Droods were… …originally Druids back in the day, and now we have the Droods based at Drood Hall. They’re a huge family of super-secret agents who keep the supernatural bad guys at bay, use secrets as leverage or blackmail, and keep the countries of the world in line. Emily was Arthur and Martha’s daughter who married Charles — Edwin’s parents whom Eddie thought dead for most of his life. Martha, Eddie’s grandmother, had been the Matriarch, the head of the Family. Capability Maggie is a landscape gardener. The heart of the Hall is the Sanctity where the alien entity from another dimension resides and the ruling Council meets. The current entity is the much nicer Ethel, who provides the strange matter for the amazing Drood armor. Current members of the ruling Drood Council include Uncle Jack the Armourer (he’d been one of the family’s leading field agents); William the Librarian (he recently married Ammonia Vom Acht, a very powerful telepath) who is slowly getting his mind back ( Man with the Golden Torc , 1); Cedric, the bullying Serjeant-at-Arms (Eddie thinks he must have had his good side surgically removed); and, Callan, Head of the War Room. The Drood in Cell 13 doesn’t officially exist. When he did, he was Laurence Drood, the then-family Armourer. Uncle James had been the Grey Fox, THE super secret agent for the family. Organizations For the Good?? The Department of the Uncanny is… …a government information-gathering organization created by Edwin’s grandfather, Arthur, Martha’s first husband and a rogue Drood who became the Regent of Shadows. (They used to call Arthur the Drood with a conscience.) Diana and Patrick, Edwin’s parents’ aliases, have been disowned by the family for working for the Regent of Shadows. Ankani is Arthur’s personal aide. The Phantom Berserker is a Viking ghost. The London Knights are another agency for good. Black Heir is a super secret organization that cleans up weird tech left behind after alien incursions. MI 13 is… …the British government’s secret spy organization whose mission is to protect Queen and country from supernatural threats (it’s said that a lot of their higher-ups are Wulfshead club management). The inept Alan Diment is its current head ( For Heaven's Eyes Only , 5). Philip MacAlpine had been its previous treacherous head ( For Heaven's Eyes Only ). The Nightside is… …an anything goes "Underground" in London ruled by the Authorities who are represented by Walker, and it seems that John Taylor is the new Walker, and he’s on his honeymoon ( The Bride Wore Black Leather , 12). Some of those who patronize the Nightside include Monkton Farley, the famous consulting detective — “A hard man to dislike — but worth the effort”; Ellen de Gustibus is an agent of the Good, but she, literally, eats monsters; Charlatan Joe is no longer welcome in the Wulfshead; the Painted Ghoul is disgusting for the fun of it; Waterloo Lillian; Harry Fabulous could get you ANYthing, then he crossed the club management; the Karma Catechist knew all there was to know about magical systems; and, Hadleigh Oblivion, the Detective Inspectre who has no shades of grey, is unstoppable, investigating the very worst crimes, where reality is under threat. He used to be Walker in the 1960s and 70s until something happened to him. He appears to be associated with the Deep School/Dark Acadamie. A former hippie, the Dormouse builds inter-dimensional Doors, a trick he learned from old Carnacki. Yet more were on the invitation list for the Lady Faire's ball: Jumping Jack Flashman, a thief and burglar who uses his short-range teleportation skills to pull it off. The Vodyanoi Brothers, Gregor and Sergei, are an obnoxious pair of Russian werewolves who were kicked out of the Moscow Mafiosi for nastiness. Dead Boy. Jimmy Thunder, God for Hire (he’s a descendent of the old Norse Gods and is a private investigator, bounty hunter, and supernatural bail bondsman), carries Mjolnir, Thor’s Hammer. The original Bride of Frankenstein is dating Springheel Jack who is/was the precursor to Jack the Ripper. The Replicated Meme of Saint Sebastian were six versions of the same personality in six different bodies, a soul-share deal. The Living Shroud makes a living haunting people who won't pay up. Lady Alice Underground is an elderly but robust explorer of the Underverse. The Last of Leng is the only survivor of a vicious people. Tommy Oblivion is an existential private eye, specializing in cases that may or may not have occurred. Ms Fate is a costumed adventurer. The Wulfshead is… …a bar (and club) patronized by denizens of the Nightside. The club management is feared throughout the world. The Roaring Boys are club security. The Winter Palace is… …the ultimate in exclusive and located in Ultima Thule, the coldest place in any world, existing in a pocket dimension, a world with its own rules. The Lady Faire was… …created by Baron Frankenstein (when he was getting old and kinky) as a ladything, an omnisexual, and the ultimate sexual object, being all things to all people. The blood-red men are unstoppable. The Red King and the Sceneshifters were a really secret group who rewrote History. False Knights are members of the Order of Steel who gave themselves up to a dark force which permanently bound magical armour to its wearer, making them completely unbeatable, created in answer to the Droods. Shadow Banks are secret underground financial institutions that fund supernatural crimes and criminals. Kayleigh’s Eye is an amulet that makes the wearer invulnerable to all forms of attack. The Lazarus Stone is an alien device, a time travel mechanism that lets the user reach back in time. Drood scarecrows are the dead-but-aware bodies of Drood enemies bound to protect Drood Hall. The OverNet is the darkest side of the Internet dealing exclusively with supernatural anything. Siberian Death Wurms are really nasty. The Cover and Title The cover is the blues, purples and whites of the icy Winter Palace, as the suited Edwin Drood, his back to us, chases down the Lady Faire in her white mini and over-the-knee black boots, desperate to grab the Lazarus Stone that shines in her outstretched hand. An info blurb is at the top in black with a gray horizontal rule separating it from the author’s name in purple. At the bottom in a black-outlined, cold yellow is the title with the series information at the very bottom right, set off with its own horizontal rules. The title is everyone’s focus, the Property of a Lady Faire.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dru Pagliassotti

    I liked Green's old Hawk & Fisher series, with their strong AD&D feel, and his Nightside series has had some emotional strength, but the Drood series is utterly stale. Everyone is super-powerful and super-rich and never particularly suffers, and tension is built primarily by the characters telling each other how much danger they're in even though they're the toughest creatures in the world. Jokes and one-liners are repeated as though the author didn't remember he'd just used them a few chapters I liked Green's old Hawk & Fisher series, with their strong AD&D feel, and his Nightside series has had some emotional strength, but the Drood series is utterly stale. Everyone is super-powerful and super-rich and never particularly suffers, and tension is built primarily by the characters telling each other how much danger they're in even though they're the toughest creatures in the world. Jokes and one-liners are repeated as though the author didn't remember he'd just used them a few chapters ago, and plot inconsistencies fill the pages (Ultima Thule freezes Eddie blue through his Drood armor when he's trying to chip it off the Door, but he barely even notices it when he's standing in the middle of it? A great deal of the novel covers Eddie and Maggie working hard to get into the Winter Palace but his allies get in without invitation or explanation?) Green can and has done better, but these uninspired novels are definitely not the author at his best.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ed Nemo

    Simon R Green continues the story of Eddie Drood and the Wild Witch, Molly Metcalf. Once again declared rogue, Eddie and Molly have to get back a piece of super tech to satisfy the blackmail whims of a new enemy. I always love Green’s writing. Here he combines a grand list of interesting side characters and super violence. A little humor is always the tipping point with a book like this, and Simon R Green delivers. Great Stuff!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    2.5 stars. Ok continuation of this series about supernatural enforcer Edwin Drood and his complicated relationship with his extremely large and secretive family. The next book in the series doesn't come out until sometime in 2015, by which point I won't remember anything in the ongoing story arc. :) 2.5 stars. Ok continuation of this series about supernatural enforcer Edwin Drood and his complicated relationship with his extremely large and secretive family. The next book in the series doesn't come out until sometime in 2015, by which point I won't remember anything in the ongoing story arc. :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sterph1

    Not to offend the fans, but think when it comes to a series (ok, most of them) you've all been where I am now. Short version of the life of a series for a reader/fan = 1. like/love 2. Bloom off the rose but continue to read because still care or just plain curious. 3. Still read but really more of a "skim" just to see where it's going (like reading family newsletter of people you care about but haven't seen for years). 4. Give up on the series and move on. Caught myself skimming Book #5. Book #8 Not to offend the fans, but think when it comes to a series (ok, most of them) you've all been where I am now. Short version of the life of a series for a reader/fan = 1. like/love 2. Bloom off the rose but continue to read because still care or just plain curious. 3. Still read but really more of a "skim" just to see where it's going (like reading family newsletter of people you care about but haven't seen for years). 4. Give up on the series and move on. Caught myself skimming Book #5. Book #8 is so thinly written and repetitive of plot devices and even dialogue from the previous books that friends & family think I'm a speed reader (so very not). A cute quick read if you have an hour to kill and haven't read the earlier books, but for me RIP Secret Histories.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    Where other books in the series were leading up to something, this book felt a little pointless to the overall story arc. The writing was no different, the characters were no different, but I was, I hate to say it, bored. I generally love Simon R Green's books. I started off reading The DeathStalker series and moved on from there. I'm hoping this particular title is just an interlude and following books will get back on track. Where other books in the series were leading up to something, this book felt a little pointless to the overall story arc. The writing was no different, the characters were no different, but I was, I hate to say it, bored. I generally love Simon R Green's books. I started off reading The DeathStalker series and moved on from there. I'm hoping this particular title is just an interlude and following books will get back on track.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bauer

    Not much to say here. If you're a fan of the series you MUST read it. If you've never read about the fantastic Drood clan, start in an earlier work or else much of the tension, background, inside-jokes and other aspects will go right over your head. "Property of a Lady Faire" has everything one would expect. Plus some genuinely touching moments and an unusual sense of paranoia. Not much to say here. If you're a fan of the series you MUST read it. If you've never read about the fantastic Drood clan, start in an earlier work or else much of the tension, background, inside-jokes and other aspects will go right over your head. "Property of a Lady Faire" has everything one would expect. Plus some genuinely touching moments and an unusual sense of paranoia.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    A lot of the same old. It was a fun quick read that occupied a couple hours, but honestly these books follow the same basic plot with the same old writing style. Everyone is rich and powerful, but Drood armor is just a bit more powerful.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    Typical fun SR Green trip down a dead end street at 100 mph. Molly Metcalf, the witch of the wild woods and Eddie Kick some ass and take supernatural names! Fun.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Traci

    Good old Eddie Drood and his crazy family. Can't wait to get to the next one! Good old Eddie Drood and his crazy family. Can't wait to get to the next one!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Property of a Lady Faire is the eighth book in the Secret Histories series written by Simon R. Green. It stars Edwin Drood, code named Shaman Bond and he is a part of the Droods, an ancient family that purportedly watches over the world and protects it from various threats, including supernatural and magical ones. Eddie Drood must find the mysterious Lazarus Stone to secure the release of his parents. He and Molly Metcalf, his girlfriend and witch, endure over-the-top encounters with various enti Property of a Lady Faire is the eighth book in the Secret Histories series written by Simon R. Green. It stars Edwin Drood, code named Shaman Bond and he is a part of the Droods, an ancient family that purportedly watches over the world and protects it from various threats, including supernatural and magical ones. Eddie Drood must find the mysterious Lazarus Stone to secure the release of his parents. He and Molly Metcalf, his girlfriend and witch, endure over-the-top encounters with various entities in their quest for the stone, last in the custody of the Lady Faire, a multiply-gendered person who incites universal sexual desire. Property of a Lady Faire is written rather well. The narrative is rather humorous as Eddie and Molly’s nonstop bantering forms a nucleus around which frantic encounters coalesce, providing diverting, if overwhelmingly pointless, action. Green attempts to wrest significance from the medley of bizarre incidents by focusing on Molly's loyalty to Eddie, despite her own grievances with his family, and his choice between love and family power. All in all, Property of a Lady Faire is written rather well and is a good start to what would hopefully be a wonderful series, which I plan to continue in the very near future.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christoph Weber

    I quit reading the series a while back. Then I saw new books, and I figured "why not continue?" Now I know why: it's just not that good, not anymore. A third of the book is spent on details to get every ready up to speed on what's happened in the many books before and how everything works. Another third seemingly is filled by repetitions of no-too-funny jokes and lines. "Why do you keep asking me questions you know I cannot answer?" Why indeed, Eddie Drood? Why indeed, Simon R.? My heart aches whe I quit reading the series a while back. Then I saw new books, and I figured "why not continue?" Now I know why: it's just not that good, not anymore. A third of the book is spent on details to get every ready up to speed on what's happened in the many books before and how everything works. Another third seemingly is filled by repetitions of no-too-funny jokes and lines. "Why do you keep asking me questions you know I cannot answer?" Why indeed, Eddie Drood? Why indeed, Simon R.? My heart aches when I give it only two stars, but it just didn't make me want to read more.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Another great story, fast-paced in the Drood world, exposing secrets and trundling along a steam train through Siberia enroute to the Lady Faire celebration. Molly the Wild Witch & paramour of Eddie, adds her touch toDrood family and the adventure.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason Hardin

    Another funny and interesting Eddie Drood story. As always I love the James Bond, rebel aspect of the Secret History books. This coupled with the banter back and forth between Eddie and Molly makes for an enjoyable read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Tollefson

    What can I say? It's a Drood. Neither Eddie nor Molly has grown much since their introductions, so it's all very predictable. Truth be told, I probably won't bother with more of this series. I've read three now, and an invincible hero just isn't all that engaging. What can I say? It's a Drood. Neither Eddie nor Molly has grown much since their introductions, so it's all very predictable. Truth be told, I probably won't bother with more of this series. I've read three now, and an invincible hero just isn't all that engaging.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    DNF at page 78, after catching yet another repeated phrase. Mr Green has a bad habit of this, not just within a singular book, but across and between his series. It must be "the easiest thing in the world" for him to do. DNF at page 78, after catching yet another repeated phrase. Mr Green has a bad habit of this, not just within a singular book, but across and between his series. It must be "the easiest thing in the world" for him to do.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chianna

    Interesting and entertaining. Will read more! (Audio book has a great narrator)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Breane Ross

    Another great Secret Histories book by Simon Green. Really love Eddy Drood and Molly the witch. These characters rock! Way to go Mr Green!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steven Ede

    Love this series ... Supernatural James Bond😁

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Disappointingly little of the Lady herself. Overall, it felt a little disconnected from the ongoing plot about Eddie's parents. But it was a fun journey. Disappointingly little of the Lady herself. Overall, it felt a little disconnected from the ongoing plot about Eddie's parents. But it was a fun journey.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Will Myers

    I love Simon R. Green. Around here, we call his work (Nightside, Secret Histories, the series about the Carnacki Institute) "enjoyable fluff." Although the books are relatively long, they're an easy read because there's not much braining to be done. So, once again, Eddie and Molly are accused of doing something wrong and only they can save the world! Essentially. There's a new, but old, villain, a new MacGuffin to catch, and a new location to be reached. All-in-all, good fun. Here's my main issue I love Simon R. Green. Around here, we call his work (Nightside, Secret Histories, the series about the Carnacki Institute) "enjoyable fluff." Although the books are relatively long, they're an easy read because there's not much braining to be done. So, once again, Eddie and Molly are accused of doing something wrong and only they can save the world! Essentially. There's a new, but old, villain, a new MacGuffin to catch, and a new location to be reached. All-in-all, good fun. Here's my main issue with this book: it was too long. There were parts described, in detail, that could have been left out, because they didn't apply to the main plot arc. Also, there was nothing really here that we haven't seen before. The beginning plot, the Incident, the Unstoppable Foe, the Deus Ex Machina. I would have preferred to see Eddie (or Shaman) do more work without his torc, like he did in Casino Infernale. Eddie talks all the time about the traits needed to be a spy, but we rarely see those. When in doubt, bust out the armour instead of thinking your way through things. Don't get me wrong: it was enjoyable. There was the usual cast of characters (Armourer, Sarjeant-at-Arms), a new character, Capability Maggie, and some good chuckles along the way. But there could be so much more to Eddie than there is. We need to see some character growth out of him. "I hate the family!" one minute, "Anything for the family!" the next. As it has been for eight books. I would love to see the next book focus on Eddie dealing with an actual problem that punching in the face can't solve. Have Eddie be threatened somehow, force him to change and grow. At least, that's what I'm hoping for.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dan'l Danehy-oakes

    The problem with reviewing a series book is, how much context do you put in for those who haven't read any of the series? And the answer her, I think, is the heck with that, if you haven't read any of the other "Secret Histories" novels, you aren't likely to start with this one. So Eddie Drood comes home from a reasonably successful mission to find that his grandmother, the late Matriarch of the Droods, has left him a bequest. In the meanwhile, the Merlin Glass is acting strangely. And someone ha The problem with reviewing a series book is, how much context do you put in for those who haven't read any of the series? And the answer her, I think, is the heck with that, if you haven't read any of the other "Secret Histories" novels, you aren't likely to start with this one. So Eddie Drood comes home from a reasonably successful mission to find that his grandmother, the late Matriarch of the Droods, has left him a bequest. In the meanwhile, the Merlin Glass is acting strangely. And someone has opened a Door to the grounds of Drood Hall, which should be impossible. _And_ when he goes, with Molly Metcalf, to ask some questions at the Department of the Uncanny, he finds everyone there - including his grandfather, the Regent of Shadows - dead, messily dead, as in torn to pieces. A Voice informs him that, if he wants his parents back, he must provide the Voice with the Lazarus Stone - of which Eddie has never heard. And, with everyone (including his own family) believing that he and Molly committed the murders at the Department ... well, even asking questions is going to be a little tricky. Eddie will fight through False Knights, blood-red men, and Siberian Death Wurms, before he comes to Ultima Thule, where the Lady Faire waits...along with the enemy Eddie never expected. The book is as good as any in the series, with supernatural action and sarcasm galore. It ain't Hie Arte, but it's entertaining as hell, and what more do you want for eight bucks these days?

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Parungao

    Eddie Drood has just been declared rogue by the Drood family. It nust be Tuesday. In this latest book Eddie Drood and Molly Metcalf have been blamed for the massacre of the Department of the Uncanny, but they didn't do it. The party responsible has Eddie's long lost parents captive, and will release them if Eddie and Molly will recover the mysterious Lazarus Stone. The current owner of said stone is the mysterious Lady Faire. The search for the stone and for the Lady Faire is the maguffin which Eddie Drood has just been declared rogue by the Drood family. It nust be Tuesday. In this latest book Eddie Drood and Molly Metcalf have been blamed for the massacre of the Department of the Uncanny, but they didn't do it. The party responsible has Eddie's long lost parents captive, and will release them if Eddie and Molly will recover the mysterious Lazarus Stone. The current owner of said stone is the mysterious Lady Faire. The search for the stone and for the Lady Faire is the maguffin which keeps this novel going, along with somne fantastic action sequences featuring Eddie and Molly fighting off various parties searching for them. An enjoyable adventure read, with plenty of references to the Nightside series, but it took a while to get to the goal and the titular character "The Lady Faire". The identity of the mysterious villain was something of an anticlimax, and the ending seened a bit rushed. An enjoyable story, but not the best of this series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aidenmorningstar

    seriously substandard work from Simon R Green, whats worst in the series is the hypocrisy, Eddie regularly claims how Droods protect humanity and supernatural bad guys from pushing their weight yet Eddie waste no opportunity to bully ordinary people through his armor or stop Molly from doing so or after seeing human statues in ice self righteously commenting some one will pay while conveniently forgetting drood them self do worse to their intruder by turning them into scare crow about them Eddie seriously substandard work from Simon R Green, whats worst in the series is the hypocrisy, Eddie regularly claims how Droods protect humanity and supernatural bad guys from pushing their weight yet Eddie waste no opportunity to bully ordinary people through his armor or stop Molly from doing so or after seeing human statues in ice self righteously commenting some one will pay while conveniently forgetting drood them self do worse to their intruder by turning them into scare crow about them Eddie himself has boasted that at right frequency they could be heard screaming .Secondly they always claim how Droods protect humanity in 9 out of 10 cases all they protect humanity from is other Droods only and other 1 time from people whose lives Droods ruined who are looking for payback no mater the cost utterly disappointing series from Simon R Green

  25. 4 out of 5

    Harris

    Look, it's Simon R. Green. If you've been reading him this long into the series, you know exactly what you're going to get. Honestly, it's kind of hard to take the books seriously because there are never any stakes for Simon or Molly. Neither of them are ever explicitly in danger. They're both so insanely overpowered that it's hard to take any threats seriously, no matter how much build-up they get. Molly's magic and Drood's deus-ex-machina (er, I mean his torque) are the "win" button; no matter Look, it's Simon R. Green. If you've been reading him this long into the series, you know exactly what you're going to get. Honestly, it's kind of hard to take the books seriously because there are never any stakes for Simon or Molly. Neither of them are ever explicitly in danger. They're both so insanely overpowered that it's hard to take any threats seriously, no matter how much build-up they get. Molly's magic and Drood's deus-ex-machina (er, I mean his torque) are the "win" button; no matter what happens, it inevitably wins the fight without much effort. I like some of the set-up and the concepts, but the actual execution is getting stale. And this is proving to be true of ALL of Green's novels.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    Simon Green has written several series but lately has concentrated upon two; the Nightside and Secret Histories which are both set in the same fictional universe. This book is the latest of the Secret Histories series where Eddie Drood (aka Shaman Bond) is caught up in another adventure with his main squeeze Witch Molly Metcalf. This time the two are framed for a series of murders and told if Eddie wants to see his parents they must find the Lazarus Stone. The book has devolved into a number of Simon Green has written several series but lately has concentrated upon two; the Nightside and Secret Histories which are both set in the same fictional universe. This book is the latest of the Secret Histories series where Eddie Drood (aka Shaman Bond) is caught up in another adventure with his main squeeze Witch Molly Metcalf. This time the two are framed for a series of murders and told if Eddie wants to see his parents they must find the Lazarus Stone. The book has devolved into a number of highly unlikely fights and battles in which Drood and Metcalf barely escape with their lives while swapping humorous banter. If you are looking for escapist fair, this will fit the bill but don't expect much more.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    A solid adventure in the Secret Histories series - the retrieval of the Lazarus Stone. And while both Eddie's parent's and the death of Molly's parent's are referenced - frequently - it's mostly just tantalizing mentions without actually moving those plots forward Gideon Emery's voice for the Inspector Detective is particularly (and deliciously) chilling. One frustration with the book is that we get the same thing/people described in detail two or three times - as if Green (and the editors) forg A solid adventure in the Secret Histories series - the retrieval of the Lazarus Stone. And while both Eddie's parent's and the death of Molly's parent's are referenced - frequently - it's mostly just tantalizing mentions without actually moving those plots forward Gideon Emery's voice for the Inspector Detective is particularly (and deliciously) chilling. One frustration with the book is that we get the same thing/people described in detail two or three times - as if Green (and the editors) forget that he's already covered the describing and getting readers new to the series up to speed. There's also a description of the Lady Faire that goes on and on and on in the most redundant, circular way. The novel could have been tightened and been better for it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Metagion

    Once again a great read, but a little slow going. I thoroughly enjoy reading about Eddie Drood & the Wild Witch Molly Metcalfe, and will miss them when the series wraps up... What would you give to bring back someone you loved? Would you betray your family? Your country? Would you kill? When Edwin "Eddie" Drood, the World's Best Secret Agent is blamed by his family for the deaths of everyone at the Department of the Uncanny (including the Regent of Shadows, Eddie's beloved Grandfather) it's up to Once again a great read, but a little slow going. I thoroughly enjoy reading about Eddie Drood & the Wild Witch Molly Metcalfe, and will miss them when the series wraps up... What would you give to bring back someone you loved? Would you betray your family? Your country? Would you kill? When Edwin "Eddie" Drood, the World's Best Secret Agent is blamed by his family for the deaths of everyone at the Department of the Uncanny (including the Regent of Shadows, Eddie's beloved Grandfather) it's up to Eddie and Molly to clear their names and find the Lazarus Stone, but not without facing his greatest enemy yet...anything for family! Great read, but a wee bit clunky (could've been condensed a little) but cool as always. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Christopher D'Amico

    One of the latest in the Secret Histories series, Lady Faire does not disappoint. With lots of madcap action and jibes thrown faster than punches, Eddie Drood and Molly Metcalf blast and banter their way through the opposing forces. But this time, some of those forces don't seem to mind as much as the others. What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object? And when that object is a whole army of them? One of the latest in the Secret Histories series, Lady Faire does not disappoint. With lots of madcap action and jibes thrown faster than punches, Eddie Drood and Molly Metcalf blast and banter their way through the opposing forces. But this time, some of those forces don't seem to mind as much as the others. What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object? And when that object is a whole army of them?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chrys

    This is one of my favourite series of books, Simon R. Green makes me laugh every time. I've read some reviews that say it's all a bit formulaic, but to my mind it's very redolent of the original 007 films. We learn a bit more about Eddie and his family each time, and are drawn into the web. There is a bad guy (or 10) a lot of fighting and some brilliantly imagined characters - I loved the Lady Faire, a very sinister siren. Very entertaining and great fun, and nicely linked to the Nightside books This is one of my favourite series of books, Simon R. Green makes me laugh every time. I've read some reviews that say it's all a bit formulaic, but to my mind it's very redolent of the original 007 films. We learn a bit more about Eddie and his family each time, and are drawn into the web. There is a bad guy (or 10) a lot of fighting and some brilliantly imagined characters - I loved the Lady Faire, a very sinister siren. Very entertaining and great fun, and nicely linked to the Nightside books. I was very upset to have finished that series, but my favourites from that universe are living on - just wish he would write faster!!

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