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Black Science #1

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Grant McKay, former member of The Anarchistic Order of Scientists, has finally done the impossible: He has deciphered Black Science and punched through the barriers of reality. But what lies beyond the veil is not epiphany, but chaos. Now Grant and his team are lost, living ghosts shipwrecked on an infinite ocean of alien worlds, barreling through the long-forgotten, ancie Grant McKay, former member of The Anarchistic Order of Scientists, has finally done the impossible: He has deciphered Black Science and punched through the barriers of reality. But what lies beyond the veil is not epiphany, but chaos. Now Grant and his team are lost, living ghosts shipwrecked on an infinite ocean of alien worlds, barreling through the long-forgotten, ancient, and unimaginable dark realms. The only way is forward. The only question is how far are they willing to go, and how much can they endure, to get home again?Join writer RICK REMENDER and the superstar art team of MATTEO SCALERA & DEAN WHITE for this face-melting science fiction epic spanning the lifetimes of a cast of dimensional castaways lead by the man who caused it all.


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Grant McKay, former member of The Anarchistic Order of Scientists, has finally done the impossible: He has deciphered Black Science and punched through the barriers of reality. But what lies beyond the veil is not epiphany, but chaos. Now Grant and his team are lost, living ghosts shipwrecked on an infinite ocean of alien worlds, barreling through the long-forgotten, ancie Grant McKay, former member of The Anarchistic Order of Scientists, has finally done the impossible: He has deciphered Black Science and punched through the barriers of reality. But what lies beyond the veil is not epiphany, but chaos. Now Grant and his team are lost, living ghosts shipwrecked on an infinite ocean of alien worlds, barreling through the long-forgotten, ancient, and unimaginable dark realms. The only way is forward. The only question is how far are they willing to go, and how much can they endure, to get home again?Join writer RICK REMENDER and the superstar art team of MATTEO SCALERA & DEAN WHITE for this face-melting science fiction epic spanning the lifetimes of a cast of dimensional castaways lead by the man who caused it all.

30 review for Black Science #1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    It took a special promo by Image Comics for me to try their digital comics storefront. It was hard to resist when Image was offering the first issues of their 2013 titles for free; especially since some of those title were some of the most acclaimed comics last year. It was a pretty sweet deal, since they offered their comics DRM freeas and in the PDF, ePub, CBR and CBZ formats. However, because the site wasn't prepared to serve all those customers going for the free books, I was only able to ge It took a special promo by Image Comics for me to try their digital comics storefront. It was hard to resist when Image was offering the first issues of their 2013 titles for free; especially since some of those title were some of the most acclaimed comics last year. It was a pretty sweet deal, since they offered their comics DRM freeas and in the PDF, ePub, CBR and CBZ formats. However, because the site wasn't prepared to serve all those customers going for the free books, I was only able to get two. Luckily, one of those was Black Science by Rick Remender. Remender mines the science gone wrong lode here, although with the pulp science sensibilities of his Fear Agent work. I have the greatest respect for Remender and his work, his Uncanny X-Force would always be one of my all-time favorite comic book runs and he's currently killing it monthly in Uncanny Avengers. I hope he takes it in good stride when I describe his work as "Hickmanesque". It has mad science, alien worlds, alternate dimensions and family. Almost like Hickman's Fantastic Four/FF run through Remender's eyes and Matteo Scalera's lines and Dean White's palette. In short, it something up my alley. A promising first issue and I certainly would be looking for subsequent releases.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Forbidden science. Think of Lost In Space with a twist. A group of scientists are thrown off course and seem to be jumping dimensions or alternate realities, trying to get home. Sabotage might play a part. Wild guess though, as for half of this issue all you get to see is a guy running from aliens and lamenting how it was all his fault and everybody else didn‘t deserve this. Yeah, yeah, got it. Pop-psychology, running, screaming, one-dimensional and bland characters. The rest doesn‘t offer a lot Forbidden science. Think of Lost In Space with a twist. A group of scientists are thrown off course and seem to be jumping dimensions or alternate realities, trying to get home. Sabotage might play a part. Wild guess though, as for half of this issue all you get to see is a guy running from aliens and lamenting how it was all his fault and everybody else didn‘t deserve this. Yeah, yeah, got it. Pop-psychology, running, screaming, one-dimensional and bland characters. The rest doesn‘t offer a lot of insights or meaningful developments of any kind. I was left with a big „Whatever!“ The artwork had its moments. I didn‘t like the look of the faces, they looked very old-school. And that human with the negative attitude had really weird ears. Oh, another reviewer raised a very good question: Why would a fish woman have boobs? Not continuing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessaca Willis

    Not my kind of book, but not terrible. Although the graphics are breathtaking, it made it difficult to distinguish some details/people in the story. I will give the next book a shot, just to determine if I really do or don't like it. Not my kind of book, but not terrible. Although the graphics are breathtaking, it made it difficult to distinguish some details/people in the story. I will give the next book a shot, just to determine if I really do or don't like it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    At first I thought "Black Science" just wasn't for me... but then I got my hands on my own phisical copy and I discovered just how wrong I was :) This book is awesome on so many levels - the art is amazing (!!) the story is great, it's about science and I'm all about that :D Sure - there's some randomness in the story and the action could be a bit more consequently, but this is a comic book after all and I recommend this one with two hands :) At first I thought "Black Science" just wasn't for me... but then I got my hands on my own phisical copy and I discovered just how wrong I was :) This book is awesome on so many levels - the art is amazing (!!) the story is great, it's about science and I'm all about that :D Sure - there's some randomness in the story and the action could be a bit more consequently, but this is a comic book after all and I recommend this one with two hands :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Intriguing and action-packed start to this new sci-fi series from Rick Remender and Matteo Scalera. Grant McKay leads a team of anarchist scientists who've unlocked the secrets of black science - and now they're trapped in an endless time-travel loop! Chaos erupts as science fiction and history collide and Scalera and colourist Dean White do a tremendous job of illustrating it. Read the full review here! Intriguing and action-packed start to this new sci-fi series from Rick Remender and Matteo Scalera. Grant McKay leads a team of anarchist scientists who've unlocked the secrets of black science - and now they're trapped in an endless time-travel loop! Chaos erupts as science fiction and history collide and Scalera and colourist Dean White do a tremendous job of illustrating it. Read the full review here!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Einar Nielsen

    Finished this last weekend and was pleasantly surprised. The story is the basic travelling between dimensions with a darker twist. The world that the team travel to were great and weird. The story moved along well and i was interesting in were it was going. There were also a few surprise twists. So all in all i was happy with this one and will definitely check out the next copy. Recommend this one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    This is a quirky little comic with a lot of promise. I came around to it from an Image Firsts issue, and fell in love with the concept. I left the first volume a bit underwhelmed, though; the panel work is frenetic and makes the story hard to follow, which isn't helped by the fact that certain bits of the story arc feel underdeveloped. Characters die before I even really understand who they are, though the flashbacks in the later issues of the volume move things along nicely. Also, I don't think This is a quirky little comic with a lot of promise. I came around to it from an Image Firsts issue, and fell in love with the concept. I left the first volume a bit underwhelmed, though; the panel work is frenetic and makes the story hard to follow, which isn't helped by the fact that certain bits of the story arc feel underdeveloped. Characters die before I even really understand who they are, though the flashbacks in the later issues of the volume move things along nicely. Also, I don't think I'm quite on board with Scalera's art, which gets really loose and caricature-ish in the later issues, which makes the other problems harder for me to forgive. Still, I love the idea of this book, and think that it could potentially rival its much more hyped sci-fi comic cousin, Saga. Bumpy start, but I'm looking forward to more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Black Science combines themes that we've seen in many other sci-fi/speculative fiction works before: the slippery slope of science, "Sliders"-esque traveling through multiple dimensions, and a ragtag group who doesn't always get along coping with extreme stress. However, it's done well, and Remender's script reads well to develop the characters and have the reader care about them (at their own risk, since he doesn't seem to be squeamish about killing them off). Including one of the scientist's t Black Science combines themes that we've seen in many other sci-fi/speculative fiction works before: the slippery slope of science, "Sliders"-esque traveling through multiple dimensions, and a ragtag group who doesn't always get along coping with extreme stress. However, it's done well, and Remender's script reads well to develop the characters and have the reader care about them (at their own risk, since he doesn't seem to be squeamish about killing them off). Including one of the scientist's two children also changes the dynamic of the story in an intriguing way. I'll definitely be reading more.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I read the first volume and it was quite a mess. But the premise was interesting enough to get me through to the end (and I think I checked out a subsequent volume) and then it sort of dissolves into silliness.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marla Haasz

    it was like reading a really visually intense poem

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Layout is inconsistent and difficult to follow. The story seems to be missing something as well.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Drrmrmrr

    Illustrations are awesome. Not 100% sure how I feel about the story, kind of all over the place too early on but I'm excited to see where this goes. Illustrations are awesome. Not 100% sure how I feel about the story, kind of all over the place too early on but I'm excited to see where this goes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Black Science, Volume 1 How to Fall Forever Author: Rick Remender, Matteo Scalera, Dean White Publisher: Image Comics Date: 2014 Pgs: 152 Dewey: 741.5973 BLA Disposition: Irving Public Library - South Campus - Irving, TX _________________________________________________ REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS Summary: To save the world, to better the world, to prove it could be done, Grant McKay invented the Pillar, an interdimensional transporter, to explore the eververse. The Pillar fired prematurely while he was gi Black Science, Volume 1 How to Fall Forever Author: Rick Remender, Matteo Scalera, Dean White Publisher: Image Comics Date: 2014 Pgs: 152 Dewey: 741.5973 BLA Disposition: Irving Public Library - South Campus - Irving, TX _________________________________________________ REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS Summary: To save the world, to better the world, to prove it could be done, Grant McKay invented the Pillar, an interdimensional transporter, to explore the eververse. The Pillar fired prematurely while he was giving a tour to his children alongside his two research assistants, one of whom he was having an affair with, and just as the project bureaucrat and his watchdog interrupt the tour...the Pillar fires. They are tossed across the eververse. Only, someone smashed the Pillar’s tether device that would under normal operation have locked on to home and guided them back. Now they are lost in the Eververse and it is a damned sight more dangerous than they expected. _________________________________________________ Genre: Image Comics Comics Graphic Novels Science Fiction Why this book: I’ve been eyeballing it for awhile and this time through the library they had the first 4 volumes. So I grabbed them all. _________________________________________________ Favorite Character: Pia McKay, chief scientist Grant’s eldest daughter. Tougher than nails. Pissed off at her dad. And still doing what she has to do to help get them all home. Doing what is necessary, even when it means crossing a line that she never imagined. Ward is a hardcase. He’s there to do a job for Grant who gave him a chance when no one else would. The Monkey-Symbiote version of McKay. Be funny if the Monkey-Symbiote version of Kadir killed human Kadir. The Feel: The theme seems to be “he’s not coming.” No one is safe. Favorite Scene / Quote: A Cthulhian temple and a scientist explorer in an astronaut-scuba suit on the run from humanoid frog men with lightning tongues. Helluva opening scene. The layers of the Onion, the building blocks of Infinology. The theory that anything you can imagine exists in some layer of the eververse. Hope Grant smokes Kadir. The Dr Smith analogy is wearing thin and it’s only Book 1. Can’t believe what happened with McKay and Kadir. Journeys end, juxtaposition, a pact based on true self, and a journey’s beginning. Chapter 6 was all go, don’t stop fight, then fight for your life, then fight some more. Hmm Moments: So, they’re sliding through alternate universes because one of them sabotaged the control panel and the Pillar’s coolant vessel. They’ve got a Dr Smith onboard. Techno-steampunk First Peoples invading Europe in a WW1 setting in a Manifest Destiny is damned cool. The Pillar is a cool macguffin. So, it’s possible to leap between worlds without a Pillar by going through the cracks left by the passage of previous Pillars. Ideology vs Survival. What do you do? Not fair to Rebecca, but it never is. Someone gets hurt in those situations, sometimes, everyone gets hurt. WTF Moments: Figured they’d be running into dimensional alternates of themselves, just didn’t expect them to be there to kidnap the children to replace theirs who died when their Pillar exploded. Meh / PFFT Moments: Chapter 2 and my favorite character is dead. And Dr Smith and the pencil pushing Dr Smith Lite are both alive. RIP Ward. I want Kadir and Chandra to get theirs. I want that pretty badly. The Unexpected: This owes a lot to Sliders. _________________________________________________ Last Page Sound: Liked it. Author Assessment: Yes. Moving on. Editorial Assessment: Well done. Knee Jerk Reaction: glad I read it _________________________________________________

  14. 4 out of 5

    Abhinav

    You can read the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/11/... “Where the first issue was all weird SF adventure, the second issue is human drama, and the soft switch is glorious.” ~Shadowhawk, The Founding Fields Its not often that a new series begins with an excellent issue where both the writing and the art mesh together so seamlessly as they did last month in Rick Remender and Matteo Scalera’s Black Science #1. That issue was a straight-up pulp SF adventure w You can read the full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/11/... “Where the first issue was all weird SF adventure, the second issue is human drama, and the soft switch is glorious.” ~Shadowhawk, The Founding Fields Its not often that a new series begins with an excellent issue where both the writing and the art mesh together so seamlessly as they did last month in Rick Remender and Matteo Scalera’s Black Science #1. That issue was a straight-up pulp SF adventure with some really badass freaky aliens and a fantastic ticking-clock story. Scientist Grant McKay’s headlong flight through the jungles of this world was an engaging story that worked for me on all levels and Black Science #2 is an issue that I had really been looking forward to. Quite a turnaround from last year where after reading Remender’s Captain America #1 I couldn’t really be bothered in any way to pick up Captain America #2. As I said above, the first issue was all adventure with a hint of human drama. The second issue is heavy on the human drama as the story changes gears to give us the background on the characters and what brought them to that point when we first see Grant McKay. We don’t get to see the entire story, there isn’t enough room in the issue for that anyway, but we do see strong foundations laid down for how the group behaves the way that it does. Especially Kadir, the financier of the entire Pillar project that was Grant’s life’s work. Since this is a human drama story this time, there was a fair amount of characterisation for every member of Remender’s cast. Grant, Rebecca, Chandra, Kadir, Nate, they all get to shine throughout the issue, and that’s what I loved about this issue the most. Each flashback informs on who these characters are and what their motivations are. On top of that, the specific conflict that is being generated between the team members, especially as Kadir and Chandra start factioning the group, it makes for some really good reading. Remender pretty much excels at his characterisation here. Once again, Matteo Scalera’s pencils and Dean White’s colours steal the show though. Visually speaking, Black Science #2 is not as pure awesomeness as Black Science #1 but still the issue stands as one of the best drawn issues I’ve read all month, so far. Some of Scalera’s character work is not up to scratch, being a bit too angular and undefined at times, but I still loved this issue. White’s colours are just phenomenal and really give Scalera’s pencils a lot of time to shine all through. There are 2-3 pages at the end, when we really get to the big twist of this world that the team finds itself on, and they are by far the best pages of this issue. So much going on in those pages, with so much gorgeous art to look at. And that’s pretty much why I love this comic. The story is fantastic. The art is fantastic. The cover is fantastic. Everything about it is just fantastic. Rating: 9/10

  15. 5 out of 5

    P D

    Oh holy crap the visuals are gorgeous. Lots of watercolor work, vividly saturated colors, crisp lines. I didn't totally love the choice of font, but given the mood—rapid, adrenaline-fueled—it worked out alright. Slip in the obligatory gratuitous alien T&A (I kid, it wasn't that gratuitous) and we're all set for a distant future where our narrator has apparently broken all kinds of laws, both natural and societal. Of course, traveling at breakneck speed means it's a bit unclear at the opening, and Oh holy crap the visuals are gorgeous. Lots of watercolor work, vividly saturated colors, crisp lines. I didn't totally love the choice of font, but given the mood—rapid, adrenaline-fueled—it worked out alright. Slip in the obligatory gratuitous alien T&A (I kid, it wasn't that gratuitous) and we're all set for a distant future where our narrator has apparently broken all kinds of laws, both natural and societal. Of course, traveling at breakneck speed means it's a bit unclear at the opening, and they do take advantage of this: in medias res at light speed, with a decent amount of background monologue, so that the pieces fit together eventually. I think "black science" is supposed to be the Clarke's Law equivalent of black magic. That kind of thing always sets me on edge a little, but at first glance it seems like this character is more complex than the run of the mill "ha-ha I'm a crazy scientist", so I'm willing to hold off judging until I have a reason to do so. That said, I don't know how much of the setup from this issue will apply to the following story—the quality of the art won't change, but is this story going to focus primarily on what's happening at home and the bigger conflicts, or is it going to be action/adventure?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shelly Schulz

    I was given a copy courtesy of Netgalley. To be completely up front and blunt, I enjoyed this. I like that straight off there’s a ton of action and story development. There’s a great underlying plot and it’s smart. The writing and dialogue are very smart and fast paced. There’s enough explanation and exposition that it’s not an info dump alongside great illustrations. It does remind me a bit of the television show Sliders (seriously, look it up it was amazing.)–but the differences are strong eno I was given a copy courtesy of Netgalley. To be completely up front and blunt, I enjoyed this. I like that straight off there’s a ton of action and story development. There’s a great underlying plot and it’s smart. The writing and dialogue are very smart and fast paced. There’s enough explanation and exposition that it’s not an info dump alongside great illustrations. It does remind me a bit of the television show Sliders (seriously, look it up it was amazing.)–but the differences are strong enough that I’m not feeling like it’s fan fiction. The characters are well written and unique with their own voices. The aliens that they encounter aren’t the most creative, but I think with the way this story is going and conflict we as readers are thrust into when the story opens, it’s easily ignored. The art though—I keep coming back to it. The lines are great and the colors are brilliant and saturated with an interesting quality to them. I will be reading this series as it progresses, and I’m interested to see where it’s going from the ending point. I’ve been on a manga kick for so long that it was a little different to pick up a traditional graphic novel/comic book and read it, but I found Black Science to be a good trap door back into that genre.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    When reading Black Science I couldn't help but think how Jonathan Hickman tries to come up with these philosophy-heaving, faux-science driven stories and here comes Rick Remender with an great first issue of black science and ditches the science for some good old fashioned dimension hopping complete with loony creatures. Black Science is great for two main reasons: an interesting premise and solid writing. Remender is my favourite writer due to his phenomenal runs on Punisher and Uncanny X-force When reading Black Science I couldn't help but think how Jonathan Hickman tries to come up with these philosophy-heaving, faux-science driven stories and here comes Rick Remender with an great first issue of black science and ditches the science for some good old fashioned dimension hopping complete with loony creatures. Black Science is great for two main reasons: an interesting premise and solid writing. Remender is my favourite writer due to his phenomenal runs on Punisher and Uncanny X-force and he continues his tradition of a strong, first person narrative with Grant McKay, scientist and father of two. We are thrust into the conflict midway (made tense by the addition of primitive frog and fish people) so there is some back story to be flushed out with later issues but this first issue sets the tone for the series and does a great job of reeling you in. Matteo Scalera provides some amazing art coloured by the equally talented Dean White to create a solid introduction to this intriguing new series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    I'm just entering into the immense world of graphic novels. I loved comics as a kid/young teenager but am just beginning to explore again. I think this was just a set I came across at B&N and it sounded pretty cool, and the art was good, so I went with it. I thought it was decent so far - it's a cool premise, about some scientists who develop a way to hop around the multiverse (or 'ever-verse' here) but then are sabotaged and can't control the destination or timing of their next jump. Given that I'm just entering into the immense world of graphic novels. I loved comics as a kid/young teenager but am just beginning to explore again. I think this was just a set I came across at B&N and it sounded pretty cool, and the art was good, so I went with it. I thought it was decent so far - it's a cool premise, about some scientists who develop a way to hop around the multiverse (or 'ever-verse' here) but then are sabotaged and can't control the destination or timing of their next jump. Given that premise, and the color palette and lines that appeal to my aesthetics, I was bound to like it OK. It never really hooked me more than that though. Maybe the family dynamics was a little too formulaic, maybe there was a bit too much trying to be developed too quickly. I'll probably pick up the next volume eventually and see if it grabs me more, and abandon it if not. Besides, there are so, so many graphic novels that have been so highly recommended to me that I really want to read, and this was just a lark.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Dimension-hopping story This science fiction comic book takes us on a trek across various dimensions/realities by the invention of a Pillar, the idea being that the scientists will be able to transport resources from other dimensions to benefit the Earth. The bunch of characters include Grant, his children, his lover, his sponsor and a couple of others there to flesh out the story. As could perhaps be predicted, things go pear-shaped and they end up trying to get home, some characters dying along Dimension-hopping story This science fiction comic book takes us on a trek across various dimensions/realities by the invention of a Pillar, the idea being that the scientists will be able to transport resources from other dimensions to benefit the Earth. The bunch of characters include Grant, his children, his lover, his sponsor and a couple of others there to flesh out the story. As could perhaps be predicted, things go pear-shaped and they end up trying to get home, some characters dying along the way. The characters interact reasonably realistically, arguing and empathising. The artwork by Matteo Calera is quite good but I found the frames too colourful for my liking and sometimes it was difficult to see what was intended. Enjoyable enough but it is not a book that I would have bought and I am not interested enough in what happens next in subsequent volumes.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Grant McHugh finds a way through black science to break the barriers of reality. But he does not expect those realities to be so full of chaos. As he travels to get back to the "pillar" to go home, he find that it has been destroyed but by who? Grant and his team are lost. To get home, they must travel through forgotten and ancient dark realms. This is pulp fiction mixed with science fiction. It compels you to keep reading this fantastic adventure. The artwork is gorgeous! This is a comic I won't Grant McHugh finds a way through black science to break the barriers of reality. But he does not expect those realities to be so full of chaos. As he travels to get back to the "pillar" to go home, he find that it has been destroyed but by who? Grant and his team are lost. To get home, they must travel through forgotten and ancient dark realms. This is pulp fiction mixed with science fiction. It compels you to keep reading this fantastic adventure. The artwork is gorgeous! This is a comic I won't forget and plan to read the next volume. Disclaimer: I received a digital galley of this book free from the publisher from NetGalley. I was not obliged to write a favourable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    ShingetsuMoon

    Anyone who has ever watched the show Sliders will find the basic idea of this comic series very familiar. Scientist builds a device, things go wrong, and they end up stuck going from one world to another with varying amounts of time until they jump again. Those who aren't familiar with the show Sliders can expect to be dropped right into the middle of the action. However the book lets you know what's going on and what happened soon enough that you don't get lost or have to spend time fumbling aro Anyone who has ever watched the show Sliders will find the basic idea of this comic series very familiar. Scientist builds a device, things go wrong, and they end up stuck going from one world to another with varying amounts of time until they jump again. Those who aren't familiar with the show Sliders can expect to be dropped right into the middle of the action. However the book lets you know what's going on and what happened soon enough that you don't get lost or have to spend time fumbling around to figure out what's going on. This was a great comic and I would definitely recommend this collection of the first six issue to anyone interested in checking out the series. This was a great story and definitely action packed! Rated M mostly for language.

  22. 5 out of 5

    A M H

    Love the science fiction plot and alien settings and creatures.The art is amazing and colorful. Great alien designs and backgrounds. Nothing ordinary or mundane. They alien societies we catch a glimpse of feel fleshed out and realized. Well done. The only thing I wasn't a fan of, was the over use of Jesus's name in vain on multiple occasions in the dialogue. I understand they're in there a horrible life/death situation, so they're going to cuss, but it just felt repetitive and not varied enough Love the science fiction plot and alien settings and creatures.The art is amazing and colorful. Great alien designs and backgrounds. Nothing ordinary or mundane. They alien societies we catch a glimpse of feel fleshed out and realized. Well done. The only thing I wasn't a fan of, was the over use of Jesus's name in vain on multiple occasions in the dialogue. I understand they're in there a horrible life/death situation, so they're going to cuss, but it just felt repetitive and not varied enough if it had to be there, but maybe that's just me. On an unrelated note, the main character's name is a scientist named Grant McKay, and it just makes me think of Stargate's Dr. Rodney McKay, who is my fav. character in all of TV. So that's cool. lol 3.5

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peter Hiller

    It just doesn't work for me. I do like the whole idea. But the art style just doesn't work for me. Maybe it's just needed because of the whole alternate timeline concept. Each issue is a chance to start totally new. But for me I think it suffers (this is the same reason I'm not a fan Of "the kindly ones" cycle in the sandman series) And I just didn't feel it. The "each issue is separate" I've seen execute better in John Prophet. The whole Sliders concept I've seen (though they do pull of some good It just doesn't work for me. I do like the whole idea. But the art style just doesn't work for me. Maybe it's just needed because of the whole alternate timeline concept. Each issue is a chance to start totally new. But for me I think it suffers (this is the same reason I'm not a fan Of "the kindly ones" cycle in the sandman series) And I just didn't feel it. The "each issue is separate" I've seen execute better in John Prophet. The whole Sliders concept I've seen (though they do pull of some good executions when going just totally out there, the WW1 with Native Americans world was great). Others love it, I didn't.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I think this first came to my attention when I saw some clickbait titled "10 things to read while you wait for season 3 of Rick and Morty". To be sure, I never ended up taking this list all too seriously, so I summarily forgot about Black Science. As of October this year, I am pleased to say I finally got around to reading this. Complex, gorgeous and super heavy on the science, this book certainly is a great sci-fi story. I find the characters to have great depth and I think wherever you add int I think this first came to my attention when I saw some clickbait titled "10 things to read while you wait for season 3 of Rick and Morty". To be sure, I never ended up taking this list all too seriously, so I summarily forgot about Black Science. As of October this year, I am pleased to say I finally got around to reading this. Complex, gorgeous and super heavy on the science, this book certainly is a great sci-fi story. I find the characters to have great depth and I think wherever you add interdimensional travel, you really have no boundaries when it comes to possibilities, so I look forward to reading more as the reissues are released.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Parks

    The most fun I've had reading a comic in a while, and I read a lot of comics. I tend to read comics based on who wrote them. If Jonathan Hickman comes out with something new I have to check it out. The news of a new Grant Morrison book being released usually precipitates an underwear change. I feverishly scan the shelves at the library for the names "Alan" and "Moore." You get the picture. I am profoundly sad that up until now I really had no idea what an amazing writer Rick Remender is and had The most fun I've had reading a comic in a while, and I read a lot of comics. I tend to read comics based on who wrote them. If Jonathan Hickman comes out with something new I have to check it out. The news of a new Grant Morrison book being released usually precipitates an underwear change. I feverishly scan the shelves at the library for the names "Alan" and "Moore." You get the picture. I am profoundly sad that up until now I really had no idea what an amazing writer Rick Remender is and had never bothered to check out his works. So glad I finally remedied that.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    This was pretty sweet. It has kind of a retro Heavy Metal (the movie) feel. They're basically "falling" through dimensions and each one has awesome aliens or alternate history stuff going on. About 50% of it is them getting chased around trying to survive while the main character berets himself through an inner dialogue. I like the writing a lot and it makes me wonder if you could write successful prose like that where there's constant action but also constant pontificating/philosophizing. Lookin This was pretty sweet. It has kind of a retro Heavy Metal (the movie) feel. They're basically "falling" through dimensions and each one has awesome aliens or alternate history stuff going on. About 50% of it is them getting chased around trying to survive while the main character berets himself through an inner dialogue. I like the writing a lot and it makes me wonder if you could write successful prose like that where there's constant action but also constant pontificating/philosophizing. Looking forward to volume 2.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Basically the SLIDERS tv show without the tv special effects budget. Arrogant scientist creates a machine to travel detween dimensions. Arrogant boss sabotages machine to steal idea or protect world (true motivation still up in the air at this point). Machine randomly jumping through alien dimensions with passengers trying to survive harsh environments, strange creatures, hostile inhabitants, and each other. Art has a dark, painted look and is slightly abstract. Not good superhero comic art, but Basically the SLIDERS tv show without the tv special effects budget. Arrogant scientist creates a machine to travel detween dimensions. Arrogant boss sabotages machine to steal idea or protect world (true motivation still up in the air at this point). Machine randomly jumping through alien dimensions with passengers trying to survive harsh environments, strange creatures, hostile inhabitants, and each other. Art has a dark, painted look and is slightly abstract. Not good superhero comic art, but it works pretty well for this type story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    5 Stars Black Science #1 is simply amazing. Wow was I blown away by the story, the setting, the artwork, the selfish egomaniac bastard protagonist, the aliens, and more. This was a really awesome start to a science fiction graphic novel series that tickles all of my likes. There is so much to love. The artwork is fabulous and truly graphic. The first chapter had a great in your face attitude that I loved. Multiverse stories make me giddy. This one simply has it all. I can't wait for the next one. 5 Stars Black Science #1 is simply amazing. Wow was I blown away by the story, the setting, the artwork, the selfish egomaniac bastard protagonist, the aliens, and more. This was a really awesome start to a science fiction graphic novel series that tickles all of my likes. There is so much to love. The artwork is fabulous and truly graphic. The first chapter had a great in your face attitude that I loved. Multiverse stories make me giddy. This one simply has it all. I can't wait for the next one.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Silas

    Having no preconceived notion of what this book would be, I found this rather underwhelming. I'm sure I got it in some kind of sampler pack, since I only have the one issue, and I am not currently inclined to seek out more. This volume was severely lacking in backstory, which is a common comic book gambit, but the volume failed to deliver any by the end of the first issue (likely, they are writing for the trade that I don't have), which is a big no-no. I guess it involves alternate realities and Having no preconceived notion of what this book would be, I found this rather underwhelming. I'm sure I got it in some kind of sampler pack, since I only have the one issue, and I am not currently inclined to seek out more. This volume was severely lacking in backstory, which is a common comic book gambit, but the volume failed to deliver any by the end of the first issue (likely, they are writing for the trade that I don't have), which is a big no-no. I guess it involves alternate realities and egotistical scientists, which just doesn't really intrigue me all by itself.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Black Science is a fast paced sci-fi story. The artwork is pretty awesome with a lot going on in the alien backgrounds. I liked the way the story unfolded. You get small pieces of the story as the characters are busy trying to survive. By the end, you get a good grasp of what led the characters to the situation they are in. There are a couple of plot twists that keep the story interesting and moving forward.

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