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Fantasy & Science Fiction, July 1998 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #564)

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22 review for Fantasy & Science Fiction, July 1998 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #564)

  1. 4 out of 5

    John Loyd

    F&SF goes to the movies. Four stories, three with movie themes, the other written like a screen play. There are several special feature columns. What books would make great films, movies that shouldn't have been made, what actors should play a character, etc. Unfortunately the essays were pretty much a waste of space. I'd never heard of most of the books mentioned and the ones I had read, e.g. The Left Hand of Darkness, I didn't remember the plot/characters. 7 • Auteur Theory • 34 pages by Richar F&SF goes to the movies. Four stories, three with movie themes, the other written like a screen play. There are several special feature columns. What books would make great films, movies that shouldn't have been made, what actors should play a character, etc. Unfortunately the essays were pretty much a waste of space. I'd never heard of most of the books mentioned and the ones I had read, e.g. The Left Hand of Darkness, I didn't remember the plot/characters. 7 • Auteur Theory • 34 pages by Richard Chwedyk Very Good. Cath visits her father, once a prominent director. He shows her a film that he wanted to make had everything fallen into place. It is something that never existed in this universe. It must be from a parallel timeline. 51 • Goobers • 16 pages by Harvey Jacobs Good+. Nestor goes to see a movie and his view is blocked by an enormous man. This happens a second time. The third time he sits in the front row and is force to move right behind the blob. Nestor uses movies as a social ice breaker. He really wants to see the movies so he can voice his opinion. He can't not go. What can he do? 76 • Incident at Oak Ridge • 39 pages by Terry Bisson Good/Very Good. Fred and Kim are hiking in the mountains of Tennessee when they are transported to 1944 where they are inside some restricted area. Fred asks to talk with Richard Feynman, Kim wants a cigarette. Humorous dialog. 130 • The Curse of the Demon • 32 pages by Ron Goulart Good/VG. Nancy inherits a small casket from a distant relation that practiced black magic. She's afraid and asks Dan to test it out once she is a safe distance away. The letter that comes with the casket says to open it and say an incantation to control the demon. Dan opens the casket, but falls backward from the force of the opening, with no chance to say the words. The demon is free but is willing to grant Dan a favor. Maybe. Instead of having the studio buy Dan's script, the demon turns himself into a child actor and causes accidents that happen to advance his career. Goulart usually jumps from scene to scene with huge gaps. Didn't notice that here. It has his usual witty banter and outrageous situations, in addition this one also had a nice flow.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    This is an issue of F&SF devoted to the movies. The movie theater marquee on the cover has the names of three of the authors with stories in this issue (Terry Bisson, Ron Goulart, and Harvey Jacobs), the sign "Richard Feynman starring in INCIDENT AT OAK RIDGE," and the sign "F&SF GOES TO THE MOVIES." The ticket booth has a poster saying "F&SF GOES TO HOLLYWOOD." The being selling tickets looks like some kind of large mechanical insect. The patrons in line to purchase tickets are a blonde girl, a This is an issue of F&SF devoted to the movies. The movie theater marquee on the cover has the names of three of the authors with stories in this issue (Terry Bisson, Ron Goulart, and Harvey Jacobs), the sign "Richard Feynman starring in INCIDENT AT OAK RIDGE," and the sign "F&SF GOES TO THE MOVIES." The ticket booth has a poster saying "F&SF GOES TO HOLLYWOOD." The being selling tickets looks like some kind of large mechanical insect. The patrons in line to purchase tickets are a blonde girl, a tentacled creature with ichor (or something) dripping from it, a wolfman, a robot, and a vampire wearing a cloak. This will be a 🌟Quadruple Feature with Many Selected Shorts.🌟 CONTENTS ◾Fiction: ▪️"Auteur Theory" - Richard Chwedyk ▪️"Goobers" - Harvey Jacobs ▪️"Incident at Oak Ridge" - Terry Bisson ▪️"The Curse of the Demon" - Ron Goulart ◾Special Features ▪️"Nine Fantasy Novels That Should Be Made into Films" - Jonathan Carroll ▪️"Eight SF/Fantasy Films That Have Really Stayed with Me" - Kathi Maio ▪️"Eight Great Animated Fantasy Films" - James Morrow ▪️"But What I Really Want to Do Is Direct" - Esther M. Friesner ▪️"Six Great SF Movies That Could Be Made Without Audible Explosions in the Vacuum of Space" - Ursula K. Le Guin ▪️"Who I'll Cast When They Let Me Direct..." - John Kessel ▪️"Five More SF Biopics We Don't Need" - Howard Waldrop ▪️"Ten SF/Fantasy/Genre Films That Should Not Have Been Made" - Pat Cadigan ◾Departments: ▪️"Editorial" - Gordon Van Gelder ▪️"Books to Look For" - Charles de Lint ▪️"Musing on Books" - Michelle West ▪️"Plumage from Pegasus: 'Escapist Velocity' " - Paul Di Filippo ▪️"Films: 'Deep Space, Right Here at Home' " - Kathi Maio ▪️"Curiosities: 'Claire Winger Harris' " - Richard A. Lupoff The four stories in this issue all have a connection to movies. Three of them are about movies. The fourth one, "Incident at Oak Ridge" by Terry Bisson, is a movie - that is, it is a film script. Two men from the present (the 1998 present) find themselves in Oak Ridge, Tennessee in 1944, a time and place at which people are working on developing an atomic bomb. They are held by the Army as spies. Physicist Richard Feynman is there; perhaps they can convince him that they really are from his future. Harvey Jacobs' story "Goobers" concerns film as a social phenomenon. Shared opinions about movies can bring people together. However, every time the main character goes to a movie, the same loud, crude, large man sits in front of him and blocks his view, so he can't have an informed opinion of any of the films. Obviously, some action is required...perhaps some drastic action. "The Curse of the Demon" by Ron Goulart is a story about making movies. It seems to be easier to make popular, highly regarded films if the star is a demon who takes the shape of a young boy, with every characteristic chosen for extreme liability. And also, the demon being, after all, a demon, he is inclined to make sure that no one opposes his plans - at least not for long. Richard Chwedyk's "Auteur Theory" tells of an aging film director, his daughter, and a mysterious schoolmate of the daughter. One of the director's neighbors, an avid film buff, has got hold of a bunch of films - films that never existed in our universe, such as Orson Welles's planned but never shot film of Heart of Darkness. All of these stories are quite good. The "Special Feature" items are all fascinating. Some of them are intended to be purely comic; Howard Waldrop's entry is particularly so. The lists by Carroll, Maio, Morrow, and Le Guin are all serious and informative. Kathi Maio is also represented with her film review column. Her topic is science fiction and fantasy set in the ocean. The films that she reviews are Deep Rising and Sphere, both of which she dislikes. Paul Di Filippo's "Plumage from Pegasus" humor column continues the movie theme with a discussion of films of the mid-Twenty-second Century. The book review columns by Charles de Lint and Michelle West stray from the subject of film. De Lint reviews books by Dean Koontz, Graham Joyce, and Jonathan Carroll. He describes Joyce's book The Tooth Fairy as "one of those near-perfect novels that grabs you from the first page and doesn't let go until the last sentence." West reviews books by Sean Stewart, Mary Doria Russell, and Richard Grant. The "Curiosities" column by Richard A. Lupoff praises Claire Winger Harris, "the first woman to write science fiction stories for the science fiction magazines." Lupoff mentions that Harris's short stories were collected in a book titled Away from the Here and Now. There is a cartoon by Joseph Farris. The cover, with which I began this review, is by Jill Bauman. Unless readers hate everything about movies, I think that they will find this an exceptionally interesting issue of F&SF.

  3. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ashby Albright

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ubikuberalles

  6. 5 out of 5

    Igraine

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leroy Erickson

  9. 5 out of 5

    PAPENFUSS

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary Mastrolia

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael Joseph Schumann

  13. 4 out of 5

    Donna Jacoby

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

  16. 5 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jaspher Cabanday

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Terri Baker

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donna Lombardo

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dante

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

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