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Wisconsin's Flying Trees in World War II: A Victory for American Forest Products and Allied Aviation

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Wisconsin's trees heard "Timber " during World War II, as the forest products industry of the Badger State played a key role in the Allied aerial campaign. It was Wisconsin that provided the material for the De Havilland Mosquito, known as the "Timber Terror," while the CG-4A battle-ready gliders, cloaked in stealthy silence, carried the 82nd and 101st Airborne into fierce Wisconsin's trees heard "Timber " during World War II, as the forest products industry of the Badger State played a key role in the Allied aerial campaign. It was Wisconsin that provided the material for the De Havilland Mosquito, known as the "Timber Terror," while the CG-4A battle-ready gliders, cloaked in stealthy silence, carried the 82nd and 101st Airborne into fierce fighting throughout Europe and the Pacific. Sara Witter Connor follows a forgotten thread of the American war effort, celebrating the factory workers, lumberjacks, pilots and innovative thinkers of the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory who helped win a world war with paper, wood and glue.


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Wisconsin's trees heard "Timber " during World War II, as the forest products industry of the Badger State played a key role in the Allied aerial campaign. It was Wisconsin that provided the material for the De Havilland Mosquito, known as the "Timber Terror," while the CG-4A battle-ready gliders, cloaked in stealthy silence, carried the 82nd and 101st Airborne into fierce Wisconsin's trees heard "Timber " during World War II, as the forest products industry of the Badger State played a key role in the Allied aerial campaign. It was Wisconsin that provided the material for the De Havilland Mosquito, known as the "Timber Terror," while the CG-4A battle-ready gliders, cloaked in stealthy silence, carried the 82nd and 101st Airborne into fierce fighting throughout Europe and the Pacific. Sara Witter Connor follows a forgotten thread of the American war effort, celebrating the factory workers, lumberjacks, pilots and innovative thinkers of the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory who helped win a world war with paper, wood and glue.

21 review for Wisconsin's Flying Trees in World War II: A Victory for American Forest Products and Allied Aviation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I'm currently on page 59, and so far, this doesn't feel like a cohesive book. It feels more like lists of people who worked for various lumber companies who then went to war, and various products the lumber companies made, but no narrative. ... I'm now done (well, giving up on page 193 of 218 pages of text), and it never really got better. It had moments when it looked like it was going to become a cohesive narration, but then it didn't. I'm currently on page 59, and so far, this doesn't feel like a cohesive book. It feels more like lists of people who worked for various lumber companies who then went to war, and various products the lumber companies made, but no narrative. ... I'm now done (well, giving up on page 193 of 218 pages of text), and it never really got better. It had moments when it looked like it was going to become a cohesive narration, but then it didn't.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kent Archie

    This is an interesting subject, especially since I grew up in Northern Wisconsin where much of the work described was done. The writing is kind of clumsy and that is distracting. The main subject of the book is the use of plywood in aircraft and after reading it I still am not sure how sheets of wood are removed from a log or how plywood is shaped into curved aircraft sections. I had no idea how much wood went into shipping things to the front and that you could build aircraft from plywood. The auth This is an interesting subject, especially since I grew up in Northern Wisconsin where much of the work described was done. The writing is kind of clumsy and that is distracting. The main subject of the book is the use of plywood in aircraft and after reading it I still am not sure how sheets of wood are removed from a log or how plywood is shaped into curved aircraft sections. I had no idea how much wood went into shipping things to the front and that you could build aircraft from plywood. The authors grandfather ran a company that made plywood for use in the British Mosquito bomber. This became important to the book when she wrote a letter to a German company that provided some equipment they used to ask about any records they had about her grandfathers visit to Germany in the late 1930's. They said they couldn't because airplanes built with plywood her grandfather had made using the German equipment and destroyed their archives during the war.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dave Hoff

    Very interesting chapter on the Home Front during WW2, with rationing, hard to find itemss for living, the need for workers in defense plants & in the forests, getting logs for the hundreds of forest product needs. Other chapters, Gliders for the Airborne to go into combat, the British all wood mosquito bomber, and how waterproof glue came into being interesting. Much info for those in wood product production & sales, but others, probably not..

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tom Laney

  5. 5 out of 5

    Allison Lichtenberg

  6. 4 out of 5

    James

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kangas

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bob Hiebert

  9. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Mcfarlane

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Shulman

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ken Buchholz

  12. 5 out of 5

    THOMAS RYASKO

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hillary

  14. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Wilson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sue Gill

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom Michel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Richard Barth

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jake Bonack

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