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The Translation judges for the National Book Awards - Richard Miller, Alastair Reid, Eliot Weinberger - cites Clayton Eshleman and Jose Rubia Barcia's translation of Cesar Vallejo's The Complete Posthumous Poetry as follows: "This, the first National Book Award to be given to a translation of modern poetry, is a recognition of Clayton Esheman's seventeen-year apprenticeship The Translation judges for the National Book Awards - Richard Miller, Alastair Reid, Eliot Weinberger - cites Clayton Eshleman and Jose Rubia Barcia's translation of Cesar Vallejo's The Complete Posthumous Poetry as follows: "This, the first National Book Award to be given to a translation of modern poetry, is a recognition of Clayton Esheman's seventeen-year apprenticeship to perhaps the most difficult poetry in the Spanish language. Eshleman and his present collaborator, Jose Rubia Barcia, have not only rendered these complex poems into brilliant and living English, but have also established a definitive Spanish test based on Vallejo's densely rewritten manuscripts. In recreating this modern master in English, they have also made a considerable addition to poetry in our language."


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The Translation judges for the National Book Awards - Richard Miller, Alastair Reid, Eliot Weinberger - cites Clayton Eshleman and Jose Rubia Barcia's translation of Cesar Vallejo's The Complete Posthumous Poetry as follows: "This, the first National Book Award to be given to a translation of modern poetry, is a recognition of Clayton Esheman's seventeen-year apprenticeship The Translation judges for the National Book Awards - Richard Miller, Alastair Reid, Eliot Weinberger - cites Clayton Eshleman and Jose Rubia Barcia's translation of Cesar Vallejo's The Complete Posthumous Poetry as follows: "This, the first National Book Award to be given to a translation of modern poetry, is a recognition of Clayton Esheman's seventeen-year apprenticeship to perhaps the most difficult poetry in the Spanish language. Eshleman and his present collaborator, Jose Rubia Barcia, have not only rendered these complex poems into brilliant and living English, but have also established a definitive Spanish test based on Vallejo's densely rewritten manuscripts. In recreating this modern master in English, they have also made a considerable addition to poetry in our language."

30 review for The Complete Posthumous Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vladimir

    I discovered Vallejo quite late but reading a single poem was enough to attract me to his poetry. Pity that I don't speak Spanish, still English translation was really good. The quality of the text vary as in any "complete" collection. Although written nearly 100 years ago, dark and profound, Vallejo's poetry is still fresh and original. Here is an excerpt: "How long has anesthesia, as man call it, lasted? Science of God, Theodicy! if I am forced to live under such conditions, totally anesthetize I discovered Vallejo quite late but reading a single poem was enough to attract me to his poetry. Pity that I don't speak Spanish, still English translation was really good. The quality of the text vary as in any "complete" collection. Although written nearly 100 years ago, dark and profound, Vallejo's poetry is still fresh and original. Here is an excerpt: "How long has anesthesia, as man call it, lasted? Science of God, Theodicy! if I am forced to live under such conditions, totally anesthetized, my sensitivity turned outside in! O doctors of the salts, men of the essences, fellowmen of the bases! I beg to be left with my tumor of consciousness, with my sensitive leprosy, no matter what happens, even though I may die! Allow me to feel pain. if you wish but leave me aroused from the sleep, with all universe embedded, even if by force in my dusty fever." And my favorite poem: For several days, I have felt an exuberant, political need to love, to kiss affection on its two cheeks, and I have felt from afar a demonstrative desire, another desire to love, willingly or by force, whoever hates me, whoever rips up his paper, a little boy, the woman who cries for the man who was crying, the king of wine, the slave of water, whoever hid in his wrath, whoever sweats, whoever passes, whoever shakes his person in my soul. And I want, therefore, to adjust the braid of whoever talks to me; the hair of the soldier; the light of the great one; the greatness of the little one. I want to iron directly a handkerchief for whoever is unable to cry and, when I am sad or happiness hurts me, to mend the children and the geniuses. I want to help the good one become a little bit bad and I badly need to be seated on the right hand of the left-handed, and to respond to the mute, trying to be useful to him as I can, and also I want very much to wash the lame man’s foot, and to help the nearby one-eyed man sleep. Ah love, this one my own, this one the world’s, interhuman and parochial, maturely aged! It comes perfectly timed, from the foundation, from the public groin, and, coming from afar, makes me wantto kiss the singer’s muffler, and whoever suffers to kiss him on his frying pan, the deaf man on his cranial murmur; whoever gives me what I forgot in my breast, on his Dante, on his Chaplin, on his shoulders. I want, finally, when I’m at the celebrated edge of violence or my heart full of chest, I would like to help whoever smiles laugh, to put a little bird right on the evil man’s cape, to take care of the sick, annoying them, to buy from the vendor to help the killer kill, a terrible thing and I would like to be kind to myself in everything.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Desca Ang

    This review is taken from my IG account @descanto I have to admit that I am not at my best these days. I am struggling with anxiety without knowing the reasons why. I also experience eating and sleeping disorder. Add the boredom from working from home and the LDR shit with Pak M have turned these days into not-so-great gloomy days. I started to realise why Dickinson keeps saying, "why does it take so long for me to die?" Or why Alda Merini keeps saying, "ho bisogno di silenzio. Ho gia parlato tan This review is taken from my IG account @descanto I have to admit that I am not at my best these days. I am struggling with anxiety without knowing the reasons why. I also experience eating and sleeping disorder. Add the boredom from working from home and the LDR shit with Pak M have turned these days into not-so-great gloomy days. I started to realise why Dickinson keeps saying, "why does it take so long for me to die?" Or why Alda Merini keeps saying, "ho bisogno di silenzio. Ho gia parlato tanto...- I need the silence. I have talked too much, " In their poems. It's just prolly a sign of the right momento to step and retrace back who we are. The Complete Posthumous Poetry does not only rise Vallejo's critic to the social injustice but also rises the awareness about the war, the new hope, and the values of humanity. Yet the poems do speak differently to me. I can sense the desperation in most of those poems. Yet there is also a glimpse of hope about life that he wants to deliver. Ah, have you ever gone through poems and you became more and more depressed like when I read Vallejo's?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Antonio Delgado

    To love Vallejo's poetry is to love humanity, to embrace humanity with its wars, its hate and its a fuck up future. To read Vallejo's poetry is to become human again, to understand the pain of others as our pain, to hate ourselves and to despise what we have become. In the meantime only poetry can heal and remind us of our futile existence. To love Vallejo's poetry is to love humanity, to embrace humanity with its wars, its hate and its a fuck up future. To read Vallejo's poetry is to become human again, to understand the pain of others as our pain, to hate ourselves and to despise what we have become. In the meantime only poetry can heal and remind us of our futile existence.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    Vallejo is an intuitive man with heart. He feels, senses, observes, and captures it all in words. His keen eye and articulate soul unite in his poetry. He translates moments and experiences of life into verse, which create pictures in the mind of this reader. Thus, reading this volume, with every turn of the page, was like watching a slideshow or short video. Vallejo's posthumous poetry provided an outstanding read and experience. May his words live on. Vallejo is an intuitive man with heart. He feels, senses, observes, and captures it all in words. His keen eye and articulate soul unite in his poetry. He translates moments and experiences of life into verse, which create pictures in the mind of this reader. Thus, reading this volume, with every turn of the page, was like watching a slideshow or short video. Vallejo's posthumous poetry provided an outstanding read and experience. May his words live on.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I read this book in 1979 or 1980, while taking a class from translator Clayton Eshleman. The poetry is difficult, tortured, haunting. Lines from it still float up in my memory -- tender and agonized. "The incredible amount of money it takes to be poor." "The anger of the poor / has one oil against two vinegars." "And I want, therefore, to adjust the hair of whoever talks to me, the hair of the soldier..." I read this book in 1979 or 1980, while taking a class from translator Clayton Eshleman. The poetry is difficult, tortured, haunting. Lines from it still float up in my memory -- tender and agonized. "The incredible amount of money it takes to be poor." "The anger of the poor / has one oil against two vinegars." "And I want, therefore, to adjust the hair of whoever talks to me, the hair of the soldier..."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I'm not crazy about the translation--it's highly rated but I feel it sometimes renders Vallejo more difficult than necessary. I've read other translators of Vallejo's poems that seemed to flow better. Additionally, there are several typos in the text that should have been easily caught. However, Vallejo's poetry still shines through despite the quibbles, so it's definitely worth a read. I'm not crazy about the translation--it's highly rated but I feel it sometimes renders Vallejo more difficult than necessary. I've read other translators of Vallejo's poems that seemed to flow better. Additionally, there are several typos in the text that should have been easily caught. However, Vallejo's poetry still shines through despite the quibbles, so it's definitely worth a read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

    Volver a Vallejo después de 10 años. Leer a Vallejo con más de treinta años de edad. Después de otras vidas, otras lecturas, después de ser otra. Leer a Vallejo y saber que " Ya va a venir el día;/ la mañana, la mar, el meteoro..." Volver a Vallejo después de 10 años. Leer a Vallejo con más de treinta años de edad. Después de otras vidas, otras lecturas, después de ser otra. Leer a Vallejo y saber que " Ya va a venir el día;/ la mañana, la mar, el meteoro..."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    I'm convinced that Vallejo will one day be considered the greatest poet of the 20th century. He is said to have anticipated surrealism. But he infused it with playfulness, muscular lyricism, and unimaginable kindness. I prefer Eshleman's translations, even if they are less accessible than others. I'm convinced that Vallejo will one day be considered the greatest poet of the 20th century. He is said to have anticipated surrealism. But he infused it with playfulness, muscular lyricism, and unimaginable kindness. I prefer Eshleman's translations, even if they are less accessible than others.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Blurp

    A delight and a bible for how to better understand the limitless capacity of the human spirit. Software engineers and lawyers (the dual two-headed donkeysmen of the apocalypse): don't read, your mother's underpants aren't in there. A delight and a bible for how to better understand the limitless capacity of the human spirit. Software engineers and lawyers (the dual two-headed donkeysmen of the apocalypse): don't read, your mother's underpants aren't in there.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stosch

    pretty good, 1 poem is amazing. looking forward to The Black Heralds. posthumous books usually arent that great. tortured soul poetry. worth a read, its different. pretty good, 1 poem is amazing. looking forward to The Black Heralds. posthumous books usually arent that great. tortured soul poetry. worth a read, its different.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Unbelievable poetry from a Peruvian writer. Anguished and enigmatic and yet completely clear.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tara Daly

    Not only an excellent translation into English but a beautifully handsome book to hold. Vallejo is one of the true greats, not only in Peru, but internationally.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vogisland

    Amazing book. After Residencia en la Tierra, I was not looking forward to he Spanish Civil War poems that close this book, but these were much better.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jim Angstadt

  16. 5 out of 5

    H. Scull

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nacheinander

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chazz

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Horton

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lo Nathamundi

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brad Richard

  22. 4 out of 5

    Juan Jesus Payan

  23. 4 out of 5

    C

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ann Klefstad

  25. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Marchena Montalvo

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Porter

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tarfia

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laure-anne

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