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Dr. Woodrew Moreland, a respected scientist, has invited Alex Delaware, psychologist/detective, to his home on a tiny Pacific island to help him organize his papers for publication. It's a light workload leaving plenty of time for Alex and his girlfriend, Robin, to relax. Quickly, however, secretive houseguests and unexplained visitors dim the pleasures of deep blue water a Dr. Woodrew Moreland, a respected scientist, has invited Alex Delaware, psychologist/detective, to his home on a tiny Pacific island to help him organize his papers for publication. It's a light workload leaving plenty of time for Alex and his girlfriend, Robin, to relax. Quickly, however, secretive houseguests and unexplained visitors dim the pleasures of deep blue water and white sands. Alex can't help wondering why Dr. Moreland really invited him to the island. When he probes, Alex discovers a sour and unwelcome truth. But truth it is, and its discovery comes just in time to save Alex and Robin from the violence that threatens them.


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Dr. Woodrew Moreland, a respected scientist, has invited Alex Delaware, psychologist/detective, to his home on a tiny Pacific island to help him organize his papers for publication. It's a light workload leaving plenty of time for Alex and his girlfriend, Robin, to relax. Quickly, however, secretive houseguests and unexplained visitors dim the pleasures of deep blue water a Dr. Woodrew Moreland, a respected scientist, has invited Alex Delaware, psychologist/detective, to his home on a tiny Pacific island to help him organize his papers for publication. It's a light workload leaving plenty of time for Alex and his girlfriend, Robin, to relax. Quickly, however, secretive houseguests and unexplained visitors dim the pleasures of deep blue water and white sands. Alex can't help wondering why Dr. Moreland really invited him to the island. When he probes, Alex discovers a sour and unwelcome truth. But truth it is, and its discovery comes just in time to save Alex and Robin from the violence that threatens them.

30 review for The Web

  1. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    In this 10th book in the 'Alex Delaware' series, the psychologist/sleuth is in the Marshall Islands for a working vacation. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** I've been a fan of Jonathan Kellerman's 'Alex Delaware' series for a long time, but the recent ones have gone downhill in my opinion. For that reason I decided to go back and read an old Alex Delaware novel, thinking I'd enjoy it. In 'The Web', published in 2003, psychologist/LAPD consultant Dr. Alex Delaware is on an extended visit In this 10th book in the 'Alex Delaware' series, the psychologist/sleuth is in the Marshall Islands for a working vacation. The book can be read as a standalone. ***** I've been a fan of Jonathan Kellerman's 'Alex Delaware' series for a long time, but the recent ones have gone downhill in my opinion. For that reason I decided to go back and read an old Alex Delaware novel, thinking I'd enjoy it. In 'The Web', published in 2003, psychologist/LAPD consultant Dr. Alex Delaware is on an extended visit to the tiny South Pacific island of Aruk (in the Mariana Chain) with his girlfriend Robin Castagna and their French bulldog Spike. Alex has been hired by the isle's resident physician, Dr. Bill Moreland - who's been there since the end of WWII - to help organize his medical files and write a book. The nearby Bikini Atoll was used to test a hydrogen bomb in 1954, and the fallout from that had terrible medical consequences. Moreover, Moreland tells stories about a local cat-woman (a female who behaved like a cat) and an unsolved case in which a woman on the island was horribly killed and cannibalized. Moreland provides an office for Alex, an art studio for Robin, and a run for Spike. He also serves delicious food and drinks and arranges for recreational activities like swimming and snorkeling. During a tour of Moreland's very extensive estate, he shows Robin and Alex his lovely gardens as well as his 'invertebrate zoo', populated with giant hissing cockroaches, huge tarantulas, and other scary creatures. Hissing cockroach Giant tarantula As they settle in, Alex and Robin become acquainted with other people spending time on the estate, including Moreland's divorced daughter Pam - who's also a physician; Moreland's assistant Dennis - who's a trained nurse; and a married couple who are PhD scientists. Robin and Alex also meet some of the local residents of Aruk, including the chief of police; a couple of merchants; a pushy journalist; and two ominous creeps who ogle Robin and make rude remarks. Before long there are more suspicious deaths on Aruk; scary bugs get loose; Spike is infuriated by badly behaving humans; Moreland is seen sneaking around at night; an entitled U.S. Senator visits and throws his weight around; and Alex starts to suspect that Moreland lured him to the island under false pretenses. And of course Alex is right!! As the story unfurls there are some big surprises, and I'd categorize them as unbelievable, lurid, and crass. There's also a lot of non-graphic romance between Alex and Robin - which isn't surprising because they're still at it fifteen years later. ❤ LAPD Detective Milo Sturgis, who's a regular character in this series, makes a brief appearance via phone calls - and I missed his big personality (and big appetite). 😊 The book has a 'horror' vibe, but it's in sync with other books in the series where Alex meets dangerous people. The story moves too slowly to be a gripping thriller - and Kellerman describes his characters' appearance and clothing in too much detail (as always) - but this is a serviceable mystery to pass a few hours with....and I cheered at the end. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    "Look at this," he said. "I'm sure you've never seen a web like this." Mystery readers who like their stories compartmentalised and samey will probably frown upon what Kellerman has done here. It’s an Alex Delaware novel, but it is also quite unlike any of the other novels in the series (or at least those that I have read, which, admittedly aren’t that many). For starters: the story takes place on a remote and obscure Micronesian island. Consider: a large mansion filled with house guests; a grueso "Look at this," he said. "I'm sure you've never seen a web like this." Mystery readers who like their stories compartmentalised and samey will probably frown upon what Kellerman has done here. It’s an Alex Delaware novel, but it is also quite unlike any of the other novels in the series (or at least those that I have read, which, admittedly aren’t that many). For starters: the story takes place on a remote and obscure Micronesian island. Consider: a large mansion filled with house guests; a gruesome past murder; a gruesome present murder; red herrings; strange people. It does sound like this might be the best novel Agatha Christie never wrote… but it’s not quite that either. Shining the penlight into a dark tank, he revealed something half covered by leaves. It crawled out slowly and my stomach lurched. This novel brings a bit of the old bizarre factor to the table, which is saying quite a lot, considering the nature of the Alex Delaware novels. Let me put it this way, I read The Web on the back of a spate of Horror novels and it didn’t feel out of place. The Web is a fairly cryptic book, quite literally filled with riddles. To be honest, there’s a bit of over-indulgence on the author’s part in turning the whole thing into something not completely unlike a dramatic reality show, but it works… somehow. "It's something, isn't it? You come to an out-of-the-way place, think you're escaping big-city crime, and it runs after you like a mad dog."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    I like Kellerman's characters, but I'm starting to get a bit tired of his detailed descriptions of whatever area he's either entered, or who's wearing what. This took place on a little island (I think it's fake) in the S.Pacific. Alex Delaware & his partner (Robin)get an unexpected "vacation" as he does research for a Dr. there, who is about to retire. Has to do w/nuclear bombs being discharged under water years ago...and the fallout from those tests. Now, the dear Dr. has a cavefull of "aliens" I like Kellerman's characters, but I'm starting to get a bit tired of his detailed descriptions of whatever area he's either entered, or who's wearing what. This took place on a little island (I think it's fake) in the S.Pacific. Alex Delaware & his partner (Robin)get an unexpected "vacation" as he does research for a Dr. there, who is about to retire. Has to do w/nuclear bombs being discharged under water years ago...and the fallout from those tests. Now, the dear Dr. has a cavefull of "aliens" who must be taken care of as he...well...you've got to read it. Sorry...the "vacation" gets called short when things starting falling apart on the secret, isolated little island.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Dr. Alex Delaware and his girlfriend leave LA for a three month sabbatical and head to a Micronesia island to help Dr. Moreland organize his research and papers for publication. They believe this light work load will give them a much needed vacation. But no! The tropical paradise is anything but as Alex discovers a conspiracy (as he does in every book) that Dr. Moreland is complicit in that is so preposterous that it strained credibility.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wonda

    2...I don't want to say this one is bad, for it's time, it would have been a three, possibly four...Unfortunately, this storyline has been down, overly!!! What saved this one for me was the umraveling of SEVERAL cases...that's right...events aren't always linked my friends!! 2...I don't want to say this one is bad, for it's time, it would have been a three, possibly four...Unfortunately, this storyline has been down, overly!!! What saved this one for me was the umraveling of SEVERAL cases...that's right...events aren't always linked my friends!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This is not one of the more recent books in the Delaware series. I didn't realize until after I started, that one of my favorite features of this series - the intelligent repartee that goes on between Alex and his usual cohort in crime sleuthing, Lt. Milo Stugis, would not be there. For me, this is what sets The Delaware books apart from all the others. So I was somewhat disappointed. Kellerman still writes interesting books. This time Alex is invited to join a doctor Moreland living on a romote This is not one of the more recent books in the Delaware series. I didn't realize until after I started, that one of my favorite features of this series - the intelligent repartee that goes on between Alex and his usual cohort in crime sleuthing, Lt. Milo Stugis, would not be there. For me, this is what sets The Delaware books apart from all the others. So I was somewhat disappointed. Kellerman still writes interesting books. This time Alex is invited to join a doctor Moreland living on a romote island in Micronesia to join him in collaborating on some research he is doing there. since Alex's home is being rebuilt and Robin is on physical leave from her musical instrument crafting business, the two decide to mix business with a little pleasure in paradise. It doesn't take long for them to discover that there are strange goings on in the home of the doctor and it starts to take on the complexion of "The Island of Dr. Morneau" (perhaps Kellerman's tongue and cheek reference to Dr Moreland?). The plot does become a little bizarre with cannibalistic murders and involvement with atomic test victims. Also, the fact that Alex would even consider the doctor's proposition to stay on the island to continue his work stretches credability. All in all, not my favorite in this series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nanosynergy

    (Book 10 of author's Alex Delaware/Milo Sturgis series.) Alex Delaware is dimmer than I thought. Delaware is lured to an isolated, tropical island by a wealthy scientist -- whom he has never met nor heard of - with flattery and the promise of an underwritten, 6-month vacation. From the beginning of the book, the words "If it sounds to good to be true..." echoed in my head. Then, coincidentally, Delaware's Barbie-girlfriend, Robin, needs a break from her work as well and is able to tag along for (Book 10 of author's Alex Delaware/Milo Sturgis series.) Alex Delaware is dimmer than I thought. Delaware is lured to an isolated, tropical island by a wealthy scientist -- whom he has never met nor heard of - with flattery and the promise of an underwritten, 6-month vacation. From the beginning of the book, the words "If it sounds to good to be true..." echoed in my head. Then, coincidentally, Delaware's Barbie-girlfriend, Robin, needs a break from her work as well and is able to tag along for months of love-making in between spiders, giant cockroaches, murder, and a bit of horror. Even their dog travels with them. But Milo only has a cameo appearance (via phone) - which reminded me of the old television plot technique. Delaware was frankly dull outside his partnership with Milo. To his credit, Kellerman has scattered, short passages with good descriptions of various supporting character, etc. However, if you are not a Kellerman fan committed to reading through the Delaware series, I recommend skipping this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    Kellerman departs significantly from his pattern in this book. Instead of the LA area, the action takes place on a remote tropical island. Robin accompanies Dr. Deleware for a relaxing time, while he confers with Dr Moreland, a scientist who wants Dr Deleware to perhaps collaborate on articles or a book. But there are some other strange people staying at the hotel-like house where the scientist lives. There are some creepy episodes as the scientist collects rare spiders, and also has other creep Kellerman departs significantly from his pattern in this book. Instead of the LA area, the action takes place on a remote tropical island. Robin accompanies Dr. Deleware for a relaxing time, while he confers with Dr Moreland, a scientist who wants Dr Deleware to perhaps collaborate on articles or a book. But there are some other strange people staying at the hotel-like house where the scientist lives. There are some creepy episodes as the scientist collects rare spiders, and also has other creepy things going on. It makes for a an interesting read, but I'll be glad to get them back to LA.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Weinstein

    This might be a terrific book, but I will probably never know. Early scenes with disgusting people and even more disgusting spiders led me to return the book to a safe place on the shelf.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Not one of my favorite books from this author. Even thought story was good I missed the rapport that Alex has with Milo. It was good that you got to know Robin a little better but other than that this book was just mediocre.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tgordon

    I hate spiders! And all bugs alike! So this book is going to show you how these things are helpful and I still hate! This is a good Alex book but not one my favorite. Life it tries to show is all of worth....not just bugs.

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Highton

    Twelve years since I last read an Alex Delaware book, and this one is different in terms of its setting - a very remote island in Micronesia as Alex and Robyn take advantage of an interesting short-term job offer. A fascinating plot really only unfolds in the last eighth of the book, making the earlier sections seem a little slow moving. Encouraged to take up the series again.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Adamchuk

    An interesting story line involving spiders, government medical experimentation and a desire for profit. It all takes place on a remote Pacific island slated for tourism. But first some things have to be taken care of.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Alex gets a letter from a Dr. Moreland asking him to come to his island, Aruk, to help Moreland get his papers in order. Alex and Robin go there and find that paradise is not what it seems to be.

  15. 4 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    Kellerman's Delaware mysteries always teeter towards soap opera and occasionally fall in. This is one that fell. Depending on you, the reader, that can be either good or bad. For me, the other elements either make the book good or bad. I like 'The Web'. Another element is that Kelleman's plots always contain Truth - of historical facts or recent headlines on CNN - which he heavily fictionalizes. Since I read the news as obsessively as I do novels, and I have done so for 50 years, plus my memory Kellerman's Delaware mysteries always teeter towards soap opera and occasionally fall in. This is one that fell. Depending on you, the reader, that can be either good or bad. For me, the other elements either make the book good or bad. I like 'The Web'. Another element is that Kelleman's plots always contain Truth - of historical facts or recent headlines on CNN - which he heavily fictionalizes. Since I read the news as obsessively as I do novels, and I have done so for 50 years, plus my memory is not yet decaying, I am always feeling that sense of déjà vu whenever I read a Delaware mystery. As fantastic as they might seem to less informed readers, the only things fictionalized are that these events happen to one guy in his life as a California therapist. Kellerman also conflates events that might have actually occurred decades apart by putting them into the same time era in one location, and of course while these events happened to different real people once, in these books all of the characters are imaginary people. Kellerman also obviously imagines what the real people who lived might have felt going through the actual events in history, as well as constructing heroic behaviors for his fictional characters. Whatever. The fact remains is that as far out as these plots seem to be, they actually have happened on some level to real people at some point in the past somewhere in the world and you can go online to read the real story, or a least find several real stories that match many of the plot bullet points, despite it maybe actually happening to Black-Americans and mental hospital patients in the American south instead of on Aruk, or being a conflation of actual intentional radiation poisoning of soldiers in American deserts and Pacific Islanders in WWII so that there are still islands out there in real life no one can live on today due to the nuclear bombing America did in the name of scientific experimentation. There are also 'hot' spots in American wastelands today, too. Lastly, the recent attempt by the corporations that backed George W. Bush's Iraq war to steal markets and businesses in Iraq for international corporate profit only demonstrate that business rape is an ongoing enterprise today as well. Without the light of journalism and government without corruption, business is selfish, mean, murderous and psychopathic, and when coupled with a military partnership, it is tripled in effect against common human decency. There are thousands of examples of business/military partnerships throughout human history up through current times where entire countries are raped and/or destroyed for the strictly monitory benefits of the few people, the 1% if you will, at the top. These places are easy to spot - despite millions and billions of dollars going into a country or geographical area, there are few schools, clinics, business opportunities or infrastructure like roads and electricity and clean water on tap. So, no, I don't feel these mysteries border on fantasy, only soap opera. Sometimes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Newtek30

    Good Read Well developed characters, multiple plots and subplots, with astute attention to details. A little conflagrated. I enjoy most Alex Delaware novels.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Corey Woodcock

    Oh boy. So this was a random pick at a used book store-I liked the shiny cover, and when I see something shiny, it immediately has my undivided attention! I’ve never read any Kellerman so I had no idea what to expect, and I was beyond pleasantly surprised. This is a thriller so bizarre it borders on a horror novel. Alex Delaware is a psychologist called to a remote tropical island in the South Pacific to help a strange and mysterious doctor sort out some things at the end of his life. Gruesome m Oh boy. So this was a random pick at a used book store-I liked the shiny cover, and when I see something shiny, it immediately has my undivided attention! I’ve never read any Kellerman so I had no idea what to expect, and I was beyond pleasantly surprised. This is a thriller so bizarre it borders on a horror novel. Alex Delaware is a psychologist called to a remote tropical island in the South Pacific to help a strange and mysterious doctor sort out some things at the end of his life. Gruesome murders with potential cannibalism begin-but this is not just a murder mystery. This area is close to Bikini Atoll, where nuclear bombs were tested years before, and this begins to come in to the story as well....anymore would be a spoiler. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, in fact I have already grabbed another Kellerman book offline! There were many strange twists and turns that I never would’ve seen coming in this book, and the ending was satisfying and appropriately strange. I think this book would be good for fans of both the murder mystery and horror fans, as there are some really dark things going on. And have I said STRANGE enough yet? Kellerman himself is a child psychologist, and this comes through in the writing. The perspective is really interesting and I think this added to my interest in it. Details are not spared and there may be a little extra analysis than other authors of the genre like John Sandford. This perspective in fiction was fresh and something I haven’t really read before so it was more than welcome. 4/5. Will be spending more time with Jonathan Kellerman and Alex Delaware in the future for sure!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Boremomsn.Com

    Talk about a boring book. It was an ever so slow build, not towards suspense, but to develop a mystery, that when you finally learn what is going on, your disappointed as a reader. The plot was as trite as it gets, and over used among many authors. Kellerman is capable of telling a good story, this was not one of them. Alex Delaware goes on vacation to an isolated island in Micronesia. Too much time is then spent on describing the place, introducing the various characters, and nothing that is ha Talk about a boring book. It was an ever so slow build, not towards suspense, but to develop a mystery, that when you finally learn what is going on, your disappointed as a reader. The plot was as trite as it gets, and over used among many authors. Kellerman is capable of telling a good story, this was not one of them. Alex Delaware goes on vacation to an isolated island in Micronesia. Too much time is then spent on describing the place, introducing the various characters, and nothing that is happening seems related. 300 pages into the story, and things finally get going and hurtle the reader towards a big disappointment. At least the ending was feel good. I don't recommend this one, even if you're a die hard Kellerman fan. It just plain is not a very good story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Lake

    The story was actually... ok. It was good up until the end, and then it seemed like a cheap stage production. And the writing style? I don't like it. fragmants. floating. around. redundantly. and needlessly. just say it. don't spray it. Probably won't read any more of this author's work and it is because of the style. I know he probably means it to be some sort of unique art form, but just when you get in the rhythm of the story, this crap (see above) pops up and slows everything down. oh, and he went The story was actually... ok. It was good up until the end, and then it seemed like a cheap stage production. And the writing style? I don't like it. fragmants. floating. around. redundantly. and needlessly. just say it. don't spray it. Probably won't read any more of this author's work and it is because of the style. I know he probably means it to be some sort of unique art form, but just when you get in the rhythm of the story, this crap (see above) pops up and slows everything down. oh, and he went on and on too much about the decor of every damn room the characters went into. Who cares! It had nothing to do with the story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Cauthen

    This book had a much different feel than all of the other Delaware books I have read. It started out seeming as if it would become a grade B horror movie, with killer mutant bugs. Storyline was slowish and it didn't come together for me. I really struggled to get through it. Alex's final discovery was ridiculous and completely unbelievable. Really did not like this one at all. This book had a much different feel than all of the other Delaware books I have read. It started out seeming as if it would become a grade B horror movie, with killer mutant bugs. Storyline was slowish and it didn't come together for me. I really struggled to get through it. Alex's final discovery was ridiculous and completely unbelievable. Really did not like this one at all.

  21. 4 out of 5

    l

    This book is set away from LA, so Milo is only a few phone calls in the book. This is a little different from some of his other books. Is not a particularly stimulating read- but it is a good book. I wouldn't really buy it- rather check it out at the library. This book is set away from LA, so Milo is only a few phone calls in the book. This is a little different from some of his other books. Is not a particularly stimulating read- but it is a good book. I wouldn't really buy it- rather check it out at the library.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Stephens

    The pace and tone of this book was very different from the rest of the Delaware novels. Milo wasn't a big part of the plot and was only included in a phone conversation. Maybe it was the change of setting, but this book just seemed a little "off" The pace and tone of this book was very different from the rest of the Delaware novels. Milo wasn't a big part of the plot and was only included in a phone conversation. Maybe it was the change of setting, but this book just seemed a little "off"

  23. 5 out of 5

    Suze

    Kellerman always throws in a twist or two that you don't expect, and this novel didn't disappoint. I like his sense of humor, too. The beginning dragged a bit, which is why this one only gets three stars. Kellerman always throws in a twist or two that you don't expect, and this novel didn't disappoint. I like his sense of humor, too. The beginning dragged a bit, which is why this one only gets three stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Typical Kellerman - good airplane read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Enjoyable, though not one of Jonathan Kellerman's best, in my opinion. Enjoyable, though not one of Jonathan Kellerman's best, in my opinion.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    I got about 3/4 of the way through this book and gave it up. Improbable and not interesting to me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mitzy

    I've always enjoyed Jonathan Kellerman's books, but I HATE SPIDERS. This is a story about spiders, and I just couldn't bring myself to read more than a few pages~ I've always enjoyed Jonathan Kellerman's books, but I HATE SPIDERS. This is a story about spiders, and I just couldn't bring myself to read more than a few pages~

  28. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn Mattice

    Excellent book. I would highly recommend it to all who love a good mystery

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Shrugged

    FYI, this story is partly about spiders, hissing cockroaches and other creepy crawlies. That is why the title is "The Web". It has nothing to do with the Internet. Creepy crawlies are by no means the entirety of the novel. Call it occasional. It is meant to bring a feeling of caution to the reader, but not to creep the reader out. For example, it is revealed that Robin, Dr. Delaware's long-time live-in lover, had a wolf spider as a pet when she was a child. If spiders are OK with her then they s FYI, this story is partly about spiders, hissing cockroaches and other creepy crawlies. That is why the title is "The Web". It has nothing to do with the Internet. Creepy crawlies are by no means the entirety of the novel. Call it occasional. It is meant to bring a feeling of caution to the reader, but not to creep the reader out. For example, it is revealed that Robin, Dr. Delaware's long-time live-in lover, had a wolf spider as a pet when she was a child. If spiders are OK with her then they should be OK for the reader. Warning: Children are in danger in this novel. That includes babies. The story: A medical doctor is living on a small island paradise in the U.S. territories (I assume in the Marianas), and has invited Dr. Delaware and Robin for an all expenses-paid visit in order to make a study of his medical papers and hopefully prepare a journal paper out of it all. Delaware sees the invitation as an opportunity for Robin and himself to take a well-earned vacation as their house is rebuilt and redecorated. (See, "Bad Love" and "Self-Defense" for the reason why it needed to be rebuilt.) One of the doctor's medical reports involved the murder and ritual cannibalization of a woman on the island which led to civil unrest and the near-shutdown of the US Air Force base on the island. The economic future of the islanders continues to be under attack, and it is ripe for yet another bizarre murder. Any problems with this story? There are a few and the author seems to acknowledge them through the mouths of his characters. For an "island paradise" there seem to be very few people taking pleasure in living there. In fact, they seem to be on the brink of exploding. The character of the military commander of the Air Force Base seems very one-dimensional, being there only as a coat-holder until the real power-holder shows up. There is also a husband and wife visiting the island whose excuse for remaining so long seems very thin. In fact, most of the characters (including Alex and Robin) have almost no reason to be there that any reasonable person would accept at face value. Any modesty issues? Yes. The F-word is used. Prostitution is discussed. Masturbation outdoors is discussed and described briefly by someone who witnessed it. Thus it was one step removed from the actual event. Sex between Alex and Robin is described briefly as is the new norm for these novels. (In the first three books of the series the sexual encounters were a little more graphic.) Abortion is treated as distasteful, but meaningless to the people explaining why they did it. Also a man exposes himself in public. Dr. Delaware confronts him about it. Impotence is also discussed. The ending reveal of everyone's real motives is good and a little surprising, but there is a medical program of the past whose description seemed strange to me like, "OK, but why would they want to do that?" Also the scene of vindication and confrontation seemed too cliche. Over all, I really liked it and if it weren't for the spiders I'd be anxious to read it again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    It's now somehow 1993 - either because I somehow did the math wrong somewhere along the way (quite possible) or there was some weird time warp to move the timeline in the book series to be closer to the publication dates of the books (more possible). At any rate, Robin and Alex's house is still being rebuilt and their short-term lease on their Malibu rental is coming to an end, with notice they need to move out so it can be rented to someone else. No problem - Alex gets an invite for an all-expe It's now somehow 1993 - either because I somehow did the math wrong somewhere along the way (quite possible) or there was some weird time warp to move the timeline in the book series to be closer to the publication dates of the books (more possible). At any rate, Robin and Alex's house is still being rebuilt and their short-term lease on their Malibu rental is coming to an end, with notice they need to move out so it can be rented to someone else. No problem - Alex gets an invite for an all-expense paid working vacation to help an elderly doctor on some remote Micronesian island organize his files to see if there is a paper there they can jointly publish. As Robin is now conveniently suffering from what sounds like carpal-tunnel and can't do her luthier work, they, along with dog Spike, hop on a plane to paradise. I tuned a lot of this one out. Sadly, Kellerman returned to his earlier format of lengthy descriptions of things I didn't care about, though part of me did think "Hmm...this may be important later, maybe I should listen closer." Yeah, I don't really feel I missed anything by tuning out as much as I did. So basically, they are in paradise, which is mostly crime free, save for a long ago murder and one more recently. And then Alex and Robin arrive and another murder happens that seems to be a copycat of the previous one, Milo consults long distance via phone, though he mostly talks to Robin as a liaison between her and the contractors working on the house, reading through the cases, Alex starts to wonder if strange happens in the islands history are more connected than they appear to be, he once again ends up in danger, though this time he drags Robin in to it, he figures out who the bad guy is and Alex and Robin and Spike head back home. This wasn't a bad book, it just wasn't as interesting to me as some of the others in the series have been simply because the return to the long-winded descriptions didn't hold my attention and made me not as in-tune to the rest of the story as I may have been otherwise. Plus, the narrator's voice for the character of Alex seemed more whiny than usual.

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