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A collection of Latin American short fiction which is designed to enable readers to savour an individual writer's style and vision. These eight novellas are by some of Latin America's most popular and critically acclaimed writers. A collection of Latin American short fiction which is designed to enable readers to savour an individual writer's style and vision. These eight novellas are by some of Latin America's most popular and critically acclaimed writers.


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A collection of Latin American short fiction which is designed to enable readers to savour an individual writer's style and vision. These eight novellas are by some of Latin America's most popular and critically acclaimed writers. A collection of Latin American short fiction which is designed to enable readers to savour an individual writer's style and vision. These eight novellas are by some of Latin America's most popular and critically acclaimed writers.

50 review for Masterworks Of Latin American Short Fiction: Eight Novellas

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nathan "N.R." Gaddis

    Contents :: GGM -- "Innocent Eréndira" from Innocent Erendira and Other Stories. Ana Lydia Vega -- "Miss Florence's Trunk" from True and False Romances whose gr=blurb is :: "In this scintillating collection of stories Puerto Rican writer Ana Lydia Vega exposes machismo, Caribbean style. With deft pastiches of genre fiction - the thriller, the historical romance, the bodice ripper - she turns the traditions of Latin American fiction on their heads and produces a work that critically reflects the in Contents :: GGM -- "Innocent Eréndira" from Innocent Erendira and Other Stories. Ana Lydia Vega -- "Miss Florence's Trunk" from True and False Romances whose gr=blurb is :: "In this scintillating collection of stories Puerto Rican writer Ana Lydia Vega exposes machismo, Caribbean style. With deft pastiches of genre fiction - the thriller, the historical romance, the bodice ripper - she turns the traditions of Latin American fiction on their heads and produces a work that critically reflects the influence of US culture. Though her stories appear in many anthologies, this is the first collection of Ana Lydia Vega's work to be published in English. It showcases one of the provocative 'post-feminist' voices of the continent." 13 Ratings · 1 Review Guillermo Cabrera Infante -- "I Heard Her Sing" from Three Trapped Tigers ;; which you should just read the whole damn novel and skip the Anthologizable. Álvaro Mutis -- "The Snow of the Admiral" from The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll. I'll skip this novella so's I'll be=reading the whole damn thing. Alejo Carpentier -- "The Road to Santiago" from The War Of Time. Which, whilst Carpentier ain't BURIED, this book of his is. Julio Cortázar -- "The Pursuer" from End of the Game and Other Stories. João Guimarães Rosa -- "My Uncle, the Jaguar" from Estas Estórias. His BURIED novel The Devil to Pay in the Backlands being the reason for my picking up this Anthology for a Penny.*** Felisberto Hernández -- "The Daisy Dolls" from Piano Stories. My copy surprised me with an inscription by the editor. Many copies still available for under Four Bucks ; no comment about their being inscribed. *** This should probably all go into a thread at the BURIED Book Club, but what the heck. This Rosa guy, aside from the oop The Devil to Pay in the Backlands, has three short story collections in English oop. The Third Bank of the River and Other Stories (English 1962) (winging its way to my doorstep as we speak] Sagarana: A Cycle of Stories (English, 1938) Tutameia (English, 1967) --the solid edition being knot in the gr=db. Note that the later two appear to have the same title in both English and Portuguese. And I see several copies being sold from Germany ; not sure of the edition's language of those. At any rate, oop and you'll be asked for more than a pair of dollars. Any corrections/etc re : Rosa, most welcome.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rise

    The eight novellas in this anthology represent a diversity of Latin American styles. Each is retrofitted with a theme distilled from the writer's worldview. Each represents an articulation of the writer's linguistic brio. There is one work translated from Portuguese—that of João Guimarães Rosa. The rest is from Spanish. As with any discussion of the novella form, the accessible introduction by Ilan Stavans notes the apprehensions surrounding a story whose length ranges inconsistently between a lo The eight novellas in this anthology represent a diversity of Latin American styles. Each is retrofitted with a theme distilled from the writer's worldview. Each represents an articulation of the writer's linguistic brio. There is one work translated from Portuguese—that of João Guimarães Rosa. The rest is from Spanish. As with any discussion of the novella form, the accessible introduction by Ilan Stavans notes the apprehensions surrounding a story whose length ranges inconsistently between a long short story and a short novel. What really makes a novella? Is it the mileage of pages or the wattage of effect? To be more precise, what makes for a Latin American novella? The scholar has an elegant answer:    From the Latin American writer's point of view, a novella is a most challenging endeavor, a trial of will and muscle. It requires the meticulousness, the mathematical approach of a short story, each word sitting in its right place so as to carry the plot's overall effect; but it also needs the panoramic appetite and ardor of a novel, its wider cry and spell, to be properly effective. Parsimonious by nature and perhaps even avaricious, a [short] story succeeds by subtraction; its beauty is in its smallness, its delicate balance between brevity and scope. The novel ... is an anything-goes, hodgepodge genre whose main principle is addition ... The novella is far less flexible—"the middle ground," in García Márquez's words, "an addition by way of subtraction." As noted also in Stavans's introduction, a useful reference point around which to gauge the effect of the novellas assembled before us is the period of la generación del boom. This Latin American burst of creativity in the late 1960s put many writers on the world literature map and set a new literary aesthetic and standard. The "Boom" is represented in the collection by Gabriel García Márquez, G. Cabrera Infante, and Julio Cortázar. The signature works of this fertile period (One Hundred Years of Solitude, Hopscotch, Conversation in The Cathedral, Terra Nostra, and Three Trapped Tigers) still cast their awesome shadows. Succeeding writers, those enamored by the spell of magic realism and intergenerational sagas, failed in their imitations of this generation. Magic realism, unfortunately, is the literary movement that has been largely associated with the Boom. Those who took a crack in overthrowing the old vanguards also didn't come up with lasting alternatives. It was not until the late 1990s and onwards that new novelists emerged from the shadows of their predecessors and made an emphatic generational break through works that better "explain contemporary Latin America" (to borrow the words of Mempo Giardinelli cited by Stavans). The trio of Alejo Carpentier, João Guimarães Rosa, and Felisberto Hernández represents the preboom era in this collection. Collectively, their works are as varied and inventive as can be. Carpentier is baroque; Guimarães Rosa, avant-garde; and Hernández, surreal. Ana Lydia Vega is the only female writer here, a reflection of what Stavans observed as a "male-dominated affair" in Latin American letters right up to la generación del boom. Vega's is the only post-boom response in the collection while Alvaro Mutis, while almost contemporaneous to the famed generation, writes his own series of existentialist novellas. Brief descriptions of the "masterwork" novellas included in the volume can be found here .

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kinosfronimos

    An interesting but not all round stellar collection, yet some good reads, particularly stories # 1, 2, 7, 8.

  4. 5 out of 5

    sarafem

    What idiot gave this book five stars? The only story I loved was Garcia Marquez, and there were only two others that didn't bore me to tears. I picked this up because I have loved Latin American novels, and as a short story lover thought that I would like these even more. How is it that a 400-page novel can feel like 100, and a 40-page story can feel like 1,000? I forced myself to get through these stories because I can not bring myself to hate anything Latin American (well okay, besides my ex-hu What idiot gave this book five stars? The only story I loved was Garcia Marquez, and there were only two others that didn't bore me to tears. I picked this up because I have loved Latin American novels, and as a short story lover thought that I would like these even more. How is it that a 400-page novel can feel like 100, and a 40-page story can feel like 1,000? I forced myself to get through these stories because I can not bring myself to hate anything Latin American (well okay, besides my ex-husband) and felt like I had to stumble across a gem at some point. Sadly, the day I read this book was a waste of my life. Especially horrible, almost bringing me to self-mutilate by poking my eyeballs out with a Bic pen, was My Uncle, The Jaguar. The brightest spot of it was the last sentence when a jaguar finally ate that fucker. I wished he had eaten him by page two.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bert Hirsch

    The novellas by Infante and Cortazar are treasures. A wonderful and easy opportunity to explore 2 unique writers. Cortazar writes about a fictionalized Charlie Parker living and playing in Paris. Infante relates light night escapades of a photo journalist in pre-revolutionary Havana focused on the bizarre story of La Estrella an enormous 350 pound songstress.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Trent

    Eight novellas, which vary in quality, but a wonderful chance to get acquainted with writers you may not have read before.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Parisa Rahimian

    A disappointment!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mihai Popa

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Verissimo Triplett

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hillevi

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debs

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alan Sevison

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Meinel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marni

  15. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erendira

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelleen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anneke

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eric Pabon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Juan Carlos

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Smith

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liza

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elinor

  25. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Fasching-Gray

  26. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Shields

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Horne

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Burns

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  30. 4 out of 5

    Miette Gillette

  31. 5 out of 5

    Karena

  32. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  33. 4 out of 5

    Frances

  34. 5 out of 5

    hadaverde

  35. 4 out of 5

    Rosalie

  36. 5 out of 5

    David Tafoya

  37. 5 out of 5

    Mike Franks

  38. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Aldana

  39. 4 out of 5

    Beavers Family

  40. 4 out of 5

    Steven Schumm

  41. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  42. 4 out of 5

    Pablo

  43. 5 out of 5

    Lynne King

  44. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  45. 4 out of 5

    Julie Valencia

  46. 4 out of 5

    Ayman Fadel

  47. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Essl

  48. 4 out of 5

    Uriel

  49. 4 out of 5

    Rich

  50. 5 out of 5

    Jake Fernandez

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