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The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom

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"An exciting story about a girl and her father who escape slavery. . . . Works well as a story and also as a lesson in African-American history." — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL Now that Hannah’s papa has decided to make the run for freedom, her patchwork quilt is not just a precious memento of Mama — it’s a series of hidden clues that will guide them along the Underground Railroa "An exciting story about a girl and her father who escape slavery. . . . Works well as a story and also as a lesson in African-American history." — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL Now that Hannah’s papa has decided to make the run for freedom, her patchwork quilt is not just a precious memento of Mama — it’s a series of hidden clues that will guide them along the Underground Railroad to Canada. A fictionalized account of a fascinating oral history, THE PATCHWORK PATH tells the story of a two of the thousands who escaped a life of slavery and made the dangerous journey to freedom — a story of courage, determination, and hope. - A Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights Outstanding Book, Honorable Mention - An Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Gold Award Winner


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"An exciting story about a girl and her father who escape slavery. . . . Works well as a story and also as a lesson in African-American history." — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL Now that Hannah’s papa has decided to make the run for freedom, her patchwork quilt is not just a precious memento of Mama — it’s a series of hidden clues that will guide them along the Underground Railroa "An exciting story about a girl and her father who escape slavery. . . . Works well as a story and also as a lesson in African-American history." — SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL Now that Hannah’s papa has decided to make the run for freedom, her patchwork quilt is not just a precious memento of Mama — it’s a series of hidden clues that will guide them along the Underground Railroad to Canada. A fictionalized account of a fascinating oral history, THE PATCHWORK PATH tells the story of a two of the thousands who escaped a life of slavery and made the dangerous journey to freedom — a story of courage, determination, and hope. - A Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights Outstanding Book, Honorable Mention - An Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Gold Award Winner

30 review for The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mariah Roze

    Hannah learned to make patchwork quilts when she was very young. Her father decides to make the run for freedom and she has one of her patchwork quilts become a precious memento of her mom. The quilt is a series of hidden clues that will guide them along the Underground Railroad to Canada. This is a story that tells of the thousands of slaves that took the dangerous journey to freedom. This book is for older elementary and higher.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Blake Hargett

    I loved everything about this book! First, the text was beautifully written. All throughout the book, the use of vivid, descriptive language mirrors the artfully produced pictures. Though it did not win the Caldecott Award, I believe that it should have. Erin Bennett, the illustrator of the book, paints a beautiful vision of the journey to freedom from the bounds of slavery. In my classroom, I would use this book in both language arts and social studies. The story laid out only a small picture o I loved everything about this book! First, the text was beautifully written. All throughout the book, the use of vivid, descriptive language mirrors the artfully produced pictures. Though it did not win the Caldecott Award, I believe that it should have. Erin Bennett, the illustrator of the book, paints a beautiful vision of the journey to freedom from the bounds of slavery. In my classroom, I would use this book in both language arts and social studies. The story laid out only a small picture of what the journey was truly like, yet invites the reader to continue along the path. This book is a 10/10!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Carroll

    This is one of the most beautiful historical fiction books that I have ever read. Although this is a picture book, it is geared more towards the older child than a younger child. There is a great deal of symbolism and historical facts that would be lost on a younger child. There are a few details that are true in this book, and this is based on a true story. Many African American Slaves did use quilts to communicate on the Underground Railroad. Children need to learn from the mistakes that our a This is one of the most beautiful historical fiction books that I have ever read. Although this is a picture book, it is geared more towards the older child than a younger child. There is a great deal of symbolism and historical facts that would be lost on a younger child. There are a few details that are true in this book, and this is based on a true story. Many African American Slaves did use quilts to communicate on the Underground Railroad. Children need to learn from the mistakes that our ancestors have made and the struggles that many people have overcome. It is shocking and saddening to learn of slavery, but it is also empowering and uplifting to read about the heroic and brave acts that occurred. This is the story of Hannah, her parents and her sister Mary. Hannah's mother teache her how to stitch a quilt and the meanings behind each square. Hannah's sister is sold, and her mother dies shortly after of a broken heart. Hannah and her father use the quilt and escape from their slave owners. The rest of the story shows their brave journey and happy ending. The illustrations in this book went perfectly with this beautiful story. You felt the heartache that this family went through and you rejoiced for them at the end.

  4. 4 out of 5

    mg

    I have used this in 4th and 5th grade classes to discuss the Underground Railroad and the coded quilts that were used. The kids have been captivated by the story, which really explains the quilt squares so much better than a lecture could. After reading it, we review what each of the quilt squares was called and what its code indicated to the runaway slave. The pictures are quite clear and do a wonderful job of illustrating the meaning behind the quilt squares. I would also recommend this anyone I have used this in 4th and 5th grade classes to discuss the Underground Railroad and the coded quilts that were used. The kids have been captivated by the story, which really explains the quilt squares so much better than a lecture could. After reading it, we review what each of the quilt squares was called and what its code indicated to the runaway slave. The pictures are quite clear and do a wonderful job of illustrating the meaning behind the quilt squares. I would also recommend this anyone who is interested in UGRR/Slave quilts used around this time who does not have time to read "Hidden in Plain View" by Jacqueline Tobin. Stroud has based her picture book on the adult book by Tobin and has done a wonderful job. The picture book might be a wonderful way to whet a young researcher's appetite to learn more about the UGRR as well as other ways that slaves used secret communication to let each other know how to escape to freedom. Though this is a picture book, it's really meant for mid- to upper- elementary, mostly because of all the history required in order to understand it (slavery in our early years as a country, the North vs. the South, etc.).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Becky Birtha

    I've probably read too many picture books about escaping on the underground railroad to be a fair judge anymore. The Patchwork Path is also one of a growing number that tell of the use of patchwork quilts as maps or code for escaping travelers. (On this subject, the author's afterword provides a reference to historical source book, Hidden in Plain Sight). Erin Susanne Bennett's brightly colored paintings, while stunning, may make the journey seem more simple than it could really have been. What I've probably read too many picture books about escaping on the underground railroad to be a fair judge anymore. The Patchwork Path is also one of a growing number that tell of the use of patchwork quilts as maps or code for escaping travelers. (On this subject, the author's afterword provides a reference to historical source book, Hidden in Plain Sight). Erin Susanne Bennett's brightly colored paintings, while stunning, may make the journey seem more simple than it could really have been. What moved me most, on Hannah and Papa's journey, was their day hidden beneath the floor of the First African Baptist Church in Savannah, Georgia, a place I have visited and recognized in the painting. Children will enjoy finding the quilt patterns, and their meanings, throughout the story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    KIMBERLY JEAN

    Text-to-Text-Connection The book Patchwork Path is an exceptional story about a child learning how a patchwork quilt can be a family heirloom. Another book that you can compare this book to is a Secret to Freedom. In this book you learn about the Underground Railroad. In both stories you learn what each patchwork meant to the individual and the story that it told. The stories are relatable and tell a different story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christine Valle

    Hannah's mother taught her when she was young how to make a special kind of quilt: a quilt map to freedom. This quilt was designed to help show slaves a route to escape slavery. Each symbol on the quilt has a secret meaning that only the slaves would be able to recognize, which helps them keep it a secret. This book is a beautiful story that shows the struggles that slaves faced when they attempted to escape their owners. It also shows the hardships slave families face when they are separated fr Hannah's mother taught her when she was young how to make a special kind of quilt: a quilt map to freedom. This quilt was designed to help show slaves a route to escape slavery. Each symbol on the quilt has a secret meaning that only the slaves would be able to recognize, which helps them keep it a secret. This book is a beautiful story that shows the struggles that slaves faced when they attempted to escape their owners. It also shows the hardships slave families face when they are separated from their loves ones. The quilt symbolized hope and freedom for these slaves when they had nothing left and were ready to make their journeys. A book I would connect this to is, Show Way by Jacqueline Woodsen. Both books discuss paths that were created to help slaves escape to freedom. "I'll pray for her and dream about all of us being free."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nova

    The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom tells the story of a young girl and her father’s flight from slavery to freedom. Hannah uses the quilt that her mother made to guide her and her father through the frightening journey. Each square from the quilt symbolizes an action or path that they will need to take to reach Canada safely. As long as Hannah remembers, her mother and father have been talking about freedom, but when her sister is sold to a different slave owner and Hannah’s mother dies The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom tells the story of a young girl and her father’s flight from slavery to freedom. Hannah uses the quilt that her mother made to guide her and her father through the frightening journey. Each square from the quilt symbolizes an action or path that they will need to take to reach Canada safely. As long as Hannah remembers, her mother and father have been talking about freedom, but when her sister is sold to a different slave owner and Hannah’s mother dies of a broken heart, Hannah and her father decide to run away to Canada. This is a touching tale of bravery. During each step of the journey Hannah refers to the quilt for guidance, and the reader feels that her mother is with her. Hannah and her father make it to Canada safely and they prepare to begin their new lives. At the end of the story the author writes about how the story idea came from a book called Hidden in Plain View: A Secret Story of Quilts and the Underground Railroad. According to the book, slaves used quilts to plan escapes and make maps to share with each other. Stroud uses these true accounts to create this historical fiction picture book. Erin Susanne Bennett uses oils to create the rich illustrations. The quilt theme is carried throughout the entire story. Quilt blocks are illustrated for each leg of the journey and the illustrator carries the geometric quality of quilt blocks throughout the rest of the illustrations. Teachers could use this story for a study of Black History Month or for a Civil War or pre-Civil War unit. This could be used with students from Kindergarten to 3rd grade. The strength of this story is that it deals with a hard to understand time in this country in a way that is appropriate and sensitive for very young readers. The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom was reviewed very well. Anne Hanson from Library Media Connection agreed that the theme of the quilt was echoed in the drawing of people, landscapes, and structures. She said that using this style “enhanced the sense that the quilt is ever-present”. The reviewer from Horn Book wrote that the book was a well written personal narrative, and that the afterward provided historical authenticity.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Gilligan

    Stroud, Bettye. (2005). The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom. Candlewick Press. Tumblebooks This was a touching story about two slaves who must journey far and wide to gain their freedom. It was based on stories that have been passed down orally about the underground railroad and quilts that were used to relay messages. The young girl Hannah was given a quilt by her mother, who later passed away. She was told that the quilt contained a secret code that would help her escape to freedom. Each Stroud, Bettye. (2005). The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom. Candlewick Press. Tumblebooks This was a touching story about two slaves who must journey far and wide to gain their freedom. It was based on stories that have been passed down orally about the underground railroad and quilts that were used to relay messages. The young girl Hannah was given a quilt by her mother, who later passed away. She was told that the quilt contained a secret code that would help her escape to freedom. Each square contained symbols that could help Hannah know what to do when she most needed it. One stormy night, she and her father made their escape. They planned to reach Canada and thus gain their freedom. During their escape they encountered many obstacles, but Hannah used the symbols in the quilt to brainstorm solutions. When they finally reached freedom, Hannah planned to make another quilt using the old remnants of their slave clothing to tell the story of their journey. This book does more than show what it might have felt like to be a slave; to have family members taken from you; to have run for your freedom. It is also historical. I've heard a little about quilts being used during the Underground Railroad so I know their is truth in this story. I also know that some of the things in the story, such as the church they hid under were real places. So I think this book would be great to use during a unit in Social Studies. This story could be read either during or after students have learned about the events leading up to the Civil War or the Underground Railroad. As a followup activity, the class could make their own quilt, with each student contributing their own square that communicates a personal idea or experience.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Luz

    In the story The Patchwork Path, the representation of language, culture, setting, and relationships are accurate. The language used in the story is appropriate according to the period of time and socio-cultural (slavery) in the United States. Hanna and her family suffered as many other slaves family separations, unfairly actions, and so many injustices and people wanted to escape looking fro freedom. The relationships between the characters are clearly described in the story and represents diff In the story The Patchwork Path, the representation of language, culture, setting, and relationships are accurate. The language used in the story is appropriate according to the period of time and socio-cultural (slavery) in the United States. Hanna and her family suffered as many other slaves family separations, unfairly actions, and so many injustices and people wanted to escape looking fro freedom. The relationships between the characters are clearly described in the story and represents different socio-economic classes and how the interaction between the characters define the results. In this case, how Hanna and his dad were able to find freedom. The character fully realized and shown to have agency, the quilt map she has from mom to help her and dad to find the railroad to Canada, is the key element in the story. Therefore, by having it and understanding the clues, Hanna makes it possible for her and dad to accomplish their goal. In addition, the main character of the story definitely belongs to an unequal world, where race and ethnicity will define the lifestyle you will have. Hanna was born as a slave, and for that reason, there was not an opportunity for her to have a “normal” life with her parents and sister living together. She had to accept that her sister was bought by another master, her mom died, and her dad wanted Hanna to have a better life, so they needed to run away from the plantation. Poverty was not mentioned clearly; but,based on the time and circumstances it is clearly marked the different socioeconomic status between plantation owners and slaves.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Mcguirk

    Stroud, B. (2005). The patchwork path: A quilt map to freedom. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Candlewick Press. Picture Book Soak (one I can’t wait to use) A Patchwork Path tells the story of one girl and her father’s escape from slavery. She and her father head north to Canada to leave their life on a Georgia plantation. They follow the path recorded in stitches in their family quilt, which served as a coded map to freedom. Although this story is fiction, the Afterword explains that American slaves d Stroud, B. (2005). The patchwork path: A quilt map to freedom. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Candlewick Press. Picture Book Soak (one I can’t wait to use) A Patchwork Path tells the story of one girl and her father’s escape from slavery. She and her father head north to Canada to leave their life on a Georgia plantation. They follow the path recorded in stitches in their family quilt, which served as a coded map to freedom. Although this story is fiction, the Afterword explains that American slaves did in fact use the patchwork of quilts to communicate secret messages to each other, and several of the locations the characters travel to in the story were in fact real stops in the Underground Railroad. In addition to the historical fiction presented in this book, the illustrations are boldly colored and use angles and shading to create dimension in the art and support the plot of the story well. I really like this picture book and think it will serve as excellent support for history instruction for upper elementary students. This book would be an excellent literature integration when students are learning about slavery, colonial life, or the events preceding the civil war. One reason I think this story will interest students is because history is more interesting when the events are humanized, and often times textbooks fail to present information about the people who lived during the events covered in the text, and this story provides the audience with a glimpse into the lives of slaves beyond dates and events.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This historical fiction picture book is a must read for all upper elementary school classrooms! With beautiful illustrations, a heart wrenching story, and historical accuracy, this tale of two family members who successfully escaped slavery on the underground railroad will grasp the attention of teachers and students alike. Even though it is a picture book, it is geared more toward fourth and fifth grade and up. I love that this story does not sugarcoat the horrors of slavery but also tells the This historical fiction picture book is a must read for all upper elementary school classrooms! With beautiful illustrations, a heart wrenching story, and historical accuracy, this tale of two family members who successfully escaped slavery on the underground railroad will grasp the attention of teachers and students alike. Even though it is a picture book, it is geared more toward fourth and fifth grade and up. I love that this story does not sugarcoat the horrors of slavery but also tells the story through the perspective of an innocent, brave, hopeful child who clings to the memory she has of her beloved mother. There are so many lesson possibilities with this book— the first obvious one is as an introduction to teaching about the history of slavery and the underground railroad. Another great activity with this book would be to print out a picture of the quilt and the story that goes with it and look at the symbolism in depth as a class. Have the students reread the story with the “map” in hand and point out how Hannah and her father used it at each point throughout their journey. They could then create their own quilt maps using geometric shapes and write a coded story of their own. This could also be the introduction of a research project on the underground railroad, especially since there are specific geographic locations mentioned in the book that are further explained in the Afterword.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Behrends

    Summary - Father and daughter slaves escape to freedom using the patches of a quilt sewn by the child's mother to lead them through to freedom in Canada. Curriculum Connection - I would love using this with second to fourth grade students to discuss the unique traditions of slaves in the south and how they used unwritten and unspoken forms of communication. This would fit in with a discussion of famous Americans in second grade playing off of the study of Lincoln or with the discussion of Virgini Summary - Father and daughter slaves escape to freedom using the patches of a quilt sewn by the child's mother to lead them through to freedom in Canada. Curriculum Connection - I would love using this with second to fourth grade students to discuss the unique traditions of slaves in the south and how they used unwritten and unspoken forms of communication. This would fit in with a discussion of famous Americans in second grade playing off of the study of Lincoln or with the discussion of Virginia and the Civil War in fourth grade. Personal Reaction - I liked this book because it was told completely from the perspective of the little girl which helps make it relatable to students. I read/watched this book on Tumblebooks and while I liked that the narration gave life to the little girl I just wasn't sold on the format. I also loved the focus on the use of a quilt and the explanation of the symbols. Visual Appeal - Again I liked that the illustrations focused on the little girl and her perspective of the experience. I also liked the darkness of the illustrations because it spoke to the risk and danger involved. Intended Audience - Second to fourth grade, about seven to ten years old.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie F

    I selected this book as my audio this week and I had the opportunity to watch it on Tumblebooks. This story was great! It is about Hannah, who is a slave on plantation in Georgia. Hannah deals with the grief of losing her mother and her sister being sold to another plantation. One night Hannah and her dad run away, bringing with them the quilt Hannah’s mother had made her. It turns out there is a secret map sewn onto the quilt, one that will lead them to freedom. They encounter many different ob I selected this book as my audio this week and I had the opportunity to watch it on Tumblebooks. This story was great! It is about Hannah, who is a slave on plantation in Georgia. Hannah deals with the grief of losing her mother and her sister being sold to another plantation. One night Hannah and her dad run away, bringing with them the quilt Hannah’s mother had made her. It turns out there is a secret map sewn onto the quilt, one that will lead them to freedom. They encounter many different obstacles on their way to freedom such as hiding in floorboards and taking tunnels to rivers. The entire time Hannah clings to the quilt as it reminds her of her mother. This is truly a story of hope and perseverance. I think one really cool project would be to have students create a writing quilt expressing what they have learned from reading this story. I think it’s a great story for grades second through fourth because the content is interesting and engaging for that level. It provides a child of about that age’s perspective and ordeal and it would be interesting to see students around the same age react to that.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Alexander

    I read this book as a TumbleBook and thought it was very interesting and the illustrations were eye catching. The story is about a little girl that is escaping from slavery using the Underground Railroad. Her mother made her a quilt that her father and her use to leave slavery in Georgia and head for Canada. This story would be good to used when talking about the Underground Railroad in class, especially with younger children because it is in the perspective of a young child. I also thought it c I read this book as a TumbleBook and thought it was very interesting and the illustrations were eye catching. The story is about a little girl that is escaping from slavery using the Underground Railroad. Her mother made her a quilt that her father and her use to leave slavery in Georgia and head for Canada. This story would be good to used when talking about the Underground Railroad in class, especially with younger children because it is in the perspective of a young child. I also thought it could be used to show how stories are passed down from generation to generation and the use of symbols. The illustrations in this book are nice and the colors are bright, especially the ones in the quilt. The bright colors in the story help the reader a feel a sense of hope for the family. Reading the book my reaction was that it was full of information on how the runaway slaves used secret symbols to communicate and find freedom.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fara Carson

    The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom Stroud, B., & Bennett, E. S. (2005, January 1). A Patchwork Path:A Quilt Map to Freedom [TumbleBook Edition]. Retrieved from http://http://asp.tumblebooks.com/lib... Tumble Book A wonderful book about how a slave family escaped using a Freedom Quilt. The book had wonderful pictures that had rich colors. I am not sure that this book made the best tumble book or if the animation on the tumble book was lacking but this was not the best version of a tumble bo The Patchwork Path: A Quilt Map to Freedom Stroud, B., & Bennett, E. S. (2005, January 1). A Patchwork Path:A Quilt Map to Freedom [TumbleBook Edition]. Retrieved from http://http://asp.tumblebooks.com/lib... Tumble Book A wonderful book about how a slave family escaped using a Freedom Quilt. The book had wonderful pictures that had rich colors. I am not sure that this book made the best tumble book or if the animation on the tumble book was lacking but this was not the best version of a tumble book that I have seen. I really enjoyed the story and it made up for the visual short comings. I think if I had chosen the physical book I would have enjoyed it more. I would use this book in an older elementary setting and after reading it and discussing the connections to the civil war I would have the kids make their own "freedom Quilts" for how there were going to graduate and follow their dreams. PreK-5th Grade.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Choe

    The book is about Hannah and her father running away from the plantation, where they were slaves. Hannah uses the codes from the quilt that her mother made as her guide to freedom. It is age-appropriate for upper elementary leveled students. The story is interesting to children and makes them think about questions such as who were slaves, and why they tried to find freedom. It contains rich, thick plot and includes realistic, convincing characters. The illustrations enhance and correspond to the The book is about Hannah and her father running away from the plantation, where they were slaves. Hannah uses the codes from the quilt that her mother made as her guide to freedom. It is age-appropriate for upper elementary leveled students. The story is interesting to children and makes them think about questions such as who were slaves, and why they tried to find freedom. It contains rich, thick plot and includes realistic, convincing characters. The illustrations enhance and correspond to the text. It is also accurate in terms of setting. The author described some of the parts in the book can still be seen today. For instance, the church mentioned in the story exists in Savannah, Georgia. Both author and illustrator and African American like the characters in the book. The lifestyle of the characters is genuine because it describes in details with illustrations how slaves tried to escape from plantations to find freedom.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I find it hard to imagine setting off with only a few things I can carry, in a terrible rainstorm so that my scent is masked. This is the story of a man and his daughter who set off to escape one stormy night. The thread that helps are the patchwork quilt squares that are symbols to help them survive, one about flying geese which means to follow because they're flying north, another that is called the "drunkard's path' that means to avoid a straight path, to walk in a zig-zag pattern, harder to I find it hard to imagine setting off with only a few things I can carry, in a terrible rainstorm so that my scent is masked. This is the story of a man and his daughter who set off to escape one stormy night. The thread that helps are the patchwork quilt squares that are symbols to help them survive, one about flying geese which means to follow because they're flying north, another that is called the "drunkard's path' that means to avoid a straight path, to walk in a zig-zag pattern, harder to be followed. Hannah's sister was sold, and soon after her mother died. She and her father made this journey together, walking miles and miles so they could make it to the crossroads (another patch) across Lake Erie and into Canada. The author credits Jacqueline Tobin and Raymond Dobard for allowing the use of these patch symbols from their book, Hidden In Plain View. Illustrations by Erin Susanne Bennett are folk art paintings that fill the pages with fear and happiness, lots of action.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Summary:This story is about a little girl, Hannah, and her father who are slaves. They escape to Canada to gain their freedom. To get there, they use the patchwork quilt (created by her mother) that contains hidden clues. Curriculum Connection:Maps and directions, geography, African-American history Reaction:I liked this story more and more as I continue to read it. It had great details and although it's fictional, many locations and passageways were real. I would definitely use this book as an in Summary:This story is about a little girl, Hannah, and her father who are slaves. They escape to Canada to gain their freedom. To get there, they use the patchwork quilt (created by her mother) that contains hidden clues. Curriculum Connection:Maps and directions, geography, African-American history Reaction:I liked this story more and more as I continue to read it. It had great details and although it's fictional, many locations and passageways were real. I would definitely use this book as an introduction to the concept of slavery because the way it's presented would be easy for even young children to understand. Audience:Kindergarten-Third Visual Appeal:The front cover and title of this book is why I chose to read this story. You can tell this little girl is on an adventure or a mission and you want to read it to find out why. The illustrations and colors are very eye-catching.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    This book is about a young slave girl named Hannah who lives with her family on a plantation in Georgia. When her sister gets sold to another slave owner and her mother dies of heart ache, Hannah and her father set out to escape from slavery. Hannah's mother had taught her how to make a patchwork quilt that would help her to freedom one day. Each patch had a secret meaning to help them travel. Hannah and here Papa followed the patchwork quilts meanings and found their way to freedom in Canada. T This book is about a young slave girl named Hannah who lives with her family on a plantation in Georgia. When her sister gets sold to another slave owner and her mother dies of heart ache, Hannah and her father set out to escape from slavery. Hannah's mother had taught her how to make a patchwork quilt that would help her to freedom one day. Each patch had a secret meaning to help them travel. Hannah and here Papa followed the patchwork quilts meanings and found their way to freedom in Canada. The illustrations in this book are almost cubist-like, with sharp edges and features, but the colors are outstanding and brilliant. Not too much detail is added to the drawings, but just enough to make you stare at the pictures for a while. The text is long and somewhat difficult, so I would read this to a third or fourth grade class maybe. It would make a great inro book in a slavery unit.

  21. 5 out of 5

    EmilyV

    This is the story of Hannah who loses her sister and mother on a slave plantation. She escapes with her father using a patchwork quilt as a map that her mother has left her. The story has vivid oil painted illustrations that display the expressions of the characters as they continue on their journey. I read this text digitally on Tumblebooks and the illustrations were clear and able to be enjoyed. Some features of the online story book were when the narrator read a sentence, it turned red so the This is the story of Hannah who loses her sister and mother on a slave plantation. She escapes with her father using a patchwork quilt as a map that her mother has left her. The story has vivid oil painted illustrations that display the expressions of the characters as they continue on their journey. I read this text digitally on Tumblebooks and the illustrations were clear and able to be enjoyed. Some features of the online story book were when the narrator read a sentence, it turned red so the reader can easily follow along. There were also parts of the illustrations that were enhanced when that part of the page was read aloud. I thought this was engaging and helpful for comprehension of the story itself. This story could be used when studying African-American history as well as paired with informational text or other pieces of historical fiction to study slavery.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Young Hannah is a slave on a southern plantation. Her mother passes away after her sister is sold. But her memories are fond, especially of quilt making and the secrets of the pattern. Throughout this fictional story of historical events, Hannah and her father run towards freedom following the code of the quilt. Along the way the meet gentle characters that help them get to a ship to sail them to Canada. Close to the end of their journey, relieved by the sight of a new land, she is reminded of t Young Hannah is a slave on a southern plantation. Her mother passes away after her sister is sold. But her memories are fond, especially of quilt making and the secrets of the pattern. Throughout this fictional story of historical events, Hannah and her father run towards freedom following the code of the quilt. Along the way the meet gentle characters that help them get to a ship to sail them to Canada. Close to the end of their journey, relieved by the sight of a new land, she is reminded of the sadness she feels without her mother and sister. This colorfully illustrated story is excellent for grades 1-4. The afterword details the historical background of the oral story of quilt makings use in communicating details of the Underground Railroad.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Newton

    Great story! This book would be wonderful to use for a history lesson. If I were to use it, that is what I would use it for. It is based on historical events during the times of slavery. A young girl named Hannah lived with her family and they were slaves on a farm. Hannah's sister got sold and then her mother later passed away. Before her mother passed, she taught her how to sew quilts. Hannah and her father later escaped and it talks about their adventure/struggles. Hannah sews a quilt that te Great story! This book would be wonderful to use for a history lesson. If I were to use it, that is what I would use it for. It is based on historical events during the times of slavery. A young girl named Hannah lived with her family and they were slaves on a farm. Hannah's sister got sold and then her mother later passed away. Before her mother passed, she taught her how to sew quilts. Hannah and her father later escaped and it talks about their adventure/struggles. Hannah sews a quilt that tells the story of their journey and she leaves a patch blank for when they reunite with her sister. This story is very touching and shows children what life was like for slaves during this time. The artwork in this story is very beautiful. Definitely recommend this story. Category: Tumblebook

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christine Mccurley

    Stroud, B. (2007). The patchwork path. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press. Tumblebooks/ LOV This story gives an example of what it would be life for a young girl making an escape from slavery. Unlike what many may know, a quilt can hold all of the secrets of freedom. Although this story is fictional, it contains elements from real live events. Through the drawings and the story line, the reader is able to understand the difficulties the family faced on their journey. When discussing the Underground Stroud, B. (2007). The patchwork path. Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press. Tumblebooks/ LOV This story gives an example of what it would be life for a young girl making an escape from slavery. Unlike what many may know, a quilt can hold all of the secrets of freedom. Although this story is fictional, it contains elements from real live events. Through the drawings and the story line, the reader is able to understand the difficulties the family faced on their journey. When discussing the Underground Railroad in the classroom, this would be a great time to incorporate the story. I would recommend this for any elementary grade, but specifically grades 2-5. I enjoyed this book myself!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Taneka

    What a gem! The Patchwork Path is about a young girl named Hannah, born a slave in Georgia, that has a quilt that she and her mother made before her mother died. She told Hannah that the quilt will tell her everything she needs to know to run to freedom. I have heard of these quilts before, but unfortunately, I have never seen one. I find it wonderful that individuals that were treated as nothing more than animals, can come up with an intricate concept to free themselves from bondage. This book What a gem! The Patchwork Path is about a young girl named Hannah, born a slave in Georgia, that has a quilt that she and her mother made before her mother died. She told Hannah that the quilt will tell her everything she needs to know to run to freedom. I have heard of these quilts before, but unfortunately, I have never seen one. I find it wonderful that individuals that were treated as nothing more than animals, can come up with an intricate concept to free themselves from bondage. This book would be great for a classroom or church program on quilt making. It would be even better if it could be tied in with Black Heritage/History Month.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    In this beautifully illustrated book, Hannah is a slave on a Georgia plantation. When she is ten, her mother taught her to make a "special quilt" where "each pattern holds a special meaning." She and her family dreamed of freedom. After her sister is sold and her mother passes away, Hannah and her father leave the the plantation and escape to Canada following the secret signs in the quilt. Their journey is full of danger, but the desire for freedom is great. Picture books like this is a wonderfu In this beautifully illustrated book, Hannah is a slave on a Georgia plantation. When she is ten, her mother taught her to make a "special quilt" where "each pattern holds a special meaning." She and her family dreamed of freedom. After her sister is sold and her mother passes away, Hannah and her father leave the the plantation and escape to Canada following the secret signs in the quilt. Their journey is full of danger, but the desire for freedom is great. Picture books like this is a wonderful way to introduce young students to a terrible time in our nation's history.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gail Barge

    This would be a great book to read with students when studying the underground railroad and the ways in which slaves escaped to freedom. The afterword of the book explains where the story comes from and the truth behind the story. This book could lead to a whole discussion and study of the quilts made by slaves that held to secrets to freedom in symbols. I would like to have students create their own quilts of freedom using symbols to create a map to freedom. I think that would be an interesting This would be a great book to read with students when studying the underground railroad and the ways in which slaves escaped to freedom. The afterword of the book explains where the story comes from and the truth behind the story. This book could lead to a whole discussion and study of the quilts made by slaves that held to secrets to freedom in symbols. I would like to have students create their own quilts of freedom using symbols to create a map to freedom. I think that would be an interesting culminating activity following a study of the underground railroad.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tita Kontodiakos

    - Grade/Interest Level: 3rd - Reading Level: Primary - Genre: Historical, Information - Main characters: Little girl, Father - Setting: Underground Railroad - POV: 3rd person Summary: This is a glorified story about a young girls travel to freedom with her father. The little girl and her father find their way alone on the Underground Railroad by means of the girl’s quilt which was passed down to her by her late mother. Theme: This story signifies the importance of family, especially during hard time - Grade/Interest Level: 3rd - Reading Level: Primary - Genre: Historical, Information - Main characters: Little girl, Father - Setting: Underground Railroad - POV: 3rd person Summary: This is a glorified story about a young girls travel to freedom with her father. The little girl and her father find their way alone on the Underground Railroad by means of the girl’s quilt which was passed down to her by her late mother. Theme: This story signifies the importance of family, especially during hard times.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amber Adams

    This story describes the encounters of slaves as they try to escape to the underground railroad. The author uses sensory details (Papa‟s lantern cast strange shadows; followed the riverbed upstream; The cold soaked my shoes. My toes felt like icy, hard pebbles; My knees and legs ached; Just as the sun rose, I saw a flock of geese) and italicized words to invite ua into the story and allow us to imagine exactly what the character is going through. I will use this book to teach students that diffe This story describes the encounters of slaves as they try to escape to the underground railroad. The author uses sensory details (Papa‟s lantern cast strange shadows; followed the riverbed upstream; The cold soaked my shoes. My toes felt like icy, hard pebbles; My knees and legs ached; Just as the sun rose, I saw a flock of geese) and italicized words to invite ua into the story and allow us to imagine exactly what the character is going through. I will use this book to teach students that different text in writing is acceptable and how to use sensory details.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ouida Robinson

    Author: Bettye Stroud Title: The Patchwork Path Plot: This is a story about Hannah and her Papa who escape North to freedom. Hannah has to bring along the patchwork quilt that her mother helped her make. This quilt will help guide them to freedom. Setting: in the South Characters: Hannah and Papa Point of View: First person Theme: Culure and Diversity; Slavery Style: Historical Fiction Copyright: 2005 Notes: I enjoyed reading this book. I could use this book to teach about the Underground Railroad.

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