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The Boy Problem: Notes and Observations of Tabitha Reddy

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Tabitha "Tabbi" Reddy believes in signs. Like fortune cookies. Magic 8-Balls. Shooting stars. And this year, she hopes, looking for the right signs will lead her to the right boy! Inspired by her BFF, Kara (star of THE BOY PROJECT), Tabbi starts her own "project" in the hopes of finding a cute crush. With the help of a math lesson on probability, Tabbi tries to predict who Tabitha "Tabbi" Reddy believes in signs. Like fortune cookies. Magic 8-Balls. Shooting stars. And this year, she hopes, looking for the right signs will lead her to the right boy! Inspired by her BFF, Kara (star of THE BOY PROJECT), Tabbi starts her own "project" in the hopes of finding a cute crush. With the help of a math lesson on probability, Tabbi tries to predict who the right boy for her might be! Where is she most likely to meet him? What is he most likely to look like? Full of fun illustrations, hilarious equations, and lessons in cupcake-baking, life, love, and friendship, this book has a 100% probability of awesomeness. A perfect "next step" for fans of DORK DIARIES.


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Tabitha "Tabbi" Reddy believes in signs. Like fortune cookies. Magic 8-Balls. Shooting stars. And this year, she hopes, looking for the right signs will lead her to the right boy! Inspired by her BFF, Kara (star of THE BOY PROJECT), Tabbi starts her own "project" in the hopes of finding a cute crush. With the help of a math lesson on probability, Tabbi tries to predict who Tabitha "Tabbi" Reddy believes in signs. Like fortune cookies. Magic 8-Balls. Shooting stars. And this year, she hopes, looking for the right signs will lead her to the right boy! Inspired by her BFF, Kara (star of THE BOY PROJECT), Tabbi starts her own "project" in the hopes of finding a cute crush. With the help of a math lesson on probability, Tabbi tries to predict who the right boy for her might be! Where is she most likely to meet him? What is he most likely to look like? Full of fun illustrations, hilarious equations, and lessons in cupcake-baking, life, love, and friendship, this book has a 100% probability of awesomeness. A perfect "next step" for fans of DORK DIARIES.

30 review for The Boy Problem: Notes and Observations of Tabitha Reddy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen

    Super-cute book with real kid appeal...I got an advance copy of this and I couldn't even read it until my 11-year old had finished it because she wouldn't let it go. She even recommended it to her friends. Super-cute book with real kid appeal...I got an advance copy of this and I couldn't even read it until my 11-year old had finished it because she wouldn't let it go. She even recommended it to her friends.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kary

    I read this to review before putting into circulation at my middle school. At the time, it was so new that there were no pro reviews out there. Honestly, I thought it would just be the typical corny middle school girly contemp. But, it really was more than that. I couldn't help but appreciate the math tie-ins - a major part of the plot was an algebra project about probability (common core on the brain, don't ya know). It also had the redeeming qualities of the main character befriending a "nerdy I read this to review before putting into circulation at my middle school. At the time, it was so new that there were no pro reviews out there. Honestly, I thought it would just be the typical corny middle school girly contemp. But, it really was more than that. I couldn't help but appreciate the math tie-ins - a major part of the plot was an algebra project about probability (common core on the brain, don't ya know). It also had the redeeming qualities of the main character befriending a "nerdy" girl regardless of the harm to her own popularity status, as well as engaging in a charitable project. It still has the sappy middle school romance though. In other words, this is BOUND to be popular with my 6th and 7th grade girls. A must read for fans of Dork Diaries!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aneesha

    This book was not so great. I mean who comes up with a game of finding a boyfriend. I personally think no one should read this if you do not like notes and Observations about boys.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    My copy was provided by Netgalley. Tabby loves signs. She will find a sign in anything, be it a cloud or a puddle or even cheese from a pizza. She wants to use signs, predictions, and probability to help predict who her dream guy is. She will do anything to find a boyfriend who is right for her. Tabby teams up with her best friend Kara and Pri, a girl absolutely obsessed with cupcakes. This book is filled with cupcakes, drawings, and hilarious equations as Tabby goes on her quest to find the perf My copy was provided by Netgalley. Tabby loves signs. She will find a sign in anything, be it a cloud or a puddle or even cheese from a pizza. She wants to use signs, predictions, and probability to help predict who her dream guy is. She will do anything to find a boyfriend who is right for her. Tabby teams up with her best friend Kara and Pri, a girl absolutely obsessed with cupcakes. This book is filled with cupcakes, drawings, and hilarious equations as Tabby goes on her quest to find the perfect boyfriend. This book was fun and cute! Kinard absolutely nails the voice of a middle school girl. Tabby sounded exactly like a pre-teen who is obsessed with boys. There are random exclamation points, capitalized words, and random thoughts that perfectly captures how a middle school girl thinks and talks. Tabby was a really fun character. It was awesome to see how optimistic she was. She could see the bright side out of everything and she could find something to believe in everywhere. She even thought she could find her dream guy in a pile of cheese she thought was shaped like a face. Tabby's true quirkiness was expressed with the cute equations she created and the doodles she made. The doodles were exactly what I would predict Tabby to make. Tabby was also an awesome friend and cared about Kara and her troubles, as well as making a friend in something she thought was annoying. Tabby also genuinely wanted to help out her cousin and others who were affected by a natural catastrophe. She didn't want to spend money on herself, but would rather help others instead. This book also indirectly helps teach you some probability. It makes probability seem fun and exciting. Tabby makes it seem easy and like something everyone should do. Her equations are always funny and end up helping her, showing that math is useful after all. All the characters were awesome and were unique in their own way. Even Tabby's mom was awesome even though she did seem a bit strict at times, but she was also unafraid to help Tabby no matter what. I would definitely recommend this book to a middle school girl. It was laugh-out-loud funny and kept you entertained the whole time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla

    I love this book! I totally thought it was going one way when it went the other way and it was pretty surprising. I this the author did exaggerate a lot, but it was funny in some situations. I would read this book more than once and would recommend this to some of my friends. Tabitha Reddy is a very interesting little girl and what kind of things she does to get guys to notice and like her are very weird and funny. Her BFF Kara is interesting in many ways too with all the experiments she has don I love this book! I totally thought it was going one way when it went the other way and it was pretty surprising. I this the author did exaggerate a lot, but it was funny in some situations. I would read this book more than once and would recommend this to some of my friends. Tabitha Reddy is a very interesting little girl and what kind of things she does to get guys to notice and like her are very weird and funny. Her BFF Kara is interesting in many ways too with all the experiments she has done to find out which boys are meant for her. I love this book and the first one The Boy Project. In this book Tabitha believed in predictions and signs. She saw a boys face in fallen pizza cheese, she heard a car alarm (which after a few days this new kid at school his phone went off at school and it was very loud.) After many predictions she had two people she thought was her future bf, Alex B, and Andres. Andres was the one she ended up dating at the end of the book, it was kinda cute how they found there ways to each other and seems like something that might have happened or will happen to people in real life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sofia N.

    I loved the book so much that I couldn't stop reading it! In the middle of the book when her Uncle, Aunt, and cousin, Maddie, had a big storm, I thought something bad might happen! So what happened was Tabbi wanted to raise money for Maddie's school that was also damaged. It was so nice of Tabbi and her friends to sell cupcakes at her school. But all of the sudden, she gets in trouble from a bully, Maybelline. So the girls tried to find somewhere else to sell cupcakes. Later on, the girls found I loved the book so much that I couldn't stop reading it! In the middle of the book when her Uncle, Aunt, and cousin, Maddie, had a big storm, I thought something bad might happen! So what happened was Tabbi wanted to raise money for Maddie's school that was also damaged. It was so nice of Tabbi and her friends to sell cupcakes at her school. But all of the sudden, she gets in trouble from a bully, Maybelline. So the girls tried to find somewhere else to sell cupcakes. Later on, the girls found out about a festival and sold more cupcakes there and ended up getting over $700 for the school. Most of this book is about Tabbi trying to find a boyfriend. She wanted a PERFECT boyfriend and couldn't find one. She tried and tried to even get advice from girls at her school to find a great boyfriend. She first liked one boy then didn't, then another boy then didn't like him. So, she knew that there was this perfect boy. They met a few times and even met at the festival. Then she knew..... He was the one!! Overall, in my opinion I love this book!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dina Roberts

    I received this book for free via Goodreads First Reads I think this book is very cutesy...maybe sometimes a little too cutesy. But I enjoyed reading it. It's in the same style as the Wimpy Kid books—diary with a lot of illustrations. When I got the book, I thought it was young adult. But after reading it, I'd say it's more middle reader. I'd put the target age at about 8-11. I think the kids who like shows like iCarly and Drake and Josh will likely enjoy the book. That's not to say the book can't I received this book for free via Goodreads First Reads I think this book is very cutesy...maybe sometimes a little too cutesy. But I enjoyed reading it. It's in the same style as the Wimpy Kid books—diary with a lot of illustrations. When I got the book, I thought it was young adult. But after reading it, I'd say it's more middle reader. I'd put the target age at about 8-11. I think the kids who like shows like iCarly and Drake and Josh will likely enjoy the book. That's not to say the book can't be enjoyed by people of any age! At times I wondered if the book is meant to be somewhat "educational". There's a lot of talk about a probability project for math class. Other stuff in the book: Cupcakes, fortunate telling, hurricanes, fundraising, bullying via viral videos, etc.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Edith

    This book has the most adorable voice with doodles! Tabitha Reddy is the sort of girl who can find a face in cheese. Her hilarious personality really shines through the cute doodles she draws throughout the story to illustrate her points. Tabs (as her best friend Kara calls her) makes math references like 2 + 1 = 3rd wheel. There is a great probability lesson with cupcakes and plenty of boy theories. The middle grade voice is so spot on. I can't get over how much the author captures this age. Ta This book has the most adorable voice with doodles! Tabitha Reddy is the sort of girl who can find a face in cheese. Her hilarious personality really shines through the cute doodles she draws throughout the story to illustrate her points. Tabs (as her best friend Kara calls her) makes math references like 2 + 1 = 3rd wheel. There is a great probability lesson with cupcakes and plenty of boy theories. The middle grade voice is so spot on. I can't get over how much the author captures this age. Tabitha practically leaps from the page. This is a book kids will pick up on their own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    So cute & funny! My middle school girls will definitely identify with Tabi & her wacky ideas for getting a boyfriend.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jen Petro-Roy

    I adored this. Kinard utterly nails the middle school voice. So cute.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dan Shonka

    This is a fun book, and Kami Kinard does a wonderful job building the suspense, emotional investment, and character growth. The main character, Tabbi, isn't always the most likable, but she grows on the reader, learning from mistakes, and simply growing in character. Kinard injects plenty of humor to spice it up, too. By the end, she also knows just how to tug at the heartstrings to put a warm, fuzzy bow on the story. Very enjoyable, and very satisfying. This is a fun book, and Kami Kinard does a wonderful job building the suspense, emotional investment, and character growth. The main character, Tabbi, isn't always the most likable, but she grows on the reader, learning from mistakes, and simply growing in character. Kinard injects plenty of humor to spice it up, too. By the end, she also knows just how to tug at the heartstrings to put a warm, fuzzy bow on the story. Very enjoyable, and very satisfying.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Heather Montgomery

    Everyone has had to deal with the problem of mean girls. But the problems in this book go way beyond that - they tie right into the math curriculum. But don't get the idea that it's boring. In this book, humor abounds. Everyone has had to deal with the problem of mean girls. But the problems in this book go way beyond that - they tie right into the math curriculum. But don't get the idea that it's boring. In this book, humor abounds.

  13. 5 out of 5

    711Vinoj

    This is an amazing book. You can see into the mind of the character with all of her notes!

  14. 5 out of 5

    711Bethany

    A very relateable book that everyone should read!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Pegram

    Funny and sweet and so fun to read! Tabbi's voice is strong and engaging, her friends are fun to hang out with, and cupcakes save the day. What's not to love? Funny and sweet and so fun to read! Tabbi's voice is strong and engaging, her friends are fun to hang out with, and cupcakes save the day. What's not to love?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    I got this for my daughter. She enjoys science and math and got a kick out of how they were used in a funny way in this book (and in the Boy Project--she wanted both).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Simona Poposka

    Cool how all crazy things happened through the year!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Thasbeeha

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Its about a girl wanting to have boyfriend and so she wants to have a boyfriend and there she will face some problems.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carol Baldwin

    In between drafts of my manuscript I’m working on character development using worksheets provided by the faculty of KidLit Summer School—a marvelous online class created by Kami Kinard and Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen. The first one that I tackled was by A.C. Gaughen where she challenged writers to consider the rules governing their character’s voice and point of reference. Since I recently read The Boy Problem by Kami Kinard, I thought I’d use Gaughen’s worksheet to review Kami’s book, a companion mi In between drafts of my manuscript I’m working on character development using worksheets provided by the faculty of KidLit Summer School—a marvelous online class created by Kami Kinard and Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen. The first one that I tackled was by A.C. Gaughen where she challenged writers to consider the rules governing their character’s voice and point of reference. Since I recently read The Boy Problem by Kami Kinard, I thought I’d use Gaughen’s worksheet to review Kami’s book, a companion middle-grade novel to her first book, The Boy Project, which I reviewed exactly two years ago.On the opening pages the reader meets breezy, funny Tabbi Reddy who believes in signs and desperately wants a boyfriend. Even spilling a pizza on the floor of the local pizza joint turns into a prediction about landing a boyfriend. She tries to convince her best friend Kara, and Kara’s boyfriend Chip, that the cheese on the floor is a lot more than a messy pile of mozzarella. “And this is his hairline,” I pointed to a jagged edge that jutted out form the gooey forehead. “Don’t you think it looks exactly like a guy?” “I guess I can kind of see it,” said Kara. “Kind of see it? I’ll tell you what I see: the image of my future crush. Look at that handsome profile! He’s perfect for me!” ………… After the waitress cleans up the mess the girls return to their booth and Tabbi concludes, “This is the best day of my life!” I said. “You’re either overreacting,” said Kara, “or losing it.” “Am not! That pile of cheese was a sign—a sign from the universe that the right guy is out there for me after all!” (p.7-8) In this way Kinard sets up some rules about Tabbi’s voice and her character: 1. She’s going to interpret events—perhaps even misconstrue them—to fit what she wants to happen. (A savvy reader will recognize that this tendency will probably get Tabbi into trouble.) 2. She is totally an 8th-grade girl with a BFF who she can risk being slightly crazy with. 3. She is slightly over-the-top dramatic. Tabbi’s point of reference is math. Sprinkled throughout the book are equations, charts, lists, diagrams, and line drawings. For example, one of Tabbi’s inner goals is expressed in an equation on the first page at the pizza shop: “ 2 +1 = Third Wheel.” She attempts to meet her external goal (gaining a boyfriend) by methodically listing “Boys who have potential,”; creating a love-predictor cootie catcher; surveying how other girls caught their boyfriends, and creating a game that will predict who her next boyfriend will be. At the same time Tabbi is trying to find a boyfriend, her Algebra teacher is also tackling probability—with a more academic type assignment. When Tabbi and Priyanka--a cupcake lover and the last person in the world Tabbi wants to be assigned to work with—are teamed up on a project that uses probability to predict the future, not only does a cupcake war take over their school and they raise money for a truly good cause, but yes…Tabbi finds her unexpected-yet-could-have-been predicted boyfriend. Although the book is full of Tabbi's boy-craziness, I appreciate how Kami wraps the book up at the end. I don't want to spoil it for you, so let's just say, it's a great "there-is-more-to-life than-finding-a-boyfriend" ending.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    Tabbi is positive that the universe is giving her major signs that she will be getting a boyfriend soon. The only part that she's not quite sure about is which boy, exactly, will be the first to win her heart. Since Tabbi and her friends are learning about probability in math class -- and since the students must come up with an exciting project to test and present all that they are learning about probability -- Tabbi decides to combine school with her love life and she sets out to use math, as we Tabbi is positive that the universe is giving her major signs that she will be getting a boyfriend soon. The only part that she's not quite sure about is which boy, exactly, will be the first to win her heart. Since Tabbi and her friends are learning about probability in math class -- and since the students must come up with an exciting project to test and present all that they are learning about probability -- Tabbi decides to combine school with her love life and she sets out to use math, as well as the mystical signs of the universe, to find her new boyfriend.... But things don't always go as planned, and soon Tabbi must deal with annoying perky classmates, scary family situations, and an unusual obsession with cupcakes -- all while using her new probability skills to find her new boyfriend. So, are the odds in Tabbi's favor when it comes to true love? --- I completely was not aware that THE BOY PROBLEM: NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS OF TABITHA REDDY was a companion book to another novel by the author, so I was a teeny bit nervous that I would be missing huge chunks of back story by skipping ahead to the current novel. However, being an easy-to-read middle grade novel, this story worked absolutely fine as a stand-alone novel, so there were no problems at all reading this novel before the first of its kind. I really liked the voice throughout the story, as Tabbi documented her daily thoughts, fears, and inspirations. The young, naive teenage essence was honestly captured pretty well here, and I could easily remember writing several similar little journal type entries back in my own teenage days, never realizing until adulthood how melodramatic and overly excited my thoughts and ramblings must seem to those around me. The plot line was cute enough, despite the fact that I was hoping for a middle grade novel to be a little less focused on the relationship aspect of things. Some of the secondary characters were a tiny bit over-the-top for my tastes, but clearly the intended audience for the story would have fewer hesitations on these things, I'm sure. Overall, this was a pretty solid, quick, and entertaining read. I thank the publisher for allowing me an advanced copy for the purposes of sharing an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Tabbi is back (after The Boy Project), trying to use mathematical formulae and the process of elimination to determine which boy in her grade she should date. Her single mother is not helping, not letting her hang out at the skate park with Malcolm when Tabbi is ill, and embarrassingly flirting with one of Tabbi's teachers! When her class has a project on probability, Tabbi ends up working with the perky Priyanka, whose life seems to revolve around cupcakes. After a bad storm destroys Tabbi's co Tabbi is back (after The Boy Project), trying to use mathematical formulae and the process of elimination to determine which boy in her grade she should date. Her single mother is not helping, not letting her hang out at the skate park with Malcolm when Tabbi is ill, and embarrassingly flirting with one of Tabbi's teachers! When her class has a project on probability, Tabbi ends up working with the perky Priyanka, whose life seems to revolve around cupcakes. After a bad storm destroys Tabbi's cousin's school, the girls decide to bake cupcakes to try to raise money. They fill out all the school paperwork (this is a real thing!), but end up going head-to-head with the evil "Maybelline" who runs another cupcake fund raisers to get money for uniforms AND stocks other people's boyfriends! When new boy Andres shows up at school, Tabbi thinks that he is cute and might be a good choice to date, and tries to win his heart with gluten free cupcakes. There are a few problems with Tabbi's best friend Kara, and some social embarrassment (a huge zit, a funny video that gets posted on Faceplace, but nothing too dire. Strengths: A lot of girls ask for books in diary form, and this works well. The doodles and math problems add a different spin. While the mean girls aren't nice, they aren't super mean, and Tabbi handles them well. There's even a little bit of cultural diversity with Pri's family. Weaknesses: I found the math problems and graphs, etc. a little annoying, but then it occurred to me that it's probably a good example for middle school girls to show a girl who is interested in math AND boys. Again, as an adult it's hard to imagine anyone spending that much time thinking about boys... until I read my diary from that time period and want to set fire to it. Hard to complain when a book is too close to reality!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Books

    This was a difficult read to get through, not only because it’s not at all for teens, but the melodramatic whining of a middle schooler was just too much for me to take seriously. I do understand that kids that age are, in fact, melodramatic—that everything is important, including who you work on your algebra project with, and that finding a boyfriend is of ultimate importance. Tabbi Reddy is a bubbly, bright middle schooler who believes that looking for signs and making predictions can help you This was a difficult read to get through, not only because it’s not at all for teens, but the melodramatic whining of a middle schooler was just too much for me to take seriously. I do understand that kids that age are, in fact, melodramatic—that everything is important, including who you work on your algebra project with, and that finding a boyfriend is of ultimate importance. Tabbi Reddy is a bubbly, bright middle schooler who believes that looking for signs and making predictions can help you figure out what’s going to happen in literally every aspect of her life. The message that needing to have a boyfriend to be happy didn’t change throughout the story, as I thought it would. By the end, Tabbi is dating a cute, caring boy, has befriended an over-enthusiastic, nerdy girl, has become closer with her BFF, and has raised money selling cupcakes to help out a school in need. This story is so full of the melodrama of middle school that the empowering message of creating a charity and accepting a classmate for who she is is overshadowed. Since the characters are in middle school, and are worried about first kisses and hand holding, I would recommend this to kids in grades 4-6, and no older.

  23. 5 out of 5

    The Styling Librarian

    The Boy Problem: Notes and Predictions of Tabitha Reddy by Kami Kinard, ARC, 3rd grade and up, Realistic Fiction. Release date: April 29th, 2014. –HAPPY BOOK BIRTHDAY SOON!! I read this book because of the fantastic book trailer that a blogger friend’s students made… Really cute. I think that the statistics and probability mixed in this book made math more appealing and entertaining for readers. Plus more realistic. Enjoyed how a girl was portrayed as having more depth and interest in the world bu The Boy Problem: Notes and Predictions of Tabitha Reddy by Kami Kinard, ARC, 3rd grade and up, Realistic Fiction. Release date: April 29th, 2014. –HAPPY BOOK BIRTHDAY SOON!! I read this book because of the fantastic book trailer that a blogger friend’s students made… Really cute. I think that the statistics and probability mixed in this book made math more appealing and entertaining for readers. Plus more realistic. Enjoyed how a girl was portrayed as having more depth and interest in the world but can also be majorly concerned with finding a boyfriend. Could enjoy this story for the side stories as well and additionally know that it would be good to read the original book which centered on our main character’s best friend. Lovely. Here’s the fantastic book trailer created by my blogger friend’s students: Here’s the link about Mr. Etkin’s blog about the creation of the trailer- http://mretome.wordpress.com/2014/04/...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Seventh-grader, boy-crazy Tabitha finds herself between boyfriends and desperate for a new one. Believing in signs, omens and the like, she believes her next boyfriend’s image is in a glob of pizza cheese that has fallen off her pizza. To further validate her search, she uses an algebra assignment in probability to calculate her odds of finding Mr. Right. Throw in a cupcake fund-raiser to help victims of a hurricane, some cyberbullying, and peer interactions both good and bad and you have a thor Seventh-grader, boy-crazy Tabitha finds herself between boyfriends and desperate for a new one. Believing in signs, omens and the like, she believes her next boyfriend’s image is in a glob of pizza cheese that has fallen off her pizza. To further validate her search, she uses an algebra assignment in probability to calculate her odds of finding Mr. Right. Throw in a cupcake fund-raiser to help victims of a hurricane, some cyberbullying, and peer interactions both good and bad and you have a thoroughly melodramatic story that tweens and young teens will relish. And I am sure you can guess the ending. Written in journal format and interspersed with lots of drawings, the chatty text is laden with Girl-speak. Too many subplots and underdeveloped characters diminish this story for me, especially the constant need for a boyfriend for validation; but the intended audience thrives on such. Order if needed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Tabbi Reddy is looking for love and watching signs indicating possible candidates for her next boyfriend. But sometimes signs can be wrong or can be misinterpreted. After developing a love predictor and bingo game and querying classmates about how they and their crushes first met, Tabbi thinks she has a love connection all figured out. When she decides to enlist her friends in a baking project to earn money for disaster relief, she and the class Mean Girl bump heads. While I grew a bit tired of Tabbi Reddy is looking for love and watching signs indicating possible candidates for her next boyfriend. But sometimes signs can be wrong or can be misinterpreted. After developing a love predictor and bingo game and querying classmates about how they and their crushes first met, Tabbi thinks she has a love connection all figured out. When she decides to enlist her friends in a baking project to earn money for disaster relief, she and the class Mean Girl bump heads. While I grew a bit tired of her desperate search for a boyfriend, I liked how Tabbi grew over the course of the book, even realizing that having a guy by her side wasn't absolutely necessary and giving a chance to a classmate that she had avoided earlier. I also liked how proactive she was and the positive spin given to math and her math teacher. He sounds like a keeper, and the book itself raises several important issues.

  26. 5 out of 5

    705hannah

    After reading this book I really liked it. I liked how it showed that Jenna can find a boy who likes her and make a new friend. Jenna is obsessed with how the world gives you signs that will show you to the perfect boy. And during this year she is devoted to finding the perfect boy. But at the same time she is during a project with a girl who is a little crazy. Jenna goes through many crushes but can't find the perfect one. And her math project is based on cupcakes and what flavers to kids like After reading this book I really liked it. I liked how it showed that Jenna can find a boy who likes her and make a new friend. Jenna is obsessed with how the world gives you signs that will show you to the perfect boy. And during this year she is devoted to finding the perfect boy. But at the same time she is during a project with a girl who is a little crazy. Jenna goes through many crushes but can't find the perfect one. And her math project is based on cupcakes and what flavers to kids like more. Until something happens with her extended family in londen and she and her friends are trying to raise money by selling cupcakes. This book is really about how Jenna can make friends, find a boyfriend, and help others.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    The Boy Problem was a very good book, it takes you into the normal life of a girl searching for a boy. She goes through many different struggles, even with her family ever since a horrible disaster. Tabitha ( the main character) thinks that predictions and luck can happen, but some don't...However, the book also has some horrible parts. The character may overreact over nothing and sometimes that page will leave you puzzled and confused, but in the end the book was wonderful. When I finished the The Boy Problem was a very good book, it takes you into the normal life of a girl searching for a boy. She goes through many different struggles, even with her family ever since a horrible disaster. Tabitha ( the main character) thinks that predictions and luck can happen, but some don't...However, the book also has some horrible parts. The character may overreact over nothing and sometimes that page will leave you puzzled and confused, but in the end the book was wonderful. When I finished the book, it turned out to be one of my most favorite books! It was fun, sad, happy and had all the elements for an (almost) perfect book. In the end I really enjoyed this book, and I also really recommend it (especially for girls).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Angelica Dimeo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I received this book free from a goodreads giveaway. This book is geared towards middle schoolers age wise. It at first was kinda slow paced. I liked the drawings in it. Tabitha is in middle school with her friend Kara who has a boyfriend. Tabitha feels like a third wheel since she has no boyfriend and she tries doing predictions and charts and surveys to figure out who will be her next bf. Then she is assigned a probability assignment by her new math teacher and her partner is Pri a girl that annoys I received this book free from a goodreads giveaway. This book is geared towards middle schoolers age wise. It at first was kinda slow paced. I liked the drawings in it. Tabitha is in middle school with her friend Kara who has a boyfriend. Tabitha feels like a third wheel since she has no boyfriend and she tries doing predictions and charts and surveys to figure out who will be her next bf. Then she is assigned a probability assignment by her new math teacher and her partner is Pri a girl that annoys her by being so happy and loud. This book was a fun read after the really slow moving plot in the beginning. Was a fun read will defiantly recommend for my niece who is in middle school.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Hall

    Kami Kinard does middle grade like Einstein does math. THE BOY PROBLEM picks up a character from Kinard's BOY PROJECT and tells her story of MG romance, which of course includes MG angst and drama and conflict and chaos and humor and mathematical predictions. Yep, by the time you finish reading about Tabitha Reddy's boy problem and how she goes about tackling it, you're going to be smarter than a fifth grader. Maybe even smarter than a sixth grader. And you'll have another laugh line or two. But i Kami Kinard does middle grade like Einstein does math. THE BOY PROBLEM picks up a character from Kinard's BOY PROJECT and tells her story of MG romance, which of course includes MG angst and drama and conflict and chaos and humor and mathematical predictions. Yep, by the time you finish reading about Tabitha Reddy's boy problem and how she goes about tackling it, you're going to be smarter than a fifth grader. Maybe even smarter than a sixth grader. And you'll have another laugh line or two. But it'll be worth it. And I can make my own prediction, based on my research and study of THE BOY PROBLEM: Middle graders will love this book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    THE BOY PROBLEM: NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS OF TABITHA REDDY Well, it looks like Kami Kinard has done it again! She's written the perfect journal book for girls for the second book straight! Through humor, spunky characters, unforeseen circumstances, mishaps and misguided "predictions," Tabbi (and the reader) learns what can and can't be predicted and how. She also finds out that maybe--just maybe--you don't truly know someone 'til you actually do! It turns out that cupcakes + mustaches + a magic THE BOY PROBLEM: NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS OF TABITHA REDDY Well, it looks like Kami Kinard has done it again! She's written the perfect journal book for girls for the second book straight! Through humor, spunky characters, unforeseen circumstances, mishaps and misguided "predictions," Tabbi (and the reader) learns what can and can't be predicted and how. She also finds out that maybe--just maybe--you don't truly know someone 'til you actually do! It turns out that cupcakes + mustaches + a magic 8-ball = The Boy Problem! A must-read (along with The Boy Project) for any tween, for sure---and even we POST-teens! ;)

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