web site hit counter A Promise in Pieces - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A Promise in Pieces

Availability: Ready to download

A baby quilt touches many hearts as it travels from family-to-family and through generations. After the end of World War II, Clara Kirkpatrick returns from the Women’s Army Corp to deliver a dying soldier’s last wishes: convey his love to his young widow, Mattie, with apologies for the missed life they had planned to share. Struggling with her own post-war trauma, Clara thin A baby quilt touches many hearts as it travels from family-to-family and through generations. After the end of World War II, Clara Kirkpatrick returns from the Women’s Army Corp to deliver a dying soldier’s last wishes: convey his love to his young widow, Mattie, with apologies for the missed life they had planned to share. Struggling with her own post-war trauma, Clara thinks she’s not prepared to handle the grief of this broken family. Yet upon meeting Mattie, and receiving a baby quilt that will never cuddle the soldier’s baby, Clara vows to honor the sacrifices that family made. Now a labor and delivery nurse in her rural hometown, Clara wraps each new babe in the gifted quilt and later stitches the child’s name into the cloth. As each new child is welcomed by the quilt, Clara begins to wonder whatever happened to Mattie—and if her own life would ever experience the love of a newborn. Little does she know that she will have the opportunity to re-gift the special quilt—years later and carrying even greater significance than when it was first bestowed.


Compare

A baby quilt touches many hearts as it travels from family-to-family and through generations. After the end of World War II, Clara Kirkpatrick returns from the Women’s Army Corp to deliver a dying soldier’s last wishes: convey his love to his young widow, Mattie, with apologies for the missed life they had planned to share. Struggling with her own post-war trauma, Clara thin A baby quilt touches many hearts as it travels from family-to-family and through generations. After the end of World War II, Clara Kirkpatrick returns from the Women’s Army Corp to deliver a dying soldier’s last wishes: convey his love to his young widow, Mattie, with apologies for the missed life they had planned to share. Struggling with her own post-war trauma, Clara thinks she’s not prepared to handle the grief of this broken family. Yet upon meeting Mattie, and receiving a baby quilt that will never cuddle the soldier’s baby, Clara vows to honor the sacrifices that family made. Now a labor and delivery nurse in her rural hometown, Clara wraps each new babe in the gifted quilt and later stitches the child’s name into the cloth. As each new child is welcomed by the quilt, Clara begins to wonder whatever happened to Mattie—and if her own life would ever experience the love of a newborn. Little does she know that she will have the opportunity to re-gift the special quilt—years later and carrying even greater significance than when it was first bestowed.

30 review for A Promise in Pieces

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carole Jarvis

    Reviewed at The Power of Words: http://tinyurl.com/kde6low I have greatly enjoyed the books I've read so far in the Quilts of Love series. Each of these standalone stories tell of love and loss, hope and faith, tradition and new beginnings, and focus on the women who quilted these things into their family histories. But when it comes to A Promise in Pieces by debut author Emily T. Wierenga, I'd have to say this story is in a class of its own. I'm not sure what I expected when I first picked this Reviewed at The Power of Words: http://tinyurl.com/kde6low I have greatly enjoyed the books I've read so far in the Quilts of Love series. Each of these standalone stories tell of love and loss, hope and faith, tradition and new beginnings, and focus on the women who quilted these things into their family histories. But when it comes to A Promise in Pieces by debut author Emily T. Wierenga, I'd have to say this story is in a class of its own. I'm not sure what I expected when I first picked this book up - another sweet story and a fairly light read, maybe? We often use terms like "unique" or "fresh voice" to describe a first-time author or an unusual book - and while these descriptions hold true, there's a lot more involved here. What's most unusual to me, I think, is that the story is told entirely in the voice of 77-year-old Clara while travelling with her family to bring completion to a promise made long ago. It reads almost like a journal and it just feels so real! Emily has crafted a wonderful story with her lyrical writing, and she has that special "something" when it comes to making her characters leap off the pages. I recognized this as a gem in the Christian fiction market from the first page, and this is a story whose characters will continue to linger in my thoughts. Clara's reminiscing begins in 1943 when she joined the Women's Army Corp, and what follows is one of the most real and emotionally touching accounts I've ever read. Upon seeing the field hospital tents in Normandy, Clara reflects on the pain "that happened when I looked into the faces of the soldiers and saw someone who reminded me of Timmy from the ship, or the brother I never had, and the pain only war could inflict: the pain of being so wrenched from reality you just toss and moan." At center stage is the quilt - made by young bride Mattie with eager anticipation that turned to grief when her husband died - that became a source of blessing and comfort to many families in Clara's hands. Clara tenderly touched the names stitched into the cloth. The patches of fabric were varying shades of blue and yellow, and next to her children's names there were others - fifty-seven others - and beneath each name, a promise, stitched in white. A word, written in tiny cursive, blessing the baby. The whole quilt covering a generation of children, blanketing them in hope. Characterization and writing style are also strengths of Emily's writing . . . • Oliver, Clara's husband, a truly appealing man who comes to see life as a gift - "a man who'd grown friendships like he had flowers, with tenderness and care, attentive to detail." • Mrs. Bailey, Clara's landlady, whose "words tasted like hope, and I was ravenous." • The strong friendship between Clara and Mattie - "A good friend is someone who is always there. Period. Nothing earthly - no fight, no hurt, no words - can separate a friendship that has its footing in heaven." Clara's spiritual growth is present on every page - moving from anger at God when her efforts to save someone fail, to acceptance that pain is a part of love. I am so glad God put this story in Emily's heart and hope we will hear more from her soon. Highly recommended! Thank you to Litfuse Publicity for providing a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Robbins (Heidi Reads...)

    Holy moly. This book threw me for a loop. The reminiscent style of writing drew me right in and fascinated me with Clara's story and thoughts. I thought the first part was emotional, as Clara shares her experiences as a WWII nurse with her grandson and family. But it was when she returned from war and struggled with returning to normal life that the book really resonated with me. I was reading it during my daughter's swim lessons and had to wipe away tears from beneath my sunglasses- that's a hu Holy moly. This book threw me for a loop. The reminiscent style of writing drew me right in and fascinated me with Clara's story and thoughts. I thought the first part was emotional, as Clara shares her experiences as a WWII nurse with her grandson and family. But it was when she returned from war and struggled with returning to normal life that the book really resonated with me. I was reading it during my daughter's swim lessons and had to wipe away tears from beneath my sunglasses- that's a huge indicator of just how good it is- crying in public! What's interesting to me is that I didn't exactly connect with Clara's personality- it was the poignant and profound truths that were revealed through her struggles that brought my feelings and some obviously repressed emotions to the surface. Yeah, my husband chuckled at me when he came into our room as I was finishing the book and literally sobbing- I can't remember the last time I had a good sob. "It's just a book," he said. "That's not why I'm crying!!!" I protested. Themes of birth, death, fear, love, family, service, trust, and faith are all intertwined as a hurting Clara searches for her calling and role in life. She is such a strong person but her vulnerabilities and fears eat at her, all the while she keeps moving forward and finding peace through serving others and providing relief to other hurting victims of war and life. Even through sadness and grief, the book ends with a new light and hope for Clara, which I thought was just so fitting and perfect. This is by far my favorite of the Quilts of Love series, and also my favorite use of a quilt in a novel. I can't recommend this book highly enough!!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ane Mulligan

    , A Promise in Pieces, grabbed hold of my heart and didn't let go until I read "The End," and even then, the characters have lingered in my mind. Well-written, this touching story will leave you wanting more from this talented new author. Novel Rocket and I give it our highest recommendation. It's a 5-star must read. , A Promise in Pieces, grabbed hold of my heart and didn't let go until I read "The End," and even then, the characters have lingered in my mind. Well-written, this touching story will leave you wanting more from this talented new author. Novel Rocket and I give it our highest recommendation. It's a 5-star must read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carla Stewart

    Beautifully rendered with depth and compassion, A Promise in Pieces is a celebration of joy in a special quilt that commemorates the miracle of new life and offers healing to the brokenhearted. With a bright new voice in Christian fiction, Emily T. Weirenga’s debut novel is one to be cherished. Tender and heartfelt from the first page to the last and a worth addition to the Quilts of Love series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sena

    Such a wonderful sweet book! Loved all of the characters and the family element of the book. Great time period of the 40's and on. Enjoyed reading about the fashion and beauty of the era. Definitely one of my favorite books read so far. Short book with a great story. Such a wonderful sweet book! Loved all of the characters and the family element of the book. Great time period of the 40's and on. Enjoyed reading about the fashion and beauty of the era. Definitely one of my favorite books read so far. Short book with a great story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Damoff

    When we made the decision to move to Dallas and buy a house across the street from the one where I grew up — the house where my dad was slowly losing my mom to dementia memory by memory, and where our son and his wife and their baby were also living, helping Dad navigate this heart-breaking journey — I wanted a visual representation of the season we were about to enter. Four generations living in close community, the old fading away even as the new blossomed, all inextricably connected by blood When we made the decision to move to Dallas and buy a house across the street from the one where I grew up — the house where my dad was slowly losing my mom to dementia memory by memory, and where our son and his wife and their baby were also living, helping Dad navigate this heart-breaking journey — I wanted a visual representation of the season we were about to enter. Four generations living in close community, the old fading away even as the new blossomed, all inextricably connected by blood and God’s eternal purposes. I wanted to anchor this moment in imagery, so I commissioned a painting from my friend, Emily Wierenga. A single branch extending through four seasons, with white winged birds blowing through it all like the breath of God. Emily more than met the challenge. Using color, texture, and abstract form, she painted meaning, and it’s no surprise to me that she writes the same way. When Abingdon Press asked her to write a book about a quilt, the story’s structure itself became a patchwork — the past and the present intentionally interspersed, each piece a collage of characters and themes beautifully interwoven. I read the first half of A Promise in Pieces on an airplane flying to Detroit to speak at a women’s retreat, and I finished it on the flight home. As I closed the final page, I couldn’t help thinking of an illustration I’d used at the retreat: "If you drop a pebble in water, ripples are set in motion. But let’s say it’s not a pebble. Let’s say it’s a priceless jewel. Something you dearly love. Something irreplaceable. You’ve spent your life trying to protect it, and now, due to circumstances beyond your control, it’s gone. You stare in disbelief at the spot where it went down, a multitude of 'if only’s' swirling in your head. You wish you could press rewind or wake up and realize it’s all just a horrible nightmare, but you can’t, and it isn’t. At this point, you have a choice. You can keep staring at the spot where your treasure sank, or you can watch the ripples to see what God is doing. Because He is always doing something beautiful. And your story? The one that feels like it just went desperately wrong? It’s not just yours. Your story intersects my story and a thousand other stories. The ripples set in motion in our lives touch other lives, and more ripples are set in motion. We’re not autonomous. We are members of one another, and all of our individual stories are part of God’s greater story. The story in which God redeems all that is broken." A Promise in Pieces is a story about brokenness and redemption. It’s a patchwork of stories within a story within a story, all of it revolving around a quilt that has a life of its own, each of its squares a promise to someone whose story has been woven into the life fabric of one woman, a World War II army nurse named Clara. It’s a book about what it means to be human — the search for significance and acceptance and love, and the fears and misunderstandings that often drive us to run from the very things we so desperately desire. It’s about loss and healing, frailty and forgiveness — the way life intersects life, and meaning finds us right where we are, especially when we’re searching for it somewhere else. It’s light set against darkness, hope against despair, and the remarkable truth that God takes these contrasts and stitches them together into beauty, all of this told in the words of an artist — words that paint mental pictures: “seagulls dipping down and rising like washerwomen, pinning up the waves” and “the breeze lifted their hair and the edges of their spirits” and “I stepped off the train and fell into the arms of home.” Emily has deftly pieced together loneliness and love, war and peace, life and death, and running through it all is one shining thread. God’s grace. To read A Promise in Pieces is to be wrapped in the warmth of redemption’s embrace. Maybe your life should intersect Clara’s, too?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nancee

    My skills as a reviewer cannot begin to summarize this book and do it justice. This book needs to be absorbed piece by piece like the blocks and stitches in the quilt that holds this story together. The fact that this is Emily T.Wierenga's debut novel is astonishing! It is impressive that a young woman created the life story of an elderly woman with such incredible depth of feeling and insight. The author displays wisdom beyond her years in portraying the yearnings, passion, emotions and realiti My skills as a reviewer cannot begin to summarize this book and do it justice. This book needs to be absorbed piece by piece like the blocks and stitches in the quilt that holds this story together. The fact that this is Emily T.Wierenga's debut novel is astonishing! It is impressive that a young woman created the life story of an elderly woman with such incredible depth of feeling and insight. The author displays wisdom beyond her years in portraying the yearnings, passion, emotions and realities in the life of the main character in "A Promise in Pieces." The layers in this story are like the layers of a quilt, bits and pieces of cloth that comprise the top, batting which adds thickness and warmth, a backing to encase the batting, and the stitches which strengthen and bind the quilt together. As Clara's life unfolds and her faith is many times questioned assurance is realized through the light of something tangible in her life, and the scheme of God's plans are revealed, strengthening her resolve. This is one woman's story, her journey of faith, her fears and dreams, the journey she travels throughout her life, and the people who become the focus in her life. This is an amazing piece of art that may be lost on young readers who lack the experiences of older readers, but I believe that the lessons learned throughout this beautiful story can be applied to anyone's life. I highly recommend "A Promise in Pieces" as a remarkable and brilliant narrative! I look forward to future books by this author! Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from Abingdon Press through the Book Fun program, a program sponsored by The Book Club Network, in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are my own, and no monetary compensation was received for this review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle Cobb

    What I Loved Honestly? I wasn't sure I was going to like Clara. Before I opened the book. Oh, but I did. See, I was uncertain of whether this would be a WWII novel or whirlwind romance or the quilt's journey or about Clara's friendship with Mattie. Why I didn't really believe it could be both and all I don't know. Then it was. And I really, really liked Clara. And her adventure and gut-wrenching WWII sorrow. And her romance with the man who saved her and whom she feared losing. And the quilt's journ What I Loved Honestly? I wasn't sure I was going to like Clara. Before I opened the book. Oh, but I did. See, I was uncertain of whether this would be a WWII novel or whirlwind romance or the quilt's journey or about Clara's friendship with Mattie. Why I didn't really believe it could be both and all I don't know. Then it was. And I really, really liked Clara. And her adventure and gut-wrenching WWII sorrow. And her romance with the man who saved her and whom she feared losing. And the quilt's journey--and one heroic grandson's decision. And Clara's friendship with Mattie, what almost drove them apart and what brought them back together again. Why I Recommend This Book I don't think I've ever cried as much over a book that wasn't the Bible as I cried over this one. I loved it, and it's staying on my keepers shelf, and you need to get yourself a copy, too. This story folds in on Clara like a quilt, like real life, and there's pain and there's beauty, too. And I LOVE the ending.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Louise

    I love the first person voice of A Promise in Pieces. I could do more than just empathize with Clara, the main character--I was living her story through her words. I felt her chagrin over being restricted to ridiculous rules as the daughter of a conservative, nonresistant pastor. I smelled the aromas that filled her with discuss in the nurse's boot camp. I cried with her at the bedside of a dying soldier. I agonized with her at the birth of the first child she delivered on her own as a midwife. T I love the first person voice of A Promise in Pieces. I could do more than just empathize with Clara, the main character--I was living her story through her words. I felt her chagrin over being restricted to ridiculous rules as the daughter of a conservative, nonresistant pastor. I smelled the aromas that filled her with discuss in the nurse's boot camp. I cried with her at the bedside of a dying soldier. I agonized with her at the birth of the first child she delivered on her own as a midwife. The only thing I didn't like about A Promise in Pieces was that it was so short. It left me hungry for more. I couldn't help but wishing Emily had developed the characters more--I felt like I was just barely meeting them when they were already leaving the story or aging many years and changing in character. Because not only can Emily tell a good story, but she can make her characters come to life on the pages. I just wished I'd had a chance to spend more time with them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Richmond

    For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do. -Ephesians 2:9-11 I don't think I've ever read a book that illustrated this verse so well! Clara and her family travel to the World War II Museum to deliver an important artifact. But more important than any treasure is the story she shares on the way. A Promise in Pieces amazed me in so many ways, especially weaving together a present-day story with one from the 1940s, and, in the m For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do. -Ephesians 2:9-11 I don't think I've ever read a book that illustrated this verse so well! Clara and her family travel to the World War II Museum to deliver an important artifact. But more important than any treasure is the story she shares on the way. A Promise in Pieces amazed me in so many ways, especially weaving together a present-day story with one from the 1940s, and, in the midst of lump-in-the-throat sadness, imparting such hope. We really are God's handiwork, and I pray I'll be able to do His work as well as Clara did!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kd Sullivan

    There are few books that I can say have spoken as directly to my heart as A Promise in Pieces did. Emily beautifully weaves a tale about Clara, a woman in the twilight of her years, who is retelling her life's story to her grandchildren as their family travels to complete a promise. As the story moves on, the eminent future foreshadows Clara's narrative and drives the reader to continue. Intergenerational, interdenominational, and intercultural, this book is sure to speak to the hearts and lives There are few books that I can say have spoken as directly to my heart as A Promise in Pieces did. Emily beautifully weaves a tale about Clara, a woman in the twilight of her years, who is retelling her life's story to her grandchildren as their family travels to complete a promise. As the story moves on, the eminent future foreshadows Clara's narrative and drives the reader to continue. Intergenerational, interdenominational, and intercultural, this book is sure to speak to the hearts and lives of any who make the wise decision to pick it up.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This story is more told than shown, breaking every rule I've ever been taught about how you should show the story, not tell it. But it works for Ms. Wierenga. Obviously a talented journalist, she can report the facts, Jack. I wasn't exactly pulled into the story the way I would've liked, and it was more of a reporting of facts than an actual story, but it was an interesting read, recounting one woman's experiences as an Army nurse during WWII. And how she was able to reconcile with her family an This story is more told than shown, breaking every rule I've ever been taught about how you should show the story, not tell it. But it works for Ms. Wierenga. Obviously a talented journalist, she can report the facts, Jack. I wasn't exactly pulled into the story the way I would've liked, and it was more of a reporting of facts than an actual story, but it was an interesting read, recounting one woman's experiences as an Army nurse during WWII. And how she was able to reconcile with her family and learn to have a heart for God. Recommended

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tia

    I received this AVR ebook through NetGalley from Litfuse Publication for an honest review. I am not being compensated for a good or bad review of this book. I loved the story in this book. It was exciting how the author took a story from the past and wove it to the present day. It was not only a war story, but a love story too. It was a true chick-lit book and was really excellent. I loved it and can't wait to read more books in this series and read more from this author! I received this AVR ebook through NetGalley from Litfuse Publication for an honest review. I am not being compensated for a good or bad review of this book. I loved the story in this book. It was exciting how the author took a story from the past and wove it to the present day. It was not only a war story, but a love story too. It was a true chick-lit book and was really excellent. I loved it and can't wait to read more books in this series and read more from this author!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    I enjoyed this book greatly. This new author has made a wonderful debut with this story. The story was heart-rending in places and hilarious in others. The author easily transitioned those scenes. I felt like I was in the car with Clara as she tells her story to her family. Great storytelling! A great debut, a great book. Loved it! 5 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    I have come to love every book in the Quilts Of Love series so much and this one is no exception! They each have something to learn about different eras and it always includes a quilt. I love it!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    In A Promise in Pieces by Emily T. Wierenga, Clara Kirkpatrick and her best friend, Eva, just finished nursing school during WWII. Clara’s father was a pacifist preacher. “Daddy didn’t know the truth about the war . . . he just stood at his pulpit and spouted about peace while men died to make it happen.” Clara and Eva ran away to enlist as nurses. Clara’s heart was broken many times over caring for soldiers in various states of health in the worst physical settings. On a particularly bad night, In A Promise in Pieces by Emily T. Wierenga, Clara Kirkpatrick and her best friend, Eva, just finished nursing school during WWII. Clara’s father was a pacifist preacher. “Daddy didn’t know the truth about the war . . . he just stood at his pulpit and spouted about peace while men died to make it happen.” Clara and Eva ran away to enlist as nurses. Clara’s heart was broken many times over caring for soldiers in various states of health in the worst physical settings. On a particularly bad night, she had a patient named Gareth who was dying but singing hymns. He had been a preacher, but he and his wife, Mattie, felt he should go fight to defend people against the evils of Hitler. Gareth’s faith and example rekindled Clara’s. Gareth asked her to take a letter to his wife as soon as she could after the war. Clara fulfilled Gareth’s wish and went to see Mattie and deliver Gareth’s letter. “Mattie’s home reached out like an old friend, with its shutters around the windows and its welcome mat and white lace at the windows.” Mattie wanted to talk extensively with the last person to see Gareth. The two became friends, and Mattie gave Clara a baby quilt she had made. Since Mattie’s own dream of having a family was now gone, the quilt was too painful to keep. After the war, Clara became a midwife. When she delivered a baby, she loaned the blanket to the new mother and then embroidered his or her name on the quilt along with a word of blessing. She didn’t think she’d ever marry: she had seen so much loss and devastation, she didn’t want to love someone only to lose them. But life took Clara and the quilt in surprising directions. She faced more than one tragedy and struggled with the search for significance. “I somehow missed the war, in a mournful, sadistic kind of way. I missed knowing I was needed. I missed fighting for something. I felt a little lost, not having a clear, defined purpose.” The story is told by Clara as a grandmother sharing the details with her grandson on a family trip. Some parts of it are shared as flashback chapters. Then the last third or so of the book catches up with the family in real time. and continues from there. Though sad in parts, the story shares Clara’s growth in faith and her finding her purpose. There are sweet and poignant moments throughout. But there were also a couple of odd places. In one passage she tells her children: “God is kind of like sugar. He dissolves inside our hearts. So he’s there, and he’s making us sweeter, so to speak, but he isn’t visible.” There was quiet as they ate, and I thought about the love of Oliver and these children and the friendship of Mattie and the dream of the women at the tables, and I thought, in fact, God is so very visible. We just have to have eyes to see him.” I think she’s just trying to make the point that God works on us invisibly, from the inside out. But I have trouble with the analogy of God “dissolving” in our hearts. In another place, she speaks of “How we are all God-in-flesh, born to die to ourselves, so others might be saved.” I think she’s just saying that God calls us to lay down our lives for others as He did. But even though He indwells believers, I wouldn’t call us “God-in-flesh” in the same way Jesus was. I tried to look the author up online, but links to her website, Facebook page, and Twitter accounts all led to error pages or “Page Removed” messages. I found a few articles of hers online but not enough to really know where she’s coming from. Her other books are nonfiction. This book is part of a “Quilts of Love” series, but from what I can tell, the books are individual stories unconnected to each other except with the quilting theme. Except for the couple of odd places I mentioned, this was a good story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Carlson

    This happens to be my first time reading A Quilts of Love novel, and won't be my last! Now I want to read them all! This book happens to be one of over twenty in this series of stand alone novels, and this is also author Emily T Wierenga's debut novel! Congratulations to her! I definitely plan on reading many more of her books in addition to the other authors in this series, too. I really enjoyed this author's writing style and her story telling because it felt 'real', as if I was right there in This happens to be my first time reading A Quilts of Love novel, and won't be my last! Now I want to read them all! This book happens to be one of over twenty in this series of stand alone novels, and this is also author Emily T Wierenga's debut novel! Congratulations to her! I definitely plan on reading many more of her books in addition to the other authors in this series, too. I really enjoyed this author's writing style and her story telling because it felt 'real', as if I was right there in the car listening to the story! This book covered so much in the 207 pages, but it never felt as if it was too much. Now that I am finished, I am finding myself thinking more about this book, still! I thought the story this book told was pretty amazing! It was a beautiful story for everything Clara, our main character, did! Even though her husband may be quiet, Clara's growing up life was not quiet to begin with at all. This book starts out in the year 2000 with Clara and her entire family going on a trip to Louisiana for a very important mission. She had a quilt to deliver to the National World War II Museum to be accepted as an artifact. This quilt helped to deliver many babies into this world and to comfort many women who lost husbands or sons/grandsons from the war. For all of the lives this quilt touched, their names were all hand stitched onto this quilt, so there is a lot of history on/in it. It was never intended to be, it just happened to turn out this way. In the beginning of this trip, Clara's grandson, Noah, was playing a game on one of those electrical devices, a Nintendo, and when he handed it to her to try to play it, it wrenched her heart to see he was playing a game in which you shot and killed other people. If only these young kids had known life/war was not a game but a true loss of life affecting so many people. This gave Clara the idea to ask her family if they would like to hear her life story on this trip. She asked if any of them were interested, and they were! (Even the Nintendo game disappeared!) This is where the book starts to flip-flop back and forth between the present and the years of WWII. On page 57, Clara tells her grandson, "If it weren't for Mattie, I would never have found my way to your father nor to each of you. So in a way, this trip is about commemorating the gift of friendship. The gift of family. The gifts of faith. And it all started with a quilt." It is in the second chapter the story that starts to tell us how Clara's life begins. We go back to the year 1943. We learn Clara was named after Clara Barton, the founder of the National Red Cross, also her Grandmother! Clara had the same drive and ambitions as her grandmother had, and every different part of her life was devoted to God's plan he had for her to follow from the beginning of her life well into her 80's, and just shortly after the loss of her husband. God was once again at work inside of Clara, and she knew it! Clara starts telling us the story of her life when she and her only friend at the time, Eva, go to the Red Cross Recruiting Center and signed up with the Army Nurse Corps. This was BIG and wrong according to Clara's parents, but right for Clara to do. Clara had many hurdles to get through in life, starting in her childhood. One of her very first was her bible thumping preacher father who seemed to use the bible the way he wanted to as it pertained to him and his circumstances no matter who it seemed to hurt, and it hurt Clara the most as she had to listen to him twist it to serve his wants and needs. Her mother was not one to stand up to her father, either. She was not allowed to play with other kids her own age either, but as long as her life revolved around the church, then it was okay. This was not okay, and Clara missed out on a lot of childhood because of it. Not only that, but her father was completely against the war and thought we should just turn the other cheek! What? How anyone could be against that war is beyond me! He not only preached it but lived what he preached. It was during this time that Clara had lost her faith in God because of her father. She was not even allowed to read any other book besides the bible. As we read this book, we learn she finds her faith again, but it took quite a lot to get it back. Clara was so afraid of telling her parents what she did, she waited until the night before she was to leave to go the next morning, yet she lies and tells them she has a week yet before she really has to leave. Lying to them was the only way she was going to be able to go. Later that night Eva threw a stone which hit her window, and out of it down she climbed to go start her life. Now they were on a ship on their way to Normandy, France where they ended up nursing 'all' of the good troops injuries the Germans inflicted upon them. Clara made many friends along her time in Normandy, France, and many of them lifelong friends, especially Mettie. There is so much more to learn from and about Clara's during her time in France during the war, but that is left for you to read and enjoy! It wasn't until later after she returned home that she met a man named Oliver who was smitten over her. The problem was she had decided marriage was not in her future. See how the plans God has for us can change despite what 'we' want for ourselves! That was enjoyable! A little shocking because I truly believed her! Another quote from the book: "Oliver was a very quiet man who loved the Lord (and his wife and family) with a LOUD kind of love." That was the perfect description of Oliver. To read of their awkward yet amusing courtship was very amusing! This is one book I HIGHLY recommend anyone read. It touched my heart and is a book you will not soon forget. This book is very full of faith (it must be especially when you are sitting in the center of a world war! If that does not test your faith, I don't know what will?!), quiet love, shows us the how God uses us for His plans and not ours, and great family. I just want to add a personal note. I was lucky enough to have both sets of my grandparents alive well into my early 20's! I was extremely grateful! I heard so many WWII stories from all of them. Being an avid family tree maker and scrapbooker, I sucked in every story they ever told me about WWII, and I asked a lot of questions, too. They also taught me a lot about the Depression prior to the war, too (although that is 'not' in this book.) I also have scrapbooks I made that have the war ration books in them. I could SO relate to one of the characters in this book because one of my own grandmothers did what one of the characters in this book did! They did not use all their ration stamps and getting so low without food in the house that she would get left with ONE packet of sugar, too! I had a good laugh when I read that! She never would use all the stamps up each month, either, which drove my own mother and her two brothers crazy! They were hungry! I can honestly say what this author writes IS true and does follow true to history of what I was told from word of mouth by the people who lived through that time. This book will always hold a dear spot in my heart because I felt like my grandparents were back with me, even if for a little while! Thank you, Emily T Wierenga! I received this book for FREE from Abingdon Press and LitFuse Publicity in exchange to read and write a review about it. It is NOT required for this review to be either positive or negative, but of my own honest opinion. "Free" means I was provided with ZERO MONIES to read this book nor to write this review, but to enjoy the pure pleasure of reading it. I am disclosing this information in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255, http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/wa... Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amy Haas

    So this is a book that is definitely not something I would normally read, however it was a good read. I wouldn't say it was excellent but definitely inspiring. Its labeled a Christian Fiction book which I have read one other of this genre before and loved it. I love the religious aspect brought into a book and how God leads you to your next major life evemt, even if it's something bad, the reasoning behind it will be that there will be light on the other side and you realize that you went throug So this is a book that is definitely not something I would normally read, however it was a good read. I wouldn't say it was excellent but definitely inspiring. Its labeled a Christian Fiction book which I have read one other of this genre before and loved it. I love the religious aspect brought into a book and how God leads you to your next major life evemt, even if it's something bad, the reasoning behind it will be that there will be light on the other side and you realize that you went through a hard time for a reason. I didn't really associate myself with the character very much but definitely could see the reason she did the things that she did. Makes me wonder if the author ever thought the way she wrote her characters to think.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tomi Alger

    Clara serves in World War II as a nurse in France. She returns to the US and finds the widow of a soldier she had treated. Mattie, the widow, gives her a baby quilt, which Clara uses as she now works as a midwife and embroiders the names of the babies on the quilt. The book actually covers all of Clara's life. The story is good, though some seems a bit unrealistic. The book is part of a series of books with quilt connections. Clara serves in World War II as a nurse in France. She returns to the US and finds the widow of a soldier she had treated. Mattie, the widow, gives her a baby quilt, which Clara uses as she now works as a midwife and embroiders the names of the babies on the quilt. The book actually covers all of Clara's life. The story is good, though some seems a bit unrealistic. The book is part of a series of books with quilt connections.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Charline Romine

    What? I found that this story presented a lot of Scriptural truth but it was so depressing. There were several events that were funny and touching but overall not too uplifting. Maybe it is just me and I didn’t receive it well. The ending could be a lot better.

  21. 4 out of 5

    JanetW

    as with all of the books in this series ... i continue to enjoy them ... i also either learn some thing new or it reminds me of solid Christ-like values that get forgotten in the busy-ness of life.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Sawyers

    A sweet fun read. Great for anyone in nursing or healthcare field in general.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susie

    Enjoyed this book of the series too. It spans the life of one woman and the life lessons she has learned. (Most of the time when she was not expecting a lesson). Great book of faith and love.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne Tate

    Fantastic This is a really lovely book, looking at World War II from a different perspective. Lots of really sad moments. Forgiveness is essential for living a happy life.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Darinda

    The 17th book in the Quilts of Love series. Christian fiction. Historical fiction. Sweet story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen E.

    Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Quilts of Love series ~ A Promise in Pieces by Emily T. Wierenga, © 2014 Quilts tell stories of love and loss, hope and faith, tradition and new beginnings. The Quilts of Love series focuses on the women who quilted all of these things into their family history. Featuring contemporary and historical romances as well as women's fiction and the occasional light mystery, you will be drawn into the endearing characters of this series and be touched by their stories. A baby qui Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Quilts of Love series ~ A Promise in Pieces by Emily T. Wierenga, © 2014 Quilts tell stories of love and loss, hope and faith, tradition and new beginnings. The Quilts of Love series focuses on the women who quilted all of these things into their family history. Featuring contemporary and historical romances as well as women's fiction and the occasional light mystery, you will be drawn into the endearing characters of this series and be touched by their stories. A baby quilt touches many hearts as it travels from family-to-family and through generations. After the end of World War II, Clara Kirkpatrick returns from the Women’s Army Corp to deliver a dying soldier’s last wishes: convey his love to his young widow, Mattie, with apologies for the missed life they had planned to share. Struggling with her own post-war trauma, Clara thinks she’s not prepared to handle the grief of this broken family. Yet upon meeting Mattie, and receiving a baby quilt that will never cuddle the soldier’s baby, Clara vows to honor the sacrifices that family made. Now a labor and delivery nurse in her rural hometown, Clara wraps each new babe in the gifted quilt and later stitches the child’s name into the cloth. As each new child is welcomed by the quilt, Clara begins to wonder whatever happened to Mattie—and if her own life would ever experience the love of a newborn. Little does she know that she will have the opportunity to re-gift the special quilt—years later and carrying even greater significance than when it was first bestowed. A Promise in Pieces is a beautiful story of hope and love. 2000. Spring*summer*autumn*winter ~*~ the four seasons of our lives. Will I ever look at them the same? Looking back, I wonder sometimes, as I watch the young life of my family around me. My memory takes me away at times. To those days long ago, hearing the gunshots ring out, and the groans around me. Especially one young man, Gareth. I told him I would take a message back to his wife, Mattie. Mattie. I think of her now. Mattie, dear Mattie. I think of all the children, newborns, I have wrapped in the quilt she gave me ~ the baby quilt of hope. It was 1943. My friend, Eva, and I signed up for the Army Nurse Corps. The night before we had listened to a father talk about his son and not getting letters from him anymore. My father said I was named after Clara Barton, the nurse who began the American Red Cross. I am Clara Anne ~ so, of course, I would want to serve others with my nursing degree. But... I left home without my parents' approval or blessings. We were shipped overseas. Shipped is the right word! I experienced being seasick, and what homesickness was too. ... we were protected by the Geneva Cross on our uniforms––the red Greek cross on a white background declaring all nurses neutral. --A Promise in Pieces, 33 1945 France. Amazing grace, how sweet the sound... Gareth was singing while semiconscious on the tent floor mattress. As he lay dying, he dictated a letter to his Mattie. As I wrote it down for him, he had me promise I would hand deliver it to her in New Orleans. That night I began believing in God again. Excerpt from page 46: On our days off, Martha and I biked the curved roads of France. We became friends shortly after Gareth died, and with Eva gone, too, I was sore alone. So we biked, come spring, as the war raged on. We biked on our days off to villages around Normandy, and we played with the children we found, spent time with women whose houses had been bombed, and bought crusty loaves of French bread to hand out and cheese and meat, and it felt good to be giving in this way. To be outside, in the country side of rolling green, and to remember life beyond war. Such an exceptional story told in first person. Clara shares memories she had lived vividly to her grandson, Noah. Do you know the stories of those who are very important to you? Clara's journey brings her home to make amends with her parents, move on to her own beginnings at Mrs. Bailey's room and board, and patient Oliver. I thoroughly enjoyed the writings of Emily Wierenga, in a gentle telling of Clara's life and those around her. Clara touched many other lives beyond what she might have intended, just by being herself, doing what she knew to do. ***Thank you to Litfuse Publicity Group for inviting me to be part of the book tour for A Promise in Pieces by Emily T. Wierenga and to Abingdon Press for sending me a copy to review. This review was written in my own words. No other compensation was received.***

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nora St Laurent

    I’m thankful for the review copy I received from the book club Network www.bookfun.org . I’m grateful for the opportunity to read a powerful and moving novel giving me a glimpse into how war affects every aspect of life. It changes people who fight in battle and those left behind who are praying and waiting for their loved ones to return. I liked how the author wrote this novel in first person thru the eyes of Clara Wilson. This novel kicks off on December 7th, right after Japan bombed Pearl Harb I’m thankful for the review copy I received from the book club Network www.bookfun.org . I’m grateful for the opportunity to read a powerful and moving novel giving me a glimpse into how war affects every aspect of life. It changes people who fight in battle and those left behind who are praying and waiting for their loved ones to return. I liked how the author wrote this novel in first person thru the eyes of Clara Wilson. This novel kicks off on December 7th, right after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. The novel talks about a brave women named, Clara Barton; she’s the one who founded the American Red Cross. Clara Wilson wanted to be like Clara Barton. So she studied really hard at being a nurse. Clara tells a friend, “Jimmy Stewart put his career on hold to enlist, so I decided I would too, as I signed the forms saying I now belonged to the army nurse Corps. “Free a man to fight.” The poster said, “Clara saw how, “the roles were all scattered and reversed, and woman were raising families and fixing machinery and delivering mail, driving trucks and no one was sleeping. The whole country was just kind of stumbling around in the mad state of insomnia. Roosevelt was on the radio, saying “I regret to tell you that many American lives have been lost,” hearing that was enough to keep us awake and fighting in our own humble ways. Even if it meant just fighting at home so the men could go abroad, but Eva and I would join the ranks of women who’d already signed up to care for the wounded, the ranks let so many years ago by Clara Barton.” Eva and Clara were next door neighbors friends since childhood. They ran off without their families’ blessings to help were they could. They weren’t prepared for what they went thru in boot camp marching in battle wear, building up their strength so they could assist the wounded. Things got real bloody and frantic after the battle of the bulge happened. Clara thinks, “We were all too busy trying to keep near-dead a live; we had no time to think about ourselves…”And where was God?... I begged my fingers to minister as they washed and wrapped gauze, and I smiled if any of the soldiers looked at my face, but night and day and hours wore on, and men died because we couldn’t reach them fast enough. Because no matter how bright the light inside you, if everything around you is oppressively dark, it begins to leak into your eyes and eventually you either die or find a miracle…and I found a miracle…That’s when I met Gareth.” Clara hand wrote a letter Gareth dictated. He requested she hand deliver it to his wife Mattie. Clara makes good on her promise after the war ends. Mattie was grateful Clara gave her the note and explained how Gareth died. Mattie sends Clara home with a quilt she made for her future children. Clara didn’t want to accept it but Mattie insists. There was a demand for midwives after the war. There was a baby boom so Clara decided to write the names of the babies she delivers on the quilt. Later Mattie got the idea for them to make quilts and put the names of men who died in battle on them. They would ask women to send pieces of clothing and other items about their children to add to the quilt. There was a great response, to these quilts. There was a need. They even got written up in Life Magazine and went on to develop and organize a corporation called Forever Family. These became known as healing quilts. People wanted to donate their time, material and money to create these memory quilts. I later discovered that women really did this. I loved reading how this organization started and how lives were deeply touched and healed by making and receiving these amazing quilts. This is a powerful and memorable story that will surprise you and warm your heart. You won’t look at quilts the same way. It’s a keeper. Disclosure of Material Connection: #AD Sponsored by publisher. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” Nora St Laurent TBCN Where Book Fun Begins! www.bookfun.org The Book Club Network Blog www.psalm516.blogspot.com Book Fun Magazine www.bookfunmagazine.com

  28. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    Two women's lives cross when one is a nurse to a dying man and promises him to deliver a letter to his young wife. Two women's lives cross when one is a nurse to a dying man and promises him to deliver a letter to his young wife.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen (Kat) Smith

    Often times we look back on our life by the time we are old and wonder if anything we have done has meant anything. Has our life created a legacy that shows where we have walked and left footprints on the hearts of those around us? Clara Kirkpatrick has always wondered if God was calling her to something more, something greater. She found it on the cusp of World War II when she ran away from home to become a nurse. Her parents didn't want her to go, and she lied to them about signing up. But in Often times we look back on our life by the time we are old and wonder if anything we have done has meant anything. Has our life created a legacy that shows where we have walked and left footprints on the hearts of those around us? Clara Kirkpatrick has always wondered if God was calling her to something more, something greater. She found it on the cusp of World War II when she ran away from home to become a nurse. Her parents didn't want her to go, and she lied to them about signing up. But in her heart, she felt God was pulling her in that direction. To give something more of herself than simply growing up as a preacher's daughter. She never dreamed she would break their hearts. Yet she found her true calling. Something that would connect her life forever through the threads she would weave in the lives of the people she touched. That was the day she met Gareth, a wounded man she met as a nurse who showed her how you could combine a love for God and still serve in the war. Knowing there was little more she could do for him, than offer to hold his hand, since his injuries were life threatening and being without pain meds, she offered comfort in his final moments. His last request was a letter to his wife, and a promise that Clara would deliver his final declarations of love in person to Mattie. It was a promise she would keep. It was one of the most difficult times in her life when the war was finally over, giving that letter to Mattie in person. She could understand it if she would refuse to talk to her, but Mattie had a true heart after God. After reading the letter, Mattie gave her a quilt she had made hoping that one day her and Gareth might begin a family. Now that he was dead, she knew in her heart she could never marry and with that the promise of children with Gareth would never be fulfilled. Since Clara was a nurse she asked Mattie if she might stitch the names of the children who had been lost in the war or as a result of childbirth into the quilt to remember them and to also pray for those children who would now grow up without a father. It would be Clara's legacy and promise that she too, would never marry for fear that death would rob her of love. But God had other plans in store for Clara, one that would take her life farther than she would ever dream and create something that began with a promise and restore all those broken pieces in her life to something of beauty to be passed on to her family. This is Clara's story and one that will impact your life as well as it did hers . I received A Promise in Pieces by Emily T. Wierenga compliments of Abingdon Press and Christian Fiction Blog Alliance for my honest review. I did not receive any monetary compensation for a favorable review and the opinions are strictly my own. This was such a beautiful story of a servant's life, Clara's life and how God can use the broken places in our own lives to restore us and create something true beautiful with them. We will be able to look back and see how God took those messes in our life and we make marks by moving forward in those dark times. We might not see it until we turn around and look back, but it's there. For those that love WWII as your backdrop coupled with a beautiful story of love and redemption than this is the perfect book for you. As an addition to the Quilts of Love series, this book doesn't have to be read in order but as a stand alone, but trust me, if you love quilts and the stories they hold, you'll want to pick up all of them.I easily give this one a 5 out of 5 stars. It has found a permanent place in my bookshelf with the rest!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    A Promise in Pieces by is a fantastic addition to the Quilts of Love series, the first published book by Emily Wierenga. Her beautiful, descriptive prose is amazing; the feelings and actions of Clara, the main character, are reflected with a unique and gifted voice. The people that she meets as a young woman are not by chance; they are ordained by a loving God – each piece designed by His gracious hand in a quilt-life all of her own. The book opens with Clara, now a grandmother, travelling to New A Promise in Pieces by is a fantastic addition to the Quilts of Love series, the first published book by Emily Wierenga. Her beautiful, descriptive prose is amazing; the feelings and actions of Clara, the main character, are reflected with a unique and gifted voice. The people that she meets as a young woman are not by chance; they are ordained by a loving God – each piece designed by His gracious hand in a quilt-life all of her own. The book opens with Clara, now a grandmother, travelling to New Orleans with her husband, children, and grandchildren to deliver a quilt that is tucked into the back of the van she rides in. Her grandson, Noah, is eager to hear more about her life and she reminisces with startling clarity about her childhood, what led her to her calling and how it changed the direction and quality not only of her life, but the lives of countless others. Clara became a nurse as her namesake, Clara Barton, had been, and she served with the Women’s Army Corp in Europe during WWII. Gareth, one of the young men she cared for during his final hours only need was for her to write a letter to his wife back home, and to deliver that letter one day to her when she returned to the States. Clara did go to meet Mattie, his widow, after the war ended and she returned from. Clara gave Mattie the gift of Gareth’s final words of love and received something that would change the course of her life – a lovingly designed quilt. The quilt would have been for the child that Mattie and Gareth had planned to have when the war was over. How will Clara, who didn’t plan to ever marry, use this quilt over the next fifty years to help countless others? How did this bring Clara and Mattie together? Clara’s struggles are no different than ours – what to do when one’s faith is gone? How to recover from deep wounds that brought self-doubt and self-condemnation? What to do with the rest of one’s life? How to trade in guilt and the insatiable need to earn grace for the free gift of God’s love and salvation? Keep tissues on hand as you experience Clara’s life and see through her eyes the value of faith, family, and ministry. This novel can be entertaining as well as share deeper spiritual values that can resonate in one’s heart long after discovering A Promise in Pieces. Favorite Quotes: “And funny how just as you begin to settle, you’re made aware of someone’s needs. And you’re kept always alive, serving each other.” “… so well, in fact that we were lacking nothing, and this, I felt indicated a problem. Because we had no reason to need God anymore.” “I hope you can know how it feels to be free, you know, of everything except happiness. To know while nothing makes sense and everything is in upheaval, you are exactly in the center of God’s will.” “She kept walking as though praying with her feet…” This outstanding book can be enjoyed by young adults as well as adults of any age who enjoy the Quilts of Love series, quilting, or quality Christian fiction. I received a copy of this book through the “For Readers Only” group at The Book Club Network, in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own, and no monetary compensation was received for this review.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.