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Edmund Spenser's Poetry

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To facilitate discussion of the place of the body and of pastoral elements in Spenser's epic, the Third Edition includes more of The Faerie Queene: from Book II, canto ix (the House of Alma), and from Book VI, the remainder of canto x and all of cantos xi-xii. The Shepheardes Calender is represented by six eclogues, including the much-discussed "Februarie." Colin Clouts Co To facilitate discussion of the place of the body and of pastoral elements in Spenser's epic, the Third Edition includes more of The Faerie Queene: from Book II, canto ix (the House of Alma), and from Book VI, the remainder of canto x and all of cantos xi-xii. The Shepheardes Calender is represented by six eclogues, including the much-discussed "Februarie." Colin Clouts Come Home Againe, increasingly a focus of critical attention, is an important addition, and Amoretti is offered in its entirety. Seventeen critical essays, judiciously chosen from the many published since 1982, have been added to supplement eleven earlier commentaries. New to the Third Edition are the perspectives of Spenser's contemporary William Camden, Virginia Woolf, William Nelson, A. Bartlett Giamatti, Donald Cheney, Judith Anderson, Richard Helgerson, Louis Adrian Montrose, and David Lee Miller. The critical essays on the House of Busyrane, Spenser's pastoral, Muiopotmos, and Amoretti are grouped to "speak" to each other in ways sure to stimulate classroom discussion. This class-tested feature is back by popular demand along with essays by D. C. Allen, Robert A. Brinkley, Ronald P. Bond, Anne Lake Prescott, Andrew D. Weiner, Susanne Lindgren Wofford, Harry Berger, Jr., and Paul Alpers. A Chronology of Spenser's life and an extensive Bibliography are also included.


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To facilitate discussion of the place of the body and of pastoral elements in Spenser's epic, the Third Edition includes more of The Faerie Queene: from Book II, canto ix (the House of Alma), and from Book VI, the remainder of canto x and all of cantos xi-xii. The Shepheardes Calender is represented by six eclogues, including the much-discussed "Februarie." Colin Clouts Co To facilitate discussion of the place of the body and of pastoral elements in Spenser's epic, the Third Edition includes more of The Faerie Queene: from Book II, canto ix (the House of Alma), and from Book VI, the remainder of canto x and all of cantos xi-xii. The Shepheardes Calender is represented by six eclogues, including the much-discussed "Februarie." Colin Clouts Come Home Againe, increasingly a focus of critical attention, is an important addition, and Amoretti is offered in its entirety. Seventeen critical essays, judiciously chosen from the many published since 1982, have been added to supplement eleven earlier commentaries. New to the Third Edition are the perspectives of Spenser's contemporary William Camden, Virginia Woolf, William Nelson, A. Bartlett Giamatti, Donald Cheney, Judith Anderson, Richard Helgerson, Louis Adrian Montrose, and David Lee Miller. The critical essays on the House of Busyrane, Spenser's pastoral, Muiopotmos, and Amoretti are grouped to "speak" to each other in ways sure to stimulate classroom discussion. This class-tested feature is back by popular demand along with essays by D. C. Allen, Robert A. Brinkley, Ronald P. Bond, Anne Lake Prescott, Andrew D. Weiner, Susanne Lindgren Wofford, Harry Berger, Jr., and Paul Alpers. A Chronology of Spenser's life and an extensive Bibliography are also included.

30 review for Edmund Spenser's Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eliza

    ...Read for class & not a fan.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Man oh man, what a funky doos affair this is. Put a knight, a maiden, and some strange symbolic creatures together; then, smoke some sweet sweet chiba, and this is what you'd probably end up with; of course, it'd end up being all metered and epic and then you'd have to go around saying, "oh yes, I wrote that little piece--you might have read it--called the Faerie Queen!" Booyaa! Man oh man, what a funky doos affair this is. Put a knight, a maiden, and some strange symbolic creatures together; then, smoke some sweet sweet chiba, and this is what you'd probably end up with; of course, it'd end up being all metered and epic and then you'd have to go around saying, "oh yes, I wrote that little piece--you might have read it--called the Faerie Queen!" Booyaa!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I thoroughly enjoy the poetry I've read of Edmund Spenser. He writes about the tragedies of life without disregarding the reality that there is hope. A life is made up of both the good and the bad. Spenser seems to have artfully mastered and I enjoy it! I thoroughly enjoy the poetry I've read of Edmund Spenser. He writes about the tragedies of life without disregarding the reality that there is hope. A life is made up of both the good and the bad. Spenser seems to have artfully mastered and I enjoy it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    The beauty of allegorical epics! Norton edition has very useful essays, notes and critical essays.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    A really useful tool. The critical essays are great and include some from the very best Spenser scholars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is an excellent and very serviceable academic edition. I used it as an undergraduate and still turn to it from time to time.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dinah

    This book is very beatifull.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    *Only read the sonnets/ cantos required for class*

  9. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Edmund Spenser resides in an area of poetry few readers venture to: Less than a generation before Shakespeare, yet not far from the inventors of English poetry as we know it (Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard and Philip Sidney). The English language and English verse were undergoing revolutionary change and essentially re-establishing their footing since Chaucer’s time. In the century around Spenser, everything from vowel pronunciation to spelling to meaning to versification was upturned. In the middle Edmund Spenser resides in an area of poetry few readers venture to: Less than a generation before Shakespeare, yet not far from the inventors of English poetry as we know it (Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard and Philip Sidney). The English language and English verse were undergoing revolutionary change and essentially re-establishing their footing since Chaucer’s time. In the century around Spenser, everything from vowel pronunciation to spelling to meaning to versification was upturned. In the middle of all this sits Spenser. Not modern, but not quite medieval. A close contemporary of Shakespeare, yet an age apart. A revolutionary, yet old fashioned even by Shakespeare’s day. Few today people read The Fairie Queene, The Shepheardes Calendar or the Fowre Hymnes to find some kind of understanding of the world around them or learn something about the contemporary human condition. Because Spenser’s world was fundamentally a different place. Perhaps if Spenser would have lived and wrote in the bustling city of London, he would have sensed the nation and the people that the English were rapidly becoming. Perhaps Spenser was the poet Shakespeare wanted to be, but Will was forced upon the stage to write popular dramas for the London masses. It's always hard to say how things work out. You can see my thoughts on The Faerie Queen here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show.... Overall, it’s different and better than I suspected. But not required reading. The rest of his poems are nice. If one is interested, it’s fascinating to see the development of the English language and verse. Epithalamion is his best and justifiably his most famous single poem. So Spenser’s not for everyone. I recommend him for lovers of poetry, English renaissance students, and writers of verse. This Norton Critical Edition does a good job bringing together the best of his work and providing valuable background and glosses.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    Read this for English class; it was really hard to get myself to care about this book, especially because of its difficulty to read/understand what I was reading. Yet, I really did like his style of writing, and how everything read like a fairytale almost. Britomart was probably my favorite character out of the lot, which is probably what's intended because of her being the emblem for chastity and the hero of Book 3. There;s a crazy amount of different plots and characters mashed into it though, Read this for English class; it was really hard to get myself to care about this book, especially because of its difficulty to read/understand what I was reading. Yet, I really did like his style of writing, and how everything read like a fairytale almost. Britomart was probably my favorite character out of the lot, which is probably what's intended because of her being the emblem for chastity and the hero of Book 3. There;s a crazy amount of different plots and characters mashed into it though, that it gets very confusing who is who and who did what. It's a shame he never got to finish the whole Faerie Queene, because I would have liked to know how it finished. Overall okay read!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Keleigh

    I heart Britomart.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    another classic, read it for class

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Allen

    I will never be finished with this one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    James

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luke Hollis

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ankara

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leo Gonzalez

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Tysinger

  19. 5 out of 5

    DribblingMacabre

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cody

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Russell

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alvaro Hidalgo Rodriguez

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eliana Marrocchella

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rackhale

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Carlson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex O'Brien

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bhakti Jethwa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lee Matthey

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