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An innovative, beautifully written analysis of Mary Shelley's life and works which draws on unpublished archival material as well as Frankenstein and examines her relationship with her husband and other key personalities. An innovative, beautifully written analysis of Mary Shelley's life and works which draws on unpublished archival material as well as Frankenstein and examines her relationship with her husband and other key personalities.


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An innovative, beautifully written analysis of Mary Shelley's life and works which draws on unpublished archival material as well as Frankenstein and examines her relationship with her husband and other key personalities. An innovative, beautifully written analysis of Mary Shelley's life and works which draws on unpublished archival material as well as Frankenstein and examines her relationship with her husband and other key personalities.

56 review for Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    Hell of a story although there are way too many Marys and Janes and Williams. They were brain-rich but name-poor in those days. 1787 – Mary Wollstonecraft, a well-educated 28 year old woman with no money and no husband, sick & tired of bad gigs as a governess, decides to become a writer. She gets some run of the mill stuff published but she is plotting something big which arrives five years later. 1792 – The first major feminist statement ever, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Yes, it raised Hell of a story although there are way too many Marys and Janes and Williams. They were brain-rich but name-poor in those days. 1787 – Mary Wollstonecraft, a well-educated 28 year old woman with no money and no husband, sick & tired of bad gigs as a governess, decides to become a writer. She gets some run of the mill stuff published but she is plotting something big which arrives five years later. 1792 – The first major feminist statement ever, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Yes, it raised eyebrows but it was a terrific success. In December MW decides to travel to Paris because there’s an exciting revolution going on there. She arrives about a month before they guillotine King Louis. The guillotine was invented to make execution more humane, but it may have been useless trying to tell that to Louis. Mary thought the revolution was going to be where women finally got to be equal! She was disillusioned when it turned out all the revolutionaries had no time for her way too revolutionary thoughts. Also, she hung around with the wrong type of revolutionary. She was very surprised when they started to be guillotined too. Meanwhile over in Sussex, a boy is born to a filthy rich family. His name is Percy Shelley. 1793 - William Godwin, aged 37, atheist ex-minister, full time writer, publishes the sexy sounding Enquiry Concerning Political Justice. Honestly, the marketing departments of publishers in the 1790s were pretty slack. I don’t think they put enough importance on book titles. It should have been called Smash The State! because it was about anarchism. But it was still a big success, so what do I know. Over in Paris, MW meets an American called Gilbert Imlay, who was a shady character, described as an “adventurer” (these days that means you make documentaries in the Amazon jungle or run marathons in Antarctica but in those days it meant you swindled rich guys and shagged their wives). Anyway, she loved this guy. 1794 – MW gives birth to her first daughter, Fanny Imlay. Gilbert hangs around a bit but doesn’t like this domestic turn of events so he is off to London. Meanwhile, WG, his pen on fire, published a great novel called Things as they Are, or, the Adventures of Caleb Williams. I have read this and it is RECOMMENDED. It was a big success, because it was EXCITING, and still is. 1795 – MW follows Gilbert back to London but finds he has other female entanglements and so in despair (you know, her situation was not good) she tries suicide by laudanum, but Gilbert rescues her from the lanky arms of Death. That was in April, but in October things hadn’t improved and she made suicide attempt No 2 by jumping off Putney Bridge. This time she is saved by passing strangers. Just think – no passing strangers, NO FRANKENSTEIN. 1796 – MW re-meets WG and this time they click. 1797 – they get married in March. This was somewhat like Karl Marx getting married to Germaine Greer, it was a marriage made in atheistic radical socialistic anarchist heaven. But it is not to last because in September MW gives birth to her second daughter and dies 12 days later. The daughter’s name is Mary. WG immediately begins a biography of MW – Memoirs of the Author of the Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Another great title. Because he believes in total honesty and cutting through the bullshit pretensions of bourgeois morality, he includes details of MW’s affairs & suicide attempts & fearlessly states they had sex before marriage. 1798 – Publication of Memoirs - it turns out everybody in the world is OUTRAGED by WG’s bean-spilling. The reviewers say things like : blushes would suffuse the cheeks of most husbands if they were FORCED to relate those anecdotes of their wives which Mr Godwin voluntarily proclaims to the world And it has the terrible effect of burying MW’s feminism for many decades. She is now associated with immorality in the mind of the public, and therefore anything she said about the rights of women is ignored with a shudder. 1801 – WG marries again, so Mary has a stepmother, but she is not evil, only irritating. 1810 – Percy Shelley publishes a novel – he’s 17 at the time. 1811 – Percy Shelley publishes The Necessity of Atheism, aged 18. This gets him chucked out of Oxford University. Just after he turns 19, he elopes with one of his sister’s friends, who was 16 years old, and was named Harriet. This was to rescue her from an abusive home situation. I don’t know why she was not called Mary. Then Shelley found out that WG was still alive. WG was his political idol. So this was like when the young white blues fans in the late 50s realised that guys like Son House and John Hurt were still alive, having assumed they were long dead. Shelley now HAD to meet WG!! 1812 – Mary finally meets her father’s rich 20 year old superfan. She is 15. 1814 – After a year of living in Scotland, Mary is back in London & re-meets Shelley. This time they fall in love and decide to elope (he likes to elope). Yes, he’s married and his wife is pregnant, but YOLO. They take Mary’s step sister Jane (now calling herself Clair) with them. That might have been a mistake. It turned out that Shelley was into free love, so you know where this story is going. They went to France & Switzerland and came back when the money ran out just like students do now. Because Shelley’s rich rich parents had cut him off without a penny after he wrote about the necessity of atheism and repeatedly eloped with teenage girls. Meanwhile Percy’s abandoned wife Harriett gives birth to a son who managed to live until the age of 12. Some feat in those days. Meanwhile meanwhile, by the year end, Shelley is sleeping with both the women he’s living with. Also around this time, he encourages a friend of his (called Hogg) to join the menage. In another age Shelley would have been a cult leader. Two girls for every boy, as the song says. But also, credit where it’s due, under Shelley’s leadership, two boys for every girl. 1815 – Mary gives birth to a daughter who dies after 13 days. 1816 – Mary gives birth to a son named Will. Claire (the cohabiting stepsister) manages to latch on to Lord Byron (he wasn’t that enamoured). All 4 of them go on their holibobs to Geneva. They have a spooky night and dare each other to write a spooky story. Mary is the only one who takes it seriously and she writes Frankenstein . She is 18. In September they all come back to London. In October Fanny Imlay, Mary’s other sister, commits suicide by laudanum for reasons unknown. In December, Harriett, Percy’s wife, commits suicide by drowning in the Serpentine. This was for reasons too predictable to repeat here. But look on the bright side, Mary can now marry Percy, which she does 20 days after Harriet’s suicide. 1817 – Mary gives birth to Clara, third child 1818 – During a journey across Italy, Clara dies 1819 – Mary’s son Will dies. So now all three of her children are dead. 1822 -On 8 July , less than a month before his thirtieth birthday, Shelley drowns in a sudden storm in a boat on the Gulf of Spezia The day after the news of his death reached England, the Tory newspaper The Courier printed: Shelley, the writer of some infidel poetry, has been drowned; now he knows whether there is God or no. The rest of her life was not quite so crazy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I love the book Frankenstein so wanted to read more about the author and to learn what led her to write such a fascinating book. Unfortunately, I ended up skimming or skipping much of Mellor's book because she focused on feminism, incest, immorality, etc, but I did learn 2 interesting things: 1) 200 years ago, when Mary Shelley wrote about putting together a man out of body parts gathered from animals and cemeteries, then giving him the "spark of life", there were actually many scientists attempt I love the book Frankenstein so wanted to read more about the author and to learn what led her to write such a fascinating book. Unfortunately, I ended up skimming or skipping much of Mellor's book because she focused on feminism, incest, immorality, etc, but I did learn 2 interesting things: 1) 200 years ago, when Mary Shelley wrote about putting together a man out of body parts gathered from animals and cemeteries, then giving him the "spark of life", there were actually many scientists attempting to bring dead things to life. Some scientists attached electric wires to dead creatures and could get the bodies to sit up, open an eye, even clench a fist. Creepy, but amazing! 2) Mary Shelley is showing that if someone (i.e. Victor) goes about creating offspring without both a father and a mother, the child would not turn out emotionally healthy and could even turn out to be a monster. I found this argument VERY interesting given the big conflict in California over same-sex marriage. Children deserve both a father and a mother, and the book Frankenstein is just one more proof of the importance to society of bringing children to the world in the "traditional" way! Yes on prop 8! Yes on traditional marriage!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Addison

    This is going to be rather scattershot, since there are several quite distinct issues this book raised for me. 1. The problem with Mellor's literary analysis is that she does not distinguish shades and degrees of meaning with any degree of sophistication or subtlety. Here, the most egregious example (discussing Frankenstein): Victor most ardently desires his bride when he knows she is dead. The conflation with his earlier dream, when he thought to embrace the living Elizabeth but instead held in h This is going to be rather scattershot, since there are several quite distinct issues this book raised for me. 1. The problem with Mellor's literary analysis is that she does not distinguish shades and degrees of meaning with any degree of sophistication or subtlety. Here, the most egregious example (discussing Frankenstein): Victor most ardently desires his bride when he knows she is dead. The conflation with his earlier dream, when he thought to embrace the living Elizabeth but instead held in his arms the corpse of his mother, signals Victor's most profound erotic desire, a necrophiliac and incestuous desire to possess the dead female, the lost mother.           To put this point another way, we might observe that Victor Frankenstein's most passionate relationships are with men rather than with women. (121) Mellor does not, of course, mean that a dead woman is the same as a gay man. But her language is imprecise enough to make it more difficult to construe her intended meaning than her inadvertent assertion. 2. The problem with her argument (in a nutshell: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's novels idealize and promote the egalitarian bourgeois family, despite acknowledging its problems) is something she herself admits: this mythical "egalitarian bourgeois family" NEVER APPEARS in any of Shelley's novels. I don't think Mellor is wrong that that ideal is something Shelley's novels wrestle with, but again, the phrasing of Mellor's argument is clumsy enough that it undercuts itself. 3. There is nothing new under the sun, including the Singularity. Both MWS's father, William Godwin, and her husband espoused a utopian political philosophy that held, among other tenets, "the conviction that the improved powers of the rational mind could conquer disease and even death" (162). Man is perfectible through the power and exercise of his own mind. And I use the noun "man" deliberately, because this seems to me to be a preoccupation of male thinkers at the expense of women. As Mellor says in her discussion of Shelley's use of Prometheus: The romantic attempt to marry opposites, to unite the mortal and the immortal in a transcendental dialectic, to create the human form divine, is seen by Mary Shelley as pure fantasy, no more real than Walton's dream.           Worse, as Frankenstein suggests, it is a very dangerous fantasy. Hidden behind Godwin's and Percy Shelley's dream of human perfectibility is a rampant egoism, the cardinal sin of the Satanic Prometheus. For Godwin and Percy Shelley, as for Coleridge and Blake, it was the mission of the philosopher-poet to guide mankind toward salvation, to participate in the infinite I AM, and to destroy the mind-forged manacles of society. Mary Shelley had seen just how self-indulgent this self-image of the poet-savior could be. (79) Replace "poet" with "engineer," and it starts looking all too horribly familiar. It's mind over matter, which in Western binary thinking always carries the freight of man over woman. And that binary thinking is wrong, but you don't fix the problem by trying to get rid of one of the terms (matter, in both Romantic Prometheanism and the Vingean Singularity, becomes irrelevant because ultimately controllable). You fix the problem by getting rid of the binary. And that involves accepting the body and--as Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was arguing, nearly two hundred years ago now--the consequences and responsibilities of the material world. Frankenstein sins in creating the monster, but he damns himself when he repudiates it. 4. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley should have killed her husband with a shovel. Also her father. Which led me to this odd little AU doggerel: Mary Shelley took an axe, And gave her father forty whacks. And when she saw what she had done, She gave her husband forty-one. 5. Among Percy Bysshe Shelley's many crimes against his wife are his "improvements" of Frankenstein. Let me offer the example Mellor uses (60): MWS wrote, in her ms of Frankenstein: Nor were these my only visions. The raising of ghosts or devils was also a favorite pursuit and if I never saw any I attributed it rather to my own inexperience and mistakes than want of skill in my instructors. Which isn't good enough for PBS. He "improves" it, thus: Nor were these my only visions. The raising of ghosts or devils was a promise liberally accorded by my favorite authors, the fulfillment of which I most eagerly sought; and if my incantations were always unsuccessful, I attributed the failure rather to my own inexperience and mistake, than to a want of skill or fidelity in my instructors. What PBS is doing is a form of scaffolding. It is not the only form of scaffolding , but it is very distinctly a species of the genus. He's taking MWS's direct, simple, quite pithy sentence and weighing it down with unnecessary verbiage. Strunk & White are waiting for their turn with the shovel. Also, PBS distorted the text. He imposed his own philosophy on it, simplified and misinterpreted the psychology, and insisted on reading Victor Frankenstein sympathetically (subconsciously recognizing his own portrait?)--and MWS let him get away with it. She did not STET any of his edits except one. His psychological hang-ups dictated that he run roughshod over her; her psychological hang-ups dictated that she let him. And I'm angry at her, in that painful way you get angry when you see a beloved friend doing something stupid that's going to hurt them, for letting him mutilate her novel. 6. Mellor knows nothing about science fiction, but she does feel obliged to gesture in its direction, resulting in this rather interesting paragraph: Mary Shelley based Victor Frankenstein's attempt to create a new species from dead organic matter through the use of chemistry and electricity on the most advanced scientific research of the early nineteenth century. Her vision of the isolated scientist discovering the secret of life is no mere fantasy but a plausible prediction of what science might accomplish. As such, Frankenstein has rightly been hailed as the first legitimate example of that genre we call science fiction. Brian Aldiss has tentatively defined science fiction as "the search for a definition of man and his status in the universe which will stand in our advanced but confused state of knowledge (science), and is characteristically cast in the Gothic or post-Gothic mold." And Eric Rabkin and Robert Scoles have identified the conventional elements of science fiction as "speculation and social criticism, hardware and exotic adventure." We might expand these criteria to say that science fiction is a genre that (1) is grounded on valid scientific research; (2) gives a persuasive prediction of what science might be able to accomplish in the foreseeable future; and (3) offers a humanistic critique of either specific technological inventions or the very nature of scientific thinking. (107) Discuss amongst yourselves. 7. Mary Shelley's novels are characterized by the absence of the mother, and by the desperate and ultimately unsuccessful attempts of daughters, sons, and fathers to find surrogates or replacements. 8. Mellor manages to do biographical criticism in a way that convinces me, and as I have said before, and loudly, biographical criticism gives me a wiggins. But Mellor goes at it the right way round. She discusses Mary Shelley's biography and then argues that these biographical problems led to an interest in/preoccupation with certain themes. She's also much more aware than most biographical critics I have read of the ways in which the personal is political. Final verdict: flawed but interesting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kali

    i don't think i appreciated/understood frankenstein or mary shelley's life until i heard a lecture by prof. anne k mellor, considered the premier shelley scholar of our time, i believe. she completely blew me away with the simple but revelatory topics she brought up in the lecture: frankenstein as birth story, expressing shelley's anxieties about childhood; frankenstein as story of man trying to reproduce without woman; and so many other creative and interesting ideas. i wrote a final paper on f i don't think i appreciated/understood frankenstein or mary shelley's life until i heard a lecture by prof. anne k mellor, considered the premier shelley scholar of our time, i believe. she completely blew me away with the simple but revelatory topics she brought up in the lecture: frankenstein as birth story, expressing shelley's anxieties about childhood; frankenstein as story of man trying to reproduce without woman; and so many other creative and interesting ideas. i wrote a final paper on frankenstein and this book was by far the most detailed and all-encompassing (and interesting) of all the sources i used, both concept-wise and regarding mary wollstonecraft's death.

  5. 4 out of 5

    David Allen

    This enlightening look at Mary Shelley's life and writings from a woman's perspective will make you think of Frankenstein in a fresh way, both textually (disaster occurs when a man tries to have a baby without a woman!) and biographically (is Shelley criticizing her husband's poor parental skills?). Good analysis of the underrated The Last Man too. For scholarship, quite readable. Docked a star for use of "teleological," "semiotics" and "phenomenological." This enlightening look at Mary Shelley's life and writings from a woman's perspective will make you think of Frankenstein in a fresh way, both textually (disaster occurs when a man tries to have a baby without a woman!) and biographically (is Shelley criticizing her husband's poor parental skills?). Good analysis of the underrated The Last Man too. For scholarship, quite readable. Docked a star for use of "teleological," "semiotics" and "phenomenological."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alis ,the story traveller

    classic!!mary shelley is the queen...sorry..empress of gothic fiction!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This book is quite possibly one of the best books I've read that has compiled all the information one could possibly need on Mary Shelley. Often, when one researches Shelley, we often find her spoken about in tandem with her husband - Percy Shelley; though this book references the Romantic poet on several occasions, Mellor ensures that the central focus of her book is Mary Shelley. Though a brilliant book in its detailing of Shelley's life, at times, Mellor forgoes clarity, and instead uses oste This book is quite possibly one of the best books I've read that has compiled all the information one could possibly need on Mary Shelley. Often, when one researches Shelley, we often find her spoken about in tandem with her husband - Percy Shelley; though this book references the Romantic poet on several occasions, Mellor ensures that the central focus of her book is Mary Shelley. Though a brilliant book in its detailing of Shelley's life, at times, Mellor forgoes clarity, and instead uses ostentatious language to describe a point, resulting in one reading over certain sentences 2 or 3 times before the meaning is understood

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    5* MARAVILLOSA BIOGRAFÍA. Sigue la vida de Mary Shelley pero no se queda en los datos biográficos en bruto, sino que los contextualiza en la época y los relaciona con los textos de ella. Se puede ver cómo las ideas que tenía Mary Shelley en el momento de la primera publicación de Frankenstein fueron cambiando a lo largo de su vida. Todo apoyado en textos, tanto novelas como cartas y su diario personal. Mil besos de chef para este libro. Mega bonus por la impecable perspectiva de género. Sé que vo 5* MARAVILLOSA BIOGRAFÍA. Sigue la vida de Mary Shelley pero no se queda en los datos biográficos en bruto, sino que los contextualiza en la época y los relaciona con los textos de ella. Se puede ver cómo las ideas que tenía Mary Shelley en el momento de la primera publicación de Frankenstein fueron cambiando a lo largo de su vida. Todo apoyado en textos, tanto novelas como cartas y su diario personal. Mil besos de chef para este libro. Mega bonus por la impecable perspectiva de género. Sé que voy a releer esta biografía muchas muchas veces.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Thomfrost

    3/4 Despite being deliberately feminist in its approach, this is one of the most balanced and comprehensive critical work on Mary Shelley I've come across so far. Of particular interest to me were the chapters about her relationship with Godwin, her story with Percy Shelley, and the scientific and philosophical works that influenced her writing. It's not perfect. There's some fuzzy logic in it, and sometimes Mellor's otherwise moderate criticism gives way to sweeping remarks and dubious claims. T 3/4 Despite being deliberately feminist in its approach, this is one of the most balanced and comprehensive critical work on Mary Shelley I've come across so far. Of particular interest to me were the chapters about her relationship with Godwin, her story with Percy Shelley, and the scientific and philosophical works that influenced her writing. It's not perfect. There's some fuzzy logic in it, and sometimes Mellor's otherwise moderate criticism gives way to sweeping remarks and dubious claims. That said, it's a good starting point for anyone interested in Mary Shelley.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    I expected a biography, this was more like a series of term papers about Shelley. Also I know next to nothing about Mary and Percy, haven’t read any of their books/writings; this book assumed I did. The book is overall the place - never knew what far reaching link the author would find between Mary’s writing. For example “Frankenstein” has links to Mary’s upbringing, Darwin, French Revolution and slavery.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Interesting way to cap off my class on Shelley/Wollstonecraft.

  12. 4 out of 5

    April

    I probably will not have time to revisit this biography for a very long time, if ever. However, I did want to take a minute to point out that what I did read (for a research paper) was hilarious, well-written, and entertaining. I would recommend this for anyone who wants to get to know Shelley and her works in a deeper way. I believe Anne Mellor is/was a leading Shelley scholar with feminist leanings, but that is just guesswork based on what my professor told me. Here are some great quotes from I probably will not have time to revisit this biography for a very long time, if ever. However, I did want to take a minute to point out that what I did read (for a research paper) was hilarious, well-written, and entertaining. I would recommend this for anyone who wants to get to know Shelley and her works in a deeper way. I believe Anne Mellor is/was a leading Shelley scholar with feminist leanings, but that is just guesswork based on what my professor told me. Here are some great quotes from chapter 1: “Their emotional an sexual passion for each other was explosive and overwhelming.” — Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters, 21. (on Mary and Percy’s relationship). “At rest for the first time in six weeks, Mary and Percy immediately set up the daily routine they would follow during their life together: reading and writing separately in the morning, sightseeing, visiting or doing errands and housework (Mary’s responsibility) after midday dinner, reading together in the evening.” — Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters, 27. “ Hogg repeatedly tried to strengthen the bond between himself and Shelley by making love to Shelley’s women. … After Shelley’s marriage to Harriet Westbook, Hogg had, with Shelley’s explicit encouragement and approval, tried to make love to her. Shelley had always insisted on his allegiance to an ideal of free and communal love; he was eager to share his wife sexually with others, and especially with his best friend Hogg. ” — Mary Shelley: Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters, 29.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    I am officially obsessed with Shelley's "feminist science". This was a really interesting look at the woman who wrote one of my favorite books and gives a great analysis of the cultural factors that contributed the obvious opposition to controlling nature found in the novel. I am officially obsessed with Shelley's "feminist science". This was a really interesting look at the woman who wrote one of my favorite books and gives a great analysis of the cultural factors that contributed the obvious opposition to controlling nature found in the novel.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book has a lot of useful information on Shelley and on Frankenstein.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bridgette

    Very insightful, especially regarding changes Percy made to Mary's work. I thoroughly enjoyed the section on Feminism. Very insightful, especially regarding changes Percy made to Mary's work. I thoroughly enjoyed the section on Feminism.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Madly Jane

    Good but not great. Miranda Seymour's biography is great, but this does give you and inside in a feminist viewpoint. Good but not great. Miranda Seymour's biography is great, but this does give you and inside in a feminist viewpoint.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    Jesus Christ, what a fraught and disturbing life Shelley had. Thankfully, she was also brilliant and a writer.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adella

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vee

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Drake

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paraicd

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anaopera

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roger Whitson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gmwalshe

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia C

  29. 5 out of 5

    John E. Meredith

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mer

  31. 4 out of 5

    karla

  32. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  33. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  34. 4 out of 5

    L.J.

  35. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  36. 4 out of 5

    Vivian Velasquez

  37. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Flynn

  38. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  39. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  40. 4 out of 5

    Tania

  41. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  42. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  43. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Philippa

  44. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

  45. 4 out of 5

    Debra Eve

  46. 5 out of 5

    Ness

  47. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

  48. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  49. 4 out of 5

    Moira Russell

  50. 5 out of 5

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  51. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  52. 5 out of 5

    Jacki Lyon

  53. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

  54. 5 out of 5

    Hesper

  55. 4 out of 5

    Einschrein

  56. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Davies

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