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The Devil May Care

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Riley Brodin is the granddaughter of Walter Muehlenhaus - a man as rich, powerful, and connected as anyone since the days of J. P. Morgan. Despite her family's connections, it's McKenzie she reaches out to when her relatively new boyfriend goes missing. Despite his reservations about getting involved with the Muehlenhaus family - again - McKenzie agrees to look for one Jua Riley Brodin is the granddaughter of Walter Muehlenhaus - a man as rich, powerful, and connected as anyone since the days of J. P. Morgan. Despite her family's connections, it's McKenzie she reaches out to when her relatively new boyfriend goes missing. Despite his reservations about getting involved with the Muehlenhaus family - again - McKenzie agrees to look for one Juan Carlos Navarre. What he finds, though, is a man who appears to be a ghost. The house - mansion, really - he told Riley he owned is actually a rental, barely lived in and practically devoid of personal effects. The restaurant he claimed to own is owned by another and Navarre merely an investor. He apparently has no friends, no traceable past, and McKenzie isn't the only one looking for him. Whoever Juan Carlos Navarre is and wherever he's gone, the one thing that is clear is that he's trouble, and is perhaps someone - as Riley's family makes clear-better out of the picture. Unfortunately for everyone, McKenzie likes trouble and trouble likes him.


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Riley Brodin is the granddaughter of Walter Muehlenhaus - a man as rich, powerful, and connected as anyone since the days of J. P. Morgan. Despite her family's connections, it's McKenzie she reaches out to when her relatively new boyfriend goes missing. Despite his reservations about getting involved with the Muehlenhaus family - again - McKenzie agrees to look for one Jua Riley Brodin is the granddaughter of Walter Muehlenhaus - a man as rich, powerful, and connected as anyone since the days of J. P. Morgan. Despite her family's connections, it's McKenzie she reaches out to when her relatively new boyfriend goes missing. Despite his reservations about getting involved with the Muehlenhaus family - again - McKenzie agrees to look for one Juan Carlos Navarre. What he finds, though, is a man who appears to be a ghost. The house - mansion, really - he told Riley he owned is actually a rental, barely lived in and practically devoid of personal effects. The restaurant he claimed to own is owned by another and Navarre merely an investor. He apparently has no friends, no traceable past, and McKenzie isn't the only one looking for him. Whoever Juan Carlos Navarre is and wherever he's gone, the one thing that is clear is that he's trouble, and is perhaps someone - as Riley's family makes clear-better out of the picture. Unfortunately for everyone, McKenzie likes trouble and trouble likes him.

30 review for The Devil May Care

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susan Grace

    I really enjoy this series! In this book #11, David Housewright pays tribute to Jim Butcher with a short quote, "But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face." I am also a big Dresden Files fan and with Mr. Housewright including this quote in his book, he went up a notch in my already great admiration! I really enjoy this series! In this book #11, David Housewright pays tribute to Jim Butcher with a short quote, "But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face." I am also a big Dresden Files fan and with Mr. Housewright including this quote in his book, he went up a notch in my already great admiration!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marca

    I accidentally picked up this book at the library. Wasn’t wearing my glasses and saw “David” on the cover – thought it was David Baldacci. The cover art kinda looked like a Baldacci book. I decided to read the book anyway since it was a mystery and was glad I did. Rushmore McKenzie, a retired police officer who is now wealthy, is approached by a young woman from the town’s richest family to find her missing boyfriend. Adventure ensues. I liked McKenzie; he was a sensible guy who played well with I accidentally picked up this book at the library. Wasn’t wearing my glasses and saw “David” on the cover – thought it was David Baldacci. The cover art kinda looked like a Baldacci book. I decided to read the book anyway since it was a mystery and was glad I did. Rushmore McKenzie, a retired police officer who is now wealthy, is approached by a young woman from the town’s richest family to find her missing boyfriend. Adventure ensues. I liked McKenzie; he was a sensible guy who played well with the law enforcement he encountered. I’ve read similar characters who are blustery and obnoxious, and think they know better than all the law enforcement. Plus, they are usually chick-magnets who attract every horny drooling Marilyn Monroe-like bimbo within miles. McKenzie has a smart girlfriend who is age-appropriate; women like him, but most do not slavor over him. McKenzie is an easy-going, gentle, likable guy, who is also very smart and tenacious. I am always happy to find a new continuing character that I like. The other characters were likable, too; not the usual good/evil demarcation line between all the characters. Oh, there was an evil character, but most, even the bad guys and gals, had some redeeming qualities. Will certainly look for more books by Housewright, and this time, not by accident.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    well this is a delightful book for many reasons. Great author with great characters but since it is set around Lake Minnetonka it was just a TRIP to see all the references. Loved it !!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dick Aichinger

    Mckenzie normally only does his 'favors' for his established friends. He makes an exception this time when helping a young woman who is worried about her boyfriend has the added benefit of antagonizing one of the most wealthy and powerful men in Minnesota, a man who has been used McKenzie in the past and been irritated immensely by him. Kylie Muehlenhaus cannot locate her boyfriend. The granddaughter of Walter Muehlenhaus has the resources from many agencies and investigators. She want McKenzie f Mckenzie normally only does his 'favors' for his established friends. He makes an exception this time when helping a young woman who is worried about her boyfriend has the added benefit of antagonizing one of the most wealthy and powerful men in Minnesota, a man who has been used McKenzie in the past and been irritated immensely by him. Kylie Muehlenhaus cannot locate her boyfriend. The granddaughter of Walter Muehlenhaus has the resources from many agencies and investigators. She want McKenzie for the same reason he may accept. Her grandfather doesn't like McKenzie so she feels more comfortable he may hold her interests about her grandfathers. What starts out as a case of attempting to track down someone who may not want to be found turns not only mysterious but deadly. McKenzie must follow a trail leading through Mexican gang members, international mystery, and fraud on a massive scale involving the US Government. Another wild ride.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Another wonderful twisty plot! Loved it! He visited one of my favorite escape places--Galena, Illinois. But he didn't make it to another of my favorite places--Betty's Pies. I also love his sly, humorous sarcasm. Secondary characters are also developed to move the plot forward. Simply, I love each entry in this series! Another wonderful twisty plot! Loved it! He visited one of my favorite escape places--Galena, Illinois. But he didn't make it to another of my favorite places--Betty's Pies. I also love his sly, humorous sarcasm. Secondary characters are also developed to move the plot forward. Simply, I love each entry in this series!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Larry Hamilton

    McKenzie agrees to help a young woman, who is the granddaughter of one of Minnesota's riches families, find her missing boyfriend. Suffice to say the boyfriend has a questionable background and McKenzie soon finds out he's not the only one looking for him. Lots of interesting characters with good action, mystery and thrills. David Housewright is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. McKenzie agrees to help a young woman, who is the granddaughter of one of Minnesota's riches families, find her missing boyfriend. Suffice to say the boyfriend has a questionable background and McKenzie soon finds out he's not the only one looking for him. Lots of interesting characters with good action, mystery and thrills. David Housewright is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Parish

    McKenzie continues in his quest to be a principled thorn in the side of those who like, love, and loath him. As with most great series, this book deepens the key relationships in his life. Much of the story careens an toward expected conclusion, but there are suspenseful twists as we ride.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Molly Panzer

    This was good. He's appearing at rum river library in October and I wanted to have read something recent. I have read one or two of his earlier titles. Love the minnesota connection. This was good. He's appearing at rum river library in October and I wanted to have read something recent. I have read one or two of his earlier titles. Love the minnesota connection.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    I always enjoy a mystery set in Minnesota.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    This is my second "McKenzie" novel. While I will read more of the series, I didn't enjoy this one as much as the other one I read. This is my second "McKenzie" novel. While I will read more of the series, I didn't enjoy this one as much as the other one I read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    Decent read, but if I were going to nitpick I feel like the ending was a little weak. I think it was supposed to have some ambiguity....

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Reed

    Good. I enjoyed it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steve Payne

    This was another typical McKenzie read, fast-paced with plenty of action and clever dialogue.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Another good thriller from David Housewright. If you haven't read one of his books you should. He's an unknown treasure from MN! Another good thriller from David Housewright. If you haven't read one of his books you should. He's an unknown treasure from MN!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brandi

    I loved this book. I think there is a character reference back to Terri Reid but I am not entirely certain as I read that book last year, I will take a look. I love McKenzie and I cannot until my library gets the next book in the series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Mensing

    In this 11th Mac McKenzie book, "that fucking McKenzie" is prevailed upon by the granddaughter of his rich nemesis, Walter Muehlenhaus, to find her missing Spanish boyfriend. Riley Muehlenhaus, the Muehlenhaus Girl, has been more than dating Juan Carlos Navarre, when he suddenly disappears. As McKenzie begins the search among the über-wealthy Minnesotans whose company Riley and Juan Carlos keep, he runs afoul of the reincarnation of a Hispanic Mafia group that seems just as intent to locate Juan In this 11th Mac McKenzie book, "that fucking McKenzie" is prevailed upon by the granddaughter of his rich nemesis, Walter Muehlenhaus, to find her missing Spanish boyfriend. Riley Muehlenhaus, the Muehlenhaus Girl, has been more than dating Juan Carlos Navarre, when he suddenly disappears. As McKenzie begins the search among the über-wealthy Minnesotans whose company Riley and Juan Carlos keep, he runs afoul of the reincarnation of a Hispanic Mafia group that seems just as intent to locate Juan Carlos. Juan Carlos may not be all that he claims to be, or even who he claims to be. An amusing scene has the receptionist at the exclusive lakefront club to which all the rich characters in THE DEVIL MAY CARE belong telling McKenzie that she doesn't believe Juan Carlos is the rich man he says he is because he seems too intent on impressing her, the hired help. Throughout the book, McKenzie works to protect Riley while he searches for Juan Carlos. Murder and rape of wealthy Minnesotans, as well as arson, define the tactics of a villain who is connected to Juan Carlos, and these events serve as the background to McKenzie's investigation. And who is this McKenzie? Wealthy in his own right, he is an ex-police detective who does not need the work but seems to be drawn into continuing his detective work for his own amusement and entertainment. Although this book is well along in the series, he still seems somewhat uncomfortable with his own wealth, and just like Juan Carlos, sometimes tries too hard to convince others of his wealth. He drives a $65,000 car, a fact he reminds us of multiple times throughout the book. He is especially aware of class and wealth distinctions within Riley Muehlenhaus' world. That sensitivity to the trappings of wealth, while annoying at times, is exactly what allows McKenzie to navigate the world that Juan Carlos seems to have created out of whole cloth. Housewright renders this world of the Muehlenhaus family, Juan Carlos, McKenzie, and others very well indeed. The descriptions created an image in my mind, and I almost feel as though I've visited the locales described. Housewright visually maps out the St. Paul/Minneapolis area, and provides background perspective on why the cities are called the "Twin Cities," as well as why they perhaps should not be. When he describes the home Juan Carlos lives in, or the roads McKenzie is following, or the scene of a crime, he creates a full visual image in the reader's mind. His characterization is a little less successful than his description of place. Although the events that take place in THE DEVIL MAY CARE are quite violent, Housewright has a light touch and imbues McKenzie with a sense of humor. For those who like their crime novels gritty, this is not a book that will satisfy. For those who enjoy a rather quirky main character but don't quite want to go as far in avoiding direct discussion of violence as to read a cozy, this book will hit the mark. It's the first I've read in the series, so I can't say if the entire series has the same tone. I did enjoy the balance between lightheartedness and seriousness that Housewright managed in this book, however, and I'm interested enough to try another in the series to see if it holds steady. This review first appeared at www.reviewingtheevidence.com.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karl Jorgenson

    David Housewright writes like Robert Parker. I told him so at an author chat and he said, 'I've been accused of that.' Their detectives are similar: wise-ass tough guys with a powerful streak of cool sophistication, right down to their weird names: Spenser (Parker) and Rushmore (Housewright). The problem I see fits the work of both authors: Rushmore is too cool for school. It's hard to credit this sharpie running around loose, poking into stuff, packing a piece and ready to use it. Housewright d David Housewright writes like Robert Parker. I told him so at an author chat and he said, 'I've been accused of that.' Their detectives are similar: wise-ass tough guys with a powerful streak of cool sophistication, right down to their weird names: Spenser (Parker) and Rushmore (Housewright). The problem I see fits the work of both authors: Rushmore is too cool for school. It's hard to credit this sharpie running around loose, poking into stuff, packing a piece and ready to use it. Housewright does a great job of creating the world: gangsters, cops, shady characters, damsels in distress, tough broads. But it's all very old-school, left over from a world I don't think ever existed, and it rings a slightly wrong note for me today. It seems like Mannix and Cannon from 1970 TV. I can see Rushmore wearing a fedora, and not ironically. Where are the cops? He's buddies with a bunch of them, so they tolerate his amateur investigation. But don't they do anything? Rushmore uncovers all the interesting angles, doing basic cop-work: interviewing people and following the connections. When somebody gets murdered, the cops have no suspects, no real idea of motive, and don't seem to be any more interested than they were when it was a quasi-missing person's case. You'd think they'd be more excited. It's a really fantastic, complicated thriller plot. Why is the slick, worldly guy who is missing? Has he disappeared or has something bad happened to him? As the case unravels, Rushmore discovers unbelievable secrets in the man's past. And I mean I didn't believe them: it's like you wandered into a bar and the bartender said, "Oh him. Yeah, I heard he heisted ten million from Sadam just before Baghdad fell, then used it to scam a hundred million from insurance companies after Deep Water Horizon blew up." You'd think some of this would be of interest to serious cops; you'd think Rushmore's tinkering would not be the way to unravel it. But he does, and I don't buy it, and it isn't satisfying, and I don't feel that triumph as he persists through the little clues and exposes the bad guys. I'm going to read an early Rushmore novel for comparison. Housewright is popular, so maybe I'm an idiot. After dozens of books, it has to be hard to come up with a fresh plot. Perhaps The Devil May Care is suffering from long-series burnout.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dave Saari

    Another good read in the McKenzie series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    CarolineFromConcord

    McKenzie is a former policeman and unlicensed private investigator in the Twin Cities who loves danger. In this mystery, David Housewright has McKenzie hunting for a rich girl's missing boyfriend. I was not crazy about the long lists of possessions that the author employs repeatedly to show that characters are wealthy, and I was not crazy about some overused thriller memes, but I found the plot satisfyingly complicated. The missing boyfriend may not be who he claims to be, his intentions toward t McKenzie is a former policeman and unlicensed private investigator in the Twin Cities who loves danger. In this mystery, David Housewright has McKenzie hunting for a rich girl's missing boyfriend. I was not crazy about the long lists of possessions that the author employs repeatedly to show that characters are wealthy, and I was not crazy about some overused thriller memes, but I found the plot satisfyingly complicated. The missing boyfriend may not be who he claims to be, his intentions toward the rich girl are unclear, and there are a lot of other people looking for him. Some of them have revenge on their minds and don't care who gets killed along the way. The descriptions of Lake Minnetonka and other parts of the Upper Midwest are good. The characters are amusing, if two-dimensional. I was really into Housewright when I lived in Minnesota. One of his novels turned me off, though -- I don't remember why -- so I'm glad I gave him another shot. I intend to read one more escapist adventure right now and then something serious.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Fast paced murder mystery. Lots of Twin Cities/Minn detail.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. mackenzie was hired by the mobs granddaughter to find her boyfriend (she ended up engaged to a woman so im not quite sure why she wanted to find him so badly). turned out he wasnt who he said he was, stolen millions of $. he got caught , mckinzie killed a bad guy and another broke his leg in a accident trying to follow him. nina wants to move in together!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Harvey

    Very solid entry in this consistently well -written and well plotted series. Rushmore McKenzie is a great character...the now wealthy, retired-young ex-cop with too much time on his hands. Also enjoy the Twin Cities and Minnesota lake locations.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ampersand Inc.

    If you like a well written mystery with good characters and a satisfying conclusion please read David Housewright. I was so surprised when I discovered him that I hadn't heard of him before - he writes good quality mystery fiction. If you like a well written mystery with good characters and a satisfying conclusion please read David Housewright. I was so surprised when I discovered him that I hadn't heard of him before - he writes good quality mystery fiction.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joe O'Connor

    Very Good; Continuing character: Rushmore McKenzie; a missing person's case turns more mysterious when in becomes apparent other, more nefarious people, are looking for the same person - and are willing to hurt others to find him Very Good; Continuing character: Rushmore McKenzie; a missing person's case turns more mysterious when in becomes apparent other, more nefarious people, are looking for the same person - and are willing to hurt others to find him

  25. 5 out of 5

    Su

    I will say outright that Housewright's works are equal to John Sandford's writing. Both are Minnesota authors and both have what seems to be an inside workings of the knowledge a Minnesota cop would have. Wonderful! I will say outright that Housewright's works are equal to John Sandford's writing. Both are Minnesota authors and both have what seems to be an inside workings of the knowledge a Minnesota cop would have. Wonderful!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    A McKenzie mystery set in Minnesota. Always fun to read

  27. 5 out of 5

    Al Stoess

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Not his best but it became more interesting as it moved along. I would have liked a better ending. Reread October 2019. Another good story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Frank Carll

    3.5 stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vontel

    Would have rated it a 3.5 if possible. A lark, and very enjoyable. I have read at least one previous book in this series. At times, it reminds me of Robert B. Parker mysteries.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Introduced to David Housewright last year by a co-worker -- and am caught up in the characters ... terrific read. Enough surprise and suspense to have me looking to the next one ...

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