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The Kids Will Be Fine: Guilt-Free Motherhood for Thoroughly Modern Women

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A bracing, hilarious manifesto for motherhood as it ought to be: spontaneous, loving, and just a little bit selfish Pre-chewing toddler food. Flash cards for two-year-olds. Endless hours of school gatherings to sit through in smiling silence. How did motherhood—which even under the best circumstances comes with a million small costs and compromises—become a venue for female A bracing, hilarious manifesto for motherhood as it ought to be: spontaneous, loving, and just a little bit selfish Pre-chewing toddler food. Flash cards for two-year-olds. Endless hours of school gatherings to sit through in smiling silence. How did motherhood—which even under the best circumstances comes with a million small costs and compromises—become a venue for female martyrdom, verging on a sort of socially approved mass masochism? How did the great natural force of maternal love get channeled into a simpering, slavish adherence to an inflexible social norm, a repressive sentimentality festooned with hideous pastel baby accessories? How did the bar to good motherhood get set so high that it's impossible for modern mothers not to feel like they're failing? It doesn't have to be this way—and Daisy Waugh is here to tell us how to opt out of the masochism cycle. Part feminist manifesto, part hilarious rant, The Kids Will Be Fine asks modern mothers to stop confusing love with subjugation. This is a book for moms everywhere who are fed up with the constant stream of unsolicited, impractical, guilt-inducing advice directed their way; for moms who have always secretly suspected that children would turn out okay even without handmade organic snacks or protective toddler headgear. With biting wit and lancing observations, Waugh gives women permission to slough off the judgments, order in some pizza, and remember that motherhood is also about the mother.


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A bracing, hilarious manifesto for motherhood as it ought to be: spontaneous, loving, and just a little bit selfish Pre-chewing toddler food. Flash cards for two-year-olds. Endless hours of school gatherings to sit through in smiling silence. How did motherhood—which even under the best circumstances comes with a million small costs and compromises—become a venue for female A bracing, hilarious manifesto for motherhood as it ought to be: spontaneous, loving, and just a little bit selfish Pre-chewing toddler food. Flash cards for two-year-olds. Endless hours of school gatherings to sit through in smiling silence. How did motherhood—which even under the best circumstances comes with a million small costs and compromises—become a venue for female martyrdom, verging on a sort of socially approved mass masochism? How did the great natural force of maternal love get channeled into a simpering, slavish adherence to an inflexible social norm, a repressive sentimentality festooned with hideous pastel baby accessories? How did the bar to good motherhood get set so high that it's impossible for modern mothers not to feel like they're failing? It doesn't have to be this way—and Daisy Waugh is here to tell us how to opt out of the masochism cycle. Part feminist manifesto, part hilarious rant, The Kids Will Be Fine asks modern mothers to stop confusing love with subjugation. This is a book for moms everywhere who are fed up with the constant stream of unsolicited, impractical, guilt-inducing advice directed their way; for moms who have always secretly suspected that children would turn out okay even without handmade organic snacks or protective toddler headgear. With biting wit and lancing observations, Waugh gives women permission to slough off the judgments, order in some pizza, and remember that motherhood is also about the mother.

30 review for The Kids Will Be Fine: Guilt-Free Motherhood for Thoroughly Modern Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anna Janelle

    In case you hadn't heard, being a mom is hard. I mean, HARD. For those of you without kids, you LITERALLY have NO IDEA how HARD. You may think you can imagine - but you're wrong. Only once you become a parent can you truly know what it mean to love something that is seemingly hell-bent on running you past the point of exhaustion 24 hours, 7 days a week. Now, part of this is because, as a single person unencumbered by a child, you can't REALLY imagine this kind of commitment to another - even if In case you hadn't heard, being a mom is hard. I mean, HARD. For those of you without kids, you LITERALLY have NO IDEA how HARD. You may think you can imagine - but you're wrong. Only once you become a parent can you truly know what it mean to love something that is seemingly hell-bent on running you past the point of exhaustion 24 hours, 7 days a week. Now, part of this is because, as a single person unencumbered by a child, you can't REALLY imagine this kind of commitment to another - even if you have a dog or cat that you really, really, love - just no. If you are one of those people reading my review, don't feel antagonized by my commentary - rather, relish the ability to do as you please when you please while you still can. Just as being a parent is special and magical, being a single person, responsible only for your own survival, is priceless. Soak it in. Live it up. Anyways, the other reason people (read also: first time moms) don't know how HARD it is - is because no one really talks about or acknowledges their own struggles with being a new parent. For some women, motherhood is almost on par with a religious calling - something that requires willing self-sacrifice and devotion. For others, those like myself, it is something of a chore - and I can admit that I struggle with it daily. Just admitting that being a mother is hard work has caused a twinge of guilt in me - and I feel compelled to add in a louder voice - I STILL LOVE MY BABY. At least, no less than a woman who pretends that all this vomit, poop, and screaming is really her cup of tea. Even if YOU don't necessarily know how hard it is to be a parent, Daisy Waugh does. She isn't afraid to admit her shortcomings and laugh at her own struggles. She thinks the myth surrounding the modern martyrdom of good mothers is ridiculous. Rather, she encourages women to allow themselves some slack in indulging in some selfish behavior. You don't have to steam your own organic vegetables and breastfeed your child through puberty to be a good mother - despite what some of your Facebook friends might post. Waugh gives mothers the permission to be seen as women again - to succumb to human impulses and take some shortcuts every once in a while. The chapters were extremely short - bite-sized snippets that are perfect for moms looking to sneak in some reading inbetween the frequent diaper changes and temper tantrums. I don't necessarily advocate all of her advice and opinions - but I LOVE her refreshing and permissive attitude. Moms carry around a lot of inexplicable internal guilt without their husbands, friends and media sources chiming in with advice and statistics. The kids WILL be fine, despite what your adversaries may say. This book is a much-needed 'atta girl to women struggle, women who need to hear that others have trouble too. Thanks to LibraryThing's Early Reviewer program for an advanced copy of this book. It was just what the doctor ordered.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bess

    OK, so the thing is this - Daisy Waugh says everything I think but am too polite to say. Also, she's funny. But... She seems to be as defensive about her own choices as she claims all the other moms who don't think like her are about theirs. Also, for someone who's telling people to stop judging others, she's kinda judgmental... OK, so the thing is this - Daisy Waugh says everything I think but am too polite to say. Also, she's funny. But... She seems to be as defensive about her own choices as she claims all the other moms who don't think like her are about theirs. Also, for someone who's telling people to stop judging others, she's kinda judgmental...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Oh, what a refreshing change from the frequently maudlin FB posts I am constantly seeing about the thrills of breastfeeding, the charms of baby barf in one's hair and snot on one's shoulder, and how it is ALL WORTH IT for this precious bundle of joy! I am a mother myself, but the self-inflicted martyrdom of so many young mothers is becoming Just. Too. Much. Daisy Waugh's new book is not intended to be a baby guide; it is intended to make the reader laugh, and it does. Waugh has a tee-tiny scalpe Oh, what a refreshing change from the frequently maudlin FB posts I am constantly seeing about the thrills of breastfeeding, the charms of baby barf in one's hair and snot on one's shoulder, and how it is ALL WORTH IT for this precious bundle of joy! I am a mother myself, but the self-inflicted martyrdom of so many young mothers is becoming Just. Too. Much. Daisy Waugh's new book is not intended to be a baby guide; it is intended to make the reader laugh, and it does. Waugh has a tee-tiny scalpel at the end of her pen, and she wields it with grace and skill (and sometimes a little ruthlessness), pricking holes in such sentimental tropes as the Selfless Mother (something that drives me mad). We have children because we WANT to have children. Not because we had to! Not to make the world a better place! Admittedly few of us were prepared for the reality, but that doesn't make us selfless martyrs. All the best chapters, I regret to say, are in the first two-thirds of the book. Waugh does get a little over the top at times (as when she suggests that, since Mom is not likely to be too keen on sex for a while, what's the big deal about Daddy getting it elsewhere?) But overall, this is a book I would certainly offer a young mother in preference to the nauseatingly sentimental (and sometimes, borderline sadistic) books that are currently out there. Well done, Daisy Waugh. I'm sure YOUR kids, at least, will be fine. Thanks to the LibraryThing Early Reviewer Program, which sent a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jacque

    Couldn’t finish this book, and in fact couldn’t finish the first three chapters. I appreciated her humor and thought process, but it was incredibly (and sharply) judgmental of mothers who don’t share her opinions. Hypocritical without meaning to be, perhaps, but still hypocritical.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Megan Hawley Steinfeld

    Overall a quick and enjoyable book, and a refreshing break from other mommy memoirs since it unapologetically celebrates moms as normal human beings who are capable of experiencing irritation, boredom, and occasional dissatisfaction without becoming lesser parents. That said, it seemed to dance back and forth between advocating that mothers judge each other less, and actively judging other mothers. It fits solidly into the advice-not-advice genre of parenting books, but with it's own individual Overall a quick and enjoyable book, and a refreshing break from other mommy memoirs since it unapologetically celebrates moms as normal human beings who are capable of experiencing irritation, boredom, and occasional dissatisfaction without becoming lesser parents. That said, it seemed to dance back and forth between advocating that mothers judge each other less, and actively judging other mothers. It fits solidly into the advice-not-advice genre of parenting books, but with it's own individual twists.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    As short as this was, I couldn't even finish this. This was just a series of offensive essays attacking even the most inane bits of motherhood. This is not guilt-free motherhood. She attacks you for every little thing, including staying at home, putting toddler snacks in containers and even putting a baby on board sticker on your car. She berates those who put sanctimonious facebook posts on their walls, but instead of that, she just decided to write a book. I couldn't handle it. As short as this was, I couldn't even finish this. This was just a series of offensive essays attacking even the most inane bits of motherhood. This is not guilt-free motherhood. She attacks you for every little thing, including staying at home, putting toddler snacks in containers and even putting a baby on board sticker on your car. She berates those who put sanctimonious facebook posts on their walls, but instead of that, she just decided to write a book. I couldn't handle it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Mielke

    I get tired of all the judging that goes on between moms, and I was hoping that this book would more or less say that, however you choose to raise your kids, it'll be fine. Instead, I thought the author just judged in the other direction (i.e. the "supermoms" are doing it wrong). Very disappointed. I get tired of all the judging that goes on between moms, and I was hoping that this book would more or less say that, however you choose to raise your kids, it'll be fine. Instead, I thought the author just judged in the other direction (i.e. the "supermoms" are doing it wrong). Very disappointed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chloe (Always Booked)

    2.5 stars. This woman is OPINIONATED-- which is totally fine. She tells it like she sees it with no regards to political correctness and thats refreshing, however, she goes too far and is crude for the sake of humor and it was too much. She is very judgmental of other moms and a lot of sections I just had to skim because her rant was too much. None of this is science or evidence based, its all just this woman's opinion on things. She also acted like parenting is just an inconvenience to her and 2.5 stars. This woman is OPINIONATED-- which is totally fine. She tells it like she sees it with no regards to political correctness and thats refreshing, however, she goes too far and is crude for the sake of humor and it was too much. She is very judgmental of other moms and a lot of sections I just had to skim because her rant was too much. None of this is science or evidence based, its all just this woman's opinion on things. She also acted like parenting is just an inconvenience to her and I didn't like that at all. Overall, I think there are better humorous books on parenting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Clare

    This parenting book is refreshingly different from the others. It's both useful and entertaining. This might be the best, most practical book about motherhood that I've read yet. I think her suggestions and insights can help the whole family improve their quality of life. I wish that every mother would read this because I think it would empower us. You can be a better mom when you've got some support, a little rest and freedom from all of society who wants to judge us, including fellow moms. This parenting book is refreshingly different from the others. It's both useful and entertaining. This might be the best, most practical book about motherhood that I've read yet. I think her suggestions and insights can help the whole family improve their quality of life. I wish that every mother would read this because I think it would empower us. You can be a better mom when you've got some support, a little rest and freedom from all of society who wants to judge us, including fellow moms.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura Cason

    I found some parts of this entertaining but overall I didn't really understand the point of the book. It seems to just be a big rant for the author to get everything she doesn't care for off her chest... I found some parts of this entertaining but overall I didn't really understand the point of the book. It seems to just be a big rant for the author to get everything she doesn't care for off her chest...

  11. 4 out of 5

    hifels

    At first, I thought this would be insightful. Turned out, it was just a bundle of subjective opinion based on the author’s experience. Maybe that is not a problem for some people, but it is a problem for me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura Hodgson

    I wanted to like this book. I wanted to feel empowered and get advice and solidarity. But the only thing I came away with was...The writer is an insufferable snob. Find another author and quickly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cheyenne Carroll

    The first half of the book was quite funny and relatable but the ending didn’t seem quite on the same landing as the rest of the book to me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    The rant I needed in my life.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    First I want to thank Daisy Waugh for a delightful book to read and for Goodreads First Read Giveaway program for making it possible for me to win The Kids Will Be Fine ~ Guilt Free Motherhood for Thoroughly Modern Women. The Kids Will Be Fine ~ Guilt-Free Motherhood for Thoroughly Modern Women is a fun look at being a mother that covers many subjects in five areas. Part One is Pregnancy and Birth with a witty look at parenting classes for expectant mothers and fathers and Daisy Waugh is right wh First I want to thank Daisy Waugh for a delightful book to read and for Goodreads First Read Giveaway program for making it possible for me to win The Kids Will Be Fine ~ Guilt Free Motherhood for Thoroughly Modern Women. The Kids Will Be Fine ~ Guilt-Free Motherhood for Thoroughly Modern Women is a fun look at being a mother that covers many subjects in five areas. Part One is Pregnancy and Birth with a witty look at parenting classes for expectant mothers and fathers and Daisy Waugh is right who wants to go see a movie of the private event of the birth of a baby in a room full of other stranger men and women with the knowledge that soon you are going to have to face that messy and painful event of birth yourself? The second part is Baby Care and I particularly liked the section on the use of disposable diapers vs. using cloth and saving the planet. If you are a die in the wool ecologist, skip this section, you won't get her humor. For the rest of us she gives a unique view that made me smile. The third section is called Child Care talks about the guilt of leaving your child to go back to work, trying to stay at home to be a full time mother to daddy-daughter relations where your loving husband declares his daughter is never... Well where does the fool think his daughter came from anyway? Section four is School starting with preschool, parent-teacher meetings and the all-time favorite of any working parent, homework when all you want is to veg-out but the kids need your 'help' with some math you never seen before when you went to school. (Personally I can remember one math teacher that called me and asked me to quit helping with algebra because the way I learned it has all changed and I was confusing my child, not helping them and he would tutor my son if needed.) I also might mention that I have been a teacher (not math)and at that time a school district administrator for many years when this happened. (Now you have heard my funny story.) Part five is Charm School and it covers swearing, Godparents, Squabbling Children and the Magic of Childhood. The magic of childhood when a child spends time just watching the clouds and seeing animals and shapes is not a waste of time and we can't buy the magic of childhood with a trip to an amusement park. As adults we need to realize that children in being themselves, whether watch clouds of a movie for the one hundred eighty-fourth time (one grandson picked Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang! for his constantly repeated movie when he came to my house) are the magic of childhood. As a professional educator, I did not always agree with the author but she wrote a witty and very funny book, while it was obvious that she loved her three children and husband dearly and realized that she, as a mother was not perfect and to expect that hurts children because as she says, "Motherhood is also about mothers."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This is a funny, tongue in cheek look at what we espouse to be motherhood in today’s media frenzied era. The author note all the hype put out about motherhood, and explains her simple, understated views on the same. The book is filled with wisdom and a hearty dose of humor as she debunks many of the myths the media perpetuates. From her assertion that we have children because we want to have children, not because of some media imposed sense of selflessness to her to her comments that we can and This is a funny, tongue in cheek look at what we espouse to be motherhood in today’s media frenzied era. The author note all the hype put out about motherhood, and explains her simple, understated views on the same. The book is filled with wisdom and a hearty dose of humor as she debunks many of the myths the media perpetuates. From her assertion that we have children because we want to have children, not because of some media imposed sense of selflessness to her to her comments that we can and should feed the children what we want to and can and not the organic food the media and others insist we should, this book addresses most of the common ideas and philosophies put forth about motherhood today. The book covers all the stages of motherhood: pregnancy, baby care, child care, school, and charm school, while debunking most of what the uninitiated continue to hold near and dear. I could easily see this mother having, raising and loving her children in her own way, despite what others think or say. Nevertheless, in the process of all this, a mother who knows how to other, raise and love her children comes through loud and clear. I found her ideas refreshing and insightful in many ways. The soon-to-be-mother as well as the seasoned mother and older grandmother could easily agree with the author as they read along with her somewhat pristine but definitely wholesome and experienced ideas. In today’s day and climate, I wish there were more books that speak to the truth in all matters as this one does available for reading. I highly recommend this one, for sheer enjoyment if not for the nuggets of wisdom the author provides. I received this from Library Thing to read and review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tori

    I started out kind of liking this book and then I got about half way through. This book is a smattering of her thoughts and didn't even show any studies or speak much about if she even ran some of this by her friends, family etc. I had to force myself to finish it. Do yourself a favor and read "free range moms" or even "Scary Mommy." This book wasn't even funny. It was honestly just her rambling and complaining a lot about other moms because she apparently thinks they all hate her or are judging I started out kind of liking this book and then I got about half way through. This book is a smattering of her thoughts and didn't even show any studies or speak much about if she even ran some of this by her friends, family etc. I had to force myself to finish it. Do yourself a favor and read "free range moms" or even "Scary Mommy." This book wasn't even funny. It was honestly just her rambling and complaining a lot about other moms because she apparently thinks they all hate her or are judging her when they probably couldnt care less. She sounds like a shrew about it. Where are the statistics that show a child is more likely to get struck by lightening than kidnapped by a stranger? Where are the studies showing non-organic is just as OK. I feed nonorganic, but jesus...put in some kind of info about why it is fine. The title is misleading. There is nothing in this book showing that "yes, you're kids will be just fine." It should be titled, "I'm trying to cash in on the free range kids movement by writing my own drivel.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    I think that Daisy Waugh makes many good points here. I think somehow between my parents generation and my generation of parenting we have taken on way too many responsibilities that are not ours. And in addition, we've taken some great learning experiences away from our children by doing so much for them. With that said, I feel like there are definitely some really worthwhile things that need to be supported by adults with more time than I have. I'm thinking about my daughters' Girl Scout leade I think that Daisy Waugh makes many good points here. I think somehow between my parents generation and my generation of parenting we have taken on way too many responsibilities that are not ours. And in addition, we've taken some great learning experiences away from our children by doing so much for them. With that said, I feel like there are definitely some really worthwhile things that need to be supported by adults with more time than I have. I'm thinking about my daughters' Girl Scout leaders, my son's Boy Scout leaders, the catechists that teach my children religious education. I am grateful to these women and men so often. Sure I can volunteer a little time here and there, but there is no way I could take on the organization necessary for such things. I think it would have been great if Ms. Waugh could have acknowledged the contribution these people make, which is not "made up" work.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lissa

    As the mother of three children, I know a thing or two about parental guilt so I was looking forward to reading this book. The author looks at different aspects of motherhood and the sometimes unrealistic expectations placed on mothers. First of all, this is a funny book and I laughed out loud several times. Her sections on pregnancy and baby care are by far the funniest I have ever read. However, about midway through her opinions become fiercer and I am not sure she does a good job alleviating As the mother of three children, I know a thing or two about parental guilt so I was looking forward to reading this book. The author looks at different aspects of motherhood and the sometimes unrealistic expectations placed on mothers. First of all, this is a funny book and I laughed out loud several times. Her sections on pregnancy and baby care are by far the funniest I have ever read. However, about midway through her opinions become fiercer and I am not sure she does a good job alleviating that guilt. I also didn’t find some of her examples very relevant…possibly because my children go to public schools? Regardless, this is a very funny book and I was able to sympathize and agree with enough points to make it worth the read. I received this book through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Frambach

    I was so excited to receive this book for free as a part of the good reads first reads program. This is a book of short snippets about motherhood. Waugh calls for more relaxed parenting style. This book is a sort of anti-parenting guide that tells us to not fear motherhood, not to feel guilty and to maintain your own life outside of motherhood. The book is funny at times, like when she tells us about how much useless plastic baby stuff she has purchased. At certain points the book is infuriating I was so excited to receive this book for free as a part of the good reads first reads program. This is a book of short snippets about motherhood. Waugh calls for more relaxed parenting style. This book is a sort of anti-parenting guide that tells us to not fear motherhood, not to feel guilty and to maintain your own life outside of motherhood. The book is funny at times, like when she tells us about how much useless plastic baby stuff she has purchased. At certain points the book is infuriating. For example, she tells us not to bother teaching children to write thank you notes. No matter if you agree with her parenting style or not, you can tell she loves her children dearly. Overall, it is a fun, entertaining read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Harriet

    This book is certainly refreshing in the sense that the underlying message is, let's stop criticising our different parenting techniques and accept that the norm is that we love our children and want the best for them. I agree with the author and think that it is high time we leave the pressure that there is such a thing as a 'perfect mother' behind. My only caveat is that she comes across as so angry that I find myself as frightened of her as I am of the 'super mums' she is so critical of. She This book is certainly refreshing in the sense that the underlying message is, let's stop criticising our different parenting techniques and accept that the norm is that we love our children and want the best for them. I agree with the author and think that it is high time we leave the pressure that there is such a thing as a 'perfect mother' behind. My only caveat is that she comes across as so angry that I find myself as frightened of her as I am of the 'super mums' she is so critical of. She does make some blunt, sweeping generalisations about Catholics that are not only judgmental but incorrect too. To sum up: this is an angry rant that is sometimes amusing, often judgmental but is well written and I pretty much read it in one sitting.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Picked this up from a display in the Edmonds library when we visited there this summer. I thought it would help me, provide some answers, but of course it didn't. I suppose I should stop hoping that. In any case I found her point of view neither new nor liberating. I would rather read my friend's blog, which is just as irreverent but more trustworthy. However I did read most of this, wondering what her take would be on certain parental topics. I saved birth and breastfeeding for last 'cause I kn Picked this up from a display in the Edmonds library when we visited there this summer. I thought it would help me, provide some answers, but of course it didn't. I suppose I should stop hoping that. In any case I found her point of view neither new nor liberating. I would rather read my friend's blog, which is just as irreverent but more trustworthy. However I did read most of this, wondering what her take would be on certain parental topics. I saved birth and breastfeeding for last 'cause I knew I would cringe. Sometimes it was funny and I liked that it made light, in general, but sometimes it just went too far for my tastes, and wasn't entertaining enough while doing so, I guess.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tova

    This book was clearly written only to justify the author's decisions in the way she parented her children. Based on what? Her opinions. She cites no research, articles, or studies, claiming you can find research to support anything. She mocks all other methods...but isn't really funny, even if/when you agree. I fell asleep 3 times in 15 minutes on the same page, at only 10:30-10:45pm. I wish I hadn't wasted my time finishing this book. This book was clearly written only to justify the author's decisions in the way she parented her children. Based on what? Her opinions. She cites no research, articles, or studies, claiming you can find research to support anything. She mocks all other methods...but isn't really funny, even if/when you agree. I fell asleep 3 times in 15 minutes on the same page, at only 10:30-10:45pm. I wish I hadn't wasted my time finishing this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brittany M.

    I will readily admit that I only read the first 15 pages of this book. I'm not normally an advocate for rating a book in such a case, but if you're going to write a book decrying all the judgement parents and especially mothers get about their parenting choices, you should probably not open that book pissing on women who choose natural childbirth. After reading other reviews, I also read the chapter on stay-at-home moms and found it just as judgmental. Will not waste any more time with this. I will readily admit that I only read the first 15 pages of this book. I'm not normally an advocate for rating a book in such a case, but if you're going to write a book decrying all the judgement parents and especially mothers get about their parenting choices, you should probably not open that book pissing on women who choose natural childbirth. After reading other reviews, I also read the chapter on stay-at-home moms and found it just as judgmental. Will not waste any more time with this.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I liked the subtitle, but this author's viewpoint is not mine. I don't believe in guilt-ridden parenthood, but Waugh's dismissal of any desire to keep chemicals away from your baby really turned me off. I don't have that attitude toward my own health, so I was looking for more of a reassurance that "dirt won't hurt." I don't expect to agree with everything in a parenting book, but her lack of consideration for any benefits of a "natural" approach made me doubt any of her arguments. I liked the subtitle, but this author's viewpoint is not mine. I don't believe in guilt-ridden parenthood, but Waugh's dismissal of any desire to keep chemicals away from your baby really turned me off. I don't have that attitude toward my own health, so I was looking for more of a reassurance that "dirt won't hurt." I don't expect to agree with everything in a parenting book, but her lack of consideration for any benefits of a "natural" approach made me doubt any of her arguments.

  26. 4 out of 5

    B

    To all the women who feel there might be more to life than being home all day, or recognize that even though they love their kids they think they're might be more to life. I felt like I had a friend, someone who understood and gave me permission not to conform to all of the other mothers out there. Thank you for reminding me we can love our kids and love ourselves too. To all the women who feel there might be more to life than being home all day, or recognize that even though they love their kids they think they're might be more to life. I felt like I had a friend, someone who understood and gave me permission not to conform to all of the other mothers out there. Thank you for reminding me we can love our kids and love ourselves too.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    For someone who writes about mothers uniting and not judging each other, the author sure comes across as judgmental. This book is basically her thoughts and grievances - it tends to be negative and not funny and it's not worth the time to read it. Though I do agree with the premise that there is a lot of unnecessary mom-guilt. For someone who writes about mothers uniting and not judging each other, the author sure comes across as judgmental. This book is basically her thoughts and grievances - it tends to be negative and not funny and it's not worth the time to read it. Though I do agree with the premise that there is a lot of unnecessary mom-guilt.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This is a fun, entertaining read. I certainly don't agree with everything Daisy Waugh says about parenting, but even when she's ranting against one of my "things" (like breastfeeding), I can appreciate the humor of the way she presents her perspective. This is a fun, entertaining read. I certainly don't agree with everything Daisy Waugh says about parenting, but even when she's ranting against one of my "things" (like breastfeeding), I can appreciate the humor of the way she presents her perspective.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    After winning this book from goodreads I couldn't wait to read it. Although my parenting is the complete opposite of what is talked about, I enjoyed reading about her style. After winning this book from goodreads I couldn't wait to read it. Although my parenting is the complete opposite of what is talked about, I enjoyed reading about her style.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ampersand Inc.

    Super-short funny and provocative advice on child-rearing; perfect for the time-strapped parent

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