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The One Week Marketing Plan: The Set It & Forget It Approach for Quickly Growing Your Business

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We’re told marketing is hard. That it requires months of analysis, weeks of brainstorming, and years of consistent implementation. To succeed in marketing, you need the fortitude of General Patton, the genius of Don Draper, and the cash reserves of Warren Buffet. WRONG. One week. That’s all it takes for most small and medium-sized businesses to dramatically improve their ma We’re told marketing is hard. That it requires months of analysis, weeks of brainstorming, and years of consistent implementation. To succeed in marketing, you need the fortitude of General Patton, the genius of Don Draper, and the cash reserves of Warren Buffet. WRONG. One week. That’s all it takes for most small and medium-sized businesses to dramatically improve their marketing. And let’s face it, most business owners do very little marketing, and what they do is not particularly effective. Business owners often don’t know how to best market their company, or are too busy working to make time to promote it. What they don’t realize is that effective marketing doesn’t have to be complicated or time-consuming. Mark Satterfield’s The One-Week Marketing Plan lays out a step-by-step system entrepreneurs can put in place in just five business days. This “set it and forget it” strategy works all day, every day to bring in new business. Tailored to each company’s niche market, this innovative plan can generate a consistent stream of customers for an out-of-pocket expense of as little as $300. Satterfield, founder and CEO of Gentle Rain Marketing, Inc., has more than two decades of experience helping clients in more than 75 niche industries grow their businesses without cold calling or hard selling. Now, in The One-Week Marketing Plan, his strategies and wisdom are accessible and realistic for entrepreneurs, self-employed professionals, and business owners looking to move in a new direction. One week. That’s all it takes. So let’s get started.


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We’re told marketing is hard. That it requires months of analysis, weeks of brainstorming, and years of consistent implementation. To succeed in marketing, you need the fortitude of General Patton, the genius of Don Draper, and the cash reserves of Warren Buffet. WRONG. One week. That’s all it takes for most small and medium-sized businesses to dramatically improve their ma We’re told marketing is hard. That it requires months of analysis, weeks of brainstorming, and years of consistent implementation. To succeed in marketing, you need the fortitude of General Patton, the genius of Don Draper, and the cash reserves of Warren Buffet. WRONG. One week. That’s all it takes for most small and medium-sized businesses to dramatically improve their marketing. And let’s face it, most business owners do very little marketing, and what they do is not particularly effective. Business owners often don’t know how to best market their company, or are too busy working to make time to promote it. What they don’t realize is that effective marketing doesn’t have to be complicated or time-consuming. Mark Satterfield’s The One-Week Marketing Plan lays out a step-by-step system entrepreneurs can put in place in just five business days. This “set it and forget it” strategy works all day, every day to bring in new business. Tailored to each company’s niche market, this innovative plan can generate a consistent stream of customers for an out-of-pocket expense of as little as $300. Satterfield, founder and CEO of Gentle Rain Marketing, Inc., has more than two decades of experience helping clients in more than 75 niche industries grow their businesses without cold calling or hard selling. Now, in The One-Week Marketing Plan, his strategies and wisdom are accessible and realistic for entrepreneurs, self-employed professionals, and business owners looking to move in a new direction. One week. That’s all it takes. So let’s get started.

30 review for The One Week Marketing Plan: The Set It & Forget It Approach for Quickly Growing Your Business

  1. 5 out of 5

    Iola

    All Plan, no Strategy The pitch is good: Marketing shouldn’t be expensive or time-consuming. The key is to focus on a system, not unconnected activities. It’s about developing relationships, not selling things. You can develop an effective system in a week, and it’s something anyone can do. Sounds good so far. Day One is determining the niche market to focus on. This is something most branding and marketing experts agree on, but an idea people rebel against. They don’t want to target just 0.001% All Plan, no Strategy The pitch is good: Marketing shouldn’t be expensive or time-consuming. The key is to focus on a system, not unconnected activities. It’s about developing relationships, not selling things. You can develop an effective system in a week, and it’s something anyone can do. Sounds good so far. Day One is determining the niche market to focus on. This is something most branding and marketing experts agree on, but an idea people rebel against. They don’t want to target just 0.001% of the market. They want to be all things to all people. Day Two is creating a free offer for prospective clients. Here’s where we run into our first problem. *whispers* I don’t like the website, which he gives as an example of how to implement his plan. It doesn’t give me any information about him, and it’s the kind of hard sell I’m not interested in (and I don’t think my clients would be interested in). It feels sleazy, and I don’t know if I can trust those “testimonials” (I found out later in the book that he wrote them, and the clients gave him permission to use them). Day Three is developing a website page to promote the free offer and obtain names for your mailing list, Day Four is developing some drip-marketing messages to be delivered to new signups and Day Five is writing ads for Google, Facebook and LinkedIn. I have to admit that he’s lost me here. I barely use LinkedIn any more because it’s been overtaken by spammers (like this guy, who admits he links to his blog post in 150 groups). And I’m not sold on the concept of Facebook advertising—too many stories about clickfarms. He then moves onto a series of “strategic marketing boosts”, which again seem more tactical than strategic (e.g. get a Twitter account), although there were some handy hints about how to record a slide show and post it on your blog. He says: “Many of us market to clients who are not terribly dissimilar from us. What engages you is also likely to intrigue your niche market.” This is my main issue with his plan. While there are some good ideas, the overall recommended execution isn’t my style. If the author is correct, it’s also not the style of my target audience. I’m already using the ideas I’m comfortable with. And, given I read these books to see if the ideas will work for the fiction authors I know and work with, are these ideas applicable to novelists? No. Because this plan appears to be more focused on selling services, not a product like a book. And because a plan is tactical, not strategic. This plan may well work for business owners who have undertaken some strategic planning and can see how these tactics will support their strategy. But the ideas aren’t for everyone. The author says: “Prospects will come into your marketing funnel automatically, week after week.” How? The whole marketing plan has been about getting people on a newsletter list, not actually selling them a product or service. At some point, a successful business has to convert leads into sales, and this ‘plan’ has nothing about how to make that jump. This is especially important if you are paying for advertising. It has to produce a return. In summary, there is some good information, but it’s not a complete guide to marketing, and it’s not a system that’s going to work for everyone. Thanks to NetGalley for providing a free ebook for review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Tons of great information I’m always skeptical of these types of books because they are usually filled with useless fillers, but this book has lots of great information. It’s especially useful for someone who is just beginning a marketing plan and is unsure where to start.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    A shortcut to developing, executing and maintaining one’s marketing plan? A “set it and forget it” approach for quickly growing your business? What’s there not to like? However the more astute manager or business owner might be advised to look just a little bit more behind the headline. All that glitters is not necessarily gold. The author claims that a business owner no longer needs to invest months of analysis, weeks of brainstorming and years of consistent implementation. It just needs a week A shortcut to developing, executing and maintaining one’s marketing plan? A “set it and forget it” approach for quickly growing your business? What’s there not to like? However the more astute manager or business owner might be advised to look just a little bit more behind the headline. All that glitters is not necessarily gold. The author claims that a business owner no longer needs to invest months of analysis, weeks of brainstorming and years of consistent implementation. It just needs a week to dramatically improve a company’s marketing. Arguably true, as the author admits that most business owners do very little marketing and what they do is not particularly effective. So doing a little more than the normal nothing of course is going to improve something. Quality as well as quantity however must be considered. Five business days are needed for the author’s step-by-step system programme that can be implemented for a couple of hundred dollars of chump change and then everything should run as clockwork. Sounds too good to be true, doesn’t it! Essentially the game plan is choose your niche market, create your free offer, create a website for the offer, develop “drip-marketing messages” and then get traffic to the website. As seems to be common with instant success-type schemes as portrayed in the book, the message has a kernel of truth, the expectation might be realised by some yet there will be a lot of frustrated, unsatisfied souls on the sidelines. What then went wrong? Wrong product? Wrong person? Failure to follow the plan? A failure in the plan? Part of this reviewer’s hesitancy, if not negativity, towards books of this kind is that they contain nuggets of sense that talk the talk yet they are incapable of being a one-size-fits-all approach (otherwise everyone would be doing it, this book has no “secret sauce” that no one else on the planet has discovered to date). Of course as a small company it is better to focus on a few things and try and master that rather than trying to be “everything to everyone” and failing. There are many good things you can take away from this book but it is better to view it as a tool, one of many you will need, rather than it being the Swiss Army penknife of marketing, being the only thing you ever need to do. Manage your expectations and throw a few buckets of cold water over the claims and you won’t go wrong. Now, of course, this reviewer might be a heretic, a non-believer and swimming against the tide. Even a stopped clock can be right twice a day. As a tool it can be a very good part of your toolkit. As the ONLY tool, sorry but one is not convinced. The One Week Marketing Plan: The Set It & Forget It Approach for Quickly Growing Your Business, written by Mark Satterfield and published by BenBella Books. ISBN 9781939529787, 320 pages. YYY

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danny Shemesh

    The book felt like a long blog post more than a proper book, but it had some value. It's basically promoting direct response marketing: 1. Target a niche 2. Offer a value for free (report/survey/myth-debunk/...) 3. Generate leads via ads (Google/Social) 4. Use opt-in forms to build a follower list 5. Use drip-emails to build relationship 6. Sell services The extra content was nice - copy templates and practical suggestions. Not a bad read overall, but I wouldn't say it was worth 15$ if you've already bee The book felt like a long blog post more than a proper book, but it had some value. It's basically promoting direct response marketing: 1. Target a niche 2. Offer a value for free (report/survey/myth-debunk/...) 3. Generate leads via ads (Google/Social) 4. Use opt-in forms to build a follower list 5. Use drip-emails to build relationship 6. Sell services The extra content was nice - copy templates and practical suggestions. Not a bad read overall, but I wouldn't say it was worth 15$ if you've already been exposed to the ideas of direct response marketing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shorel

    I love succinct and practical. This marketing book gave very practical steps to getting started in marketing. I'm sure for the MBAs out there, they are like "duh", but for a barefooter like myself...gold. Certainly a great place to start and highly recommended. Summarized: Day 1 - Find your niche. Day 2 - Give something away. Day 3 - Build a website Day 4 - Start marketing Day 5 - Increase web traffic Day 6,7 - Social media, mail-outs, mutual partner I love succinct and practical. This marketing book gave very practical steps to getting started in marketing. I'm sure for the MBAs out there, they are like "duh", but for a barefooter like myself...gold. Certainly a great place to start and highly recommended. Summarized: Day 1 - Find your niche. Day 2 - Give something away. Day 3 - Build a website Day 4 - Start marketing Day 5 - Increase web traffic Day 6,7 - Social media, mail-outs, mutual partner

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    I enjoyed this book. Nothing earth shattering or life changing, just good old-fashioned advice that was easy to implement.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amin Omat

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike Williams

  9. 5 out of 5

    Will

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cam Slach

  11. 5 out of 5

    Richard Moore

  12. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Hotea

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Benson

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bradley K

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bill Goveia

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shane Wesley

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julian Wyatt

  18. 5 out of 5

    UndeadArtist

  19. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Nazmi

  20. 4 out of 5

    Janice

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Achilles

    As one who knows nothing about marketing and looking to launch my own business, this was a helpful, simple and insightful read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Juliane Lackner

  24. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Cole

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tor

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  27. 4 out of 5

    Trish

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mark Vedel

  29. 5 out of 5

    J.s. Kahlon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Satindra Ahluwalia

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