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All the News That's Fit to Sell: How the Market Transforms Information Into News

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That market forces drive the news is not news. Whether a story appears in print, on television, or on the Internet depends on who is interested, its value to advertisers, the costs of assembling the details, and competitors' products. But in All the News That's Fit to Sell, economist James Hamilton shows just how this happens. Furthermore, many complaints about journalism- That market forces drive the news is not news. Whether a story appears in print, on television, or on the Internet depends on who is interested, its value to advertisers, the costs of assembling the details, and competitors' products. But in All the News That's Fit to Sell, economist James Hamilton shows just how this happens. Furthermore, many complaints about journalism--media bias, soft news, and pundits as celebrities--arise from the impact of this economic logic on news judgments. This is the first book to develop an economic theory of news, analyze evidence across a wide range of media markets on how incentives affect news content, and offer policy conclusions. Media bias, for instance, was long a staple of the news. Hamilton's analysis of newspapers from 1870 to 1900 reveals how nonpartisan reporting became the norm. A hundred years later, some partisan elements reemerged as, for example, evening news broadcasts tried to retain young female viewers with stories aimed at their (Democratic) political interests. Examination of story selection on the network evening news programs from 1969 to 1998 shows how cable competition, deregulation, and ownership changes encouraged a shift from hard news about politics toward more soft news about entertainers. Hamilton concludes by calling for lower costs of access to government information, a greater role for nonprofits in funding journalism, the development of norms that stress hard news reporting, and the defining of digital and Internet property rights to encourage the flow of news. Ultimately, this book shows that by more fully understanding the economics behind the news, we will be better positioned to ensure that the news serves the public good.


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That market forces drive the news is not news. Whether a story appears in print, on television, or on the Internet depends on who is interested, its value to advertisers, the costs of assembling the details, and competitors' products. But in All the News That's Fit to Sell, economist James Hamilton shows just how this happens. Furthermore, many complaints about journalism- That market forces drive the news is not news. Whether a story appears in print, on television, or on the Internet depends on who is interested, its value to advertisers, the costs of assembling the details, and competitors' products. But in All the News That's Fit to Sell, economist James Hamilton shows just how this happens. Furthermore, many complaints about journalism--media bias, soft news, and pundits as celebrities--arise from the impact of this economic logic on news judgments. This is the first book to develop an economic theory of news, analyze evidence across a wide range of media markets on how incentives affect news content, and offer policy conclusions. Media bias, for instance, was long a staple of the news. Hamilton's analysis of newspapers from 1870 to 1900 reveals how nonpartisan reporting became the norm. A hundred years later, some partisan elements reemerged as, for example, evening news broadcasts tried to retain young female viewers with stories aimed at their (Democratic) political interests. Examination of story selection on the network evening news programs from 1969 to 1998 shows how cable competition, deregulation, and ownership changes encouraged a shift from hard news about politics toward more soft news about entertainers. Hamilton concludes by calling for lower costs of access to government information, a greater role for nonprofits in funding journalism, the development of norms that stress hard news reporting, and the defining of digital and Internet property rights to encourage the flow of news. Ultimately, this book shows that by more fully understanding the economics behind the news, we will be better positioned to ensure that the news serves the public good.

47 review for All the News That's Fit to Sell: How the Market Transforms Information Into News

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chrissie Huang

    it’s a pretty dry book full of stats. read this only if you’re super into how news became news or if you’re in the news industry(?) i skimmed thru the the most part.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Schulz

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carter

  4. 5 out of 5

    x

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  6. 4 out of 5

    MJ

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Rauch

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

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    Richard Moore

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pratiksha

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nik

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jes

  13. 4 out of 5

    JC Meisinger

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ike Sharpless

  15. 5 out of 5

    Steph

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Warino

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  18. 5 out of 5

    Portia

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    Curtis

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Milito

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    John

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    Paul

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Lieberman

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark

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    Laura

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    Matthew

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    Alan Sayter

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim

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    Dan

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    Hertzel Karbasi

  32. 5 out of 5

    LPenting

  33. 5 out of 5

    Gina

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    Leo

  35. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  36. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  37. 5 out of 5

    John Nelson

  38. 5 out of 5

    George Winslow

  39. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  40. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  41. 5 out of 5

    Bec

  42. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  43. 5 out of 5

    Brian Cuban

  44. 4 out of 5

    Dkiesow

  45. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  46. 4 out of 5

    Kevin J. Rogers

  47. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

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