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Using and Understanding Mathematics: A Quantitative Reasoning Approach

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Most students taking this course do so to fulfill a requirement, but the true benefit of the course is learning how to use and understand mathematics in daily life. This quantitative reasoning text is written expressly for those students, providing them with the mathematical reasoning and quantitative literacy skills they'll need to make good decisions throughout their liv Most students taking this course do so to fulfill a requirement, but the true benefit of the course is learning how to use and understand mathematics in daily life. This quantitative reasoning text is written expressly for those students, providing them with the mathematical reasoning and quantitative literacy skills they'll need to make good decisions throughout their lives. Common-sense applications of mathematics engage students while underscoring the practical, essential uses of math.


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Most students taking this course do so to fulfill a requirement, but the true benefit of the course is learning how to use and understand mathematics in daily life. This quantitative reasoning text is written expressly for those students, providing them with the mathematical reasoning and quantitative literacy skills they'll need to make good decisions throughout their liv Most students taking this course do so to fulfill a requirement, but the true benefit of the course is learning how to use and understand mathematics in daily life. This quantitative reasoning text is written expressly for those students, providing them with the mathematical reasoning and quantitative literacy skills they'll need to make good decisions throughout their lives. Common-sense applications of mathematics engage students while underscoring the practical, essential uses of math.

30 review for Using and Understanding Mathematics: A Quantitative Reasoning Approach

  1. 4 out of 5

    Terri Lynn

    I read this to decide whether it would be useful in teaching math to classes of home school high school students and to prepare them to take the CLEP in general math to get college credit. To my astonishment, I loved it! Most of the math books I have used or taught from are so dull but this is actually exciting. I didn't actually begin it today as Goodreads insists. I just posted today so to write the review. This is THE book to use with students who are math phobic but who still need arithmetic, I read this to decide whether it would be useful in teaching math to classes of home school high school students and to prepare them to take the CLEP in general math to get college credit. To my astonishment, I loved it! Most of the math books I have used or taught from are so dull but this is actually exciting. I didn't actually begin it today as Goodreads insists. I just posted today so to write the review. This is THE book to use with students who are math phobic but who still need arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and statistics/probability at the college freshman level. It is written very clearly with interesting examples that explain concepts well and there is a lot of practice with interesting problems that often are thought provoking. I love, love, love the first two chapters because they are an introduction to formal logic which I think everyone should study. All of the chapters relate the math in them to real life applications and uses. For example, chapter 3 has the student studies the use and abuse of percentages and how numbers can deceive in polygraphs, mammograms and more. Chapter 4 heads into managing money, taxes, loan payments, credit card use and abuse, student loans, and more while studying some algebra. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 cover statistics and probability including the use of Excel and covering how statistics can be deceiving, the probability of winning the lottery, and how the auto companies have gone bankrupt. Chapters 8, 9, and 10 cover linear versus exponential growth, doubling, graphing functions, algebra with logarithms, and geometry while studying the towers of Hanoi, spy satellites, and bald eagle recovery. Chapter 11 teaches math through music and the final chapter, chapter 12, includes math through politics and whether the majority rules, the theory of voting, apportionment of the House of Representatives, and dividing the political pie. As you can see, by studying math as it applies to everything from determining the magnitude of spending on ice cream in the USA to determining the likelihood that flood will strike a city in two consecutive years by studying its 100 year flood record, this is math made interesting.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Kurz

    textbook for fall 2009

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ward and June

    I hate math - I am a developmental psychology major - why am I being subjected to this? I had enough math for a tech degree, but for psych I need more?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Angela Pearson

    I did it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Teachout

    Used for class, this is a great overview of many difficult concepts, with real-world examples that make the math useful and relevant. With plenty of exercises and several forms of explanation for each problem, this is the best math textbook I've ever come across.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Some of the problems were very difficult for people who aren’t math majors and it was also worded very poorly

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thara Tenney

    Need to know information but boring.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I wouldn't exactly say this. Textbooks are hard to criticize, especially one dedicated to math. It's not that I like math- quite frankly I hate it and am glad this is the only math class I have to take in college. However, I can't entirely bash this. In all the time I've had this book, I've only cracked it open twice. Twice guys. Once to figure out how to convert figures (i.e. money, measurements, and so on) and the other for tax purposes. I suppose I'm not an accurate judge of the book; my prof I wouldn't exactly say this. Textbooks are hard to criticize, especially one dedicated to math. It's not that I like math- quite frankly I hate it and am glad this is the only math class I have to take in college. However, I can't entirely bash this. In all the time I've had this book, I've only cracked it open twice. Twice guys. Once to figure out how to convert figures (i.e. money, measurements, and so on) and the other for tax purposes. I suppose I'm not an accurate judge of the book; my professor just doesn't use it and, quite frankly, I'm fine with that. Learning math from textbooks never has been my strong suit. I digress, the book was fine. It can be confusing at times, though. The table to convert money like pesos to the US dollar? Well, I looked at that chart so many times and still couldn't grasp what it said. Google, sadly, was my friend during that unit. Based on the taxes unit, well, it is factual. I'll give it that. So my rating would be a 3.5/5.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    (Note: Reviewing "Mathematical Tools for the Real World: Using and Understanding Mathematics", a custom edition of this book used by Brigham Young University-Idaho) This is a very basic math text used for a terminal math class. It is exactly what it sounds like, and it does a good job of it. It gets tedious at times, but what math textbook doesn't? I took this class right after completing precalculus, which is probably an influence on my opinion. The online portion is overrated and overpriced, bu (Note: Reviewing "Mathematical Tools for the Real World: Using and Understanding Mathematics", a custom edition of this book used by Brigham Young University-Idaho) This is a very basic math text used for a terminal math class. It is exactly what it sounds like, and it does a good job of it. It gets tedious at times, but what math textbook doesn't? I took this class right after completing precalculus, which is probably an influence on my opinion. The online portion is overrated and overpriced, but there's nothing you can do as a student to change that. You're just going to have to grit your teeth and throw your money down the drain on that part.

  10. 4 out of 5

    R.M. Donaldson

    Last math class I HAVE to take ever! I'm so glad to be done! The book was a pretty good math book. It helped a lot with my HUGE struggle with math. Maybe the best I've never been able to use. Taught me math better than most anything ever has.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Loo

    This is the first math book where the text made sense. I could understand how to do the problems without needing a lecture. This book deals with real life math (taxes, mortgages, etc.) and has very useful formulas in it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Boostamonte Halvorsen

    For a math book, it was really interesting! I loved that it explored the way math is used in our daily lives. I loved the way arguments are spelled out mathmatically!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dina

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laquesha Anderson

  17. 4 out of 5

    rebecca jackson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Brown

  19. 5 out of 5

    Derek

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emily Winger

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Bennett

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlynn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Jones

  26. 5 out of 5

    AJ Vaughn

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Teague

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katie Van Dyke

  29. 4 out of 5

    Allie Cooper

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

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