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The X-Men are shaken to the core by the Battle of the Atom. Kitty Pryde is particularly shaken by the events of the X-Men crossover. With her students gone, what is Kitty to do? Collecting: All-New X-Men 18-21, & material from A+X 18, X-Men: Battle of the Atom 2


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The X-Men are shaken to the core by the Battle of the Atom. Kitty Pryde is particularly shaken by the events of the X-Men crossover. With her students gone, what is Kitty to do? Collecting: All-New X-Men 18-21, & material from A+X 18, X-Men: Battle of the Atom 2

30 review for All-New X-Men, Volume 4: All-Different

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    “Bendis, get in here!” “Yes, sir!” “There’s a problem with your story.” “Which one, sir? I write about 137 of them a week for Marvel so you’ll have to be more specific.” “Oh, right. I’m talking about the latest issues of All-New X-Men.” “What’s the problem?” “There’s no Wolverine in them.” “Right. It’s about the original X-Men team being brought to the present day and having to deal with seeing their future. Wolverine didn’t join the X-Men until later so he’s not with them.” “Yeah, but he’s around now, “Bendis, get in here!” “Yes, sir!” “There’s a problem with your story.” “Which one, sir? I write about 137 of them a week for Marvel so you’ll have to be more specific.” “Oh, right. I’m talking about the latest issues of All-New X-Men.” “What’s the problem?” “There’s no Wolverine in them.” “Right. It’s about the original X-Men team being brought to the present day and having to deal with seeing their future. Wolverine didn’t join the X-Men until later so he’s not with them.” “Yeah, but he’s around now, isn’t he? So why haven’t you put him on the team? Hell, since he’s the oldest, make him their leader. That’ll be a nice twist.” “Uh, but sir. We’ve already got Kitty Pryde acting as their mentor and leader. Frankly, it’s going pretty well so I’d hate to….” “Bendis, are you aware of Marvel's General Order #1?” “Of course, sir.” “And what does it state?” “Put Wolverine In Every Book.” “Pretty clear, isn’t it?” “Yes, sir. I think calling one title Wolverine & The X-Men was particularly inspired.” “That was my idea, you know.” “I am aware of that, sir, and a brilliant idea it was.” “Right, so why are you fighting me on putting Wolverine in this one?” “Ordinarily, I’d agree with you 100%, sir, but I’m afraid I wrote us into a bit of a corner here. I had managed to work Wolverine into All New X-Men earlier as an authority figure who wanted to send the team back to their own time. That led into a lot of the conflict we used as part of Battle of the Atom.” “Now that was a good crossover. Lots of Wolverine in that one.” “Yes, sir, but unfortunately the aftermath of that would make it very difficult to come up with a logical story reason for Wolverine to work with this team.” “Hmmm…I don’t suppose those fanboys would just forget about that?” “I doubt it, sir. They’re pretty touchy about continuity.” “Damn them and their parents for letting them live in their basements! They’re the ones who want all this Wolverine, but now they’re making it impossible for us to deliver him! What do they want from us?” “I have an idea, sir. We could use X-23.” “X-23? What’s that? Some kind of amnesia gas we can spray on those Cheeto snarfing comic geeks?” “No, sir. It’s actually another character we have. Laura Kinney, she’s the female clone of Wolverine.” “Oh, that’s right. She’s got a healing factor and claws too, right?" “Yes sir. She even has foot claws!” “Foot claws, eh? Well, it’s not Wolverine, but I guess it's going to have to be close enough. Any chance you could tie some of this into some history those fanboys will recognize?” “How about a link to the classic God Loves, Man Kills story?” “That’ll do. I’m still worried about our overall Wolverine quota dropping though.” “Maybe we could do something big to get him more publicity, sir.” “Like what?” “Killing off a character and bringing him back later usually does the trick, sir.” “Great idea. We’ll get to work on that right away. We have to keep the fans happy because I just heard those Hollywood nitwits are going to use Rocket Raccoon in our latest movie. You believe that? Featuring a damn talking space raccoon instead of Wolverine in a big budget movie? I don’t know what idiot cooked that up, but I expect that it’ll flop and cripple the company!”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Three and a half stars. Contrary to what The Who say, the Kids are not Alright. The whole back-to-the-future experiment has been pretty much a fiasco and the X-Kids from the past are now stuck in the present, which is their future. Off page the X-Kids leave Wolverine’s Romper Room school and join up with the other mutants at Camp Cyclops. Kitty Pryde, who’s now revealed to be Jewish (Mazel Tov!), accompanies them. Hola! Professor Butthead! Beyond the seemingly endless obligatory fish-out-of-water hu Three and a half stars. Contrary to what The Who say, the Kids are not Alright. The whole back-to-the-future experiment has been pretty much a fiasco and the X-Kids from the past are now stuck in the present, which is their future. Off page the X-Kids leave Wolverine’s Romper Room school and join up with the other mutants at Camp Cyclops. Kitty Pryde, who’s now revealed to be Jewish (Mazel Tov!), accompanies them. Hola! Professor Butthead! Beyond the seemingly endless obligatory fish-out-of-water humorous asides… …the X-Kids go on a “training” exercise against a group of mutant haters and end up rescuing X-23. This plot development triggers some hormonal stuff from the X-Teenaged boys. Me, if I’m face-to-face with a woman with metal claws coming out of her hands, my first response would be to duck and cover, not this… Stop thinking with Lil Cyclops! Ask your future self, it'll get you nowhere, Scottie. The run-in with the Purifiers also triggers more discussion about the Past-Present-Future consequences of the X-Kids from the past being in our present, but their future. *sobs at the enormity of it all* Happy Birthday X-Men! The Gold issue contained herein offers X-Stories from many of the books past creators. Most are passable, with the best being Wolverine day dreaming about how he’ll kill off the rest of the group if they don’t buy him beer, as Charles Xavier blathers on about the finer points of a rescue mission. Sadly, nobody wrote a pool party story. Bottom Line: Bendis was writing a lot of books back then and the strain shows. Mediocre Bendis is better than some creator’s best, still….

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I know other people ore sort of over these guys, but I'm still enjoying the hell out of the All new X-men. Compared to some of the crap I've read, this title is a breath of fresh air. I could have done without the A+X stuff, but even those stories weren't too bad. So, the kids have left the Jean Grey School, and now they (and Kitty Pryde) are running with Cyclops. As a bonus, they're back with Warren, so the gang's all together. I've honestly forgotten what happened in the previous volume, but app I know other people ore sort of over these guys, but I'm still enjoying the hell out of the All new X-men. Compared to some of the crap I've read, this title is a breath of fresh air. I could have done without the A+X stuff, but even those stories weren't too bad. So, the kids have left the Jean Grey School, and now they (and Kitty Pryde) are running with Cyclops. As a bonus, they're back with Warren, so the gang's all together. I've honestly forgotten what happened in the previous volume, but apparently going back to their own time (at least for now) isn't possible. Yay! Even better, X-23 joins the cast! As her #1 fan I have to say, I may be slightly biased about this volume due to my inner fangirl screaming like a teenager. Still. X-23!!!! Beast and Cyclops were still sort of pining after Jean at the beginning of this one, but I don't think that will be the case for long. It's so cool to watch at these characters turn into something different than what their original versions were. And since the whole space-time thing is already fucked, why not just run with these ideas and go wild? I love it! I read these in single issues on Marvel Unlimited, so whatever material from X-men Battle of the Atom 2 was in this volume, I didn't get...but I enjoyed it anyway.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    This volume seemed like a bit of a dip in quality. Or maybe that's because a few issues with some serious developments have been skipped between the previous volume and this one. I assume they're in X-Men: Battle of the Atom, but I guess I'll find out when I finally read it. In theory, adding X-23 to the cast is probably a good thing. I was getting bored with the Jean drama. To be honest, I was bored with Jean drama two deaths ago. Having another female character to keep the boys from completely This volume seemed like a bit of a dip in quality. Or maybe that's because a few issues with some serious developments have been skipped between the previous volume and this one. I assume they're in X-Men: Battle of the Atom, but I guess I'll find out when I finally read it. In theory, adding X-23 to the cast is probably a good thing. I was getting bored with the Jean drama. To be honest, I was bored with Jean drama two deaths ago. Having another female character to keep the boys from completely and entirely fixating on Jean is a fantastic development. But I'm apprehensive as to how X-23 will actually fit into the team, and whether or not she'll be a permanent edition or just have a lengthy guest stint. And I actually don't know that much about her, so I don't have any sort of emotional attachment to her at all. I've never been entirely convinced by this premise to begin with, and I feel like it's starting to show wear. Maybe I would have liked it a lot more if I'd read those other issues first.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Frank Eldritch

    The fourth volume for Brian Michael Bendis' going-strong All-New X-Men is comprised of issues #18-21 which were the installments that dealt with the aftermath of the crossover event in Battle of the Atom. It also features the 50th anniversary Gold issue as a bonus material. Man, this volume is a lot more bipolar than the usual. Kitty Pryde shockingly decided to leave the Jean Grey Institute of Higher Learning, turning her back on her long-time comrades (and surrogate parents) Ororo and Logan whom The fourth volume for Brian Michael Bendis' going-strong All-New X-Men is comprised of issues #18-21 which were the installments that dealt with the aftermath of the crossover event in Battle of the Atom. It also features the 50th anniversary Gold issue as a bonus material. Man, this volume is a lot more bipolar than the usual. Kitty Pryde shockingly decided to leave the Jean Grey Institute of Higher Learning, turning her back on her long-time comrades (and surrogate parents) Ororo and Logan whom she felt betrayed by. I won't go into details; just know that her departure is rightly justified in a way. She then decided to join her best friend Illyana (Magik) who is a member of present-day Cyclops' Dream Team of Mutant Revolution (yes, I made a new pet name for it. DTMR. Shit, I gotta make a glossary of my made-up abbreviations some time). Now since Kitty is their Professor X for this timeline, the OCF felt the need to come with her since they don't feel like the rest of the current X-Men are accepting of them anyway. This is great news to Warren who was pleased that his friends finally saw some sense and now the five of them are complete once more. I don't really believe Kitty agreed with Cyclops' vision since she has her own way of doing things but I like that they're able to be civil with each other. The man may have murdered Professor X (whose role Kitty has been filling lately for the teenage OCF), but Kitty does respect him and does not harbor bitter feelings towards him in the long run unlike Wolverine. I think Kitty wanted to let bygones be bygones and focus more on training her students who are counting on her guidance, and this characterization for Kitty Pryde in this series has most definitely endeared her to me. Since reading her character in action for the first time in X-Men Forever and then for Days of Future Past, I find Kitty to be one of the exceptionally likable and enjoyable X-characters out there. Her development, relationships with people, and principles always get me interested because they're well-written, and her role in this title is no exception. In issues #19-20, the OCF went on their first mission to help a fellow mutant who is wandering around aimlessly and scared in the city. The issue opens with said mutant being harassed by the anti-mutant fanatics known collectively as the Purifiers whom everyone knows are the descendants of Reverend Stryker whose legacy of hatred and ignorance continues to spread even to this day. The OCF with Kitty and Magik arrived just in time to prevent yet another senseless hate crime, and we are treated to fabulous pages of fight scenes. In any case, I've enjoyed the confrontation between the OCF and the Purifiers. This is the first time the OCF have encountered them after all and I don't think they realize the gravity of this moment. After all, the OCF belong in the sixties, in an idyllic time where mutant discrimination isn't very rampant or blown out of disgusting proportions. Luckily enough, the goddamn Purifiers were more than enthralled to get the kids up to speed. These motherfuckers keep shouting out biblical scriptures as they murder in the name of God, hence also simultaneously making every Christian in the vicinity who is not a hatemonger feel like puking because now his or her own faith is associated with such stupid fanatics. The one thing so unforgivable about these Purifiers is how they twist the word of God to suit their inclusive views about race intolerance and self-entitlement, all the while considering themselves faithful servants of the Lord who, according to their delusions, hate the mutant race because they are unnatural abominations. "God did not create mutant" is the main idea to take away here. Yeah, that's very Christian. Please stop disguising your hatemongering with anything else but just that. Issue #21 opens with a great callback to Chris Claremont's piece God Loves, Man Kills and the illustrations themselves seem to look exactly like the panels featured in the aforementioned storyline with a few touch-ups here. Anyway, I was no longer paying that much attention to whatever fucking delusion Stryker Jr. and his apostles are currently chewing on so reading this issue was a pain in the ass. Seeing my babies incapacitated was no treat, but time-dispelled Jean Grey is proving to be someone you should never fuck around with, and she is not thrilled about Stryker and the Purifiers at all. It just occurred to me that even her present-day adult version has never encountered the full force of the Purifiers (she was dead during God Loves, Man Kills) so it's noteworthy to see how she is reacting to all of this. And let me tell you, she might be one meltdown away from killing these motherfuckers. I wouldn't be oppose to it, but the truth is, what is chilling about her reaction so far is how...calculating they are. She doesn't get full-blown angry but rather quietly seething--which for me is a lot more dangerous than her nuclear meltdowns. It feels as if after meeting the woman she becomes in the future when she decided to stay in this timeline (I'm referring to Xorn-Jean Grey from Battle of the Atom), I think teen Jean is beginning to see her point of view or at least understand why future-her got to be so vengeful. She could feel the pressure of still turning into Xorn-Jean if she's not careful with how she's dealing with anti-mutant assholes at this point. I just get the sense that Jean is struggling internally, whether she's aware of it or not, to minimize her negative feelings toward that infuriating faction of the human race that desires to destroy the mutantkind. I guess, what I'm saying is, she might become the next Magneto if she's not too careful. Xorn-Jean from Battle of the Atom was certainly giving off that world-weary witness-to-atrocities vibes in same manner as classic Magneto. That should intrigue you, dear reader. It certainly had me thinking. The Gold issue #1 aimed to showcase the best aspects that there is to love about the X-Men. The stories featured herein were written by Chris Claremont, Stan Lee, Louis Simonson, Roy Thomas, Len Wein and Fabien Nicieza. They have all contributed substantially enough in the X-Men universe way back so it was nice to read their material again albeit in the form of flash fictions. The five stories themselves were whimsical and kooky which is just the way I like them. Nothing too heavy but there is some lightness to be had particularly with that Stan Lee/Louis Simonson piece about the original X-Men and their very stilted sixties language that made me giggle non-stop because of how cheesy they used to sound like back then. The longest story here had to be Claremont's Sentinels piece where we get to see the old-continuity X-Men before all the scary shit about mutant decimation occurred so it's pre-House of M era and we get fantastic character moments with Kitty Pryde and Rogue who had just become a part of the X-Men after being Mystique's sidekick for a while. Prof X and Scott are having happy times with their girlfriends here (alien empress Lilandra and Madelyn Pryor) while Nightcrawler is still very much alive (OH, I'VE MISSED YOU, ELF!). I hate anything with Sentinels but this story was acceptable enough. It was colorful and flashy and reminded you of the times when the X-Men can still enjoy themselves while doing good instead of worrying about their survival against hatemongering assholes like the current storylines we have now. The other two pieces were delightful oneshots that feature the perspective of certain characters. The Roy Thomas one was about Banshee and Sunfire totally bro-ing it up with their little adventure. Meanwhile, Len Wein's Wolverine-focused piece was absolutely hilarious. The way that dude thinks can be so outrageous yet endearing all at once. Of course, the last piece of this issue was the only one that ended up unraveling me by the seams...then drove me bat-shit insane. Yes, the greatest surprise in this issue for me was the fact that we even got a Professor X/Magneto story! And of course it was penned by Fabian Nicieza himself! If you don't know who this jerk is, then please refer to his nineties stories Fatal Attractions and Legion Quest which are both tales of Cherik-centered madness and shippy angstiness that would render any Charles/Erik shipper such as myself angry, tearful and comatosed because of Nicieza's paradoxical pleasurable and agonizing depiction of these two dorks' relationship. Overall, the fourth volume All-Different was a great mixed bag worth chewing on. RECOMMENDED: 8/10 DO READ MY REVIEWS AT:

  6. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    Oh no... this series went downhill. What’s it about? The team of teen X-Men have to fight an anti-mutant religious cult. Other stuff happens along the way of course but main, non-spoiler headline is them fighting a religious cult. Pros: The story is fun. Standard superhero adventure but fun nonetheless. The characters are great. Always great to see the original X-Men! There’s some sweet action in this volume. I was definitely excited throughout. There’s some humorous moments that are well done. Cons: Th Oh no... this series went downhill. What’s it about? The team of teen X-Men have to fight an anti-mutant religious cult. Other stuff happens along the way of course but main, non-spoiler headline is them fighting a religious cult. Pros: The story is fun. Standard superhero adventure but fun nonetheless. The characters are great. Always great to see the original X-Men! There’s some sweet action in this volume. I was definitely excited throughout. There’s some humorous moments that are well done. Cons: This book is predictable. I mean read what it’s about and take a guess what will happen... not too hard, huh? The dialogue isn’t good. In all fairness I don’t really expect great dialogue from Bendis but yeah. The social commentary is unfortunately poorly written in this volume. I usually like the social commentary element of X-Men but Bendis on the other hand is honestly terrible at social commentary in almost anything I can think of with social commentary by him so yeah... There’s teen angst stuff that’s just as “annoying and who fucking cares” as teen angst stuff is in most things. Mixed thoughts: The art. So Immonen’s a pretty good artist a lot of the time but in this volume it’s like he did great at the scenery and action but was iffy on the characters. Sometimes they look great but sometimes (I’m specifically thinking of the teen characters) it’s like they sometimes look like they’re 10, other times they look like they’re in their 40s. The short stories. On one hand they’re entertaining but on the other hand... what did they have to do with anything in this book? I guess it’s a nice bonus but the cynical part of my brain can’t help but think “oh look, more pages so Marvel can justify a higher cover price.” Overall: Fun but nothing special. I think this title has gone downhill because it was a while back but I remember the first 3 volumes being great. This book is still decent but very flawed and I don’t feel particularly motivated to hop onto volume 5 yet. 3/5

  7. 4 out of 5

    Terence

    The Original X-Men join the new Xavier School and continue their tour of their future. So the volume starts with the Original X-Men getting some new outfits courtesy of Magik. Afterward they are off protecting a mutant from some Purifiers. The X-Men get a first hand look of the Purifiers patented brand of systematic hate sprinkled with religious passages interpreted in their favor. At this point I have to imagine Hank McCoy longs for the time people just threw rocks at them. The Purifiers are amon The Original X-Men join the new Xavier School and continue their tour of their future. So the volume starts with the Original X-Men getting some new outfits courtesy of Magik. Afterward they are off protecting a mutant from some Purifiers. The X-Men get a first hand look of the Purifiers patented brand of systematic hate sprinkled with religious passages interpreted in their favor. At this point I have to imagine Hank McCoy longs for the time people just threw rocks at them. The Purifiers are among the types of people whose real life equivalent terrifies me. When people decide to reinforce all their actions with God and convince others to believe the same the result is horrifying. Even though I feel the real life relevance of the Purifiers is poignant and powerful, this volume was just OK to me. Going on minor missions seems as though it shouldn't be on the time displaced X-Men's radar in my opinion. Oh well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Ah good, the relaxing vacation between two major events in the X-verse. It's refreshing to take a break from all that world- and race/species-saving, and just get down with some old-school mutant melodrama. Elsewhence does the world/time/Galaxy-bending crisis come from, if not the sexual politics of a redhead and her passively-moping ragtag of emotionally stunted, yet all too willing to bather about their infantile emotions, boys2men? So what do the kids do while they're not saving the world? They Ah good, the relaxing vacation between two major events in the X-verse. It's refreshing to take a break from all that world- and race/species-saving, and just get down with some old-school mutant melodrama. Elsewhence does the world/time/Galaxy-bending crisis come from, if not the sexual politics of a redhead and her passively-moping ragtag of emotionally stunted, yet all too willing to bather about their infantile emotions, boys2men? So what do the kids do while they're not saving the world? They take some time to update their wardrobe that hasn't seen a change since the 60's, and do their best tribute to the Power Rangers. They go visit with their old friends, the Purifiers, and catch up on old discussions of "abomination in the sight of God" and the meaning of life as beings less worthy than cockroaches. They meet up with X-23 to get fashion and makeup tips from our favourite psychopathic femme-Wolverine. Good stuff Bendis, entertain me even in neutral.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    This is where we come back down from the stratosphere back into good, but not amazing. Bendis had an awesome run, and I'm not saying it's over, I doubt it is, but this volume feels like the part of the roller coaster that has to start climbing back up again from after all the twists and turns and thrills. Another major loss is that Stuart Immonen is no longer the artist after issue #18. This is one of those times where an artist and writer are so in sync that change isn't the best result. I'm no This is where we come back down from the stratosphere back into good, but not amazing. Bendis had an awesome run, and I'm not saying it's over, I doubt it is, but this volume feels like the part of the roller coaster that has to start climbing back up again from after all the twists and turns and thrills. Another major loss is that Stuart Immonen is no longer the artist after issue #18. This is one of those times where an artist and writer are so in sync that change isn't the best result. I'm not saying that the new artists aren't capable, but it's just like a copy of what came before. The other problem I have is that this collection starts with #18, and Vol. 3 ended with #15...that means I'm completely lacking #16-17; Battle of the Atom issues. I think I need to read this to really get what's going on, but not enough to completely ruin the book. I'm sure they're contained in the Battle of the Atom book itself, yes? The team and Kitty end up joining up with the new Cyclops, and finally get their own uniforms that don't make them look totally out of time. What follows is a run in with the Reavers and Stryker, as well as bringing another student in. (X-23) That feels like they get their own Wolverine on this team, and another female to compete for the lusts of the other ones, not just Jean. Shockingly this leads to conflicts. We pick up X-23 after everything that happened in Avengers Arena (she killed a buttload of her old teammates/friends). I'm not super into that yet, but I do like the new personality injected by her arrival. It remains to be seen if they will make her a full 'member' of if she's just guest star of the month. The most fun here comes from X-Men: Gold, a 50th Anniversary celebration of the X-Men, with contributions from Chris Claremont, Stan Lee, Walter Simonson, Len Wein, Roy Thomas, and other X-writers from the past. The coolest part may be all the Variant Covers to #18, courtesy of Julian Tedesco; they run the gamut from 60s to 00s X-men with the various team incarnations of each decade. 60s: Cyclops, Jean Grey/Marvel Girl, Beast, Iceman, Angel 70s: Wolverine, Storm, Colossus, Nightcrawler, Banshee, Thunderbird 80s: Wolverine (Brown/Orange), Storm (Mohawk), Havok, Dazzler, Longshot, Magneto 90s: Cyclops, Rogue, Gambit, Bishop, Psylocke, Jubilee (this looks like an episode of the Animated series) 00s: The Grant Morrison New X-Men (Cyclops, Wolverine, Jean Grey, Beast, Emma Frost, Xorn It's a fun book, but in the series, it's a low point so far (that being said, the low point for this series is higher than the high point for a lot more). I will keep reading for sure.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    The X-men from the past run into the Purifiers. And a female clone of the Wolverine. Not sure why a clone of the Wolverine would be female. But okay. The Purifiers are run by Reverend Stryker's son (though I thought he used to be a Colonel, not a Reverend- but this might be a retcon) and they are surprised to see the original X-men. I did enjoy the fact that AIM and the Purifiers work together. It does make a sick sort of sense. Once again Bendis' writing style makes this series great. It's funn The X-men from the past run into the Purifiers. And a female clone of the Wolverine. Not sure why a clone of the Wolverine would be female. But okay. The Purifiers are run by Reverend Stryker's son (though I thought he used to be a Colonel, not a Reverend- but this might be a retcon) and they are surprised to see the original X-men. I did enjoy the fact that AIM and the Purifiers work together. It does make a sick sort of sense. Once again Bendis' writing style makes this series great. It's funny but at times serious. He has a great way of showing the X-men for all their good and some of their faults. His Iceman is a little to manic sometimes, reminding me of Spiderman. But, once again a great story-glad I picked it up and highly recommend this to any X-men fan. This series by Bendis is one of the best X-men series I've read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    I may be in the minority but I felt like this was one of the better outings in this series. Well done.

  12. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    So this was kind of...wonky? Boring? I can't find the right word. I like the Cyclops and Laura moment. Seeing young him and Wolverine clone talk was interesting and fun. That moment had heart. The rest? A crazy religious organization hunting down our favorite mutants. How fun! Haven't seen this before...zzzzzzz.... Yeah not much to say on this one except very very forgettable. So this was kind of...wonky? Boring? I can't find the right word. I like the Cyclops and Laura moment. Seeing young him and Wolverine clone talk was interesting and fun. That moment had heart. The rest? A crazy religious organization hunting down our favorite mutants. How fun! Haven't seen this before...zzzzzzz.... Yeah not much to say on this one except very very forgettable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    I wasn't as in love with this one, but it's still fun and plenty readable. It just introduced a lot of new characters, what with the religious zealots, Wolverine's clone, and whatever A.I.M. was. I also had a harder time following the plot, maybe because nothing huge was happening. But lots of entertainment. Another series of adventures to show off the awesome charming characters. And did you catch that Dazzler joke? Priceless. I wasn't as in love with this one, but it's still fun and plenty readable. It just introduced a lot of new characters, what with the religious zealots, Wolverine's clone, and whatever A.I.M. was. I also had a harder time following the plot, maybe because nothing huge was happening. But lots of entertainment. Another series of adventures to show off the awesome charming characters. And did you catch that Dazzler joke? Priceless.

  14. 4 out of 5

    David Church

    Thought this had the potential to be a great story but ended up just being ok. Liked the addition of X-23 & the new costumes, other than that same ole same ole. Everyone is in love with Jean, drama ensues. Wondering if Marvel is having Wolverine withdrawals not being in this collection so they decided we have to have some Wolverine connection how about X-23?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I still enjoy these. But, JFC, is there a reason why Laura Kinney always gets the short end of the stick? Give that girl a break. #SaveLauraKinney

  16. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    Kitty decides to quit the school as she feels betrayed by the people there. She joins Cyclops together with the original X-Men. They soon get a mission to save a new mutant while wearing new uniforms. It's an opportunity to dish out some spectacularly lame one-liners while fighting the purifiers, armored religious zealots who hate mutants. Did the author really thing this scene would be fun to see? The young mutant they save turns out to be X-23, but she is exhibiting way too many feelings. I pr Kitty decides to quit the school as she feels betrayed by the people there. She joins Cyclops together with the original X-Men. They soon get a mission to save a new mutant while wearing new uniforms. It's an opportunity to dish out some spectacularly lame one-liners while fighting the purifiers, armored religious zealots who hate mutants. Did the author really thing this scene would be fun to see? The young mutant they save turns out to be X-23, but she is exhibiting way too many feelings. I preferred her cold and bloodthirsty like her 'father,' Wolverine. She joins the X-Men and together they attack the brain-damaged purifiers in their home base(view spoiler)[, but are surprised to find that their leader, Stryker's son, has superhuman powers strong enough to defeat them. Before they kill the X-Men the purifiers worry about causing a time paradox, giving the captives plenty of time to escape and defeat their captors (hide spoiler)] . Weak story and the artwork is slipping too.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Damn it, Marvel, I declare 'shenanigans!' After much enjoyment with volumes 2 and 3, I eagerly cracked open 4 and . . . waited. And waited. Something was different, or odd. Why did it feel like I walked into a movie fifteen minutes after the start time? Then I do a little research via Goodreads. Oh, BTW faithful readers, there happens to be a volume "3.5" out there. (Not that my library carries it - they logically purchased numbered volumes 1 to 4.) Is this 'bait & switch,' or just being jerked ar Damn it, Marvel, I declare 'shenanigans!' After much enjoyment with volumes 2 and 3, I eagerly cracked open 4 and . . . waited. And waited. Something was different, or odd. Why did it feel like I walked into a movie fifteen minutes after the start time? Then I do a little research via Goodreads. Oh, BTW faithful readers, there happens to be a volume "3.5" out there. (Not that my library carries it - they logically purchased numbered volumes 1 to 4.) Is this 'bait & switch,' or just being jerked around? It's disappointing, for sure. It's sad, because vol. 4 wasn't really all that bad, but I was out of the loop on some of the on-going plot developments. Also, it seemed padded with the several short stories that finish the book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    The main All-New X-Men stories were great, as always. But since the collection only contained 4 issues, it included an extremely bland A + X filler. My four stars speaks of for the X-Men issues. If I had purchased this graphic novel, I probably would have felt ripped off.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    3.5 stars

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    This series is really falling downhill at a rapid pace. I was so excited by the initial premise (the original X-Men are brought to modern times by a somewhat-delusional Hank McCoy), which felt ripe with new ideas and a sense of viewing the modern world through the lens of the past. But, All-New X-Men isn't about any of that anymore. Now there's virtually no difference between the X-Men from the past and the X-Men from the future, in terms of how they behave. The past X-Men have adapted too well This series is really falling downhill at a rapid pace. I was so excited by the initial premise (the original X-Men are brought to modern times by a somewhat-delusional Hank McCoy), which felt ripe with new ideas and a sense of viewing the modern world through the lens of the past. But, All-New X-Men isn't about any of that anymore. Now there's virtually no difference between the X-Men from the past and the X-Men from the future, in terms of how they behave. The past X-Men have adapted too well to the present and seem to just be stuck in a constant state of reaction to the events around them. At this point they basically fight cliche X-Men battles and then spend 2 panels reminding us that they're from the past, but never telling us why that matters. Now the original premise has brought us to a point where the story is overstuffed with characters, none of which seem to have any real point of view or stakes. This has gone from one of my favorite new Marvel series to one I'm actually starting to dread a little bit, which obviously isn't a great sign. I mean, for an X-Men book, this is fine. The art is solid and the stories are action-packed. But, it promised to be something it isn't, and that frankly sucks.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Definitely an improvement on the "Battle of the Atom" event stuff preceding it. Not so jazzed on the new uniforms, though. Who knew Magik was such a Power Rangers fan? Bendis gets back to focussing on the snappy dialogue and character work that makes his stuff compelling, this time tossing in Laura Kinney AKA X-23, as well as revisiting some of the X-Men's finest storytelling in a plot stemming directly out of X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills. The "50th Anniversary Bonus Content" included here was forg Definitely an improvement on the "Battle of the Atom" event stuff preceding it. Not so jazzed on the new uniforms, though. Who knew Magik was such a Power Rangers fan? Bendis gets back to focussing on the snappy dialogue and character work that makes his stuff compelling, this time tossing in Laura Kinney AKA X-23, as well as revisiting some of the X-Men's finest storytelling in a plot stemming directly out of X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills. The "50th Anniversary Bonus Content" included here was forgettable, btw. Read if you must, but I found myself skimming.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    3 I wasn't a fan of this volume. The series has been quite strong, but this was a considerable drop from the previous volumes. Brian Michael Bendis still interacts with all the characters very well, not an easy task considering the volume of characters. The issue here is the water treading in this volume, it just feels like a fodder storyline. The X-Men Gold issues in the back were off putting and I just didn't bother with them. This was just an inconsistent volume and stains what has been a soli 3 I wasn't a fan of this volume. The series has been quite strong, but this was a considerable drop from the previous volumes. Brian Michael Bendis still interacts with all the characters very well, not an easy task considering the volume of characters. The issue here is the water treading in this volume, it just feels like a fodder storyline. The X-Men Gold issues in the back were off putting and I just didn't bother with them. This was just an inconsistent volume and stains what has been a solid series. Why the 3? It's just a giant step down and I didn't feel it added to the overall series arc. I had been enjoying the series up to this point. I just felt the storyline lacked substance and felt like a filler volume for the next arc storyline to kick into gear. It's not the worst volume you will read, it's just disappointing compared to what has come before. Brian Michael Bendis must've been working on something else at the time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    ellis

    this story didn't really stick w me... like, all the writing was still good! but the art has changed (eugh) and i didn't know who these religious dudes were? also, didn't realize bobby and kitty were still together before this, lol. i'll have to reread the atom book now, definitely missed a few things not having read all of the series.. (also, skipped gold. ugly art and old-fashioned writing, i'm good. rating is based on the main series...) this story didn't really stick w me... like, all the writing was still good! but the art has changed (eugh) and i didn't know who these religious dudes were? also, didn't realize bobby and kitty were still together before this, lol. i'll have to reread the atom book now, definitely missed a few things not having read all of the series.. (also, skipped gold. ugly art and old-fashioned writing, i'm good. rating is based on the main series...)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Soooo, this volume skips issues 16 & 17, which clearly contain some important plot points. Rather than include key elements of the story, Marvel stuck some of the UGLIEST comics I've ever read in at the end. Awesome. Thanks for that (<- sarcasm font). Soooo, this volume skips issues 16 & 17, which clearly contain some important plot points. Rather than include key elements of the story, Marvel stuck some of the UGLIEST comics I've ever read in at the end. Awesome. Thanks for that (<- sarcasm font).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Trike

    What the actual fuck? So I picked up the first four collections of this series at the library, even though I had actually read the first one when it came out as single issues, because Bendis' writing is really best enjoyed in the long form as a continuous story. So far it's pretty "meh" except for a good chunk of volume 3, which was actually really good, and then I hit this. At first I thought perhaps I'd picked up a later volume instead of #4 because at the beginning there was a huge jump in stor What the actual fuck? So I picked up the first four collections of this series at the library, even though I had actually read the first one when it came out as single issues, because Bendis' writing is really best enjoyed in the long form as a continuous story. So far it's pretty "meh" except for a good chunk of volume 3, which was actually really good, and then I hit this. At first I thought perhaps I'd picked up a later volume instead of #4 because at the beginning there was a huge jump in story where the OG Xers are joining Cyclops' splinter group at the old Weapon X facility. Fine, we'll probably have a "three weeks earlier" flashback in a few pages to explain how we got here. Nope. I kept waiting for it and then hit the second chapter-slash-issue and nada. So I checked the back to see if I had indeed picked up #5 or something. Turns out there are two issues missing. Vol. 4 stops at issue 15 and this one picks up at issue 18. And it's extremely clear that a lot of shit happened in those two issues. I mean, like waaaay more story occurred there than two typical issues of Bendis' work. And believe me, I know Bendis. His run on Ultimate Spider-man got me back into comics after a more than 17-year hiatus, and I loved it so much that I started reading everything he wrote. So I'm guessing that there was a damn crossover during those two issues, but none of that information is here. Not even in a summation. No "previously in All-New X-Men..." thing to catch us up. I have zero idea where to find those issues, or even if they're collected anywhere. With Marvel's numbering system of the past five or six years, who even knows what goes where? Not me. And I kinda don't want to do a bunch of research to find missing issues of comics that I'm only lukewarm about. And the kicker is that they've added some crappy 50th anniversary thing in the back along with X-Men Gold or something. Instead of collecting the actual issues that go with this story about these characters, Marvel instead adds a bunch of badly-written and terribly-drawn semi-flashback stuff featuring the X-Men as they were circa 1979-1981. That's when I was reading these books! I don't need a damn refresher course on these characters, because it was guys like me who were obsessing over the X-Men back in the day making them the gargantuan hit they are today. Argh. And the compacted stories they added weren't even good! Back then they were fucking epic, man. Globetrotting adventures, twisted psychological games, aliens galore in cosmos-shaking wars, long-lost relatives, first loves, break-ups, the deaths of entire planets... it was everything a 13-year-old of any gender could want. This was like having someone who's not very good at telling stories give you the highlights of that amazing decade-long run. In 20 minutes. You can't do it. Yet Marvel wonders why their sales are failing. It's junk like this. All of that would be fine if this collection were any good, but it's not. The story is just a mess and half the artwork is genuinely terrible. Whoever the not-Immonen artist was, they are not good. I could barely follow the story because the layouts didn't flow and the stuff was so busy and muddy that it simply didn't make sense. Such a mess on every level.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zack! Empire

    Still really liking this title. I'm glad to see that it seems to finally be moving forward. If I recall correctly the first three volumes were good, but they sort of stayed in the same place. After reading those books, and the Battle of the Atom trade, I'm a bit worn out on the "Should they be here, or should we send them home", debate. I'm glad that seems to have been curbed for now. It was cool too that even though the original five are now teamed up with Scott and his Uncanny X-Men they didn't Still really liking this title. I'm glad to see that it seems to finally be moving forward. If I recall correctly the first three volumes were good, but they sort of stayed in the same place. After reading those books, and the Battle of the Atom trade, I'm a bit worn out on the "Should they be here, or should we send them home", debate. I'm glad that seems to have been curbed for now. It was cool too that even though the original five are now teamed up with Scott and his Uncanny X-Men they didn't spend much time focusing on that in this book. I was worried after I read Battle of the Atom that they next All-New book would just be young Scott and old Scott sitting around and talking. Glad that didn't happen. X-23 is a welcome addition to the team. I didn't know much about her till I saw her on the Wolverine and the X-Men TV show. Once I did see her I though, "whoa, who is this badass Wolverine lady?" If I'm being honest the original five are not of much interest to me. The thing that has kept me going with this series is the fantastic storyline. So, I'm glad to see some characters being thrown in that I do like. I have a few problems with this collection though. There is a cover that shows Cyclops and X-23 kissing, and in the book they do have some tender moments. To me this seems a bit like having drama for the sake of drama. Right now we've got a sort of love triangle between Scott, Jean, and Beast. I get the reason of Jean kissing Beast. She saw her future with Scott and wanted to change it, so he acted on her feelings for beast instead. Now they seem to be throwing X-23 into the mix. It's a bit too soap opera for me, even as an X-Man, which must be the biggest comic book soap opera there is. The art is good, but there we quite a few double page spreads that I didn't know we spreads till I realized I was reading the panels in the wrong order. The panels are two close to the edge of the page, giving it the appearance of just being a single page. It really took me out of the story. The other thing is that the villain part of the book is pretty weak. It's almost like they just needed something to go after Battle of the Atom to get them to the Trail of Jean Grey, and this was what they stuck in. I know that not every story can be a winner, but I feel like this is just filler.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The first half was okay. But the flashback scenes for the last half was garbage.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Enjoying the younger X-Men more than I was. Less pouty whining and some real action on their part. New costumes are a gas, but wish Jean Grey was "Marvel Girl" again. Enjoying the younger X-Men more than I was. Less pouty whining and some real action on their part. New costumes are a gas, but wish Jean Grey was "Marvel Girl" again.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Buhs

    Unexpectedly innovative. Until it isn’t. Note that this review actually covers the first 7 volumes of the series. Although X-Men is all about chromosomes—the very stuff of inheritance—I never thought this title was Marvel’s extended family drama. That honor goes to The Avengers, and associated books, with their marriages and their grandfather and father and son melodramas. (The Fantastic Four is clearly about the nuclear family.) The X-Men and associated titles are about friendship, especially as Unexpectedly innovative. Until it isn’t. Note that this review actually covers the first 7 volumes of the series. Although X-Men is all about chromosomes—the very stuff of inheritance—I never thought this title was Marvel’s extended family drama. That honor goes to The Avengers, and associated books, with their marriages and their grandfather and father and son melodramas. (The Fantastic Four is clearly about the nuclear family.) The X-Men and associated titles are about friendship, especially as it is enforced, which is to say, school—when because of biology—either genes or time of birth—and institutional structure, people are forced to be together. There’s a reason the whole thing started with a Professor and his students. This is a book about the wonders and horrors of high school. The setting makes particularly acute a problem common to all serial fiction, but especially super hero books. The readers don’t want the characters to age. And the authors don’t either. It’s one thing to write about a 20-year old super hero. But a 70-year old one? Fiction set in high school has this same problem. Graduating the characters breaks down the things that forced them to deal with each other. And so Archie and Jughead are perpetual adolescences. And superheroes—the X-Men—have fifty years’s worth of drama packed into their short lives. Authors of the various X-books have finessed part of the problem through time travel. The Days of the Future Past story-line allowed the reader to jump ahead many years in the X-Men timeline to see what would happen. Cable and Bishop relied on time travel to various extents. But all of this, while sometimes freeing, ended up making the storylines, already cramped, even more convoluted. Not only does each character have many lives’s of trial and tribulation, they have many incarnations, many possible futures and pasts that they are resisting or trying to re-start. I think writers probably like the confusion, since it gives them chances to tell different stories: there are so many characters, so many permutations. But it can get eye-glazing, and one understands why DC has repeatedly blown up its fictional universe in an attempt to simplify the continuity. In this series, Brian Michael Bendis uses the old trope of time travel, but hits on a variation that opens up whole new vistas. (Until he closes them down.) It is logical and character-driven, but also a smart plot point. In the wake of the X-Men V. Avengers series and the way that Scott Summers has alienated most of his fellow mutants, Hank McCoy chooses to bring the original X-Men, fresh-faced, naive, and young, to the fictional present to confront Scott. But the motivation is layered more deeply than that. The presence of the former X-Men, so idealistic, so full of the young and beautiful Jean Grey, is meant to both inspire and punish Summers, reminding him of the beliefs he had, and the woman he lied; it also is a bit of self-hatred and Beast’s part, punishing himself for his failures, and maybe even an attempt to reinvigorate himself. Suddenly, there are new vistas in the X-Men’s universe. The previous stories need not have the same weight. It’s possible for new relationships to grow, new roles to be assumed. Maybe Hank and Jean—both from the past—will get together. Maybe Kitty Pryde will become as adept as Professor X. Maybe the whole Phoenix story need not have happened, and maybe Warren can have a different future two. The first twelve issues or so revel in this new freedom, and the books seem fresh in a way few old titles seem fresh. I especially liked the development of Hank McCoy young and old. There is also a lot of humor in the books, even as they close in on themselves, and lots of knowing winks at the angsty Marvel style, which I quite enjoyed. Soon enough, though, the title finds its way into a familiar groove, and claustrophobia starts to set in again. There’s the problems of cross-overs, where large chunks of the story are told in other books. These “events” are irritating for the reader of the titles as the come out, but they should not be for readers of the TPB reprints. The whole point of the reprint is to present a complete story, so it is frustrating as heck that Marvel refuses to bring in the other titles and make the stories complete—especially when the company is happy to round out the books with fluffy, unrelated material, such as the anniversary X-Men book included here. There’s no reason the TPB needs to be restricted by the titles of the comics. They should tell the whole damn story. But that is only a minor irritation, comparatively. There’s also the reversals. And so the original X-Men and they allies decide to join up with Scott Summers and his troop anyway, which never seems realistic and also has the effect of making the stories more compact, the possibilities fewer. And then there are the new time travelers that bring back in (a version of) Professor X. The old storylines reassert themselves. Jean Grey still loves Scott Summers. She is still too powerful and shadowed by the Phoenix. She remains a teen boys’ wet dream: beautiful, smart, kind, redheaded, but too modest to know she’s beautiful, only completed by the gaze of the right slightly nerdy boy. Sigh. Kitty continues to be under-used, made into a genius and an administrator, but the full effect of her powers never explored: they really are incredible and, by lights, undefeatable. The sixth volume here momentarily reverses the shrinking universe, when the original X-Men meet a mutant who sends them to different parts of Marvel’s far-flung mutliverse. It’s fun to get to see the different characters on their own, in unfamiliar settings. It’s probably the most character development we get of Bobby, who is otherwise here just a smart-mouthed comedy relief. Until Bendis tries to redeem the jokes by making him—spoiler?—gay. Which just doesn’t play at all, and a lot of special pleading goes on for the point to make any kind of sense. By the seventh volume this freedom is lost, and the book goes in uninteresting directions, with stories that feel like filler, even if they are not. The art through the books is uneven. In the early issues, they are excellent, with the various artists using variations on what I think of as Frank Miller’s 1980s style: a darker palette, the figures blocky and not always perfectly inked. That sounds denigrating, but its not. It makes the characters feel solid, real, but also part of some closely-related-but-not-quite-our-own universe. In later issues, the art can be just off, the expressions on faces not matching the action or the dialogue. There are a few chances for the artists to really stretch their wings and experiment with a lot of different styles, befitting the mix of eras, and these work well. But throughout the books there is a tendency to make the art during the battle scenes abstract, to the point where it is difficult to follow the action. (This is not a Hollywood track to borrow: poorly choreographed action sequences.) The seventh book, fittingly enough, has the worst art, grainy and pallid. I really liked where this started. I have trouble seeing that I will care where it ends.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Still going strong. I love this story. Great to see X-23. Brian Michael Bendis is so good at character interactions, as well as tying a large story together. There are so many interesting moments here and every character gets a chance to shine. The last issue, X-Men gold, is actually pretty awesome. It’s basically a bunch of short stories that take place around the early days of the X-Men. There’s one that takes place during fatal attractions that really threw me for a loop. It’s pretty cool. The Still going strong. I love this story. Great to see X-23. Brian Michael Bendis is so good at character interactions, as well as tying a large story together. There are so many interesting moments here and every character gets a chance to shine. The last issue, X-Men gold, is actually pretty awesome. It’s basically a bunch of short stories that take place around the early days of the X-Men. There’s one that takes place during fatal attractions that really threw me for a loop. It’s pretty cool. The art here is on point. Stuart Immonen is nothing short of amazing. I really liked the aesthetic here, it told the story and was beautiful to look at. You should def read this

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