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Privacy in the Age of Big Data: Recognizing Threats, Defending Your Rights, and Protecting Your Family

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Digital data collection and surveillance gets more pervasive and invasive by the day; but the best ways to protect yourself and your data are all steps you can take yourself. The devices we use to get just-in-time coupons, directions when we're lost, and maintain connections with loved ones no matter how far away they are, also invade our privacy in ways we might not even Digital data collection and surveillance gets more pervasive and invasive by the day; but the best ways to protect yourself and your data are all steps you can take yourself. The devices we use to get just-in-time coupons, directions when we're lost, and maintain connections with loved ones no matter how far away they are, also invade our privacy in ways we might not even be aware of. Our devices send and collect data about us whenever we use them, but that data is not safeguarded the way we assume it would be. Privacy is complex and personal. Many of us do not know the full extent to which data is collected, stored, aggregated, and used. As recent revelations indicate, we are subject to a level of data collection and surveillance never before imaginable. While some of these methods may, in fact, protect us and provide us with information and services we deem to be helpful and desired, others can turn out to be insidious and over-arching. Privacy in the Age of Big Data highlights the many positive outcomes of digital surveillance and data collection while also outlining those forms of data collection to which we may not consent, and of which we are likely unaware. Payton and Claypoole skillfully introduce readers to the many ways we are 'watched, ' and how to adjust our behaviors and activities to recapture our privacy. The authors suggest the tools, behavior changes, and political actions we can take to regain data and identity security. Anyone who uses digital devices will want to read this book for its clear and no-nonsense approach to the world of big data and what it means for all of us.


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Digital data collection and surveillance gets more pervasive and invasive by the day; but the best ways to protect yourself and your data are all steps you can take yourself. The devices we use to get just-in-time coupons, directions when we're lost, and maintain connections with loved ones no matter how far away they are, also invade our privacy in ways we might not even Digital data collection and surveillance gets more pervasive and invasive by the day; but the best ways to protect yourself and your data are all steps you can take yourself. The devices we use to get just-in-time coupons, directions when we're lost, and maintain connections with loved ones no matter how far away they are, also invade our privacy in ways we might not even be aware of. Our devices send and collect data about us whenever we use them, but that data is not safeguarded the way we assume it would be. Privacy is complex and personal. Many of us do not know the full extent to which data is collected, stored, aggregated, and used. As recent revelations indicate, we are subject to a level of data collection and surveillance never before imaginable. While some of these methods may, in fact, protect us and provide us with information and services we deem to be helpful and desired, others can turn out to be insidious and over-arching. Privacy in the Age of Big Data highlights the many positive outcomes of digital surveillance and data collection while also outlining those forms of data collection to which we may not consent, and of which we are likely unaware. Payton and Claypoole skillfully introduce readers to the many ways we are 'watched, ' and how to adjust our behaviors and activities to recapture our privacy. The authors suggest the tools, behavior changes, and political actions we can take to regain data and identity security. Anyone who uses digital devices will want to read this book for its clear and no-nonsense approach to the world of big data and what it means for all of us.

30 review for Privacy in the Age of Big Data: Recognizing Threats, Defending Your Rights, and Protecting Your Family

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sue Scheff

    I sincerely loved this book. Most tech book can be a bit difficult to understand - however this book is very "user-friendly" and is a topic that we ALL need to know about! From ages 8-80 - everyone needs to be concerned about their privacy, and the fact that big businesses are using data mining to predict our shopping habits (online and off) can not only be intrusive, it is frightening. Fact is -this is our evolving world. We can't change it, we need to embrace it and learn as much as we can to p I sincerely loved this book. Most tech book can be a bit difficult to understand - however this book is very "user-friendly" and is a topic that we ALL need to know about! From ages 8-80 - everyone needs to be concerned about their privacy, and the fact that big businesses are using data mining to predict our shopping habits (online and off) can not only be intrusive, it is frightening. Fact is -this is our evolving world. We can't change it, we need to embrace it and learn as much as we can to protect ourselves and our family. I highly recommend this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    I'm fairly well versed in security and I like security books. I don't know how to say something nice about this book. Maybe I can just say that the book has credentialed authors, and the random collection of sentences within are well footnoted. The structure, the editing, and the writing are all on equal footing, and it succeeds as a collection of unedited notes. This is a complete waste of time. Examples: p. 64: Mentions a U of Maryland sorority sister who used a bunch of "F-bombs" in an email. I'm fairly well versed in security and I like security books. I don't know how to say something nice about this book. Maybe I can just say that the book has credentialed authors, and the random collection of sentences within are well footnoted. The structure, the editing, and the writing are all on equal footing, and it succeeds as a collection of unedited notes. This is a complete waste of time. Examples: p. 64: Mentions a U of Maryland sorority sister who used a bunch of "F-bombs" in an email. It then says that she will have some work to do to reestablish her online reputation and polish her brand. It makes no mention that the email went viral and was even subject to a celebrity read by Michael Shannon. This was a sort of a key part of the example that would've made the paragraph make sense. p. unknown: It goes on about how all information you put online is being put into databases and tracked, and then mentions, almost as a drunken afterthought, that it's essential to build and maintain an extensive online presence. P. 91 (and others): This book is FULL of random, pointless interviews, such as page 91, which goes on for two pages about a mother tracking her daughter's phone and getting caught by the daughter. This is a two sentence point. Tell your kids you're tracking them. There is no need for an interview with a random person about nothing. You don't need to explain the cheese sandwich to me. Just put "CHEESE SANDWICH" on the menu. p. 81 (Uh, what? quote of the day): "If you want a simple way to use email without worrying about snooping, just give up and assume that all of your emails will be snooped on." Is this a security book? Would the 15 year old who wrote this please come down to the office? We need to discuss pgp and email encryption before we deep dive into the basics of sentence structure. p 224. "In February 2013, University of Pittsburgh researcher Andrew Schwartz's years of brain research paid off, as surgeons implanted four microchips in a paralyzed patient's brain that translate her brain's signals into movement in robotic equipment, so that she can feed herself ice cream through brain signals sent to a robotic arm." Again, teen ghost writer, this sentence doesn't say what I think the author wants it to say. If I didn't already immensely dislike this book, interspersed within the nonsense are more random, pointless quotes than an old school BBS. While I do think that people should read more about potential security threats, I can't recommend that they read this version of them. Please read something else.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Danial

    This is the "must read" tech book of the year; and I say that knowing full and well that we're still in January. Theresa Payton, former Chief Information Officer of the White House, knows a thing or two about technology and the government's use of it. So it should come as no surprise that she's stayed in the thick of technology's newest development: Big Data. Anyone who has followed my research and reviews knows that I'm a budding data scientist who condemns unethical use of data analytics; but I This is the "must read" tech book of the year; and I say that knowing full and well that we're still in January. Theresa Payton, former Chief Information Officer of the White House, knows a thing or two about technology and the government's use of it. So it should come as no surprise that she's stayed in the thick of technology's newest development: Big Data. Anyone who has followed my research and reviews knows that I'm a budding data scientist who condemns unethical use of data analytics; but I like to think that I explain my views in a level headed manner, leaving people without technology backgrounds with actionable information. Payton makes me look like a pundit screaming on the local news. She expresses her views without bias or subjectivity in a concise and compact manner (almost to a fault). This book assumes literally no technological background on behalf of the reader, and follows a logical progression from how your computer is used as a data collection tool to how data is actually used by companies and governments without your consent. And at only 274 pages, I can't imagine the book taking more than a week to read for even the most recreational reader. The only reason this book didn't get 5 stars was due in part to the overtly compact nature of the book. The book just didn't flow right. Granted, Payton (et al) are covering a vast expanse of knowledge and trying to fit so many facts into 274 pages and properly source each and every quote, factoid, and case study takes talent. Unfortunately, the book missed its mark there, and would have benefited from an extra 20-25 pages worth the "fluff" and smoother transitions. After all, the intended audience for this work is not the computer and data scientists, but the average every day user. And they/we tend to like our transitions to be smooth. That said, the book wasn't dry. As soon as you start getting a little bogged down in the details, Payton would hit you with another fact or scandal to get your blood boiling again and keep your interest piqued. All in All, this is going to be my go-to book to recommend to my non-IT peers who are interested (or should be) in America's current civil rights fight. Blog | Twitter | Facebook | Google Plus

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    What is privacy exactly? What does it mean in today's highly connected world? Does it need redefining? How do we balance security against privacy? Perhaps we are all concerned about this issue but are we sufficiently educated on it and taking any active steps to address our concerns? First step, read this book. Second, what specific areas in the book caught your attention? I bet there's at least 2-3 things to implement right away to better enhance your privacy. Lastly, get educated on your relev What is privacy exactly? What does it mean in today's highly connected world? Does it need redefining? How do we balance security against privacy? Perhaps we are all concerned about this issue but are we sufficiently educated on it and taking any active steps to address our concerns? First step, read this book. Second, what specific areas in the book caught your attention? I bet there's at least 2-3 things to implement right away to better enhance your privacy. Lastly, get educated on your relevant state's privacy laws. US Federal law on privacy is slim: "...the United States is content to allow its regulation with regard to privacy drift with the winds of business, protecting the most obviously vulnerable data and leaving the rest uncovered." Hmm, ok, but that doesn't mean we can't all take a more active role in shaping public policy on privacy. Start with your local district official. And why does the EU have more stringent privacy laws than the US? Of course after reading it I felt that the authors' well-articulated explanation should have been obvious to me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    While paging through, I thought this book was probably on a little on the "too old" side for being a technology book - I thought that you had to keep those fewer than five years old. This is six. It is Copyright 2014, and today is 2 August 2020. HOWEVER, the first time through, I read 48% of the authors' ideas. It's on the edge, so I think it's okay to remain in the stacks for a little while longer... This basically tells you to "opt-out" of various adware through your antivirus program. It has a fe While paging through, I thought this book was probably on a little on the "too old" side for being a technology book - I thought that you had to keep those fewer than five years old. This is six. It is Copyright 2014, and today is 2 August 2020. HOWEVER, the first time through, I read 48% of the authors' ideas. It's on the edge, so I think it's okay to remain in the stacks for a little while longer... This basically tells you to "opt-out" of various adware through your antivirus program. It has a few other interesting ideas, as well. Then, I felt guilty and finished the rest of the book, which honestly does have some riveting brand-new stuff I never saw before. (I mean, it mostly is the normal wise password advice laced with how criminals can get at you through email, but it never hurts to get told that again!) Why don't you have a look, too?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shannan Debus

    Definitely an important book for anyone using technology. This book contains great information about who has access to your data, from governments to businesses to cyber criminals, how this data can be used to help you or hurt you, and what you can do to protect yourself. Written in consumer language, this book is simple enough for the average, non-techie to understand.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    One of the best books on this topic I've read - it explains, in simple language and without being unduly alarming, how the legal protections we have against invasion of our privacy have failed to keep up with technology, and that this leaves us increasingly powerless to protect ourselves from intrusion not only by government and law enforcement but also by corporations and even private citizens who have no moral right to know where we go, who we see and what goes on even in our own homes. Basic One of the best books on this topic I've read - it explains, in simple language and without being unduly alarming, how the legal protections we have against invasion of our privacy have failed to keep up with technology, and that this leaves us increasingly powerless to protect ourselves from intrusion not only by government and law enforcement but also by corporations and even private citizens who have no moral right to know where we go, who we see and what goes on even in our own homes. Basic strategies are suggested to help us defend ourselves, but the authors clearly feel that the only *real* hope we have of limiting access to our deepest secrets and resources is in making our government establish legal restrictions on who can keep track of our views, habits, and relationships.

  8. 4 out of 5

    OLA Intellectual Freedom

    This practical book lays out clearly all the ways that we are being digitally tracked at the present, and all the ways we are likely to be tracked in the very near future at the Internet of Things develops more fully. The book provides practical ways that we can protect ourselves from this tracking, including behavioral changes, technology solutions, and advocated for legislative changes. Anyone who wants to reduce the size of his or her digital footprint would benefit from reading this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    River

    This book was a decent introduction to the concept of privacy in the digital era. It explains various privacy issues and debates as they relate to phones, the internet, and biometrics. It's quite broad and tackles a lot of topics, but does so while maintaining a satisfying amount of detail. It's probably the best book I have read on the topic and largely ignores some more tedious historical and philosophical arguments that other books tend to make. This book was a decent introduction to the concept of privacy in the digital era. It explains various privacy issues and debates as they relate to phones, the internet, and biometrics. It's quite broad and tackles a lot of topics, but does so while maintaining a satisfying amount of detail. It's probably the best book I have read on the topic and largely ignores some more tedious historical and philosophical arguments that other books tend to make.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Definitely worth a read if you embrace modern technology. Wearable technology, home networks, and mobile computing are moving society forward, but you should know the risks. I work in tech and I still got some good information out of this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    323.448 P347 2014

  12. 4 out of 5

    Luca

    Something You should be aware

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    While it is an excellent survey of the topic, if you're interested in privacy and have been keeping up with the topic on the internet, there is little new to you in this book. While it is an excellent survey of the topic, if you're interested in privacy and have been keeping up with the topic on the internet, there is little new to you in this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anas

    it is a good book

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ali Jafarian

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andres

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erica

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ana Riveros

  23. 5 out of 5

    Farid Kassam

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Suleiman

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dave Kocsis

  26. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  27. 5 out of 5

    T Bump

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jaywant Nalawade

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Jones

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