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Kids Are Weird: And Other Observations from Parenthood

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As he's shown in his previous hugely popular books, Jeffrey Brown has a real gift for finding humor in quirky yet universal truths. Now the bestselling author of Darth Vader and Son and Vader's Little Princess brings his witty comic observations to terrestrial parenting in this perceptive book celebrating the more surreal moments of raising a child. In charming colorful pa As he's shown in his previous hugely popular books, Jeffrey Brown has a real gift for finding humor in quirky yet universal truths. Now the bestselling author of Darth Vader and Son and Vader's Little Princess brings his witty comic observations to terrestrial parenting in this perceptive book celebrating the more surreal moments of raising a child. In charming colorful panels, Brown wryly illustrates his fiveyear- old son's take on the world around him, from watching TV ("Elton John looks pretty in that shirt") to playing with toys ("This truck can survive on very little water") to odd requests ("Don't feel happy at me"), capturing the sweetly weird times that mothers and fathers everywhere experience with their own curious, pure-minded kids.


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As he's shown in his previous hugely popular books, Jeffrey Brown has a real gift for finding humor in quirky yet universal truths. Now the bestselling author of Darth Vader and Son and Vader's Little Princess brings his witty comic observations to terrestrial parenting in this perceptive book celebrating the more surreal moments of raising a child. In charming colorful pa As he's shown in his previous hugely popular books, Jeffrey Brown has a real gift for finding humor in quirky yet universal truths. Now the bestselling author of Darth Vader and Son and Vader's Little Princess brings his witty comic observations to terrestrial parenting in this perceptive book celebrating the more surreal moments of raising a child. In charming colorful panels, Brown wryly illustrates his fiveyear- old son's take on the world around him, from watching TV ("Elton John looks pretty in that shirt") to playing with toys ("This truck can survive on very little water") to odd requests ("Don't feel happy at me"), capturing the sweetly weird times that mothers and fathers everywhere experience with their own curious, pure-minded kids.

30 review for Kids Are Weird: And Other Observations from Parenthood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    Disclaimer: I received this book for free in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. You know how on Facebook some people will post the funny thing their child said, and it isn't funny, at least not to you, because you weren't there and don't know the child? That's kind of how this book of one-off comic panes felt to me: a series of precious moments made less precious by passing them off as, at the least, humor or, at the most, art. Kids Are Weird is made up of random things I'm assuming Jeffrey Brown's Disclaimer: I received this book for free in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. You know how on Facebook some people will post the funny thing their child said, and it isn't funny, at least not to you, because you weren't there and don't know the child? That's kind of how this book of one-off comic panes felt to me: a series of precious moments made less precious by passing them off as, at the least, humor or, at the most, art. Kids Are Weird is made up of random things I'm assuming Jeffrey Brown's child said. Each page may have some kind of comic series, like when the kid wants bacon, or a few random things the kid said. I know that I never chuckled, and I'm straining to remember a time I even really smiled internally. I'm afraid I find little to care about, as an outsider, here: "What? Why not?" "You smell yucky. [next pane -->] Just kidding!" Yes, kids say such things, and they're very cute when they're yours, when you're there. But these kinds of things flop when shared with others as "humor." The illustrations don't add to the moment here, either. I'm afraid I didn't find this book funny or insightful.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    Ah, Jeffrey Brown. For quite some time Mr. Brown was writing and drawing some of my favorite comics. His autobiographical stuff was great. Honestly, I've never watched someone grow up on the page the way I have with Jeffrey Brown. His first few books, a common complaint was that they were somewhat similar, all about a relationship he had with a girl that had so many feels. For me, it was great. For an artist to do these similar books, it meant you could almost watch him refine and redraft his ea Ah, Jeffrey Brown. For quite some time Mr. Brown was writing and drawing some of my favorite comics. His autobiographical stuff was great. Honestly, I've never watched someone grow up on the page the way I have with Jeffrey Brown. His first few books, a common complaint was that they were somewhat similar, all about a relationship he had with a girl that had so many feels. For me, it was great. For an artist to do these similar books, it meant you could almost watch him refine and redraft his earlier works, a really interesting process that doesn't always happen on the page or on the bookstore shelves. Not to mention that things written about girls that involve emotions are kind of my thing. It's a symbiotic relationship. You have a book where a grown man reflects on the most significant relationship of his mid-20's? Just so happens that I have an afternoon of bath tub weeping to fill. Coincidence can be beautiful, or at least as beautiful as possible when we're talking about an adult male with questionable grooming eating Starburst jelly beans in the bathtub while reading comics. In the last few years Jeffrey Brown seems to be mining cute family material rather than the corpses of relationships long gone. It's got to be a natural progression. In a way, it's nice. After reading some pretty sad stuff for a decade or so, it looks like things are working out for Jeffrey Brown. But again, and I don't want to get more detailed on this bathtub business because it may cross over from embarrassing to downright humiliating, I prefer the sadder stuff. The work's still got a heart to it, and Brown's getting even better as an artist. But I think it's time for Jeffrey Brown and I to ride off into our respective sunsets, his being fatherhood, mine being a journey of the soul accompanied by candle with the obnoxious fragrance name "Sunset" sitting on the side of the bathtub. Told you it gets humiliating.

  3. 5 out of 5

    biblio_mom (Aiza)

    I have read this twice. but only marking it as read today. xD We had a great time reading this together as a family. We can all relate to half of the stuff, and none of the rest because they are the things that malay or muslim kids didn't do. Atleast from where I came from (Malaysia). Definitely not of our culture kind of thing. But, this book is funny nonetheless and I love the cartoon illustrations. Its in hardback and I got it so cheap from Big Bad Wolf Sale. Such a steal! I have read this twice. but only marking it as read today. xD We had a great time reading this together as a family. We can all relate to half of the stuff, and none of the rest because they are the things that malay or muslim kids didn't do. Atleast from where I came from (Malaysia). Definitely not of our culture kind of thing. But, this book is funny nonetheless and I love the cartoon illustrations. Its in hardback and I got it so cheap from Big Bad Wolf Sale. Such a steal!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Raina

    When I was young and still saying cute&funny things unintentionally, my mom recorded them in a special, cloth-bound book. She later went back and illustrated all my little quotes. I was an only child, obvs. This is Jeffrey Brown's version of that book. Pretty much literally. There's virtually no commentary (ok, flipping through the book, there are a few captions, but barely). Just unconnected scenes of full-color illustrations of his kid saying adorable things, in roughly chronological order (appar When I was young and still saying cute&funny things unintentionally, my mom recorded them in a special, cloth-bound book. She later went back and illustrated all my little quotes. I was an only child, obvs. This is Jeffrey Brown's version of that book. Pretty much literally. There's virtually no commentary (ok, flipping through the book, there are a few captions, but barely). Just unconnected scenes of full-color illustrations of his kid saying adorable things, in roughly chronological order (apparently - the kid gets visibly older), with pretty much no context. Which isn't a bad thing - kids are adorable, and one of the benefits of my job as a "youth services" librarian is that I get to overhear hilarious kid moments. Just, if that's not your thing, this isn't the book for you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    I'm a big fan of Brown's past autobiographical collections. He comes across as a warm, sincere guy and while his books are not laugh out loud funny, there's a lot of humor in his honesty and attention to detail. So now he has a kid and well...unfortunately this reads like all those Facebook posts by people who have kids. You know the ones where they have to tell the world the hilarious thing their genius child just said and you think either 1. No, they didn't say that or 2. Maybe they did but th I'm a big fan of Brown's past autobiographical collections. He comes across as a warm, sincere guy and while his books are not laugh out loud funny, there's a lot of humor in his honesty and attention to detail. So now he has a kid and well...unfortunately this reads like all those Facebook posts by people who have kids. You know the ones where they have to tell the world the hilarious thing their genius child just said and you think either 1. No, they didn't say that or 2. Maybe they did but that quote's been heavily edited or 3. Who cares? You know the ones.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Hogan

    Disclaimer: I received this book for free in a First Reads giveaway. Yeah, this just isn't very good. I think I know why; there's no story here, nothing to make me give a damn about the weird crap Jeffrey Brown's kid says. Now, I thought Darth Vader and Son was cute and charming, but we know what's going on there. It's Darth Vader and a 3 year old Luke Skywalker. Cuteness abounds. This though, is just a kid saying a bunch of random things. Now, I don't have kids, nor do I particularly like kids. Disclaimer: I received this book for free in a First Reads giveaway. Yeah, this just isn't very good. I think I know why; there's no story here, nothing to make me give a damn about the weird crap Jeffrey Brown's kid says. Now, I thought Darth Vader and Son was cute and charming, but we know what's going on there. It's Darth Vader and a 3 year old Luke Skywalker. Cuteness abounds. This though, is just a kid saying a bunch of random things. Now, I don't have kids, nor do I particularly like kids. Maybe if I did I would find this adorable, but I don't, so I don't. There needs to be a story, some reason for me to care about the kid beyond "he's so weird and random, isn't that funny?" I think Jeffrey Brown is a very talented artist, and maybe after some work on story telling or just illustrating someone else's story, he could really go places. Until then, just stick to Darth Vader and Son.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Travis Bursik

    I had recently read A Matter of Life and was hoping for more of Brown's quiet explorations of fatherhood. Instead, Kids Are Weird is a collection of goofy and cute things his son said. It reads less like a book and feels more like a new parent dominating the conversation by eagerly relaying everything their kid does with the mistaken impression that you find it just as charming as they do. I had recently read A Matter of Life and was hoping for more of Brown's quiet explorations of fatherhood. Instead, Kids Are Weird is a collection of goofy and cute things his son said. It reads less like a book and feels more like a new parent dominating the conversation by eagerly relaying everything their kid does with the mistaken impression that you find it just as charming as they do.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda [Novel Addiction]

    God, kids really are weird. And these aren't even the weirdest/most horrifying things I've ever heard kids say or talk about. I really do enjoy Jeffrey Brown's work. His Star Wars stuff is my favorite, but I like his brand of humor, so I will definitely be checking out other stuff he's done. God, kids really are weird. And these aren't even the weirdest/most horrifying things I've ever heard kids say or talk about. I really do enjoy Jeffrey Brown's work. His Star Wars stuff is my favorite, but I like his brand of humor, so I will definitely be checking out other stuff he's done.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I read this while perusing the bookstore and had a fit of laughter that probably bordered on public indecency. Whether you have kids or work with them, you'll enjoy this book. I read this while perusing the bookstore and had a fit of laughter that probably bordered on public indecency. Whether you have kids or work with them, you'll enjoy this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I love Jeffrey Brown, and his observations here are so accurate. :)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Ah so cute! Oscar is adorable! Kids really do say weird stuff. I’m looking forward to when my little Marshmallow is born and she starts talking and saying weird things!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emmy

    I don't have kids myself, but I love hearing stories from coworkers about their ridiculous and adorable children. This was a fun, condensed version of that, where all the best anecdotes are highlighted. A fun, quick ready (and the art is adorable!) I don't have kids myself, but I love hearing stories from coworkers about their ridiculous and adorable children. This was a fun, condensed version of that, where all the best anecdotes are highlighted. A fun, quick ready (and the art is adorable!)

  13. 4 out of 5

    حسناء

    kids are weird and cute and funny and adorable and i love them . oh , i loved the book too by the way :D

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

    Like many of Brown’s books, Kids are Weird is autobiographical. In his latest book, Brown turns seemingly random quotes from his preschool son, Oscar, into one or two panel comic. As anyone with children or who has spent time with children knows kids can say things adult would never consider. These sayings come across as cute, humorous, inappropriate, endearing or any combination thereof. This book has some of each. Although the book does not have an overall structure certain themes appear acros Like many of Brown’s books, Kids are Weird is autobiographical. In his latest book, Brown turns seemingly random quotes from his preschool son, Oscar, into one or two panel comic. As anyone with children or who has spent time with children knows kids can say things adult would never consider. These sayings come across as cute, humorous, inappropriate, endearing or any combination thereof. This book has some of each. Although the book does not have an overall structure certain themes appear across several of the comics. Some, like his son’s fascination with dinosaur or preparing for a new sibling, are to be expected. Others like his son’s various comments about his parents’ death are more unusual. Verdict: Jeffrey Brown has created his own version of Kids Say the Darnest Things with his son as the star of the show. Readers cannot doubt this is a labor of love for his child. Likewise, other parents will enjoy this book because they will see the foibles of their own progeny reflected in the comic panels within these pages.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    I had to pick this one up when I saw it was penned by the author of Vader's Little Princess, which I love with all of my being. Frankly, half of the book was composed of little quips where I felt like I didn't get the joke or otherwise triggered that borderline annoyance you can't help but feel when someone tells you some "cute story" about their kid that simply is not amusing to anyone in the world but that parent and that kid. But there were several pages where I literally laughed out loud -- I had to pick this one up when I saw it was penned by the author of Vader's Little Princess, which I love with all of my being. Frankly, half of the book was composed of little quips where I felt like I didn't get the joke or otherwise triggered that borderline annoyance you can't help but feel when someone tells you some "cute story" about their kid that simply is not amusing to anyone in the world but that parent and that kid. But there were several pages where I literally laughed out loud -- not just chuckling, but cracking up. Some of these vignettes were absolutely hilarious! Those pages made it all worth it and earned this one the four stars from me. When I put the book down, I found myself in quite the cheery mood. It takes like 20 minutes to read the whole book, so I highly recommend this to anyone who is a parent and/or looking for a fun, quick read. Because, hey -- kids ARE weird. And sometimes that's truly, completely entertaining.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    My kids and wife all just sailed through this (again, first read in October 2014) and liked it a lot, as they are also reading and loving Mr. Brown's latest Star Wars spinoff installment. Why aren't THEY writing the review, then?! They don't want to write reviews, they want to read the books, and laugh. I don't think I learn anything new I didn't already know from having kids myself. And familiarity with a 2014 version of KIds Say the Darnedest Things (Art Linkletter, kids, look it up!), while i My kids and wife all just sailed through this (again, first read in October 2014) and liked it a lot, as they are also reading and loving Mr. Brown's latest Star Wars spinoff installment. Why aren't THEY writing the review, then?! They don't want to write reviews, they want to read the books, and laugh. I don't think I learn anything new I didn't already know from having kids myself. And familiarity with a 2014 version of KIds Say the Darnedest Things (Art Linkletter, kids, look it up!), while it doesn't exactly breed contempt, well, it unfortunately doesn't breed hilarity or parenting insight. Guy DeLisle on BAD parenting is better than Brown on ADORABLE parenting (though Brown's heart is always recognizable in everything he does, and appreciated). DeLisle's book is more like Brown's BAD boyfriending than Kids Are Weird, I think. I like reading about losers more than winners, maybe.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jocelin

    I have read Jeffrey Brown's hilarious Star Wars inspired books and really enjoyed them. This was the first time that I have read some of his real-life humor books. Some of the humor in this book was a "hit or miss" for me. Some of it was funny and the rest of it, I didn't get. He does have a talent for writing good humorous situations, I just didn't get this one. I have read Jeffrey Brown's hilarious Star Wars inspired books and really enjoyed them. This was the first time that I have read some of his real-life humor books. Some of the humor in this book was a "hit or miss" for me. Some of it was funny and the rest of it, I didn't get. He does have a talent for writing good humorous situations, I just didn't get this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    CozyReaderKelly

    I have two young children so I thought this would be a hilarious set of comics about parenthood. Kids do say really funny things but the problem is that out of context they lose their humor. That's what happens with this collection. There were a few (maybe one every 10 pages) I found really funny, but for the most part it was lost in translation. I have two young children so I thought this would be a hilarious set of comics about parenthood. Kids do say really funny things but the problem is that out of context they lose their humor. That's what happens with this collection. There were a few (maybe one every 10 pages) I found really funny, but for the most part it was lost in translation.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ann Keller

    Great little book, filled with humor. Anyone who has kids will enjoy this special window into their world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lupe

    Hilarious! If you like weird kids. Which I do.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Amusing and tempting to look for prints of some pages just because our son is named Oscar too.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jaime K

    Kids, indeed, are weird. Jeffrey Brown has humored me immensely with his "Star Wars" children's books and yet again wins with this one. He uses his son Oscar as an example as to what very odd things children can (and will) say. "Are missiles real?" "Mommy put me in the oven." "If I eat my toast, then I die." It's a hilarious reminder that children are like sponges and are quite aware of what is going on around them, and what adults do & say. Kids will ask about death without embarrassment and think a Kids, indeed, are weird. Jeffrey Brown has humored me immensely with his "Star Wars" children's books and yet again wins with this one. He uses his son Oscar as an example as to what very odd things children can (and will) say. "Are missiles real?" "Mommy put me in the oven." "If I eat my toast, then I die." It's a hilarious reminder that children are like sponges and are quite aware of what is going on around them, and what adults do & say. Kids will ask about death without embarrassment and think about the circle of life (bigger things eat smaller ones, for example). And then they blurt out whatever is on their mind, screaming out super embarrassing information, and coming up with random insights that only make sense half the time. Jeffrey Brown's caricature of himself is pretty cool. One of my favorite scenes was the barber one. I never understood how a child could cry with a haircut since it obviously doesn't hurt. But Jeffrey Brown sums it up beautifully: "She almost cut my head off!" I honestly never thought of the fact that when a child sees SHARP OBJECT coming at them, that it's terrifying! A funny scene was with farting in the bathtub. Kids know that all of a sudden there are bubbles and then there is a horrid stench. Their lack of understanding of their own bodies is actually funny. We see Oscar grow a little through the book, and Brown hones in on the me tal development of a child Oscar's age. We also see his parents recognizing and reacting to this. It's beautiful, fun, and heartwarming.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rowe

    It’s so interesting reading Jeffrey Brown’s books, because I can really see his artistic progression. The images are really clean and well crafted, although there was something touching about his earlier work that was more frantic and more, I don’t know, youthful or something? So after reading several of his earlier, sadder, autobiographies, it made me feel really good to read this one. He seems like he’s in a happy place, and I’m happy for him. This is such a sweet love letter to his child, and It’s so interesting reading Jeffrey Brown’s books, because I can really see his artistic progression. The images are really clean and well crafted, although there was something touching about his earlier work that was more frantic and more, I don’t know, youthful or something? So after reading several of his earlier, sadder, autobiographies, it made me feel really good to read this one. He seems like he’s in a happy place, and I’m happy for him. This is such a sweet love letter to his child, and maybe not all of it is really funny, but he just seems so excited to be a dad and to have a family, that he’s included everything. Loved this one!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miss Ryoko

    Lol, Jeffrey Brown's son Oscar is a pretty witty kid. Some of the things he said made me chuckle. I don't have any children and don't plan to, but what I like most about kids is they aren't afraid to say what they are thinking because they "don't know any better." I wish adults would communicate like kids do - there is just some wonderful honesty in what kids say. Plus, they often do say some great things! If you are a parent, teacher, or caregiver of any kind, I think you will enjoy this quick, Lol, Jeffrey Brown's son Oscar is a pretty witty kid. Some of the things he said made me chuckle. I don't have any children and don't plan to, but what I like most about kids is they aren't afraid to say what they are thinking because they "don't know any better." I wish adults would communicate like kids do - there is just some wonderful honesty in what kids say. Plus, they often do say some great things! If you are a parent, teacher, or caregiver of any kind, I think you will enjoy this quick, comic read. And you might even be able to relate to it just a bit.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    I'd forgotten that I had't review this. All I remember is I laughed at some of these comics, mused at others and thought about how weird the kids my brother, sister, and me were many moons ago. Not deep, not heavy. Worth borrowing from the library or a friend. Not worth buying unless it made you laugh more than half the length of the book. I'd forgotten that I had't review this. All I remember is I laughed at some of these comics, mused at others and thought about how weird the kids my brother, sister, and me were many moons ago. Not deep, not heavy. Worth borrowing from the library or a friend. Not worth buying unless it made you laugh more than half the length of the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    The beginning tells the truth: try to enjoy the window of your kids talking to you nonstop, while it lasts. I know some parents keep a list of cute things their kids say. This book is like an illustrated version of such a list. It really feels authentic -- full of lines from his son that would only make complete sense in a little kid's mind. The beginning tells the truth: try to enjoy the window of your kids talking to you nonstop, while it lasts. I know some parents keep a list of cute things their kids say. This book is like an illustrated version of such a list. It really feels authentic -- full of lines from his son that would only make complete sense in a little kid's mind.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Shay

    Much cuter than the cat book. I didn't expect it to be hilarious, having read the cat book, and maybe that better prepared me. But the art and the panels were expertly done, and the facial expressions made everything. Adorable even for people who aren't parents, though I think the people who are would probably appreciate this even more and find it funnier since they've been there. Much cuter than the cat book. I didn't expect it to be hilarious, having read the cat book, and maybe that better prepared me. But the art and the panels were expertly done, and the facial expressions made everything. Adorable even for people who aren't parents, though I think the people who are would probably appreciate this even more and find it funnier since they've been there.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dinesh Balachandran

    Meh,thought the book would be cute. The first few pages were interesting, had several similar experiences. But then the book started to get a adulty feel to it. It was as if the author thought this is what kids must do and wrote them down.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stefani

    Giving it 2.5 ⭐️ because though I enjoyed the idea and laughed a couple times, I expected a bit more from Brown and was underwhelmed with the ‘conversations’ captured in this book. There are many other hysterical and mind-blowing things that kids say that should have been apart of this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Quick, enjoyable, cute.

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