web site hit counter The Pluto Enigma (Children of the Nan #1) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Pluto Enigma (Children of the Nan #1)

Availability: Ready to download

Andy stares, transfixed, at the picture on the large viewing screen in front of him. Even at this distance from the sun, Pluto and its large moon, Charon, shown brightly-No! How can this be? Andy feels himself floating toward a sea of blackness as he hears the captain's frantic voice: "Mission Control, we are being pushed out of orbit. Deep Space One is accelerating away f Andy stares, transfixed, at the picture on the large viewing screen in front of him. Even at this distance from the sun, Pluto and its large moon, Charon, shown brightly-No! How can this be? Andy feels himself floating toward a sea of blackness as he hears the captain's frantic voice: "Mission Control, we are being pushed out of orbit. Deep Space One is accelerating away from the Pluto system-controls are not responding to my commands-we...we're headed back toward Earth!" It's 2094. Doctor Andrew Jackson, an astrobiologist, has perfected a hibernation process that will allow humans to travel to the far reaches of the solar system. He persuades World Dynamics Inc., the world's largest aerospace conglomerate, and the United World Council to co-sponsor an expedition to Pluto. There's only one catch. The trip to Pluto will take four years, longer than anyone has ever hibernated. Andy agrees to be sealed in a capsule and goes underground to prove his system works, but an earthquake in 2097 causes Andy's capsule to go missing. He is rescued many centuries later by an advanced race of humans who call themselves the Unoites. The Unoites live in the shadow of a profound mystery: that Pluto's two small moons, Hydra and Nix, are not moons at all but artificial satellites-placed there by whom? When? Andy is discovered by Phoebe, the Unoites' lone, sentient artificial intelligence. His awakening and acceptance by the Unoites allows Phoebe to gain new insights into the Pluto Enigma-but will she be able to share her new knowledge with her human friends? The Pluto Enigma, the first entry in the Children of the Nan trilogy, offers an optimistic yet enigmatic view of the future that readers will find both plausible and desirable. It will soon be followed by Uno's Gambit, which sets the stage for the shocking conclusion brought to fruition in book III, Homo Galaxia.


Compare

Andy stares, transfixed, at the picture on the large viewing screen in front of him. Even at this distance from the sun, Pluto and its large moon, Charon, shown brightly-No! How can this be? Andy feels himself floating toward a sea of blackness as he hears the captain's frantic voice: "Mission Control, we are being pushed out of orbit. Deep Space One is accelerating away f Andy stares, transfixed, at the picture on the large viewing screen in front of him. Even at this distance from the sun, Pluto and its large moon, Charon, shown brightly-No! How can this be? Andy feels himself floating toward a sea of blackness as he hears the captain's frantic voice: "Mission Control, we are being pushed out of orbit. Deep Space One is accelerating away from the Pluto system-controls are not responding to my commands-we...we're headed back toward Earth!" It's 2094. Doctor Andrew Jackson, an astrobiologist, has perfected a hibernation process that will allow humans to travel to the far reaches of the solar system. He persuades World Dynamics Inc., the world's largest aerospace conglomerate, and the United World Council to co-sponsor an expedition to Pluto. There's only one catch. The trip to Pluto will take four years, longer than anyone has ever hibernated. Andy agrees to be sealed in a capsule and goes underground to prove his system works, but an earthquake in 2097 causes Andy's capsule to go missing. He is rescued many centuries later by an advanced race of humans who call themselves the Unoites. The Unoites live in the shadow of a profound mystery: that Pluto's two small moons, Hydra and Nix, are not moons at all but artificial satellites-placed there by whom? When? Andy is discovered by Phoebe, the Unoites' lone, sentient artificial intelligence. His awakening and acceptance by the Unoites allows Phoebe to gain new insights into the Pluto Enigma-but will she be able to share her new knowledge with her human friends? The Pluto Enigma, the first entry in the Children of the Nan trilogy, offers an optimistic yet enigmatic view of the future that readers will find both plausible and desirable. It will soon be followed by Uno's Gambit, which sets the stage for the shocking conclusion brought to fruition in book III, Homo Galaxia.

52 review for The Pluto Enigma (Children of the Nan #1)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Keira

    With a name like Nick Oddo, how could this author not write science fiction? That is what I was thinking when I won this as part of a Goodreads Giveaway. This book has a refreshing view of the future, which I say because most science fiction novels are all about how our negative actions in the present are intensified and the result is a dystopic view of the future. This novel shows a very promising view of the future, both in Andrew Jackson's time and 800 years away. The use of the future as a set With a name like Nick Oddo, how could this author not write science fiction? That is what I was thinking when I won this as part of a Goodreads Giveaway. This book has a refreshing view of the future, which I say because most science fiction novels are all about how our negative actions in the present are intensified and the result is a dystopic view of the future. This novel shows a very promising view of the future, both in Andrew Jackson's time and 800 years away. The use of the future as a setting of a science fiction gives almost limitless possibilities of what can happen, and simply explain them away as scientific advancements. I felt like the use of the 'first future' of 2094 was utterly unnecessary, since the technology is fairly close to that of our own, aside from the invention of orbs, a strange combination of a social security number, mobile phone and social media. I felt this could have been just as easily explained as being an experimental military technology in the present time, given to Andy just in case anything does happen whilst he is hibernating. I would have related more to Andy if he were from our present, rather than future present. While on the topic of future present, I wasn't bored while reading about the events leading up to the hibernation, but nor was I particularly enthralled. A lot of characters I thought were redundant and confusing, which could have been alleviated if some of the characters had been amalgamated. This is also true, though much less so, in the future future part of the novel. I found the characters of Brennan and Shorty to be virtually useless, as they fulfil no real plot points until their descendants are revealed, though these descendants are in my mind equally as non-essential at the present time. I thought a better way would have been to have them as minor characters for now, and then maybe reintroduce them as more important characters in the next instalment, perhaps as an alternate view of the events in the first part of the story. I found the story full of similarly redundant plot points, such as the expedition to New Paris. This plot point had no impact on the story or any lasting impression on the readers. Sure there was Andy's guilt, but that was mentioned and resolved in a single chapter with no apparent lasting effects. Mind you, many of these points could be trivial now but turn out to be a major turning point in the second and third books. I also found the explanations behind actions a little bit lacking. Why did they decide on an expedition to Pluto in the first place? Do they want to set up a galactic base there? Mine for minerals? Just generally explore. I would feel a lot more connected with the story if I knew more motivations of the characters. The contents page gave away much of the story for me, and I thought the mini sub-chapter titles a little grating, with headings like 'garden party' and such. I would have found out it was a party in the garden just by reading it, not by being forewarned in the first instance. I was somewhat holding out hope that the events alluded to in the contents would be about other characters, but alas, they played out exactly as I imagined they might have on my first glimpse through the pages. Whilst on the topic of presentation, there were also several spelling and formatting errors, such as speech marks after the 'Andy said,' though nothing that interrupted the flow of the story. There was also some dialogue where I didn't know who was speaking. These might just be nitpicking points though. While reading, I felt it would have been more beneficial to have seen the future entirely through Andy's eyes, not knowing the date or anyone's intentions until he did, and exploring the world as he saw it the first time. There were several cases where other characters, such as Helen or Doctor Ng, were talking about their intentions and then we read through the description of them carrying them out. To me it was like reading through the same events twice. By experiencing only Andy's perception of his surroundings, we would have been much more confused by the surroundings, wanting to know more, and maybe even mistrusting the more official characters as they had kept some secrets. It would have made the story much more interesting, in my opinion. There were a few instances of jumping around in time, which were mildly annoying at worst, and they didn't occur often, only when explaining some aspect of the current point, which made them tolerable. Not so well done, however, were the large chunks of missing action. We see the characters preparing for a major event, such as the earthquake or engagement party, and then we see the aftermath. I would have liked to have read about the event, observing how the characters react, and learning more about them. I wanted to read about the frantic search for Andy's capsule by Brennan and her team, their despair when they realised he was lost, the heartache of the family when they heard that Andy was missing, or potentially dead. These are the type of events where I would have related as an emotional human and gained the most insight into the story and its characters. The final third section of the novel read like a cheap love story to me, with predictable plot and cheesy dialogue. I thought it was the weakest part of the book. I find it hard to write about the aspects I liked about the story, simply because its much easier to write negative comments than positive ones. I rated this novel 3 stars for a reason, and that is because it is a wonderful idea posed in an interesting setting. The execution and technique could have been greatly improved, in my opinion, but the core of the story is there. I loved reading about the future world Andy finds himself in, his adventures with future technology, and the explanations by his new friends of how to use it. I also enjoyed the almost satirical references to our own current technology and culture, such as the idolisation of celebrities, prolonging of life and the prospect of being connected to everyone in the world. As a summary, I felt that this novel had huge potential, but maybe lacked in some areas of its execution. It seems to me like the typical self-published book, and thought it could have been improved with some reasonable editing. Much of the focus was on characterisation in places I felt story progression would have worked better. And points of view were either from several characters, resulting in duplicate retellings, or from one that was less informed about the situation, resulting in an incomplete picture of the events. Despite my comments above I did thoroughly enjoy being taken to the future by Mr. Oddo. I sincerely hope that it plays out as positively as it did in the novel. A great book to kick off a focus on views on the future, especially for a debut novel. I will certainly be on the lookout for the next instalment in the trilogy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Through the GR Give Away program, I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. From the description of the book, I was intrigued by Nick Oddo's original plot line. As I read through the book, Nick Oddo clearly was able to put to text his vision of the futuristic world we-humans may one day achieve. The book was well written. But there are just some dynamics that kept bothering me, and this warranted my rating of 2 stars. 1.) In my opinion, the description of the book is not an a Through the GR Give Away program, I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. From the description of the book, I was intrigued by Nick Oddo's original plot line. As I read through the book, Nick Oddo clearly was able to put to text his vision of the futuristic world we-humans may one day achieve. The book was well written. But there are just some dynamics that kept bothering me, and this warranted my rating of 2 stars. 1.) In my opinion, the description of the book is not an accurate summary of the book. Yes, the fact that satellites orbiting Pluto are artificial is an important concept to the book. Yes, the beings that created the satellites are important, too. No, it's not the main plot line of the story. Instead, its a side-plot line that offers unanswered questions. Maybe the description would be more accurate if Nick continues the series? If I had to rewrite the description of the book, it would be something to this affect: "Andy develops a hibernation system that will allow humans to reach the far end of our solar system. Before the government buys into his technology, they must see proof it works. Andy demonstrates confidence in his hibernation system by using it on himself. But oh-no! Something horrible goes wrong! Andy awakens many centuries later. He has to find peace with himself that he'll never see his loved ones again. How can he handle societal changes? Technological changes? Romance of the new human species? 2.) The first third of the book describes (view spoiler)[ Andy's familial relationships. It seems to me that Nick Oddo felt it was really important to build Andy's family tree so the reader can feel and empathize with Andy about the pain of how much he lost. In my opinion, it felt overdone. There was no excitement for those 100 pages. No high emotions, no low emotions. It almost felt like I was reading a history book of some important historical figure that I never truly cared about learning. (hide spoiler)] 3.) From the moment I received my first job till the current job that I hold, I have hated one aspect about people: People who come to my workplace to tell me how to do my job. I hate it. Hate it, hate it, hate it. Because of my strong emotion towards this, I hate negatively critiquing books. Mainly because I feel like I am calling the kettle black. I am not a writer. What right do I have to tell a writer what (s)he should or should no do? Knowing this, I humbly bring this point to face: Reading this book is like driving through Texas. The road is straight. no curves, no scenic scenery, nothing. You just trudge on and on. Yawn, chug the coffee, extend your eyelids open as far as you can. Roll down the window to remove the stagnant air. What I mean by this is that Andy had no real character flaws. He had no real challenges to work through. Yes, he woke up centuries later, but (view spoiler)[everyone loved him and took care of him. He was a celebrity. Everything was made easy for him (hide spoiler)] . There was no adrenaline pumping scenes, no heart moving scenes, no icy-water in the face scenes. Again, these are my thoughts and opinions. Other readers have found Nick Oddo's book very enjoyable and they wrote excellent reviews. I just happened not be smitten with this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wade

    This is a First Read review. I want to thank the Author, the publisher and Goodreads for the First Read opportunity and I give my sincere apologies for the delay in this review. This First Read opportunity has no influence on my review other than that I am giving a review in exchange for a free book. My review is based solely on what I think. Doesn't mean I'm right or wrong, it's just my opinion. I'm not an expert or a critic, just a book-lover. So here is my opinion: The negative: I recieved this This is a First Read review. I want to thank the Author, the publisher and Goodreads for the First Read opportunity and I give my sincere apologies for the delay in this review. This First Read opportunity has no influence on my review other than that I am giving a review in exchange for a free book. My review is based solely on what I think. Doesn't mean I'm right or wrong, it's just my opinion. I'm not an expert or a critic, just a book-lover. So here is my opinion: The negative: I recieved this book a year ago and I just did not find the book engaging at all. Instead of "can't put the book down" I couldn't pick the book up. I don't blame the author as its possible events in my personal life may have influenced my interest in reading so I have been pushing through to the end in order to complete my review. I found the first 100 pages very dry, mostly plot and charachter development. Pushing through into Part 2 I understand the reason for the development but I think it could have been done differently. My advice for authors is always to grab the reader in the first chapter. This book didn't do it for me and this is the only reason the book didn't get 5 stars. Once I hit Part 2/Chapter 15 things got really interesting and my opinion of the book changed from horrible to awesome. Despite my criticism of Part 1, the books is well written with great character and story development. I commend the author for the world he has created. It seems to be a utopia but I keep expecting a twist...a dark side to this reality. So far nothing leads me to believe this will happen. This is neither a good or bad thing. I just keep expecting an earth shattering/climactic twist. Other than that I think the world the Author has created is interesting, unique and very creative. Well done. I haven't exactly finished the book at this point (have 50 pages to go) but I am confused about something that revolves around (view spoiler)[ Andy in the future. He is being adapted into a culture/society that has been genetically modified at birth to live for hundreds of years. Andy has not been genetically altered (so far) and is to beome a younger but it would take 50 years for home to complete the T1 and T2 training and he's already in his 40s. I don't recall any mention of this in the book. Did I miss something? Has he already been genetically modified? Will I find out in the last 50 pages or maybe the sequel? (hide spoiler)] I hope so. Lastly, the very brief vague and secretive intro/mentions of (view spoiler)[ aliens (hide spoiler)] is an interesting hook and plot development that will have me reading the sequal. Very good book, worth reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    The Pluto Enigma is the author's debut novel, and,as such, shows much promise for the future. The first of a trilogy, the book is the story of a scientist from the near future who, though an accident, finds himself awakening from hibernation in the year 2910. Fortunately for him, the humans from the future are benign, taking him under their wing and teaching him how to integrate into their society (as opposed to studying him to death or treating him as a museum attraction). The most successful p The Pluto Enigma is the author's debut novel, and,as such, shows much promise for the future. The first of a trilogy, the book is the story of a scientist from the near future who, though an accident, finds himself awakening from hibernation in the year 2910. Fortunately for him, the humans from the future are benign, taking him under their wing and teaching him how to integrate into their society (as opposed to studying him to death or treating him as a museum attraction). The most successful part of the novel is the middle portion. Here, Doctor Jackson is introduced in a realistic way to the future society and its technology. Although the entire population is happy and fulfilled, there is a dark thread running through this portion of the story. There is mention of a dark history of war and massacre which brought humanity to the edge of extinction, to be saved by a mysterious intervention by an unknown entity that has become central to life on Earth. The subtle feeling of unease is very well done, and this portion of the book would easily rate four stars. However, the first and last portions of the book are much weaker. The first one hundred pages are concerned with Jackson's family backstory, going back to his childhood. There's a lot of family tree information, the presence of which mystified my until I realized it was necessary to make Jackson's marriage to the clone of his (last seen as) twelve year old niece a little less squicky. Also, their plan to raise her parents as clones from preserved DNA is definitely getting into Heinlein WTH territory. In order to enjoy the last part of the book, one must share the author's reverence for Scottish culture. Otherwise, this section will appear to be composed of filler to up the page count. So, to summarize, the science fiction part is well written and intriguing, rating four stars, but is pulled down to a three by the weak writing in Jackson's personal storyline. My thanks to the Goodreads First Reads program for providing me with the opportunity to read this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Andrew Jackson is a man who lives in our future in 2094. He is a scientist who specializes in hibernation technologies such as those used to travel in long space missions, and he has just convinced the U.N. along with his friend Michael, the CEO of one of the largest global conglomerates to prove his hibernation technology before they split the cost for a mission to Pluto. Dr. Jackson will be the guinea pig in the hibernation capsule himself for four years to prove the technology, but something Andrew Jackson is a man who lives in our future in 2094. He is a scientist who specializes in hibernation technologies such as those used to travel in long space missions, and he has just convinced the U.N. along with his friend Michael, the CEO of one of the largest global conglomerates to prove his hibernation technology before they split the cost for a mission to Pluto. Dr. Jackson will be the guinea pig in the hibernation capsule himself for four years to prove the technology, but something goes wrong, and he wakes up 800 years in the future. The book is laid out in three parts, his present, his awakening, and his introduction to the new society. The interesting thing is, all through the book, a thread runs through it surrounding Pluto and what they found up there. No spoilers I promise. It has literally shaped humanity for hundreds of years if not longer. There is also a dark note that runs through the book. It is just underneath all the happy, fulfilled people everywhere. There is talk of a massacre. There is mention of an evil General. There is mention of mankind almost coming to the brink of extinction, but none of this is explored. My bet is, all of this will be told in the second book when Andrew goes through the Younger training program and is sworn to secrecy. I'm sure it will horrify him. The book is delightful, there are no grey characters here, but I believe that it is something that has happened on purpose. No violence has happened in 500 years at least to man or animal. That is why I marked in my shelves as subversive, because something funny is going on around here, I just don't know what it is yet. Highly recommended! I loved every minute. If I had a hint more of what the dark parts were, I probably would have given it five stars, as it is, I am giving it 4.5 A Thumping Good Read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    Through Goodreads First Reads I received a copy of The Pluto Engima graciously signed by Mr. Oddo himself. At first I found the book difficult to get into as there seemed to be a lot of description about various birthday parties and Thanksgiving dinners that provided a cozy, homey atmosphere for the main character, one Captain Andrew Jackson. There was a silly section that had a budding romance developing between two characters that didn't have much to do with the main part of the book. After pl Through Goodreads First Reads I received a copy of The Pluto Engima graciously signed by Mr. Oddo himself. At first I found the book difficult to get into as there seemed to be a lot of description about various birthday parties and Thanksgiving dinners that provided a cozy, homey atmosphere for the main character, one Captain Andrew Jackson. There was a silly section that had a budding romance developing between two characters that didn't have much to do with the main part of the book. After plodding through these first 75 pages or so, the novel becomes very interesting indeed as we follow Captain Jackson's adventures in the 30th century. The Pluto Enigma gives an imaginative account of a rather utopian society that is pleasant and ever refreshing after so many recent works displaying an ugly dystopian vision of the future. I enjoyed the book enough overall to want to continue reading about this lovely vision of the future. There is of course a mystery (enigma...) that leaves wanting to continue reading further books in the series>

  7. 5 out of 5

    *Thea 'Wookiee'sMama' Wilson*

    I won this book from GoodReads FirstReads. This isn't a book I would have chosen to purchase for myself but I am trying to widen my reading horizons so I thought I would enter the giveaway and give it a try if I won and I'm glad I did as it's a very interesting book indeed. It's been well written and thought-provoking, the topic is an interesting one and I found it fascinating to read about. It written in several parts telling the story of Andrew Jackson and how a planned 4 year hibernation durin I won this book from GoodReads FirstReads. This isn't a book I would have chosen to purchase for myself but I am trying to widen my reading horizons so I thought I would enter the giveaway and give it a try if I won and I'm glad I did as it's a very interesting book indeed. It's been well written and thought-provoking, the topic is an interesting one and I found it fascinating to read about. It written in several parts telling the story of Andrew Jackson and how a planned 4 year hibernation during space travel to Pluto goes wrong when he finds himself woken several hundreds of year later than planned and is the first book in a planned trilogy. I will be looking for the next book and I really want to know what's going to happen next! More in depth review to come.......

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I found this book very hard to get into. I found the way it was written I was being 'told' what was going on rather than being 'shown'. The idea and premise of the story is wonderful to the point where one can almost overlook the problems with the writing style. As this is Nick Oddo's first novel there is room for improvement and it will be interesting to see how the story and the writing progresses through the following books. My copy was won through a goodreads competition. I found this book very hard to get into. I found the way it was written I was being 'told' what was going on rather than being 'shown'. The idea and premise of the story is wonderful to the point where one can almost overlook the problems with the writing style. As this is Nick Oddo's first novel there is room for improvement and it will be interesting to see how the story and the writing progresses through the following books. My copy was won through a goodreads competition.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Oren

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  12. 4 out of 5

    rick saulnier

  13. 4 out of 5

    Red

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deane Harlow

  15. 4 out of 5

    Viridiana Fisher

  16. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kateri Limmer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mia Redgrave

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bernie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bernie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  22. 5 out of 5

    Harry Potter

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Casper

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  25. 5 out of 5

    Charles A.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elle

  27. 4 out of 5

    Damon Owens

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bert

  29. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  30. 4 out of 5

    Betty

  31. 5 out of 5

    Melody

  32. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  33. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  34. 5 out of 5

    Candice

  35. 4 out of 5

    Becky Lepine

  36. 5 out of 5

    Judi Phillips

  37. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Lavender

  38. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  39. 5 out of 5

    Vykki

  40. 5 out of 5

    Debbie White

  41. 4 out of 5

    JinkM

  42. 5 out of 5

    Laima

  43. 4 out of 5

    Callie

  44. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  45. 4 out of 5

    Jay

  46. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Hall

  47. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Gates

  48. 5 out of 5

    Haven Gordon

  49. 4 out of 5

    Dallas

  50. 5 out of 5

    Kim Coomey

  51. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  52. 5 out of 5

    Michelle & Tony

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.