web site hit counter Best New Horror 14 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Best New Horror 14

Availability: Ready to download

The fourteenth volume in this series is going strong, and with another generous sampling of the past year's best horror fiction, it again earns "merits" from Publishers Weekly. With contributions from such favorites as Ramsey Campbell and Kim Newman, along with the talented likes of Neil Gaiman, China Mieville, Graham Joyce, Paul McCauley, Stephen Gallagher, Caitlin R. Kie The fourteenth volume in this series is going strong, and with another generous sampling of the past year's best horror fiction, it again earns "merits" from Publishers Weekly. With contributions from such favorites as Ramsey Campbell and Kim Newman, along with the talented likes of Neil Gaiman, China Mieville, Graham Joyce, Paul McCauley, Stephen Gallagher, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Jay Russell, Glen Hirshberg and many more, the hairraising tales in this edition hold nightmares for travelers in alien lands, unveil the mystery and menace lurking in our everyday reality, explore the terrors of the supernatural, and honor horror's classic tradition. As always, editor Stephen Jones provides an illuminating and engaging overview of the past year in horror fiction, as well as an affecting necrology and a guide to contacts among publishers, organizations, booksellers, and magazines in the eerier fields of fiction. Contents: Acknowledgements Introduction: Horror in 2002 by Stephen Jones October in the Chair by Neil Gaiman Details by China Miéville The Wretched Thicket of Thorn by Don Tumasonis The Absolute Last of the Ultra-Spooky, Super-Scary Hallowe'en Horror Nights by David J. Schow Standard Gauge by Nicholas Royle Little Dead Girl Singing by Stephen Gallagher Nesting Instincts by Brian Hodge The Two Sams by Glen Hirshberg Hides by Jay Russell The Unbeheld by Ramsey Campbell Ill Met By Daylight by Basil Copper Catskin by Kelly Link 20th Century Ghost by Joe Hill Egyptian Avenue by Kim Newman The Boy Behind the Gate by James Van Pelt Nor the Demons Down Under the Sea by Caitlín R. Kiernan The Coventry Boy by Graham Joyce The Prospect Cards by Don Tumasonis The Cage by Jeff VanderMeer Dr. Pretorius and the Lost Temple by Paul J. McAuley (as by Paul McAuley) Necrology: 2002 (essay) by Stephen Jones and Kim Newman Useful Addresses (essay) by Stephen Jones


Compare

The fourteenth volume in this series is going strong, and with another generous sampling of the past year's best horror fiction, it again earns "merits" from Publishers Weekly. With contributions from such favorites as Ramsey Campbell and Kim Newman, along with the talented likes of Neil Gaiman, China Mieville, Graham Joyce, Paul McCauley, Stephen Gallagher, Caitlin R. Kie The fourteenth volume in this series is going strong, and with another generous sampling of the past year's best horror fiction, it again earns "merits" from Publishers Weekly. With contributions from such favorites as Ramsey Campbell and Kim Newman, along with the talented likes of Neil Gaiman, China Mieville, Graham Joyce, Paul McCauley, Stephen Gallagher, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Jay Russell, Glen Hirshberg and many more, the hairraising tales in this edition hold nightmares for travelers in alien lands, unveil the mystery and menace lurking in our everyday reality, explore the terrors of the supernatural, and honor horror's classic tradition. As always, editor Stephen Jones provides an illuminating and engaging overview of the past year in horror fiction, as well as an affecting necrology and a guide to contacts among publishers, organizations, booksellers, and magazines in the eerier fields of fiction. Contents: Acknowledgements Introduction: Horror in 2002 by Stephen Jones October in the Chair by Neil Gaiman Details by China Miéville The Wretched Thicket of Thorn by Don Tumasonis The Absolute Last of the Ultra-Spooky, Super-Scary Hallowe'en Horror Nights by David J. Schow Standard Gauge by Nicholas Royle Little Dead Girl Singing by Stephen Gallagher Nesting Instincts by Brian Hodge The Two Sams by Glen Hirshberg Hides by Jay Russell The Unbeheld by Ramsey Campbell Ill Met By Daylight by Basil Copper Catskin by Kelly Link 20th Century Ghost by Joe Hill Egyptian Avenue by Kim Newman The Boy Behind the Gate by James Van Pelt Nor the Demons Down Under the Sea by Caitlín R. Kiernan The Coventry Boy by Graham Joyce The Prospect Cards by Don Tumasonis The Cage by Jeff VanderMeer Dr. Pretorius and the Lost Temple by Paul J. McAuley (as by Paul McAuley) Necrology: 2002 (essay) by Stephen Jones and Kim Newman Useful Addresses (essay) by Stephen Jones

30 review for Best New Horror 14

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katee

    3.5 stars. Maybe this should have been called Here's What a Bunch of Authors from the Same Literary Circle Have Been Working On Over the Past Year or So, Plus Some News? I don't know what the distinction is between dark fantasy and horror, if there's even a distinction anymore (or if there ever was), but this collection is definitely a grab bag of dark fantasy, psychological thriller, mystery, and straight up B-movie horror. Of the 21 stories in the book, there were four that really grabbed and 3.5 stars. Maybe this should have been called Here's What a Bunch of Authors from the Same Literary Circle Have Been Working On Over the Past Year or So, Plus Some News? I don't know what the distinction is between dark fantasy and horror, if there's even a distinction anymore (or if there ever was), but this collection is definitely a grab bag of dark fantasy, psychological thriller, mystery, and straight up B-movie horror. Of the 21 stories in the book, there were four that really grabbed and held me: Glen Hirshberg's 'Two Sams', Kelly Link's 'Catskin', Graham Joyce's 'The Coventry Boy' (which is actually a chapter excerpted from a novel he'd written at the time), and Jeff VanderMeer's 'The Cage' (also part of a larger collection set in the same steampunky world, but still independent of any other stories). These four entries stood out from the rest in narrative tone, prose style, and world building -- far beyond many of the stories written by supposed masters of horror and dark fantasy. (I adore Neil Gaiman as a human being, but his stories usually lack a spark of vitality, at least to me. I feel bad because lots of people whom I respect think he writes wonderfully, but it is what it is.) Honorable mention goes to James Van Pelt's 'The Boy Behind the Gate' for a heartbreaking ending. The risk you run with reading an anthology is that you will find at least one contribution that's meant to advertise the author's novel, or series of novels, and the characters and world suffer severe underdevelopment. Best New Horror #14 definitely contains stories like this. They're often easy to pick out (if you haven't read the mini bio that precedes each story) because they feel like episodes in a serialization -- fun for established fans of the author or series in question, not so fun for the horror/dark fantasy initiate. It's all right, though, because the styles and themes in this anthology are varied enough that a reader will find something worth looking deeper into.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    So, as usual, slowly working my way backwards through this series (while trying to keep up with the new ones - currently 2-3 volumes behind). And a bit of a change this time around - as I've mentioned before, I see myself as a Generalist when it comes to fiction, and also to my favored genres. I like to read widely. But what that means is that I've tried, over the years, to not just be a slave to my particular tastes and to stretch outside of my likes and dislikes. And this has paid off in spades So, as usual, slowly working my way backwards through this series (while trying to keep up with the new ones - currently 2-3 volumes behind). And a bit of a change this time around - as I've mentioned before, I see myself as a Generalist when it comes to fiction, and also to my favored genres. I like to read widely. But what that means is that I've tried, over the years, to not just be a slave to my particular tastes and to stretch outside of my likes and dislikes. And this has paid off in spades over the years, giving me a surveyor's eye over the genres and sub-genres I like/investigate, and leading me to discover strange and wondrous things, even as my small-minded parameters fall-away and enlarge under the pressure of new styles and approaches. Not always, but often. And what this has meant in a practical sense is that I tend not to abandon things I'm reading unless I find them actively distasteful or poorly written - put another way, "hope springs eternal." But, that was then and this is now, and this last month or so, while reading both this book and my usual compliment of horror fiction submissions for the Pseudopod podcast that I co-edit, I began to do something I haven't done in years if not decades - I began to give up on stories. By which I mean that I feel that I have enough of an idea of my own likes and dislikes that, at least for modern works, I can tell when stories are not being approached from an angle that I will find ultimately fruitful. In the horror genre, what this generally means for me is a specific kind of "dark fantasy" approach - stories which barely seem to worry about taking place in the real world and traffic in the figures and ideas of the supernatural without any indication that they are intending to be scary, frightening, disturbing or unnerving (which, for example, has made me wary of the Bizarro sub-genre as well - I like the shift from the prosaic to the strange, not the automatically strange). And there was a bit of that here, so I exercised my hard-won self-knowledge and "opted out early ", as it were, from a few of these stories/ That taken into account (and in service of a short-version of the review for those who don't want to read the extensive story-by-story overview to follow) I guess I will say that I thought this was a weaker installment in Jones' long-running series, overall. I've often presaged reviews of both this and the Datlow Year's Best series with a short digression on reminding readers that all Editors are human, and have their sensibilities and circle of writers who they came up alongside, and how readers need to understand this in commenting or thinking critically on these "Best Of The Year" attempts - not all editors share your tastes and you should shop around a bit, while also considering the "why" of some story's appearance without having to resort to literary conspiracy theories. Many of these editors have been toiling in these fields for an adult lifetime and even if your taste doesn't match theirs, it's still likely the work they choose has merit, even if it does not fit your definition of such. And having yet again said all that, I guess I'll add that sometimes an editor's sensibilities (wide-ranging as they are) are limited to the work available to him in any particular year. And 2002's pickings seem to have been from a year heavy on dark fantasy...I mean, hey, if you *like* that stuff, then maybe this is one of the *better* years for you! As usual, the "Year in..." and "Necrology" bulk up the front and back - I find these useful if not always imperative (I note that I now seem to have read far back enough that an "audio"/"radio" section no longer seems to be included in the "Year In" section - a shame - and that the selfsame section is, as always, exhaustive, intriguing and dismaying in turn). Jones' soapbox finale, this year, involves some dust-up on the internet involving an essay by Paula Guran (editor) opining on the "current state of horror" that perhaps stated its argument too broadly or bluntly (and, no surprise to the contemporary reader, the internet reacted spasmodically). Probably, most of what she said, or was warning about, was true but here we all are 16 years later and who would know or care? So, I guess if I'm going to follow my usual approach with anthologies, and review the stories from weakest to strongest, I need to acknowledge the two also-rans. I did not read the following: "Catskin" by Kelly Link which involves a witch and her "children" and how they handle their inheritance on her passing. That Link is an excellent writer is no doubt (we ran her "Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose" on Pseudopod) but I often find here work a little too studied or twee for my tastes. Here her Angela Carter/Ray Bradbury-esque fairy-tale approach, in which little-to-no beams of prosaic sunshine appear, just wasn't working for me after a few pages. Similarly, I liked the set-up of "The Cage" by Jeff VanderMeer - a purchaser of estates totes up a new purchase, his eye caught by a an odd, empty cage hanging from the wall, until I realized that the setting of "Ambergris" was not merely some renamed, exotic, foreign city but some fantasy otherworld in which attacks from monstrous "greycaps" that live underground was the norm. And that's why I don't read a lot of fantasy, so.... And then there were a number of stories I did read all the way through, but which didn't work for me: Brian Hodge's "Nesting Instincts" felt too long and too character heavy for the the eventual pay-off, while "The Two Sams" by Glen Hirshberg was a sprawling, emotional dredge through the feelings associated with stillbirths - but "ghosts" do not a horror story make... Surprisingly, although I'm a Ramsey Campbell booster, his "The Unbeheld" - in which an elderly school crossing guard begins to find dead animals in his home, upon which events escalate - didn't work for me. Often, Campbell's stories tend to place a character in an unbalanced narrative that slowly unravels (or hints at) their underlying psychological problem, and following along can take some attention and skill on the reader's part as well. Here, unfortunately, I felt as if the disparate story details didn't click together very tightly, while also being wrong-footed by occasional, confusing or misleading turns of phrase. The weak stories next. Neil Gaiman's "October In The Chair" is framed with a typically Gaimanesque conceit - personifications of the months gather to listen to stories (a bit of Sandman fan pandering, perhaps - SanFanPand?) and the story itself, in which a runaway boy befriends a ghost boy in a cemetery. Dark fantasy with the faintest of hints of a threat at the end, this seems like a trial run/inspiration for his later The Graveyard Book and not really my kind of thing. In "Standard Gauge" by Nicholas Royle a documentarian accidentally makes an associate of a man fixated on a long-forgotten and dismantled London rail line, with tragic results. Not bad but it never felt like it jelled into a satisfying story. When a father and daughter attend a "young singers" contest (in Stephen Gallagher's "Little Dead Girl Singing") they become aware of a talented, but oddly mechanical, co-contestant. An odd story - the title doesn't give away the twist, but to be more precise it doesn't EXACTLY give away the twist, when it should still have pointed elsewhere, or been neutral at least. In the "Good but a little flawed" category: possibly my first China Miéville story, "Details" has a young person who feeds and reads to a shut-in (who seems to dispense magical wisdom to visitors), but she's not a shut-in as much as she's hiding from an unimaginable threat. Not bad as a story ((view spoiler)['pattern recognition' as a quasi-postmodern threat (hide spoiler)] but I felt the central conceit isn't exploited as much as it could have been. "The Absolute Last Of The Ultra-Spooky, Super-Scary Hallowe'en Horror Nights", by David J. Schow - who we've also run on PseudoPod - has gang members planning on raising hell at a sprawling, Halloween "Haunt" event, until they get more than they bargained for ((view spoiler)[in that some of the staff are seemingly real monsters from the classic movies (hide spoiler)] . Not a bad story (I've tinkered with variations of the central conceit myself in a few unfinished stories), but it loses a little something in its overall dedication to its symbolic "big idea" over any attempt to engage the "how" or "why" of it, rendering a potentially resonant concept a little pulpier than it should be (view spoiler)[imagine the film CABIN IN THE WOODS if it only vaguely hinted at the underground base (hide spoiler)] . "Ill Met By Daylight" has genre stalwart Basil Copper making a stab at a story in the style of M.R. James - architect hired to refurbish an aging church in a small English town finds himself haunted by spectral visions of a malevolent historical figure buried in the churchyard. It's not bad, with occasional creepy atmospheric moments, but lacks a feeling of impetus/momentum. Kim Newman's occult detectives, the Diogenes Club (for background, see my Newman entry in the review of MAMMOTH BOOK OF BEST NEW HORROR #16) returns in "Egyptian Avenue", trying to solve the mystery of why a particular grave in a Victorian cemetery, built in the Egypto-mania style of the time, has suddenly begun evidencing virulent, Egyptian themed hauntings. Not bad but, given the central conceit, the ending is super-rushed, to its detriment, and it should have been a novella (all the prime plot points are elided or talked around). "Nor The Demons Down Under The Sea" by Caitlín R. Kiernan has a lesbian couple, both scientists, in the 1950s taking a detour from a vacation to check out a supposed haunted house. Kiernan has a few irksome stylistic tics that rankle a bit (deliberately repeated word choices), but the story is all build-up to an intensely hallucinatory, if vague, climax - with some evocative imagery and writing. Intimations of a larger plot can be teased out, but the story seems less interested in that than in bowling the reader over delirious imagery. Not for everyone (nice Shirley JacksonHaunting of Hill House nod, though). Finally, "Dr. Pretorius And The Lost Temple" has Paul McAuley's Scottish psychic detective Mr. Carlyle, moving through 1830s London in an attempt to discover the connection between a Trans-Thames tunnel project and a seemingly cursed object, while running afoul of pedantic alchemist/ne'er do well Dr. Pretorius (from THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN!). Fun and well-written, if slight, occult pulp adventure. Only four solidly good stories here: In "The Wretched Thicket Of Thorn" by Don Tumasonis a vacationing couple takes a boat on a day trip to an isolated Greek island, only to discover it won't start when they wish to leave, and that the island holds some savage and atavistic terrors. Not bad at all as a straight-ahead spooker. In "Hides", a consumptive Robert Louis Stevenson, crossing 19th Century America by stagecoach, is waylaid after an accident and ends up stumbling into a horrific scenario with his fellow travelers. Jay Russell brings the goods at the climax to a story I was worried was going to be considered "horror" strictly by default of it's Stevenson conceit - although perhaps the "horror" still seems a bit perfunctory. James Van Pelt, in "The Boy Behind The Gate," does a good job juggling two parallel (if a-chronological) plots set in the same remote mining town (separated by a hundred years). In modern times, a man desperately searches for his captive, possibly dead or dying, son possibly hidden by child molester (who subsequently committed suicide) in the abandoned pits and workings. Meanwhile, a hundred years earlier, a miner wrestles with his conscience over what to do about his fears that his own son is a wicked, malignant, "Typhoid Mary"-type spreader of death. A solid story with a satisfying, deliberately ambiguous ending. Finally, in another offering by Don Tumasonis, we are offered an intriguing storytelling conceit - a tale told by transcribed texts (and related image descriptions) on a set of 1930s exotic antique postcards illustrating a rural area near Turkey, the texts describing some kind of "Treasure Hunt" (whether material, spiritual or occult is not clear) by British travelers. This striking story has some resonance with Lovecraft's "The Picture In The House" (in the sense of "static representations of barbarous foreign practices") and is, at turns, ambiguous, striking and shocking. And so, two excellent stories left for the end. "The Coventry Boy" by Graham Joyce is an excerpted chapter from his book The Facts of Life and thus I almost didn't read it. I am happy I did (I spent a semester at Coventry Polytechnic and am familiar with the Nazi-bombed church that is the center of the chapter's narrative) as we follow, in the 1940s, Cassie, a young teen just growing into her sexual maturity (and related prophetic and visionary powers), who becomes aware that her City is about to be blitzed by the Nazis. Very powerful writing, especially in it capturing of the pandemonium of a city under siege. Joe Hill's "20th Century Ghost" is a home-run knocked out of the park, reminding me somewhat of David J. Schow's story "One For The Horrors" in terms of it being a love letter to the soon-to-be-dead theater-going experience. It's the tale of a haunted movie theater, the ghost that resides there and the man who she has haunted most of his life - oh, and movies: the spectral, ineffable, awful (in its original sense) phenomena of cinema and the movie house - the real "ghost" of the 20th Century. It ends on a sad and beautiful note, as well. Hill's impressive story control means that even details that would, in lesser hands, signpost later plot points are integrated so well and misdirected around that you don't see see them until they pay off (FANTASIA - I should have seen it coming!) and while not specifically "scary", the story still strives for (and succeeds at) mining unease from the ghost's appearances.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shatrujeet Nath

    As is always the case with anthologies, a mixed bag. The ones I positively loved were "The Boy Behind the Gate" by James Van Pelt, "The Two Sams" by Glen Hirshberg and "Details" by China Mieville. The Boy Behind the Gate will easily go down as one of the most chilling and depressing stories I have read. I liked "Hides" by Jay Russell for the way he used Robert Louis Stevenson as a character, and I thought "The Cage" by Jeff Vandermeer was extremely rich in its world-building --- I wished this wa As is always the case with anthologies, a mixed bag. The ones I positively loved were "The Boy Behind the Gate" by James Van Pelt, "The Two Sams" by Glen Hirshberg and "Details" by China Mieville. The Boy Behind the Gate will easily go down as one of the most chilling and depressing stories I have read. I liked "Hides" by Jay Russell for the way he used Robert Louis Stevenson as a character, and I thought "The Cage" by Jeff Vandermeer was extremely rich in its world-building --- I wished this wasn't a short story and just went on, taking me deeper into its fascinating world of death and decay. "The Prospect Cards" used a clever narrative device, while "Nor the Demons Down Under the Sea" was beautifully written --- though I didn't quite get what happened, which was also the author's objective, I guess. Gaiman's "October in the Chair" was nice but not great, as were "Standard Gauge" by Nicholas Royle and "Little Dead Girl Singing" by Stephen Gallagher. The ones that I didn't like at all were "Ill Met By Daylight" (cliched) and "20th Century Ghost" (ho-hum). And I have no clue what "The Unbeheld" (Ramsey Campbell) and "Catkin" (Kelly Link) were about, which is such a terrible waste of my time. I must add that I did not read 4-5 stories in the book. I just hope none of them were very good.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jien

    Better than the previous Mammoth horror anthology I read (#11) but not great. Many stories left much to be desired, though there was one gem: The Cage. My individual ratings are below: 1 Introduction - Excessive, unneeded, dull. Pages responding to Guren’s post on a website would have been better left online than in this book. 0 stars 85 October in the Chair - Unimpressing. The wrapper added nothing to the story that had nothing going for it anyway. It didn’t even get to horror. 1 star 99 Details - Better than the previous Mammoth horror anthology I read (#11) but not great. Many stories left much to be desired, though there was one gem: The Cage. My individual ratings are below: 1 Introduction - Excessive, unneeded, dull. Pages responding to Guren’s post on a website would have been better left online than in this book. 0 stars 85 October in the Chair - Unimpressing. The wrapper added nothing to the story that had nothing going for it anyway. It didn’t even get to horror. 1 star 99 Details - Evil pareidolia? That’s new. 2 stars 115 The Wretched Thicket of Thorn - Not too bad, though it runs into the cliche of totally pathetic female characters. 4 stars 139 The Absolute Last of the Ultra-Spooky […] - Surprisingly decent. 4 stars 156 Standard Gauge - Okay horror, not my type. 3 stars 169 Little Dead Girl Singing - Slightly creepy. 2 stars 182 Nesting Instincts - Weird enough to need more explanation than it gives. 2 stars 208 The Two Sams - Depressing, but not horror. 1 star 226 Hides - Not a fan of the choice to use Stevenson. Reminds me of an awful book I recently read called “Classics Mutilated.” Setup way to long, conclusion unfinished and unclear. 1 star 251 The Unbeheld - I’m starting to think Jones (editor) can’t distinguish “depressing” from “horror.” 1 star 267 Ill Met by Daylight - Adequate. A bit more horror would have been nice though, it was pretty light and over quickly. 2 stars 284 Catskin - Wasn’t a fan of the cliches or 2nd person 4th wall breaking or the childishness or the arbitrary nonsensicalness or the lack of horror. 1 star 310 20th Century Ghost - Better than most in this collection. 4 stars 330 Egyptian Avenue - Better than most in this collection. 4 stars 345 The Boy Behind the Gate - Barely horror. 2 stars 364 Nor the Demons Down Under the Sea - The dream gambit wasn’t a winner. 2 stars 378 The Coventry Boy - Not great, but not the worst. 3 stars 405 The Prospect Cards - I wanted a story, not a puzzle. The jumbled up and cut passages did nothing for the story but make it annoying, which is a pity because this one actually could have been good. 1 star 427 The Cage - It piqued my interest and held my attention. It maintained a sense of horror throughout, and the world was so interesting that I wanted more. This was a genuinely enjoyable read, which is the whole reason I’ve been slogging through this book. 5 stars 467 Dr Pretorius and the Lost Temple - Enjoyable, but doesn’t dip more than a toe into the most interesting parts. 4 stars 525 Necrology - Excessive, unneeded, dull. 0 stars 581 Useful Addresses - Excessive, unneeded, dull. 0 stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Overall a solid collection of horror stories. My favorite is by China Mieville called "Details" This story is about a mysterious old lady who has found herself prey to something in the details. These are everywhere, you look at paint and see a face in the ripples, the way paper crinkles, or sheets fold. The other top story goes to Joe Hill's "21st Century Ghost." Which takes place in an old movie theater and is similarly creepy. Overall a solid collection of horror stories. My favorite is by China Mieville called "Details" This story is about a mysterious old lady who has found herself prey to something in the details. These are everywhere, you look at paint and see a face in the ripples, the way paper crinkles, or sheets fold. The other top story goes to Joe Hill's "21st Century Ghost." Which takes place in an old movie theater and is similarly creepy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andre

    Neil Gaiman's 'October in the Chair' A brilliant short story from the master himself. The first story in this anthology and I already feel like I've got my moneys worth... A great collection of chilling fiction. Highly recommended. Neil Gaiman's 'October in the Chair' A brilliant short story from the master himself. The first story in this anthology and I already feel like I've got my moneys worth... A great collection of chilling fiction. Highly recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wendopolis

    This collection from 2002 contains a few gems. Of particular note: China Mieville's 'Details', in which a young boy delivers food to a recluse and learns the devil is truly in the details; 'The Wretched Thicket of Thorn' by Don Tumasonis tells of a couple who ignore a local's warning to stay away from a particular island, to their sorrow; 'Hides', by Jay Russel is a Western type featuring Robert Louis Stevenson as the main character. One hopes this tale is not based in truth; Basil Copper's 'Ill This collection from 2002 contains a few gems. Of particular note: China Mieville's 'Details', in which a young boy delivers food to a recluse and learns the devil is truly in the details; 'The Wretched Thicket of Thorn' by Don Tumasonis tells of a couple who ignore a local's warning to stay away from a particular island, to their sorrow; 'Hides', by Jay Russel is a Western type featuring Robert Louis Stevenson as the main character. One hopes this tale is not based in truth; Basil Copper's 'Ill Met By Daylight' is about an architect who runs into some unpleasant occupants of a church graveyard (Copper penned the much-reprinted 'Camera Obscura'); 'Catskin' by Kelly Link, is one of the best in the anthology, and anyone who is familiar with her work will agree. Small is his mother's youngest son and misses his mother terribly; 'The Boy Behind the Gate' by James van Pelt is about two fathers and two sons in different time periods; And finally an absorbing story by Paul McAuley, in which one of my favorite characters, Mr. Carlyle, has another adventure, this time at the beginning of his career as an occultist/ghost hunter. McAuley's stories with Mr. Carlyle are worth seeking out, although there are not many. These are my favorite stories, but I didn't skip any, which speaks of the quality of this anthology.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Smith

    Excellent horror stories that ran the gamut of creature features to dark fantasy fever dreams. I will always pick up an anthology edited by Stephen Jones.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Albert

    Great story! You can broaden your audience by publishing your story on NovelStar Mobile App.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    as with all anthologies, this is a mixed bunch. overall the quality is high, and I enjoyed reading them. the contributions from Jeff Vandermeer, Jay Russell, Don Tumasonis and Kelly Link were all wonderful, and I'll be tracking down some of their other work. I was a little disappointed by Neil Gaiman and China Mieville, whom I usually like. the stories from Kim Newman, Paul McAuley, and Brian Hodge were pretty dull, and I had to force my way through them. overall, I really enjoyed this, and will as with all anthologies, this is a mixed bunch. overall the quality is high, and I enjoyed reading them. the contributions from Jeff Vandermeer, Jay Russell, Don Tumasonis and Kelly Link were all wonderful, and I'll be tracking down some of their other work. I was a little disappointed by Neil Gaiman and China Mieville, whom I usually like. the stories from Kim Newman, Paul McAuley, and Brian Hodge were pretty dull, and I had to force my way through them. overall, I really enjoyed this, and will definitely be trying some of the others in the series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Spinwallah

    october in the chair; neil gaiman ; its ok details; china mieville ; brilliant story, in my top few short stories ive ever read. could make a great film kk i finished it and overall it was very enjoyable. my favouries were catskin(kelly link) and the aformentioned details. i would have given it 5 stars but for a horror anthology it simply wasnt scary enough.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kayleen

    Read: October in the Chair, Neil Gaiman. A cool and interesting tale, each month; such as April and July, are people/creatures, and they gather together every month(?) and tell stories together. Very cool, wish it was longer.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Greg Kerestan

    Finally, another Dr. Pretorius story! Throw in "20th Century Ghosts," "October in the Chair" and "The Cage" and you've got a pretty solid volume- though I will always believe "Catskin" to be more a fantasy story than a dark-fantasy one. Finally, another Dr. Pretorius story! Throw in "20th Century Ghosts," "October in the Chair" and "The Cage" and you've got a pretty solid volume- though I will always believe "Catskin" to be more a fantasy story than a dark-fantasy one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    After reading this book, I found several new authors I was interested in reading more of. This series of books is great for discovering new authors to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    A.e.

    Not sure on the best new horror. I did enjoy it. But it left me waiting for something big to happen.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Martin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michele Davis

  18. 4 out of 5

    Running Press

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Morse

  23. 5 out of 5

    Darren

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rohan Kamath

  25. 5 out of 5

    Haitham

  26. 4 out of 5

    Keryn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben Myatt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lewis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heath Lowrance

  30. 5 out of 5

    Claude

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.