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I Don't Know Why She Bothers: Guilt Free Motherhood For Thoroughly Modern Women

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Daisy Waugh's razor-sharp wit takes on modern motherhood right between the eyes... Mummy. Ma, Mama, Mum. There may be different names for 'mother' but it often feels like there's only one correct way to BE one. Has motherhood been completely hijacked by parenting experts and the tutting, middle class Mummy-as-Vocation brigade? The bar to good motherhood is now so high, it's Daisy Waugh's razor-sharp wit takes on modern motherhood right between the eyes... Mummy. Ma, Mama, Mum. There may be different names for 'mother' but it often feels like there's only one correct way to BE one. Has motherhood been completely hijacked by parenting experts and the tutting, middle class Mummy-as-Vocation brigade? The bar to good motherhood is now so high, it's impossible for modern mothers not to feel as if they are failing. 'I don't know how she does it!' rings out the frantic cry. 'I don't know why she bothers,' answers Daisy. Life is short - but it's not over! We love our children but we are individuals too. Part feminist manifesto, part hilarious rant, Daisy asks modern mothers to STOP TAKING IT ALL SO SERIOUSLY. And maybe along the way, they'll start to feel a bit better about themselves.


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Daisy Waugh's razor-sharp wit takes on modern motherhood right between the eyes... Mummy. Ma, Mama, Mum. There may be different names for 'mother' but it often feels like there's only one correct way to BE one. Has motherhood been completely hijacked by parenting experts and the tutting, middle class Mummy-as-Vocation brigade? The bar to good motherhood is now so high, it's Daisy Waugh's razor-sharp wit takes on modern motherhood right between the eyes... Mummy. Ma, Mama, Mum. There may be different names for 'mother' but it often feels like there's only one correct way to BE one. Has motherhood been completely hijacked by parenting experts and the tutting, middle class Mummy-as-Vocation brigade? The bar to good motherhood is now so high, it's impossible for modern mothers not to feel as if they are failing. 'I don't know how she does it!' rings out the frantic cry. 'I don't know why she bothers,' answers Daisy. Life is short - but it's not over! We love our children but we are individuals too. Part feminist manifesto, part hilarious rant, Daisy asks modern mothers to STOP TAKING IT ALL SO SERIOUSLY. And maybe along the way, they'll start to feel a bit better about themselves.

30 review for I Don't Know Why She Bothers: Guilt Free Motherhood For Thoroughly Modern Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid Wassenaar

    Needed editing. Very funny. Sometimes oddly right-wing. Bit of a veiled attack on stay at home (and by extension work-from-home mothers) mothers. Which is odd, because, as a writer, she must be one. Makes one good point repeatedly ("we all (most of us) love our children, and that's good enough"). Makes a further good point less often, which should have been amplified ("look for the joy in life, because we're all going to die, and terrible things happen to everything we hold dear"). Doesn't tackl Needed editing. Very funny. Sometimes oddly right-wing. Bit of a veiled attack on stay at home (and by extension work-from-home mothers) mothers. Which is odd, because, as a writer, she must be one. Makes one good point repeatedly ("we all (most of us) love our children, and that's good enough"). Makes a further good point less often, which should have been amplified ("look for the joy in life, because we're all going to die, and terrible things happen to everything we hold dear"). Doesn't tackle social policy, twisted ideology, the roots of misogyny. Tells women to toughen up so toughly that there is no room for any subtlety of argument. Comes from the school of Hard Knocks and Tough Love, which is great, except for the damage it can cause if abused. Not all emotion is "wet".

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meemee

    I don't get this book. The author seems to hate everyone and everything. For her, all stay-at-home mums are depressed and unsatisfied because they couldn't pursue their career. Then there is a hateful criticism of celebrities who stated that parenthood is the best thing that ever happened to them. Buying a pram is wrong, antenatal classes are wrong, being pregnant is miserable.... I don't agree with any of those. I don't understand where she's going with all of this. I have read Sh*tty Mum and K I don't get this book. The author seems to hate everyone and everything. For her, all stay-at-home mums are depressed and unsatisfied because they couldn't pursue their career. Then there is a hateful criticism of celebrities who stated that parenthood is the best thing that ever happened to them. Buying a pram is wrong, antenatal classes are wrong, being pregnant is miserable.... I don't agree with any of those. I don't understand where she's going with all of this. I have read Sh*tty Mum and Keep Calm First Time Mum Manual that were far more enjoyable and funny.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This book is dreadful. I really wanted to like it as I agree totally with the sentiment and the general thrust of what the author is getting at. The tone is rude and the book badly edited. In fact, I don't think it has been proof read at all! Daisy's opinions, let's face it are very slightly useless, despite her protestations. I'm just glad I bought a second hand copy and didn't waste good money. This book is dreadful. I really wanted to like it as I agree totally with the sentiment and the general thrust of what the author is getting at. The tone is rude and the book badly edited. In fact, I don't think it has been proof read at all! Daisy's opinions, let's face it are very slightly useless, despite her protestations. I'm just glad I bought a second hand copy and didn't waste good money.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    As opinionated as self-satisfied as the very mums she criticises.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susanna

    I can't help it, this struck too many chords with me - it's brilliant. Mostly I try to live and let live and feel there's many ways to be a parent, and people should be free to do it their instinctive way without judgement. But then I read her rants about martryed mums who make it all such a chore, instead of relaxing as much as possible and trying to just enjoy your kids, and I think "oh yes" - at last someone is explaining it. Interestingly, I tried to get my husband to read this book but it's I can't help it, this struck too many chords with me - it's brilliant. Mostly I try to live and let live and feel there's many ways to be a parent, and people should be free to do it their instinctive way without judgement. But then I read her rants about martryed mums who make it all such a chore, instead of relaxing as much as possible and trying to just enjoy your kids, and I think "oh yes" - at last someone is explaining it. Interestingly, I tried to get my husband to read this book but it's just not interesting to him, as he doesn't even bother wondering "why she does it" - it's a female thing

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca tedder

    I'd actually give this a 3.5 out of 5. I agreed with so much of what was said in the second half it is UNBELIEVABLY close to something I could have written myself. There were some real spots that bought a knowing smile to my face but for much of the first part of the book I found it hard to relate to the "middle class working mother" perception. Very much ticking all the boxes of sterotypical England. I have no idea what it's like to be a working mum and Daisy Waugh certainly has no clue of what I'd actually give this a 3.5 out of 5. I agreed with so much of what was said in the second half it is UNBELIEVABLY close to something I could have written myself. There were some real spots that bought a knowing smile to my face but for much of the first part of the book I found it hard to relate to the "middle class working mother" perception. Very much ticking all the boxes of sterotypical England. I have no idea what it's like to be a working mum and Daisy Waugh certainly has no clue of what it's like to be a stay at home mother. Overall, a very much realistic view of modern day parenting that is funny in places but at times feels just a bit of self loving on the part of the author.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mindy

    Made me laugh, and made me crazy. I could relate to maybe 50 percent of this book, and appreciate her wit and bravery to state it as she sees. What I don't get is how an intelligent woman can talk out of both sides of her mouth. "Mothers love their children, and that is enough" is a wonderful message. But then to pivot and start attacking the mums who aren't like you? It made me less inclined to consider Waugh's points when I felt like I was dodging attacks as a SAHM (ie "non-earner), breastfeed Made me laugh, and made me crazy. I could relate to maybe 50 percent of this book, and appreciate her wit and bravery to state it as she sees. What I don't get is how an intelligent woman can talk out of both sides of her mouth. "Mothers love their children, and that is enough" is a wonderful message. But then to pivot and start attacking the mums who aren't like you? It made me less inclined to consider Waugh's points when I felt like I was dodging attacks as a SAHM (ie "non-earner), breastfeeder, cloth-diaperer, etc. It might be shocking to know that not all of us fit neatly into Waugh's stereotypes. Thank goodness.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I'd never heard of Waugh before picking up this book. So for me, while I agreed with parts of this book, most of it just read like one woman's opinion about various aspects of motherhood with nothing to convince me that her views were somehow more superior or more worthy for me to pay attention to than the views of every other mother I've ever met. Maybe if I'd heard of her I would have been more interested, but given the lack of analysis I didn't gain anything more from reading it than I would I'd never heard of Waugh before picking up this book. So for me, while I agreed with parts of this book, most of it just read like one woman's opinion about various aspects of motherhood with nothing to convince me that her views were somehow more superior or more worthy for me to pay attention to than the views of every other mother I've ever met. Maybe if I'd heard of her I would have been more interested, but given the lack of analysis I didn't gain anything more from reading it than I would have from sitting around with a group of other mothers and talking about their kids.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    This has some fun and empowering moments. But this is a book aimed at the parent of a child at private school and there are moments that completely miss the mark therefore for the average mother. Nor did I share all her opinions, but then that would have just been weird.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    What a disappointment this book was :( The Author has some really interesting views but just doesn't develop them at all. I don't agree with all her viewpoints, but would have liked much more of a discussion of them, rather than basically just headlines. Disappointing. What a disappointment this book was :( The Author has some really interesting views but just doesn't develop them at all. I don't agree with all her viewpoints, but would have liked much more of a discussion of them, rather than basically just headlines. Disappointing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Taryn

    I laughed at many of the more outrageous parts of the book and identified with a lot of it. Unfortunately the overall had the opposite effect and made me depressed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Grrr. While the original idea to normalise working motherhood without guilt appealed, most of this was just a rant which belittled the minutiae I concern myself with. Back to literature for me!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Stringer

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Croston

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elif SubaƟ

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Goodred

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Oliver

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Hopkins

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sally Campbell

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ania

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Steele

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.Gaskell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Prophet

  27. 4 out of 5

    mrs a e jayham

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

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