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In the middle of Oliver Horovitz's high school graduation ceremony, his cell phone rang: It was Harvard. He'd been accepted, but he couldn't start for another year. A caddie since he was twelve and a golfer sporting a 1.8 handicap, Ollie decides to spend his gap year in St. Andrews, Scotland—a town with the U.K.'s highest number of pubs per capita, and home to the Old Cour In the middle of Oliver Horovitz's high school graduation ceremony, his cell phone rang: It was Harvard. He'd been accepted, but he couldn't start for another year. A caddie since he was twelve and a golfer sporting a 1.8 handicap, Ollie decides to spend his gap year in St. Andrews, Scotland—a town with the U.K.'s highest number of pubs per capita, and home to the Old Course, golf's most famous eighteen holes—where he enrolls in the St. Andrews Links Trust caddie trainee program. Initially, the notoriously brusque veteran caddies treat Ollie like a bug. But after a year of waking up at 4:30 A.M. every morning and looping two rounds a day, Ollie earns their grudging respect—only to have to pack up and leave for Harvard. There, Ollie's new classmates are the sons of Albania's UN ambassador, the owner of Heineken, and the CEO of Goldman Sachs. Surrounded by sixth generation legacies, he feels like a fish out of water all over again and can't wait to get back to St. Andrews. Even after graduation, when his college friends rush to Wall Street, Horovitz continues to return each summer to caddie on the Old Course. A hilarious, irresistible, behind-the-scenes peek at the world's most celebrated golf course—and its equally famous caddie shack—An American Caddie in St. Andrews is certain to not only entertain golfers and fans of St. Andrews but also anyone who dares to remember stumbling into adulthood and finding one's place in the world.


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In the middle of Oliver Horovitz's high school graduation ceremony, his cell phone rang: It was Harvard. He'd been accepted, but he couldn't start for another year. A caddie since he was twelve and a golfer sporting a 1.8 handicap, Ollie decides to spend his gap year in St. Andrews, Scotland—a town with the U.K.'s highest number of pubs per capita, and home to the Old Cour In the middle of Oliver Horovitz's high school graduation ceremony, his cell phone rang: It was Harvard. He'd been accepted, but he couldn't start for another year. A caddie since he was twelve and a golfer sporting a 1.8 handicap, Ollie decides to spend his gap year in St. Andrews, Scotland—a town with the U.K.'s highest number of pubs per capita, and home to the Old Course, golf's most famous eighteen holes—where he enrolls in the St. Andrews Links Trust caddie trainee program. Initially, the notoriously brusque veteran caddies treat Ollie like a bug. But after a year of waking up at 4:30 A.M. every morning and looping two rounds a day, Ollie earns their grudging respect—only to have to pack up and leave for Harvard. There, Ollie's new classmates are the sons of Albania's UN ambassador, the owner of Heineken, and the CEO of Goldman Sachs. Surrounded by sixth generation legacies, he feels like a fish out of water all over again and can't wait to get back to St. Andrews. Even after graduation, when his college friends rush to Wall Street, Horovitz continues to return each summer to caddie on the Old Course. A hilarious, irresistible, behind-the-scenes peek at the world's most celebrated golf course—and its equally famous caddie shack—An American Caddie in St. Andrews is certain to not only entertain golfers and fans of St. Andrews but also anyone who dares to remember stumbling into adulthood and finding one's place in the world.

30 review for An American Caddie in St. Andrews: Growing Up, Girls, and Looping on the Old Course

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian DiMattia

    If I'm being honest, and brutally so, Oliver Horovitz is not a great writer. His chapters are short and choppy, he tells a fairly brief story and then drops it. There's no...continuity. Reading this book was like listening in on a conversation at a party for 5 minutes, then wandering away, and coming back for 5 minutes. But I have a hard time being really critical of the book, mostly because it's just likable. Most likely I mean that Horovitz is likable. Seriously, it's basically a book about a m If I'm being honest, and brutally so, Oliver Horovitz is not a great writer. His chapters are short and choppy, he tells a fairly brief story and then drops it. There's no...continuity. Reading this book was like listening in on a conversation at a party for 5 minutes, then wandering away, and coming back for 5 minutes. But I have a hard time being really critical of the book, mostly because it's just likable. Most likely I mean that Horovitz is likable. Seriously, it's basically a book about a millenial/Harvard Student talking about how much he loves golf, women and drinking with buddies (usually in that order), and I actually read the whole thing. That must mean that I was genuinely interested in how his story would turn out. Of course, it could also be that the book has good atmosphere. It's filled with the things and people of Scotland, and that drew me to it immediately. It's filled with people who don't just golf, but truly love the game and it's history. And it's filled with a young man trying to find his place in the world, but not whining about it. While there is no evidence of true wordsmithing going on here, I enjoyed reading it. I enjoyed hearing Horovitz' stories about his Uncle Ken and Ken's dear friend Henry. I enjoyed the moments where he introduces us to people who truly love the game of golf in a world of men in shorts just looking for an excuse to show off and drink. I loved getting to experience the joys of Scotland once again (and appreciate that Horovitz mentioned such staples as rock buns, but didn't feel the need to mention the noxious Lucozade!). In the end, I probably won't remember this book forever. But I'm glad I read it and I wish Oliver Horovitz well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I first read about this book in the Boston Globe and as a golfer and one who has had the privilege to play St. Andrews, I thought it might be interesting to read. Interesting....it was fantastic. My expectations of what this book would be like were far exceeded. If your a golfer, if you've played St. Andrews or hope to some day, do yourself a favor and read this book. You will not be disappointed. I first read about this book in the Boston Globe and as a golfer and one who has had the privilege to play St. Andrews, I thought it might be interesting to read. Interesting....it was fantastic. My expectations of what this book would be like were far exceeded. If your a golfer, if you've played St. Andrews or hope to some day, do yourself a favor and read this book. You will not be disappointed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    The reasons why I ended up liking this aren't numerous (and yes, I am quite surprised that I ended up liking it). Just for context, I picked up this book in a hostel in Newcastle - it had a book exchanged (and I must admit I cheated, because the host said I am exempt from leaving my signed copy - I'll just have to stop by there again to return a book at some point :) ). Anyway, I digress. I chose it because it was the only title that I could *kinda* relate to. The common denominator is, of course The reasons why I ended up liking this aren't numerous (and yes, I am quite surprised that I ended up liking it). Just for context, I picked up this book in a hostel in Newcastle - it had a book exchanged (and I must admit I cheated, because the host said I am exempt from leaving my signed copy - I'll just have to stop by there again to return a book at some point :) ). Anyway, I digress. I chose it because it was the only title that I could *kinda* relate to. The common denominator is, of course, St Andrews. To this day I have lived there for 4 years and I have yet to play a round of golf (putting doesn't count). But I was surprised at the honestly and humour of this memoir. Not very heavy on technical stuff (thankfully), it makes sure the story flows. The characters are quaint and adorable (because senior St Andeans) genuinely are, and the anecdotes are very candid (I also have a Jerry DeGroot-related story). It's a small town. It would not surprise me to have met Oliver at some point. Anyway, good travelling read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tom Anstett

    This account is a narrative about the author's life between his winter studies at Harvard and his summers as a caddie at St. Andrews in Scotland. The narrative weaves back and forth as do the seasons of the year. At times refreshing, at times eloquent, at times choppy, most of time entertaining. Lovers of golf, especially those who have had the honor of playing the Old Course, will find the descriptions of the holes through a caddy's eyes compelling and enjoyable. Horovitz entertains the non-gol This account is a narrative about the author's life between his winter studies at Harvard and his summers as a caddie at St. Andrews in Scotland. The narrative weaves back and forth as do the seasons of the year. At times refreshing, at times eloquent, at times choppy, most of time entertaining. Lovers of golf, especially those who have had the honor of playing the Old Course, will find the descriptions of the holes through a caddy's eyes compelling and enjoyable. Horovitz entertains the non-golfers by interjecting his development as a person and as a student in the pressure environment known as Harvard. Brief love affairs and poignant relationships with other caddies and a lovable uncle highlight the golf scenario. Not a well-written book, but as mentioned, mostly entertaining. The ending leaves one wondering where his life is going, but Oliver's persona satisfies readers that his life will be fulfilling in some way.

  5. 4 out of 5

    phil mcveigh

    Really enjoyed this book. I'm not golfs biggest fan and I'm a very average player myself but I understand enough about the game to understand some of the golfing language used. You will like this book if you like golf but for anyone not into golf, it's the stories about his life in America and Scotland with his Great Uncle, University life and his life away from golf that you will probably find more interesting than the caddie stories....although some of them are entertaining to any reader. I lik Really enjoyed this book. I'm not golfs biggest fan and I'm a very average player myself but I understand enough about the game to understand some of the golfing language used. You will like this book if you like golf but for anyone not into golf, it's the stories about his life in America and Scotland with his Great Uncle, University life and his life away from golf that you will probably find more interesting than the caddie stories....although some of them are entertaining to any reader. I like the way the book is written. It isn't by an experienced author but by a 'normal' everyday person and that comes across in the way the book is written. Well done Ollie, very entertaining.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I thoroughly enjoyed Oliver Horovitz's account of his years as a caddie on the iconic Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland. His stories are fascinating and give a peek behind the curtain of caddie life on a golf course - and not just any course, but perhaps the most famous course in the world. Unfortunately, the writing leaves a bit to be desired. The short, choppy sentences and sometimes repeated text could have used a bit of editing. But I'm always hesitant to throw stones, since I probably co I thoroughly enjoyed Oliver Horovitz's account of his years as a caddie on the iconic Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland. His stories are fascinating and give a peek behind the curtain of caddie life on a golf course - and not just any course, but perhaps the most famous course in the world. Unfortunately, the writing leaves a bit to be desired. The short, choppy sentences and sometimes repeated text could have used a bit of editing. But I'm always hesitant to throw stones, since I probably couldn't have done much better myself! On the positive side, the subject matter is so interesting I overlooked the memoir's flaws and am glad I spent some time reliving Horovitz's unique past.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Robertson

    If you like golf, St. Andrews Old Course, or both then this is a must read. Most of the book focuses on the caddying experience, but there are little bits that focus on his life outside the course. I found that the non-golf tidbits helped to keep things from just running together. Enjoyable, quick read that was a great insight in to a historic course and a job that requires great skill to be good at

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    An American Caddie in St. Andrews, a must read. A fun fast read! The book transports you to Scotland and puts you behind the scenes at St. Andrews. A must read for any golfer or anyone who has ever caddied.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Wailgum

    This was a fun, breezy and informative read. As a golfer, the "inside baseball" stories on St. Andrews, caddying life and golfing were enjoyable. Ollie's relationship with Uncle Ken was heartfelt and warm. Well done! This was a fun, breezy and informative read. As a golfer, the "inside baseball" stories on St. Andrews, caddying life and golfing were enjoyable. Ollie's relationship with Uncle Ken was heartfelt and warm. Well done!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Karli Eller

    A super fast read about a Harvard college student who spends his summers caddying on the Old Course at St. Andrews every summer. Anyone who likes golf and desires to play the Old Course just once in their life will enjoy and appreciate this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    warm and funny, even if you don't play golf. warm and funny, even if you don't play golf.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bob Grinnell

    Fun beach read. Wish I had read this before playing St. Andrews this Spring. Kenny was my caddie at Kingsbarn. What a treat that was!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim Morgan

    Fantastic book. Fun to read whether you are a golfer or not. I will be recommending it to all my friends. “Do what you love!”

  14. 5 out of 5

    L BLACKMORE

    Excellent read Well written and a good insight into the caddying world and At Andrews. Especially for those who have been privileged to play the old course

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dave C

    Two of the three story lines were interesting (to me). I found the caddie culture and life interesting. Quick read. Essential if you're going to golf in Scotland. Two of the three story lines were interesting (to me). I found the caddie culture and life interesting. Quick read. Essential if you're going to golf in Scotland.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Some F-bombs aside, this is a warm and at times poignant glimpse at life in St. Andrews as the author comes of age as a young ex-pat American in Scotland. A must-read for fans of the Old Course.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anne Vicendese

    Love golf! You'll love this book. Love golf! You'll love this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bob Alger

    This book was so much fun! If you love golf, and especially love Scottish golf, you will love this book. You just want to root for Ollie!

  19. 5 out of 5

    V.E.H. Masters

    A fun read - and I'm not a golfer - especially for anyone who loves St Andrews A fun read - and I'm not a golfer - especially for anyone who loves St Andrews

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Wipfler

    My favorite audiobook. An inspiring coming of age story and hilarious tales, with insightful lessons of purpose and community. Highly recommend

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    Yes I love golf, Yes I love St Andrews and of course I want a caddie. Nice enjoyable light hearted book for sport enthusiasts that also has a few good little side stories to give it a personal touch for the author.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Mcghie

    Oliver Horovitz had a gap year prior to beginning his studies at Harvard. He travelled from America to the St Andrews, Scotland – the Home of Golf – with a view to joining the team of caddies that work on the many courses around the ancient Fife town. Oliver HorovitzWe follow Oliver’s journey from his days learning the ropes as a rookie in the caddie pool; through to eventually becoming an accepted member of the team. He introduces us to the characters that he works alongside, his friends, the go Oliver Horovitz had a gap year prior to beginning his studies at Harvard. He travelled from America to the St Andrews, Scotland – the Home of Golf – with a view to joining the team of caddies that work on the many courses around the ancient Fife town. Oliver HorovitzWe follow Oliver’s journey from his days learning the ropes as a rookie in the caddie pool; through to eventually becoming an accepted member of the team. He introduces us to the characters that he works alongside, his friends, the golfers and his family – in particular Oliver’s Uncle Ken who is a St Andrews resident and seemingly Oliver’s best friend. I loved reading Oliver’s stories of the time he spent with Uncle Ken during his time living in St Andrews. Despite the highs and lows that Oliver endures through the telling of his story it is his Uncle Ken that is his constant reliable companion. The important thing to understand about An American Caddie…you do not have to be a golf fan to enjoy this book. Obviously there is a fair bit of golfing chat going to crop up in a story set on golf courses but Oliver’s narration guides you through the detail you need to know. The beauty of this book is the rich diversity of characters we encounter – this is a book about people not a book about golf. Reading An American Caddie in St Andrews was a delight. At the end of each season when Oliver returned to America you felt the heart wrench that Oliver did. You also share the elation on his return trips. We fear encounters with the fearsome St Andrews Caddie Master and we despair at the embarrassing antics of some of the OTT golfers that grace the famous Old Course. I cannot recommend this book highly enough it is funny, heart-warming, compelling and (sadly) heart-breaking too. I doubt you will find a better narrator than Oliver Horovitz in any book you read this year. Merged review: An American Caddie in St Andrews is one of those special books – a story of a life and a young man living the dream. Oliver Horovitz had a gap year prior to beginning his studies at Harvard. He travelled from America to the St Andrews, Scotland – the Home of Golf – with a view to joining the team of caddies that work on the many courses around the ancient Fife town. Oliver HorovitzWe follow Oliver’s journey from his days learning the ropes as a rookie in the caddie pool; through to eventually becoming an accepted member of the team. He introduces us to the characters that he works alongside, his friends, the golfers and his family – in particular Oliver’s Uncle Ken who is a St Andrews resident and seemingly Oliver’s best friend. I loved reading Oliver’s stories of the time he spent with Uncle Ken during his time living in St Andrews. Despite the highs and lows that Oliver endures through the telling of his story it is his Uncle Ken that is his constant reliable companion. The important thing to understand about An American Caddie…you do not have to be a golf fan to enjoy this book. Obviously there is a fair bit of golfing chat going to crop up in a story set on golf courses but Oliver’s narration guides you through the detail you need to know. The beauty of this book is the rich diversity of characters we encounter – this is a book about people not a book about golf. Reading An American Caddie in St Andrews was a delight. At the end of each season when Oliver returned to America you felt the heart wrench that Oliver did. You also share the elation on his return trips. We fear encounters with the fearsome St Andrews Caddie Master and we despair at the embarrassing antics of some of the OTT golfers that grace the famous Old Course. I cannot recommend this book highly enough it is funny, heart-warming, compelling and (sadly) heart-breaking too. I doubt you will find a better narrator than Oliver Horovitz in any book you read this year.

  23. 4 out of 5

    K

    While I have played golf one would not consider me even faintly good at it. But I suppose if I lived and breathed golf for a while my scores would get low enough to consider looking farther afield than a local public course. Then there is Oliver, a boy who grew up playing at not just one but two private golf clubs with a handicap of 1.8 that is the envy of many people. So what does a very good golfer do when he suddenly finds himself graduating from high school and headed to Harvard? Why, take a While I have played golf one would not consider me even faintly good at it. But I suppose if I lived and breathed golf for a while my scores would get low enough to consider looking farther afield than a local public course. Then there is Oliver, a boy who grew up playing at not just one but two private golf clubs with a handicap of 1.8 that is the envy of many people. So what does a very good golfer do when he suddenly finds himself graduating from high school and headed to Harvard? Why, take a year (considered a “gap year”) and caddie at the famous St. Andrews course in Scotland. But before he can become an official caddie (years of golfing and a low handicap doesn’t qualify one to be a caddie at St. Andrews) Oliver must live through the grueling caddie training program at St. Andrews. And “the St. Andrews caddie world is not a safe place for newcomers. Even less so for student newcomers. And infinitely less so for young American student newcomers.” There the author meets Rick Mackenzie, Caddie Master, a man many caddies are fearful of angering. And the author manages to do that often. The veteran caddies are much older and more experienced than Oliver and they do not welcome Oliver with open arms. But he does have a friend or two at St. Andrews as his uncle Ken and Ken’s friend Henry Anquetil (both old RAF veterans and expert gardeners’) live in town. The life of a caddie trainee on the many courses of St. Andrews (there were 6 in 2004) includes getting up at 4:30 AM and doing two loops each day (18 holes morning and afternoon) before partying or golfing in the evening. With it the author tells about the ups and downs of caddying for all sorts of golfers that range from the clueless, the rich, the once in a lifetime at St. Andrews and even the famous. At the end of his gap year Oliver somewhat reluctantly heads to Harvard but not before being rewarded by becoming, surprisingly, a full caddy. The rest of the book briefly describes his life at Harvard over the next four years and focuses on his summers as he returns to St. Andrews to continue his caddy profession. He grows into the job and finds himself becoming one of the veterans others look to for assistance. But Oliver finds that trouble is never far away when he decides to do his Senior film project on the caddies of St. Andrews – not something that is welcomed at St. Andrews. While at times funny and other times poignant (especially when the author focuses on his aging Uncle and his loyal friend) the book does give a behind-the-scenes view of a famous golf course and the work of caddies. And there are times where the author tries to seem like an average guy but not too many can say they grew up privileged enough to belong to two private golf courses, go to Harvard, and live without too much trouble as a caddy in another country (they are not that well paid). And he throws in the typical young male rounds of parties and women that remind us how young he was in the mid-2000s. A book to read if you love golf, wish to ever become a caddy, or want to know about St. Andrews (the place all golfers want to go -- even in death).

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Sikora

    Even though I have no interest in golf, this book kept me coming back for more! Great character descriptions and touching personal stories.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gigi Gilman

    Oliver Horovitz is at his graduation from Stuyvesant High School in NYC when he gets a call from the Harvard Admissions Office: he's off the wait list and IN, but the class is FULL. He has to take a gap year. In what's written as a whirlwind of decision-making, Oliver enrolls at St. Andrews University in Scotland (when Prince William was there!) for one year only, with plans to matriculate at Harvard the following year. His mom has an uncle (Ken) who lives about a par 4 (?) from the Old Course a Oliver Horovitz is at his graduation from Stuyvesant High School in NYC when he gets a call from the Harvard Admissions Office: he's off the wait list and IN, but the class is FULL. He has to take a gap year. In what's written as a whirlwind of decision-making, Oliver enrolls at St. Andrews University in Scotland (when Prince William was there!) for one year only, with plans to matriculate at Harvard the following year. His mom has an uncle (Ken) who lives about a par 4 (?) from the Old Course at St. Andrews, so Oliver has been to Scotland and golfed there. He also has a 1.8 handicap. He learns that caddying at St. Andrews can be lucrative and fun, so the summer after his school year, he signs on as a trainee caddie. I won't spoil the story any more than that, except to say the next 300+ pages, which you will devour even if you're NOT a golfer (I am not. . . yet) are filled with antics and anecdotes about caddies and golfers on the Old Course, students and flatmates, and various other colorful St. Andreans, including Uncle Ken, his best friend Henry, and other garden- and golf-obsessed residents of this cool-sounding town. Oliver is humble, funny, warm, smart and thoughtful. You will fall in love with him as he navigates the politics and personalities of the caddy shack while falling in love (and lust) himself with various golfing (and other) girls, building a deep friendship with his Uncle Ken, getting his undergraduate degree, zipping back and forth across the Atlantic, and growing up. You could read this well-written book for the funny stories about the caddies and golfers alone, but there's so much more. Oliver's understanding and even compassion for those who come to St. Andrews to fulfill a lifelong dream grows even as he does "doubles" (caddying 2-rounds a day) for some super-stingy tippers. And despite his amusingly self-deprecating nature, he also grows in confidence -- with his golf, his caddying, his academic and career goals, and . . . girls! To say it's a coming-of-age, fish-out of-water, wonderful memoir just doesn't begin to cover it. Hmmm, maybe Oliver will make a movie out of it! Read it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    At least once in their life, every golfer should make the pilgrimage to the Old Course in St. Andrews. Oliver Horovitz not only made that trip, he turned it into a coming-of-age book about his experiences working as a caddie there during his college years. An American Caddie in St. Andrews is an enjoyable, light read that covers the young man's summers looping on the Old Course while completing his education at Harvard, chasing girls, and pub crawling through the ancient town. If you're a golfer At least once in their life, every golfer should make the pilgrimage to the Old Course in St. Andrews. Oliver Horovitz not only made that trip, he turned it into a coming-of-age book about his experiences working as a caddie there during his college years. An American Caddie in St. Andrews is an enjoyable, light read that covers the young man's summers looping on the Old Course while completing his education at Harvard, chasing girls, and pub crawling through the ancient town. If you're a golfer looking for hole-by-hole insights into the Old Course, you'll probably be disappointed in this book. On the other hand, if you'd like to know what really goes on in the caddie shack, you'll be rewarded by the many tales Horovitz tells. As most of us have long suspected, caddies don't exactly have positive opinions of their clients. A tip less than 100% of the standard fee is generally met with disdain, for example. The caddies also have a private language for ridiculing their players--often right in front of them--to other caddies. It's not unusual for a caddie to purposely give wrong information to a player just for the sake of having a funny story to tell when they get back to the shack. Basically, two types of golfers are accorded caddie respect: scratch players and celebrities. The former gives the caddie fewer errant balls to look for and the latter gives them something to gossip about. If you don't fall into either of those categories, according to Horovitz, you're just another chump, at least as far as the caddies at St. Andrews are concerned. There are some non-golf story elements that turn the book into a memoir of sorts. The author chases girls and catches a few, shares various bachelor-pad type apartments with other caddies, and spends one summer filming the caddies as an assignment for one of his classes at Harvard. He also develops a fond relationship with an elderly uncle who lives in St. Andrews. A recurring theme is the way he was treated by the old caddies at the course and how, over time, he earned their trust and respect.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Frank Richardson

    Oliver Horowitz has written a jim dandy of a book. He is accepted at Harvard but he is told he will not be allowed in until the following year and so what does he do in the meantime? Why, of course, he goes to St Andrews in Scotland, lives with his beloved Uncle Ken and becomes a caddy AKA looper at the Royal and Ancient Club of St Andrews, which happens to be one of the most famous golf courses in the world. Interesting to note that the book reveals there are 31 pubs in St Andrews and 70 % of t Oliver Horowitz has written a jim dandy of a book. He is accepted at Harvard but he is told he will not be allowed in until the following year and so what does he do in the meantime? Why, of course, he goes to St Andrews in Scotland, lives with his beloved Uncle Ken and becomes a caddy AKA looper at the Royal and Ancient Club of St Andrews, which happens to be one of the most famous golf courses in the world. Interesting to note that the book reveals there are 31 pubs in St Andrews and 70 % of the population is female so what is a young man to do? He is not treated well by the caddy master and treated even worse by the older caddy's and his love life does not work out that well either but he keeps going back to St Andrews every summer and does graduate from Harvard which probably puts him a step or two ahead of most of the other caddy's.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I couldn't imagine myself liking this book. I picked it up because, well, I like golf and I like golf writing, but I love St. Andrews and I thought this sounded like a really good read...however, the narrator sounded like a truly obnoxious American and I'll be honest, it took me a few pages to warm to him. But only a few. He is a genuinely likeable guy, a great narrator and by the end of the book, with his journey through caddying at St. Andrews and his relationship with his granddad, you really I couldn't imagine myself liking this book. I picked it up because, well, I like golf and I like golf writing, but I love St. Andrews and I thought this sounded like a really good read...however, the narrator sounded like a truly obnoxious American and I'll be honest, it took me a few pages to warm to him. But only a few. He is a genuinely likeable guy, a great narrator and by the end of the book, with his journey through caddying at St. Andrews and his relationship with his granddad, you really begin to feel engaged with Oliver. All round a much more surprising, entertaining, enlightening read that I wouldn't have thought possible from such a light-hearted book. And what an insight into the world of caddying. No thank you! 4 stars

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I enjoyed this book immensely, but I would not recommend it to everyone. Golfers/caddies, like other sport professionals, have the language skill of a drunk sailor on leave (i.e. lots of foul language). What I liked about this book is it puts light on something that goes unnoticed or unseen. Oliver shows up for the first time as a shy kid looking to cap his deferment year from Harvard being around what he loves...golf. But it's more then golf. It's about the relationships. With other caddies, gol I enjoyed this book immensely, but I would not recommend it to everyone. Golfers/caddies, like other sport professionals, have the language skill of a drunk sailor on leave (i.e. lots of foul language). What I liked about this book is it puts light on something that goes unnoticed or unseen. Oliver shows up for the first time as a shy kid looking to cap his deferment year from Harvard being around what he loves...golf. But it's more then golf. It's about the relationships. With other caddies, golfers or his Uncle Ken (WWII veteran/widower) and Ken's best friend Harry. He learns respect, handwork and how important family is.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cary Carlson

    Awesome good book. Oliver Horovitz has wisdom well beyond his years. I really didn't expect to get out of this read what I did, from a guy 20 years my junior. Great stories, great insight, great characters. Made me realize something I have suspected for years. Our lives are all book worthy. Some are just given the ability and drive to get it down on paper. BTW-Ollie made me cry again reading a book. Somewhat distressed about this odd trend, but Uncle Ken and Henry were worthy. Highly recommend t Awesome good book. Oliver Horovitz has wisdom well beyond his years. I really didn't expect to get out of this read what I did, from a guy 20 years my junior. Great stories, great insight, great characters. Made me realize something I have suspected for years. Our lives are all book worthy. Some are just given the ability and drive to get it down on paper. BTW-Ollie made me cry again reading a book. Somewhat distressed about this odd trend, but Uncle Ken and Henry were worthy. Highly recommend this book to anyone golfer or no.

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