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HCSB: Holman Christian Standard Bible

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The HCSB was developed by 100 scholars and English stylists from 17 denominations, who prayerfully translated what is one of the most significant Bible translations available today. The HCSB reflects linguistic advances in vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and formatting while it retains meaningful theological terms. In the HCSB you'll find God's personal name (Yahweh), the The HCSB was developed by 100 scholars and English stylists from 17 denominations, who prayerfully translated what is one of the most significant Bible translations available today. The HCSB reflects linguistic advances in vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and formatting while it retains meaningful theological terms. In the HCSB you'll find God's personal name (Yahweh), the use of "Messiah" in the New Testament, and the use of "slave" in the New Testament, just to name a few examples. Also, you'll notice the contemporary speech patterns in the HCSB mean that words like "behold" and "shall" are not used. Instead, words or phrases that are common today can be found in their place.


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The HCSB was developed by 100 scholars and English stylists from 17 denominations, who prayerfully translated what is one of the most significant Bible translations available today. The HCSB reflects linguistic advances in vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and formatting while it retains meaningful theological terms. In the HCSB you'll find God's personal name (Yahweh), the The HCSB was developed by 100 scholars and English stylists from 17 denominations, who prayerfully translated what is one of the most significant Bible translations available today. The HCSB reflects linguistic advances in vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and formatting while it retains meaningful theological terms. In the HCSB you'll find God's personal name (Yahweh), the use of "Messiah" in the New Testament, and the use of "slave" in the New Testament, just to name a few examples. Also, you'll notice the contemporary speech patterns in the HCSB mean that words like "behold" and "shall" are not used. Instead, words or phrases that are common today can be found in their place.

30 review for HCSB: Holman Christian Standard Bible

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danette

    Indeed, the Lord's hand is not too short to save, and His ear is not too deaf to hear. Isaiah 59:1 2018 - A book longer than 400 pages "Look! God's dwelling is with humanity, and He will live with them. They will be His people, and God Himself will be with them and be their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes. Death will no longer exist; grief, crying, and pain will exist no longer, because the previous things have passed away." Revelation 21:3b-4 2020 - A book you think will make you Indeed, the Lord's hand is not too short to save, and His ear is not too deaf to hear. Isaiah 59:1 2018 - A book longer than 400 pages "Look! God's dwelling is with humanity, and He will live with them. They will be His people, and God Himself will be with them and be their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes. Death will no longer exist; grief, crying, and pain will exist no longer, because the previous things have passed away." Revelation 21:3b-4 2020 - A book you think will make you a better person

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erik Rostad

    Wow, read it straight through for the first time in my life. What an experience!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    This is a re-read of The Holy Bible for me, so this review will be specifically about this Holman Christian Standard Bible translation, which I obtained for free on my kindle from Amazon. I will admit that the language of this translation makes it easy to understand some of the more complicated verses of the Bible. The language is modern and contemporary. For someone who has never read the Bible before, this version might be a good way for them to be able to be introduced to the books contained This is a re-read of The Holy Bible for me, so this review will be specifically about this Holman Christian Standard Bible translation, which I obtained for free on my kindle from Amazon. I will admit that the language of this translation makes it easy to understand some of the more complicated verses of the Bible. The language is modern and contemporary. For someone who has never read the Bible before, this version might be a good way for them to be able to be introduced to the books contained herein. For someone who loves and enjoys the language of versions of the Bible such as the King James Version, this might be a disappointment. It was for me. I love the language of King James. Having some of the beautiful, poetic verses written in a simplified, modern day format made them lose some of their beauty. So depending on what you are looking for in a translation of the Bible, this book may or may not be for you. But since an e-book version is available for free, anyone is able to check it out themselves to decide.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    A tremendously wonderful translation of the greatest book (Living Word) ever written. The typeface is easily readable. Footnotes and study aids are clear and concise. I found it especially enlightening, footnotes depicting originating manuscripts (Greek, Hebrew, and/or otherwise) expressing variable interpretations where available. And, endearing to me and my personality: The deeply rich purple, leather cover with diecut filigree accents. I look forward to reading again this coming year, but in A tremendously wonderful translation of the greatest book (Living Word) ever written. The typeface is easily readable. Footnotes and study aids are clear and concise. I found it especially enlightening, footnotes depicting originating manuscripts (Greek, Hebrew, and/or otherwise) expressing variable interpretations where available. And, endearing to me and my personality: The deeply rich purple, leather cover with diecut filigree accents. I look forward to reading again this coming year, but in timeline chronological order. Five INFINITY stars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    CSB is a fine translation and a great improvement on the HCSB.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandi (Rambles of a SAHM)

    For years now I have been marking up my Bibles with notes and highlights and scraps of paper. But let's face it, you can only keep so many extra pieces of paper or sticky notes in your Bible before it causes the spine to break down. More recently I have begun Bible Art Journaling. The first Bible I started in didn't have very wide margins and it was a bit of a challenge, so I did a lot of tip-ins. Again not the best solution because it eventually does a number on your spine. You can just imagine m For years now I have been marking up my Bibles with notes and highlights and scraps of paper. But let's face it, you can only keep so many extra pieces of paper or sticky notes in your Bible before it causes the spine to break down. More recently I have begun Bible Art Journaling. The first Bible I started in didn't have very wide margins and it was a bit of a challenge, so I did a lot of tip-ins. Again not the best solution because it eventually does a number on your spine. You can just imagine my delight when I discovered the HCSB Notetaking Bible. The margins are wide enough to illustrate or make notes next to the very passage I am concentrating on. The margins are lightly lined so it is easy to make notes that are legible and not wonky. It's also easy to cover the lines with art work. The ink used is a faded grey so it doesn't interfere with your doodles. I've had success with colored pencils, watercolor, acrylic paint, and micron pens. There is little to no bleed through onto the adjoining page. The pages are thin but sturdy. The font is small but still readable. I'm pleased with the overall size of the Bible. With such wide margins and single column text it still is a very portable book. I've carried it with me to church and haven't found it unwieldy. The Bible nerd in me loves all of the extra features. There are colorful maps and a wonderful daily reading plan that has boxes to check when you've finished reading the particular passage. I'm a list maker - box checker so this pleases me. Such a nice sense of accomplishment is achieved when you look back at all of the passages that you have completed. My favorite extra feature is the concordance. It is quite complete. I'm used to anemic ones that force you to look up what you need elsewhere, but this one is very extensive. Whether you are a notetaker or Bible art journaler or a combination of both, I think you will find the Notetaking Bible to be to your liking. I received a copy of this Bible to facilitate my review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    Oh, I really like this Bible! It has an absolutely beautiful cloth cover that is firm yet flexible. The inside front and back pages also have a beautiful floral design on sage paper. I am really enjoying the notetaking areas on each page for when I want to journal my thoughts. It is a single column design and the only thing I have a bit of a problem with is that the font feels small to me. The study Bible that I currently take to church has much larger font that is easier on the eyes. However, th Oh, I really like this Bible! It has an absolutely beautiful cloth cover that is firm yet flexible. The inside front and back pages also have a beautiful floral design on sage paper. I am really enjoying the notetaking areas on each page for when I want to journal my thoughts. It is a single column design and the only thing I have a bit of a problem with is that the font feels small to me. The study Bible that I currently take to church has much larger font that is easier on the eyes. However, that is truly the only thing that I struggle with a bit when reading this Bible. I love the thickness of the pages. They are just right for journaling, while not being too thick. I am using the Bible reading plan, which is located toward the back of the Bible. I like the flexibility of the plan. It can be used as a daily plan that covers both the old and new testament, or the reader can choose to follow just the old or just the new plan. I am working through both. A concordance and maps are located in the back, however, there are no additional study aids. The extra room is saved for journaling and notetaking. This Bible is a great choice for women or teens who would like to have a pretty Bible that also has notetaking room built into it. I received a complimentary copy of this Bible. All opinions are my own. You can read this review on my blog: https://brittreadsfiction.wordpress.c...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    This Bible translation was free for my Nook, and I've been pleasantly surprised to find it accurate, conservative, easy to read and easy to navigate. I have not felt compelled to purchase any other Bible version for my own reading or for following along at church, although our congregation favors the NIV (1984) and our pastor favors the NASB.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura Zielke

    Over the past few months, I’ve been using a new translation of the Bible called the Christian Standard Bible. Published by Holman Bible Publishers in early 2017, the Christian Standard Bible (CSB) is an unexpected, yet (apparently) necessary, update of the 2004 Holman Christian Standard Bible. 🔎 Click to enlarge About the Christian Standard Bible When a well-established publishing company produces a thorough revision of its previous translation—wit Over the past few months, I’ve been using a new translation of the Bible called the Christian Standard Bible. Published by Holman Bible Publishers in early 2017, the Christian Standard Bible (CSB) is an unexpected, yet (apparently) necessary, update of the 2004 Holman Christian Standard Bible. 🔎 Click to enlarge About the Christian Standard Bible When a well-established publishing company produces a thorough revision of its previous translation—with the intent that the new version completely replace the old—less than 15 years after the original, one sits up and takes notice. In fact, when I announced that I would be reviewing this Bible, the very first question my friend and former seminary classmate, Gale P., had was: “Why? What’s the agenda? Was it necessary?” It is my intention that this review address those questions. When I requested a review copy from B&H Publishers in March, I determined to use it regularly for a while before forming an opinion—I have no desire to write a review without doing my due diligence. So, that said, I feel like I'm finally at a place where I can share my opinion based on use in worship services, Sunday School, and personal study. But before I share my impression, I'd like to tell you about the translation itself and the physical copy I received. Descriptions from the Packaging To introduce you to the CSB, I'm going to quote directly from the full-color, cardstock sleeve in which my Bible arrived. Why use their words and not my own? 🔎 Click to enlarge Because the cover contains a description written by the publishing company filled with what they would like us to know about their new translation, and it will help explain at least one of the reasons Holman chose to revise the HCSB: To increase consumption. Notice the progression from accuracy to popularity: "highly reliable" "highly readable" "as literal as possible to the Bible's original meaning without sacrificing clarity" "optimal blend of accuracy and readability" "makes Scripture more moving (Yikes!), more memorable, and more motivating to read and share with others" helps you "to experience God's truth as never before" (Yikes!) I was tracking with them until they touted their translation would make Scripture "more moving" and help me experience God's truth as I never have before! I mean, gosh, if that's the case, then we should all run to LifeWay and purchase one immediately. In fact, stop reading this review, and click here to buy your copy RIGHT NOW! ⚡ What? Back so soon? Okay, then I'll keep writing. Can I just remind us that the ONLY way Scripture becomes "more moving, more memorable, and more motivating to read" is because of the work of the Holy Spirit—not the Holman—in our lives. [Just a little aside: When I created the hyperlink above, I noticed the ISBN for this particular thinline reference Bible ends with 666.😲 You'd think they would have caught that at the publishing company and asked for a different ISBN, but I guess not.] 😂 Why Revise the HCSB? So, back to Gale's question: Why did Holman find it necessary to completely revise their HCSB translation of the Bible? It's actually pretty interesting, especially in light of the fact that they brought together "more than 100 top conservative scholars from 17 denominations" to work on the 2004 translation. I guess the final translation wasn't as marketable or acceptable as they had anticipated. 🔎 Click to enlarge It appears that the main catalyst for this 2017 revision (and new name: CSB) was the feedback they received about the HCSB "from pastors, seminaries, and other conservative denominations." Oh, to be a fly on the wall at Holman! I have no idea what type of comments were made. All I know is that they refer to the new CSB as "a translation that’s even stronger" than the HCSB!  And there you have it. It's stronger!💪 (Are they saying the HCSB was a weak translation? And what are the implications of using the HCSB as the backbone of the CSB? My brain hurts.) If you'd like to know more about why they revised the HSCB and what the major differences are between it and the CSB, you can click here. One of the questions I had was who exactly worked on the "stronger" version? Although the HCSB boasted "over 100 top scholars," the revision team was comprised of only 21 scholars. (If you ever watched the TV show, "Where Are They Now?" you might enjoy this bit of CSB trivia: One of the more recognizable names in the list of scholars who worked on this translation is none other than award-winning author and Christian recording artist, Michael Card. If you don't recognize his name, you will probably recognize some of the songs he's written including "El Shaddai," "Emmanuel," and "Love Crucified Arose.") With the help of Google, I was able to determine that the educational backgrounds of the CSB scholars fall into the following denominations: Baptist (10), Evangelical (4), Lutheran (2), Presbyterian (2), Anglican (1), Non-denominational (2).  You can click here to view the list of scholars for yourself. There is a heavy Baptist influence (50%), but that should be expected since Holman is a Baptist publisher. I know the intent was to produce a translation devoid of denominational bias; however, I'm not sure that is possible. Is anything truly neutral? What you can know for sure is this: "The conservative, evangelical scholars of the Christian Standard Bible affirm the authority of Scripture as the inerrant Word of God. Seeking the highest level of faithfulness to the original texts and accuracy in their translation, these scholars and LifeWay, the non-profit ministry that stewards the CSB, also champion the Bible against cultural trends that would compromise its truths." (read more on their site) To use inclusive language, or not to use inclusive language? That is the question. When I was a child, the third person masculine pronoun "he" often meant "he or she." By the time I was in college (in the 80s), language had become more inclusive and more bulky. Instead of using "he" as the inclusive pronoun, we began using "he or she" OR "she or he" OR (my favorite) "s/he." By the time I was in seminary, textbooks were being published with pictures of females in stereotypically masculine roles (e.g., architect, doctor, hunter) and males executing stereotypically female duties such as holding a baby or cooking a meal. Fast forward to the twenty-first century, and our children are growing up in a world where "he" is "one male," and "she" is "one female," and you're going to have a tough time with Bible translation. Publishers have been trying for years to bring gender inclusivity to ancient Scripture, but it's not as easy as swapping pronouns. In the vast majority of foreign languages, both ancient and modern, the masculine plural has always included women; however, it hasn't always been translated like that. So, when scholars came together with the intent to make their translation more accurate and able to be understood by the modern reader, it makes sense that they decided to use inclusive language wherever and whenever appropriate. You can read about their translation decisions (and employment of inclusive language) here and here. The Physical Copy I Received 🔎 Click to enlarge The CSB Thinline Reference Bible I received to review is bound in a medium-brown faux leather with a debossed cross on the front cover. The pages are gold-gilded (probably not real gold), and the Smyth-sewn binding helps the the Bible to lay open flat without having to put a weight on the pages (although you might have to break it in a bit after you first purchase it). It's the perfect size (not too big, not too small). The 8.5 point sans serif font is surprisingly easy to read considering how small it is. The translation features topical subheadings, cross references, a concordance, and maps. I love it! My Opinion on the CSB When it all comes down, though I find the Christian Standard Bible to be an excellent resource, I don't think I would rely solely on this particular version when teaching a class. (Teachers should always use more than one translation when preparing—and, if possible, teaching—their lessons). I like the Christian Standard Bible, and I have enjoyed using it to add breadth and depth to my studies. I might not always prefer their translation, but that's why I use multiple versions. 🐧 Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog. Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Kassing

    I enjoyed working through this translation in 2019. It reminded me of the NIV. This will make a great gift for someone exploring Christianity or who is new Christ follower.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The first time I remember hearing about the HCSB translation was in John Macarthur's book: 'SLAVE: The hidden truth about your identity in Christ', in which this translation is used because it translates 'doulos' literally as 'slave' rather than the less accurate translation of 'servant' or 'bondservant'. That made me curious to take a better look at the translation. This translation uses "Optimal Equivalence" as the translation method which they consider to be a careful cross between formal equ The first time I remember hearing about the HCSB translation was in John Macarthur's book: 'SLAVE: The hidden truth about your identity in Christ', in which this translation is used because it translates 'doulos' literally as 'slave' rather than the less accurate translation of 'servant' or 'bondservant'. That made me curious to take a better look at the translation. This translation uses "Optimal Equivalence" as the translation method which they consider to be a careful cross between formal equivalence an dynamic/functional equivalence. Also, the translators do not give in to gender neutrality, as they mention in their 'introduction': "…the translators have not changed 'him' to 'you' or to 'them,' neither have they avoided other masculine words such as 'father' or 'son' by translating them in generic terms…" There were some specific things that I looked for, in particular the usage of other translations of the Old Testament for textual criticism. In Genesis 4:8 instead of the verse reading , "And Cain told Abel his brother. And it came to pass, when they were in the field…"( ASV) it relies upon the Samaritan Pentateuch, the Septuagint, Syriac and Vulgate and reads, "Cain said to his brother Abel, 'Let's go out to the field.' And while they were in the field…" Including that statement there is added clarity, and, though not in the Masoretic text, it has numerous supports in other available texts. They support their translation choices/sources with footnotes explaining where the variants are taken from and also to give alternate readings that are not found in the Masoretic text of the OT. I did appreciate that, unlike the NIV, at Isaiah 7:14 where it says "the virgin will conceive…" they do not have a footnote saying "or young woman". But I didn't like that, unlike the NIV, in Psalm 40 where they follow the Masoretic wording of "my ears you have opened" they don't include a footnote mentioning that other ancient translations like the LXX read "body you have prepared for me". It reads in a sort of cross between modern English and a more literal style, though I think it is leaning more towards a literal translation which I appreciate. But overall, I think I like the translation. Oh, I also liked how they converted measurements into feet, inches, miles…etc. It makes it easier to picture. And now, as for the external/material things, the binding of this version was silky smooth, and I like the simple yet decorative cover. On the inside the font is nice and large and easily readable, even the footnotes are a nice size. This Bible has a topical concordance at the back and at the beginning a summary of God's plan for salvation in which I particularly liked some of their wording for instance, "First, God says we must repent. The word 'repent' means a change of direction. This means when we turn to God, we are turning away from sin and giving up on the attempt to make ourselves right before God." Many thanks to B&H publishers for sending me a free copy of this Bible to review!(My review did not have to be favorable)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Shipman

    While I enjoyed this translation of the Bible, it is not THE translation for me. There were some translation choices that stood out to me as too Baptist based, such as the use of beer instead of strong drink in Luke 1:15, and the placement of punctuation in sentences speaking of baptism and the Holy Spirit. At times I was curious as to if I was reading a non-gender inclusive update of the NIV instead of the revised HCSB. While I did find this translation easy to read, study, and enjoy, I find tha While I enjoyed this translation of the Bible, it is not THE translation for me. There were some translation choices that stood out to me as too Baptist based, such as the use of beer instead of strong drink in Luke 1:15, and the placement of punctuation in sentences speaking of baptism and the Holy Spirit. At times I was curious as to if I was reading a non-gender inclusive update of the NIV instead of the revised HCSB. While I did find this translation easy to read, study, and enjoy, I find that it lost something during the revision. The HCSB used Yahweh in the place of LORD off and on throughout the Old Testament, and this is something that I think should have been retained. It was dropped due to many commentators/reviewers saying that The usage of Yahweh was inconsistent. But using the Tetragrammaton helped the Bible to stand out and be different. It also bucked the trend on the translation of John 3:16, which some commentators found interesting. I also miss the bullet points that were in the HCSB that helped to explain theological words in a dictionary placed near the concordance. Now, like previously stated, this translation reads more like the NIV, another horse in the pack. I the cross reference system used in the Bible is very robust and does help in study/understanding. I also found the translation footnotes to be interesting, and helpful in seeing the various ways translators had worded the passages. Would I recommend this translation to someone? I would without reservation. It provides enough tools that the average person would be able to read, study, and understand scripture without having to turn to an outside source. It is a good translation; but I find that rather than standing out from the crowd, like the HCSB used to do, the translation team chose to rejoin the herd with their revision. Because of this, this is not the translation for me and I will continue to use the ESV as my EDC, and consult the CSB when looking for how other translators viewed the passage I am studying. Ps I know that the Christian Standard Bible published by Holman is not the Holman Christian Standard Bible, but since the introduction discusses how this translation came about, I thought it only fair to compare the two.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Todd Miles

    I am not going to rank the Word of God - how can it be anything other than 5 stars. But I do want to make a few comments about the translation. Attempting to depart from the formal equivalent translation - dynamic equivalent translation continuum, the HCSB opts for what they call "optimal equivalence." As near as I can figure, if measured upon the preceding continuum, they will be inconsistent, sometimes being very formal and other times giving a dynamic translation. I wonder how helpful that is I am not going to rank the Word of God - how can it be anything other than 5 stars. But I do want to make a few comments about the translation. Attempting to depart from the formal equivalent translation - dynamic equivalent translation continuum, the HCSB opts for what they call "optimal equivalence." As near as I can figure, if measured upon the preceding continuum, they will be inconsistent, sometimes being very formal and other times giving a dynamic translation. I wonder how helpful that is, but on the whole, it is a very readable text and a useful and distinct contribution. Generally, I found the prose translations to be top-notch, but the poetry translations to be a bit stilted in places, lacking some literary beauty and literary grace. Here are some of the features that I did not appreciate: 1) The HCSB use of contractions was maddening. Regardless of whether the Lord would use a contraction in real life, it seems to diminish the literary value. 2) The HSCB translation of Christos as "Messiah" at places in the NT but "Christ" at others seemed arbitrary and unhelpful. It is a Greek word that is easily translatable. Translate it consistently. The HCSB rationale that this was done depending on whether it was a Gentile or Jewish context seemed odd - Jesus is always the Jewish Messiah who always finds himself at the epicenter of Jewish prophecy even when he is the light to the Gentiles, so there is always a Jewish/Gentile context at every place in the NT. 3) The HCSB translation of Lord with the transliteration "Yahweh" was odd. In addition to being needlessly offensive to any Jewish reader, we do not know that this is how the word was pronounced (I suspect not), so what is the point? One other point - there are some familiar passages of which the typical translation has been questioned. The HCSB chose to go with an unfamiliar reading of these passages (e.g., John 3:16; Mal 2:16). I found that to be helpful, at least for the sake of translation comparison.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Parker

    I have read through both the original HCSB and the newer CSB. Both the original HCSB and the newer CSB are solid English translations. The newer CSB is slightly more fresh and readable in places, although there are areas in which I prefer the style of the original CSB. Both accurately reflect the original biblical manuscripts.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Yuska Vonita

    I'm joining Reading the Bible as Literature challenge hosted by Roof Beam Reader. I obtained this bible for free from Amazon. The language is easy to understand. Just finished reading Genesis. I'm going to get through Exodus for a couple of days.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Ridgeway

    In 2005 our church read this edition of the Bible from cover to cover. This translation is easier to read than some.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephen N. Collins

    My favorite translation for personal devotion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    The rating is for the translation. The Bible itself is always a 5-star read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Stanifer

    As of 8/27/2020 . . . I've now read the entire Bible nine times, cover-to-cover. Each time, I've chosen a different translation. This time, it was the CSB (Christian Standard Bible, a revision of the HCSB that I read a few read-throughs ago). I have a some-might-say-sacrilegious habit of asking people I admire or who have inspired me in some way to autograph my Bible(s). This was one was signed by the three members of Phillips, Craig, and Dean, a band that's been part of my life since around middle As of 8/27/2020 . . . I've now read the entire Bible nine times, cover-to-cover. Each time, I've chosen a different translation. This time, it was the CSB (Christian Standard Bible, a revision of the HCSB that I read a few read-throughs ago). I have a some-might-say-sacrilegious habit of asking people I admire or who have inspired me in some way to autograph my Bible(s). This was one was signed by the three members of Phillips, Craig, and Dean, a band that's been part of my life since around middle school. My dad and I sang their song "Favorite Song of All" at a chapel service during my senior year of high school. I get something new out of every reading. I don't know that I can point to ONE specific insight that leaps out at me this time around, but since Revelation is freshest in my mind, let's just say . . . It's no coincidence that my favorite section of the Narnia series is the final pages of The Last Battle and that those pages sound very similar to the ending of Revelation. "Now at last they were beginning Chapter One of the Great Story . . . " ~C.S. Lewis "Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth . . . " ~John the Revelator In a world that too frequently reminds us that we are fallen creatures, the Good Book reminds us that all is not lost. "The heart of man is not compound of lies, but draws some wisdom from the only Wise, and still recalls him." ~J.R.R. Tolkien, "Mythopoeia" We are not doomed to wallow in our failures or in hopelessness. "The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to set free the oppressed, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor." ~Luke 4:18-19 (CSB) One can never drink too deeply of such words. Here's to many more readings and re-readings. Aslan is on the move!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caleb

    The CSB is a reliable and easy to read modern translation. I would recommend the CSB over the NIV as the ideal easy to read translation. The CSB is the updated version of the HCSB, most changes made are negligible; however I personally prefer the HCSB decision to use "YHWH," because that is the name the Lord gave us to use; and I prefer the HCSB decision to use "language" in 1 Corinthians rather than "tongue" because "language" better represents the meaning of the original Greek in modern Englis The CSB is a reliable and easy to read modern translation. I would recommend the CSB over the NIV as the ideal easy to read translation. The CSB is the updated version of the HCSB, most changes made are negligible; however I personally prefer the HCSB decision to use "YHWH," because that is the name the Lord gave us to use; and I prefer the HCSB decision to use "language" in 1 Corinthians rather than "tongue" because "language" better represents the meaning of the original Greek in modern English.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chad A Tyler

    5 stars because it’s the Bible. 4 stars for translation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mindee Berkman

    I really loved this translation. I found it accurate and highly readable. The quality of the content goes with saying...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ian Smith

    To be read daily

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dina (ReviewTime)

    The Sportsman's Bible contains numerous devotions written for hunters and fishermen that connect the timeless principles of God's Word with the passion of millions of North American outdoors enthusiasts. About the binding & cover The cover of this Bible is Bonded Leather, with Mothwing(tm) fall camouflage. The bonded leather this Bible is made from feels more sturdily, and durable, then any bonded leather Bible I have held. The zipper & zipper slide are a very sturdily, which reminds me of the zip The Sportsman's Bible contains numerous devotions written for hunters and fishermen that connect the timeless principles of God's Word with the passion of millions of North American outdoors enthusiasts. About the binding & cover The cover of this Bible is Bonded Leather, with Mothwing(tm) fall camouflage. The bonded leather this Bible is made from feels more sturdily, and durable, then any bonded leather Bible I have held. The zipper & zipper slide are a very sturdily, which reminds me of the zippers & slides my parents used in their upholstery shop. They only used high quality zippers & slides. Over all I would say that this Bible should prove to be very durable. I'm impressed that this Bible is so well made considering the price Trim Size: 5.74 X 7.78 X 1.18 What's inside? Inside this Bible you will find lots of features & tips written for hunters & fishermen. The text is 7 point type, with the words of Christ in red. There are subject headings in this edition which I find to be a blessing. The page edges are the same color as the zipper and are both non-reflective. Specially designed so they won't scare game. In the Front 1. Table of Contents 2. Plan of Salvation 3. HCSB Introduction In the Back 1. HCSB Bullet Notes 2. How to get the most from your Sportsman's Bible 3. God the hunter 4. The bear facts 5. Setting up a Ground Blind 6. A few secrets to calling whitetails with success 7. Keep Climbing if you want Higher Success 8. Landowner's Respect.. It's All About Integrity 9. A Landowner's Perspective 10. Tree Stand Safety 11. The Top Five Mistakes That Hunter Make With Concealment 12. Outdoorman's Survival Kit 13. Tracking Wounded Game The Great Rewards Come To Those Who Are Patients 14. The Importance of a Sanctuary 15. Paying The Price to See Clearly 16. Dead Drifting Downstream 17. All Good Things Seem to Happen At Sunrise 18. Kentucky Thunder 19. Quite Streams Can Lead to a Calm Soul 20. Original Creativity 21. A Better Man 22. The Deer 23. It's Been My Life Let It Be Yours 24. Giving Thanks is Essential for the Turkey Hunter 25. Instinctive Shooting 26. God Looks on The Heart 27. Fisherman's Code of Conduct 28. Hunter's Code of Conduct 29. Where to Turn 30. How to Contact those who helped make The Sportsman's Bible a reality My Personal Opinion I absolutely love the cover, I've always been a big fan of camouflage. The size & weight of this Bible makes it easy to travel with. Even though I'm not a hunter or fisherman, I have really enjoyed this Bible. I found the hunter's & fisherman's notes to be very interesting. In "The bear facts" section I learned that there is a special type of pepper spray for bears , and that pepper spray is your best defiance against bears. This is really good to know. There are many interesting sections in this Bible. This Bible would make a great gift for anyone who enjoys the outdoors.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    The CSB Reader’s Bible is a delightful bible which pairs the much-anticipated CSB 2017 translation with a beautiful reader-friendly presentation of the text. The translation itself (like its predecessor, the HCSB) provides beautiful and clear renderings of Scripture. For instance, Psalm 145:8 reads: “The Lord is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and great in faithful love.” Likewise, Isaiah 43:4 reads: “you are precious in My sight and honored, and I love you.” And a verse from my favori The CSB Reader’s Bible is a delightful bible which pairs the much-anticipated CSB 2017 translation with a beautiful reader-friendly presentation of the text. The translation itself (like its predecessor, the HCSB) provides beautiful and clear renderings of Scripture. For instance, Psalm 145:8 reads: “The Lord is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and great in faithful love.” Likewise, Isaiah 43:4 reads: “you are precious in My sight and honored, and I love you.” And a verse from my favorite psalm reads, “I have your decrees as a heritage forever; indeed, they are the joy of my heart” (Psalm 119:111 CSB). The CSB Reader’s Bible showcases the text by presenting it in a reader-friendly, single-column format. Verse numbers, chapter numbers, cross references, and even footnotes have been removed—thus highlighting the present immediacy of the message, as originally delivered: “Seek the Lord while he may be found; call to him while he is near” (Isaiah 55:6, CSB 2017). As a sola scriptura edition, here are no potentially sectarian study notes—thus allowing the scripture to speak for itself. Chapters (but not verses) are indicated in small but highly visible (all caps) color text at the bottom of the page. The removal of verse numbers encourages devotional and conversational intimacy with God—while according His words the utmost reverence. The text has lots of marginal space. Unlike Crossway’s ESV Single-Column Legacy Bible, it does not include section headers in the margins—thus allowing for an uncluttered presentation of the actual words of scripture. My two recommendations would be (1) to reduce the marginal space in favor of a larger font size, and (2) to create a slimline large print edition with a text size much larger than the 9.5-pt. text size of the the CSB Large Print Ultrathin Reference Bible (though the smaller size is offset by the fact that it is available in both inexpensive imitation and premium leather editions). For me, larger is always better. I am definitely spoiled on my 18-point HCSB Super Giant Print Study Bible. (Hopefully a future edition of the CSB Super Giant Print Study Bible will increase the font size from 17 pt. to 18 pt.) However, the 10-point font size of the CSB Reader’s Bible is similar to that of the NKJV Reader’s Reference Bible (9 pt.), the ESV Single-Column Legacy Bible, the NIV Sola Scriptura Bible Project (10.3 pt.), or the NIV Reader’s Bible (10.5 pt.). Lastly, I really like the fine touches such as the surprise two-color interior (with the first letter of the start of each chapter being introduced in large size and in a breathtakingly soothing royal turquoise blue color), the creamy color of the pages, the beautiful elegance of the Bible Serif font, and the fantastic set of full-color maps showcased in the HCSB Study Bible. I am happy to recommend this lovely bible! (Note: This book was provided free of charge by B&H/LifeWay in exchange for an honest review.)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    The Old and New Testaments in a recent translation. The HCSB does not want to be boxed into the categories of either "formal equivalence" (word-for-word, e.g. KJV, ASV, NASB, ESV, etc.) or "dynamic equivalence" (thought-for-thought, e.g. NIV, NLT, CEV). Instead they come up with a new category: "optimal equivalence," which they claim recognizes that form cannot be separated from meaning and thus is an attempt to make the best sense of both words and thought, but in practice seems to just mean tha The Old and New Testaments in a recent translation. The HCSB does not want to be boxed into the categories of either "formal equivalence" (word-for-word, e.g. KJV, ASV, NASB, ESV, etc.) or "dynamic equivalence" (thought-for-thought, e.g. NIV, NLT, CEV). Instead they come up with a new category: "optimal equivalence," which they claim recognizes that form cannot be separated from meaning and thus is an attempt to make the best sense of both words and thought, but in practice seems to just mean that they generally try to translate "literally," and will give notes with the literal when so idiomatic that they have used different expressions. Holman Christian is a publishing company; as far as I am aware this is the only translation that takes the name of a publisher and that's quite telling. Why does it need to exist? Despite the introduction the jury is out on that topic: it's not like there haven't been decent recent translations or revisions (see: NASB, ESV) or a lack of versions attempting to clarify meaning (see: CEV, The Voice). Holman Christian now has its own Bible to publish, so there you go. Nevertheless there are many times when the translation philosophy succeeds and can provide some clarity by bucking the trend. The use of Yahweh for the Divine Name is a positive; the fact that they still use LORD plenty of times is just inconsistent and confusing. The work is certainly a translation and is not translationese, and does capture the essential aspect of the text in a comprehensible way to someone in the 21ste century. And then it will go and render Psalm 51:5 in an even more "dynamic" way than the NIV. Despite the fact that it would seem to be a publisher's ploy for profit Holman has been generous with the HCSB, providing it free for programs like e-Sword and in this free Kindle edition. The reason for its existence is an open question; why its translators felt the need to come up with a new category ("optimal equivalence") which functionally is not much different from what can be seen in more translated FE versions like the ESV and in the less interpretive DE versions like the NIV and the CEB (despite the unwarranted NIV hate) seems unnecessary and perhaps a bit presumptuous. But since it's here it's worth a look-see; I still prefer the ESV as maintaining the best translation balance, see value in the ASV, NASB, and NRSV as study resources, and would put the HCSB with the NIV as good versions to read to expand one's way of understanding how the text should be rendered without having as many of the inferential pitfalls that come with the "interpretive" end of the DE spectrum (although for mature students there's a time and place for that as well). Mild recommendation.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Just Commonly

    Do you take notes when you study your Bible? Do you have one Bible that is designated as your note-taking Bible - as one that you can write on it, highlight it and underline it? Well, if you do, I think you'll greatly appreciate The HCSB Note-taking Bible from Holman Bible Publishing and B&H Publishing. Now, I'm not an expert on translations, so most of this review is about what I like in terms of the physicality of this Bible. However, I will say the HCSB version is a simple and easy to underst Do you take notes when you study your Bible? Do you have one Bible that is designated as your note-taking Bible - as one that you can write on it, highlight it and underline it? Well, if you do, I think you'll greatly appreciate The HCSB Note-taking Bible from Holman Bible Publishing and B&H Publishing. Now, I'm not an expert on translations, so most of this review is about what I like in terms of the physicality of this Bible. However, I will say the HCSB version is a simple and easy to understand contemporary English version. One feature of the HCSB version I do like is when it indents and create an easy to read "section" or "paragraph" of an important verse(s). First, the outside. The HCSB Note-taking Bible has a bonded leather exterior hardcover, making it sturdy and one to last for a very long time. At 8.5" x 6.5" x 1.5" thick, it's easy to carry around, but personally, I prefer it at home due to the weight (2.5 lbs) and I typically take more notes at home. What I also appreciate tremendously is the "open spine" feature. It is designed to lay flat and open no matter the page you are on, and without causing the spine to degrade in time like some glued spine books are (including Bibles). It also comes with a brown ribbon book mark to help you hold your last reading page. The interior of this Bible is just as top quality. The pages are ivory color with black print, and very small dotted line on the edge, serving as note lines. The lines are not strong in contrast due to the "dotted" nature, though I must say the space in between each line is on the small side. If you have large handwriting, you'll most likely go over the lines. The fonts are standard font sizes you find in most Bibles. Headings in a san serif font, and verses in serif. Jesus' words are not in red. Another aspect I do like about this Bible is the page numbers. It is located on the bottom right corner versus the typical on top next to or on top center of the page where the Bible page location are. I like the separation making it clear. And with that, I have to note the Bible verse/page number is on the small size. In all, I like The HCSB Note-taking Bible. It is easy to understand, read and take notes with. The great quality physicality of this Bible makes it one great gift or one to use for a long time. This review first appeared on Just Commonly Blog. NOTE: I received a complimentary copy of this Bible from the publisher, B&H Publishing Group for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own. For my review policy, please see my Disclosure page.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Create With Joy

    When we read our Bibles, it is so important to record the things that God is impressing upon our hearts during our devotional and study time – and the best place to do this is in our Bibles themselves. However, it’s often difficult to do more than highlight or underline the text inside of most Bibles because margin space is limited to non-existent. That’s why I was so excited to discover the HCSB Notetaking Bible! The HCSB Notetaking Bible contains the full text of the Holman Christian Standard Bi When we read our Bibles, it is so important to record the things that God is impressing upon our hearts during our devotional and study time – and the best place to do this is in our Bibles themselves. However, it’s often difficult to do more than highlight or underline the text inside of most Bibles because margin space is limited to non-existent. That’s why I was so excited to discover the HCSB Notetaking Bible! The HCSB Notetaking Bible contains the full text of the Holman Christian Standard Bible in a single-column setting with abundant space for taking notes, recording insights, making observations, raising questions, marking cross-references – even journaling! There are several things I really like about this Bible: * The Classic Black/Brown Bonded Leather Edition is classic! It's a well-constructed Bible that’s a pleasure to hold. It fits comfortably in one’s hands and is made of quality materials, including lay flat binding. * One third of the page is dedicated to lined note-taking space which is quite generous! * The single-text column is easy to read - there are no footnotes, comments or anything else to distract you from Scripture. However, the one big thing that will make this otherwise wonderful Bible a no-go for many potential buyers is the tiny font. If you have good eyesight, this is not an issue, but if you have difficulty seeing small print, than this is not the Bible for you. Small print aside, if you are looking for a beautiful note-taking Bible that is appropriate for gift-giving as well as for personal use, than the HCSB Notetaking Bible is worth your consideration! This review is an excerpt from the original review that is published on my blog. To read my review in its entirety, please visit Create With Joy. Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Tan

    As with many modern translations, the CSB is highly readable and reasonably pleasant to peruse. I used it alongside my trusty CSB Study Bible (one of my ‘go-to’s for well-designed maps, illustrations, and charts). My favourite CSB feature: Whenever someone in the New Testament quotes the Old Testament, the quoted text is printed in bold. A curious decision: Imperial units are used throughout. The Metric equivalents should have been placed in the footnotes, at minimum. While there is a useful “Tabl As with many modern translations, the CSB is highly readable and reasonably pleasant to peruse. I used it alongside my trusty CSB Study Bible (one of my ‘go-to’s for well-designed maps, illustrations, and charts). My favourite CSB feature: Whenever someone in the New Testament quotes the Old Testament, the quoted text is printed in bold. A curious decision: Imperial units are used throughout. The Metric equivalents should have been placed in the footnotes, at minimum. While there is a useful “Table of Weights” section at the end of the book, it is rather inaccessible. This table lists the biblical unit (e.g. Gerah), its language (Hebrew), its biblical measure (1/20 shekel), its U.S. equivalent (1/50 ounce), its metric equivalent (.6 gram), and its various translations (gerah; oboli) ---- For those interested in what the CSB has got to say about its own text: Optimal equivalence starts with an exhaustive analysis of the text at every level (word, phrase, clause, sentence, discourse) in the original language to determine its original meaning and intention (or purpose). Then, relying on the latest and best language tools and experts, the nearest corresponding semantic and linguistic equivalents are used to convey as much of the information and intention of the original text with as much clarity and readability as possible. This process assures the maximum transfer of both the words and the thoughts contained in the original. The CSB uses optimal equivalence as its translation philosophy. In the many places throughout the Bible where a word-for-word rendering is understandable, a literal translation is used. When a word-for-word rendering might obscure the meaning for a modern audience, a more dynamic translation is used. The CSB places equal value on fidelity to the original and readability for a modern audience, resulting in a translation that achieves both goals.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leslie M.

    The HCSB Notetaking Bible contains the Holman Christian Standard Bible translation, and it is designed to help the reader create a deeper connection to the Word. The Bible is written in a single-column format, with ruled margins on each page. A concordance, eight pages of maps, a one-year Bible reading plan, and an introduction to this translation of the Bible are included. I found the HCSB translation accurate and easy to understand, though some people may be unfamiliar with it. Two-inch margins The HCSB Notetaking Bible contains the Holman Christian Standard Bible translation, and it is designed to help the reader create a deeper connection to the Word. The Bible is written in a single-column format, with ruled margins on each page. A concordance, eight pages of maps, a one-year Bible reading plan, and an introduction to this translation of the Bible are included. I found the HCSB translation accurate and easy to understand, though some people may be unfamiliar with it. Two-inch margins are perfect for notes, drawings, prayers, reflections, etc. The cream-colored pages are a similar thickness to other Bibles I own. Ghosting is possible, depending on the medium used. The cover is bonded leather with a moleskin appearance, and the Bible lays flat quite nicely, making it easy to use. Some readers may find the 8-point text size to be a bit small, but it allows the Bible to be a manageable size. It would be nice for this to be offered in a larger font, as well. People with large handwriting may find the lines to be a bit too close. A unique feature to HCSB Bibles is the "Bullet Notes." These notes explain frequently used words or terms. The words/phrases are only marked with a bullet the first time they occur in a chapter. This list helps add greater understanding to what is being read. I do a daily reading plan each year, and I really enjoy having a reading plan included at the back of the Bible. I'd recommend this Bible to anyone looking for a way to enhance their spiritual walk. Disclaimer: I received a free copy from the publisher as part of the B&H Blogger Program in exchange for an honest review.

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