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After almost a year in Japan, Katie Greene has finally unearthed the terrible secret behind her boyfriend Tomohiro's deadly ability to bring drawings to life—not only is he descended from Kami, the ancient Japanese gods, but he is the heir to a tragedy that occurred long ago, a tragedy that is about to repeat. Even as the blood of a vengeful god rages inside Tomo, Katie is After almost a year in Japan, Katie Greene has finally unearthed the terrible secret behind her boyfriend Tomohiro's deadly ability to bring drawings to life—not only is he descended from Kami, the ancient Japanese gods, but he is the heir to a tragedy that occurred long ago, a tragedy that is about to repeat. Even as the blood of a vengeful god rages inside Tomo, Katie is determined to put his dark powers to sleep. In order to do so, she and Tomo must journey to find the three Imperial Treasures of Japan. Gifts from the goddess Amaterasu herself, these treasures could unlock all of the secrets about Tomo's volatile ancestry and quell the ink's lust for destruction. But in order to complete their quest, Tomo and Katie must confront out-of-control Kami and former friend Jun, who has begun his own quest of revenge against those he believes have wronged him. To save the world, and themselves, Katie and Tomo will be up against one of the darkest Kami creations they've ever encountered—and they may not make it out alive.


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After almost a year in Japan, Katie Greene has finally unearthed the terrible secret behind her boyfriend Tomohiro's deadly ability to bring drawings to life—not only is he descended from Kami, the ancient Japanese gods, but he is the heir to a tragedy that occurred long ago, a tragedy that is about to repeat. Even as the blood of a vengeful god rages inside Tomo, Katie is After almost a year in Japan, Katie Greene has finally unearthed the terrible secret behind her boyfriend Tomohiro's deadly ability to bring drawings to life—not only is he descended from Kami, the ancient Japanese gods, but he is the heir to a tragedy that occurred long ago, a tragedy that is about to repeat. Even as the blood of a vengeful god rages inside Tomo, Katie is determined to put his dark powers to sleep. In order to do so, she and Tomo must journey to find the three Imperial Treasures of Japan. Gifts from the goddess Amaterasu herself, these treasures could unlock all of the secrets about Tomo's volatile ancestry and quell the ink's lust for destruction. But in order to complete their quest, Tomo and Katie must confront out-of-control Kami and former friend Jun, who has begun his own quest of revenge against those he believes have wronged him. To save the world, and themselves, Katie and Tomo will be up against one of the darkest Kami creations they've ever encountered—and they may not make it out alive.

30 review for Storm

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I am so excited for this one. LE REVIEW BE COMING SOON I am so excited for this one. LE REVIEW BE COMING SOON

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    So, this thing has been sitting on my "currently reading" shelf for weeks, because I can't muster the strength to discuss it. I usually love to review things right away, even if I hated them...but I just can't with this series. Sorry, not sorry and all that. Also, here's a warning that there will be swearing below. So let's keep this brief: - Katie is the ultimate Mary Sue who is so special despite the fact that she does literally nothing in the entire book. (view spoiler)[She can't even fulfill h So, this thing has been sitting on my "currently reading" shelf for weeks, because I can't muster the strength to discuss it. I usually love to review things right away, even if I hated them...but I just can't with this series. Sorry, not sorry and all that. Also, here's a warning that there will be swearing below. So let's keep this brief: - Katie is the ultimate Mary Sue who is so special despite the fact that she does literally nothing in the entire book. (view spoiler)[She can't even fulfill her role as the "heir" of Amaterasu and kill Tomo as Tsukiyomi which is the point of the whole book and her whole character. I get she doesn't want to kill him, but he's clearly in pain and is dying, and you leave it to Ishikawa as you slump and cry. Nice job. (hide spoiler)] - Kami healing powers. The fuck is this, Sailor Moon's Healing Escalation? Never mentioned previously, and never explained. Just no. This led to Harry-Potter-level crap epilogue. ^^^^^^^^My face is Ron's face. - Katie spends two pages in the first chapter explaining the events of book 2 (which goes to show how long book 2 really needed to be....) but then references its events over and over through the course of this story. Annoying/repetitive to the nth degree. - THROUGH DREAMS, BECAUSE MAGIC, it becomes apparent that there are 3 Imperial artifacts ("regalia" or jingi/shinki) that Tomo, Katie, and (for some completely random reason) Ishikawa need to track down. Like the most boring version of Deathly Hallows ever. - While the one thing I actually enjoyed about the book was more inclusion of Ishikawa as a growing character, I realized he was only included because(view spoiler)[ Ishikawa's gay. And yes, inclusion is great! But this felt like it was tacked on to check a box, rather than something that could be celebrated about his character. In Japan he wouldn't let his secret out to some girl he won't even address on a first name basis. He called her "Greene", or presumably, "Greene-san", which means he probably doesn't know her that well to feel comfortable enough coming out to her before literally anyone else. Katie also feels like it's her place to tell him what to do with his life, which felt kinda gross. Maybe the author just wanted the moe. (hide spoiler)] - The author also feels the need to address the sex life between Tomo and Katie. (view spoiler)[ They don't do it - again, this is fine except that it contradicts a character's defining moment that cannot be unwritten in my eyes. In this book, she talks about how he makes her feel, there's some neck kissing, and then they stop because she's not ready and he respects her boundaries. That'd be so nice and frankly refreshing!, IF it wasn't coming from the guy who bought them a room at a love hotel... I will not forget the way that pseudo-rape scene made me feel, and I will not forgive Tomo for it. (hide spoiler)] - Fucking cardboard support characters, Tomo is angst personified, and I can't give two shits about our MC who spends her time lamenting the situation, being afraid of everything regarding the situation, talking about how the situation "needs to stop" and then doing nothing about the situation. Wish we could have gotten much more insight into characters like Ishikawa, who could have been so much more three-dimensional. - Other plot BS involving Katie's dad who somehow knows about the Kami, (view spoiler)[Jun murders yakuza members and there is absolutely no justice served to him ???? (hide spoiler)] , a Kami gang that is never explained fully and never mentioned at the end as having been disbanded. Loose ends are abundant. There's more I could go on and on about, but I get mad just thinking about this. I love Japan and Japanese culture, and this series does a disservice to it. It gets one star, and that's me being gracious.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joood Hooligan

    http://www.platypire.com/j-hooligan/s... I have been waiting for this book since the moment I finished Rain, about a year ago. I had pre-ordered this as a Christmas present to myself, because I love me so much and I knew I deserved this. When I did finally get it, I was afraid to start it. Not because I was worried I wouldn't like it, but because I did not want it to end. It didn't take long for my curiosity to get the better of me, and I started reading it. Amusing thing, I knew I liked this seriou http://www.platypire.com/j-hooligan/s... I have been waiting for this book since the moment I finished Rain, about a year ago. I had pre-ordered this as a Christmas present to myself, because I love me so much and I knew I deserved this. When I did finally get it, I was afraid to start it. Not because I was worried I wouldn't like it, but because I did not want it to end. It didn't take long for my curiosity to get the better of me, and I started reading it. Amusing thing, I knew I liked this serious. I went into this book remembering that both Ink and Rain made it into my top 10 books the years they were released. With that in mind, I was still surprised at how much I loved this book. There were a few times where I found myself having to close to book just to give myself a moment to gather my thoughts on what I had just read. The story did lead where I expected it to go, nor did it end how I thought it would. I may or may not have started crying a bit toward the end, because reasons. I have to say that I was quite impressed with the growth of many of the characters, especially Ishikawa. There is a part in here that connects to the companion novella, Rise. I cackled when I got to that part, because I knew exactly what was going on. And also because I'm so very mature. I was pleased at the direction of the relationship between Katie and Tomo in this story. Also, there's a part toward the end that reminds me of River Song from Doctor Who... and if you know me, that's a high compliment. This was a fantastic end to a wonderful story. If you're a fan of folklore, mythology, or YA paranormal romance, then you definitely need this series. I had to buy it all in paperback, because I loved it so much.

  4. 4 out of 5

    jessica ☾

    Yikes, what a let down. I honestly could hardly finish this, which was completely unexpected after enjoying the first two. I can’t find it in me to lower this to one star, even though that’s definitely what it deserves.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julianna Helms

    I WANT IT AND I WANT IT NOW.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)

    See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was a paperback I got from Amazon Vine for review. *most characters are Japanese *Ishikawa is gay, but his role troubles me Though my ratings for this series have been a bit middling in the past (3.5 for the first book, 2 for the second), my feelings for this series are a lot more enthusiastic. How on earth were Katie and Tomohiro supposed to make it together when them being around one another actually causes him harm? Would the triad Jun proposed a See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was a paperback I got from Amazon Vine for review. *most characters are Japanese *Ishikawa is gay, but his role troubles me Though my ratings for this series have been a bit middling in the past (3.5 for the first book, 2 for the second), my feelings for this series are a lot more enthusiastic. How on earth were Katie and Tomohiro supposed to make it together when them being around one another actually causes him harm? Would the triad Jun proposed actually happen? (Probably not, BUT I HAD A DREAM AND I HAD HOPE.) Sometimes, there are things you care a great deal about even if you don’t care much for them. That make sense? Whatever. Storm makes for a solid finale, but it wraps itself up perhaps too neatly in the end. Storm is fast-paced and creative beyond the bounds I expected from Amanda Sun–and I never exactly criticized her previous two novels for their lack of creativity. Even when the series indulges in tired tropes, it’s still so much like reading a sweet little shoujo manga except in novel form. It captures the nostalgic teen in me who loved manga and the overdramatic couples I often found in their pages. Just when I thought Sun had her world all laid out, she pulls out the legend of the three treasures–the sword, the mirror, and the magatama–and ties it into the fate of Jun, Tomo, and Katie. As echoes of the tragedy of Amaterasu, Tsukiyomi, and Susanou, they have a lot riding on finding a way to break the cycle. The idea of Katie’s absentee father coming out of the woodwork never occurred to me because I’m used to YA missing parents never appearing again, but Sun surprises by bringing him in and complicating things further! Turns out he knows what the Kami are after all and the ink dragonfruit Katie’s mom consumed was a vengeful gift from the fiance of a woman Katie’s father couldn’t save the life of. I expected that to tie back into Tomo’s family, but that’s probably because it’s been a while since I read Ink. Meanwhile, Jun is off becoming a maniacal leader to the rising group of Kami in Japan and Katie is being adorably oblivious to his affections for her. Even in the legend, Susanou had feelings for Amaterasu! Even when frustrating, this series is fun. Unfortunately, other plot lines we’ve dealt with throughout the series are snipped off so cleanly it hurts a little and make it clear I think the finale of any series should be longer than the books that came before it (Storm is the shortest novel in the series). Shiori was a peripheral figure in the first book and trying to steal Tomohiro in Rain, but she gets just two scenes in Storm: Katie and Tomo visiting her in the hospital post-birth and Katie encountering her and her new daughter Aya at the end of the novel. It makes sense they don’t see/talk much more of her considering they have to work fast to find the three treasures or Tsukiyomi’s blood will consume Tomo, but I wanted more closure there in terms of Shiori’s character. She really got the shaft. Tomo’s best friend Ishikawa returns and joins in on the fun now that he knows Tomo’s secret, but I feel like he’s here to ensure Katie and Tomo’s HEA. We find out he’s gay and pretty over-the-moon for his best friend, but he gets no romance of his own. His point is to be around having feelings for Tomo and help him and Katie get where they need to go. I wouldn’t have minded a subplot of Jun recruiting a male left hand to accompany Ikeda as his right hand, Ishikawa meeting that guy, and those two falling for each other in the middle of this madness. That is a good distraction if Shiori is going to be dropped after two short scenes. Give the poor guy something! For goodness’s sake, he got shot and can’t get the guy he wants. He’s a jerk and yet I feel for him. Okay, whining over. All in all, the series comes to a satisfying conclusion even though I’m still sad there was no triad of Jun, Katie, and Tomo. Will I be reading more from Amanda Sun? That’s like asking if I love cats! I’m excited for what Sun has to offer readers in the future thanks to her creative work with the Paper Gods series. Manga fanatics are going to love this and it’s perfect for a binge-read now that all the books are out!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I already read Ink, which I absolutely adore and love. Rain doesn't meet my expectations, but Storm certainly hits the right marks. It is darker than Ink, and Amanda Sun takes a deeper step into Japanese mythology. I myself have never heard of these gods before (examples include: Amaterasu, Susanoo, Tsukuyomi), but their stories are fascinating. They remind me of Greek mythology, but unlike Greek mythology, these stories are a breath of fresh air. Though they are ancient, they are created anew b I already read Ink, which I absolutely adore and love. Rain doesn't meet my expectations, but Storm certainly hits the right marks. It is darker than Ink, and Amanda Sun takes a deeper step into Japanese mythology. I myself have never heard of these gods before (examples include: Amaterasu, Susanoo, Tsukuyomi), but their stories are fascinating. They remind me of Greek mythology, but unlike Greek mythology, these stories are a breath of fresh air. Though they are ancient, they are created anew by Sun's pen. (Also, yay for cultural diversity!) Tomohiro is the sassy guy the girls hate/love. His dark side is truly explored, and though it is a very dark time for both Tomohiro and Katie, he makes the best of it and cracks little jokes here and there. These jokes provide the wonderful relief from the darkness along with some excellent pieces of dialogue. Katie's hidden powers in ink has been reawaken in Rain. She is a character who has been tossed into the wrong situation at the wrong time. But she, like Tomohiro, makes the best of it. Unlike Tomohiro, she remains hopeful even in the face of darkness and horror. Katie is easy to empathize and understand with, and she has great chemistry and banter with Tomohiro. Though the banters aren't as frequent as Ink, they still hold the perfect amount of chemistry and adorableness in them. The world building of Storm is amazing, and Amanda Sun does a great job with the descriptions. I can shiver whenever she describes ink as similar to blood. Drip, drip, drip. It brings about the perfect creepy feelings she's trying to hit. The mythology behind the Tomohiro's ink powers is fascinating, and readers will definitely be interested in Japanese myths. There is something very satisfying about Amanda's way of portraying Japanese gods and goddesses. She also does a good recap of what has happened in Ink and Rain. The plot of Storm is perfectly paced, and I have absolutely nothing to complain about. The conflict is amazing, and I enjoy the Jun vs. Tomo dynamic. The author does a good job of weaving the past and the present plots together, and parallels ensure. The Imperial Treasures subplot isn't very strong, but the drama of the story makes up for it. Overall, Storm is a strong ending to the trilogy of Paper Gods. There are a lot of chemistry, great mythology, amazing world building, troubling relationships, and an awesome conclusion. Storm cleans up the entire trilogy very well, and all (if not most) loose ends are tied up in a neat bow. I would recommend this to anyone who loves mythology and romance. Rating: Four out of Five -ofpaperandwords.blogspot.com

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    After the ending to Rain, I was left with a million questions, all with absolutely no answers. Storm picks right back up with where Rain ended, just a few days after. Katie's having issues, Tomohiro's having issues, and Jun's having serious issues. Everyone's having issues. GAH. What has the world come to? Katie and Tomo are on a race to put a stop to the waging war of kami blood inside Tomo, because if not, the kami blood will take over and he'll destroy everything. But to make matters worse, Jun After the ending to Rain, I was left with a million questions, all with absolutely no answers. Storm picks right back up with where Rain ended, just a few days after. Katie's having issues, Tomohiro's having issues, and Jun's having serious issues. Everyone's having issues. GAH. What has the world come to? Katie and Tomo are on a race to put a stop to the waging war of kami blood inside Tomo, because if not, the kami blood will take over and he'll destroy everything. But to make matters worse, Jun suddenly is having an ethical crisis, in the sense that he's letting his kami power get to his head, and suddenly he's off killing people. Though they're mainly gangsters that Jun claims the world is better off with, Jun is still murdering people. And he's convinced that if Tomo won't obey him, he'll destroy him because he's too dangerous. Issues, a little? But I see where Jun's coming from, and can even sympathize, even if his resolution is completely twisted and ridiculous. That fool. One person I really grew to like in Storm was Satoshi Iskikawa. If you recall in the first book, Ink, he was a wimpy coward, determined on exploiting Tomo's kami abilities for Tomo's "own good". Turns out there was a very good reason, and here we see him redeeming his previous actions. I loved his sass, and he brought a smile to my lips whenever he spoke. I mean, only he would demand Katie to take a picture of him and some famous bridge when there's a serious issue at stake. He's a loyal friend, and I'm glad that he's able to straighten out and find his way in the end. Him, Katie, and Tomo make an awesome team. Another surprise in this book was the reappearance of Katie's dad. I won't go into detail about it, but it brings the story and Katie's character to a full circle, and leaves a satisfying sense of closure to her life. The ending contained a lot more excitement and action than I originally suspected, which was more than fine by me. Weapons! Swords! Bows and arrows! Spears! Wings! They all make one epic battle and finale. One of the neat things about this book is that there are actual drawings on the pages, pictures that were draw in the book's plot. One of the drawings involved a snake, and may I firstly give kudos to the artist, because I nearly dropped the book when I saw it on the page. Yikes. But it gives the book a sinister feeling, as if the ink on the pages truly are trying to do some evil. Areas that are visited in this book: Shizuoka, Tokyo, Ise, and Nagoya. This book does not lack any Japanese culture, which is really nice to read about! I'm a little sad to see this trilogy go, as I enjoyed it very much. All in all, it was a fantastic series, filled with rich Japanese culture and mythology! I definitely learned a whole lot from this series! Books, Stars, Writing. And Everything in Between.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    Expected publication: June 30th 2015 by Harlequin Teen

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kc713

    3.5 stars I enjoyed this more than I thought the action picked up significantly in this book but it didn't blow me away 3.5 stars I enjoyed this more than I thought the action picked up significantly in this book but it didn't blow me away

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia

    I still love the insight of the Japanese culture and setting. Overall the book was good but the first part of the book was kind of slow.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jodie "Bookish" Cook

    Book Review Title: Storm Author: Amanda Sun Genre: YA/Fantasy/Romance Rating: **** Review: I was so excited about the final instalment in the Paper Gods trilogy. This book opens almost immediately after where Rain finished. We see Katie and Tomo looking for a way to put Tomo’s violent Kami blood to sleep but everyone else (their parents, teachers etc.) wants to keep them apart. With Tomo and Jun being on opposite sides of the coming war Katie tries everything to make Jun see sense but at this point h Book Review Title: Storm Author: Amanda Sun Genre: YA/Fantasy/Romance Rating: **** Review: I was so excited about the final instalment in the Paper Gods trilogy. This book opens almost immediately after where Rain finished. We see Katie and Tomo looking for a way to put Tomo’s violent Kami blood to sleep but everyone else (their parents, teachers etc.) wants to keep them apart. With Tomo and Jun being on opposite sides of the coming war Katie tries everything to make Jun see sense but at this point he is beyond help. Katie also have dreams about the Kami gods where she learns what will happen unless the war is prevented but despite everything she is told she believes there is a way, hidden somewhere to help Tomo fight the Kami blood within him. As we approach the ¼ mark in the novel we see the divide between the characters growing and the power Tomo has growing and getting further and further out of his control. All the while Katie is having premonitions of sorts, making her search for a way out, a way to save Tomo. With help from people who know about the kami and some are kami themselves she learns the true legends behind the ancient kami and the creation of them. This sparks an idea in Katie that just might be able to save both Tomo and Jun from their fates. As we cross the ¼ mark in the novel things so down a little with the action taking a back seat and the mythology taking the lead role. Katie and Tomo now know what they must, they have to assemble to three ancient treasures in order to stop Jun and the kami war. Katie also knows to save Tomo she has been told to kill him although she refuses to do this I have a feeling that circumstance may force her to. The treasures are kept protected all over Japan with one being kept in Tokyo. In order to get there Katie is planning on meeting her father who has been out of her life for many years as a cover story for her and Tomo travelling to find the treasures but I have a feeling that her father; Steven may reveal more than Katie knows. As we approach the halfway mark in the novel we see Katie and Tomo struggling to deal with what the ink is doing to them and what it is driving them to do. When they get to Tokyo Tomo heads off to find the first treasure while Katie goes off to meet her father. Steven isn’t what Katie expected and while she wants him in her life she isn’t quite ready to forgive him for what he did but when she learns he has know about the kami since before she was born she is scared and angry mainly directed towards him. She assures him that the kami will be dealt with soon, all the while in the background are Jun’s group of kami killing off the yakuza. As we cross into the second half of the novel Katie and Tomo have seen the jewel and it revealed the memories of the kami goddess and quickly set off to find the mirror and the sword although they end up with Sato tagging along as well. As we get closer to the end of the novel the ink becomes more and more powerful causing the little control Tomo has to weaken more and more. All the while Jun is killing and plotting his takeover of Japan. We see many different objective and why these different kami want the treasures and the question now is who will win the final showdown. As we approach the ¾ mark in the novel the group of treasure hunters find the mirror which reveals more of the mystery to them and they head off to find the sword and end it once and for all. When they arrive however they find that the sword has been lost of the sea for centuries and their only option is to draw a new sword or create a sword from the monster the original was created from. Tomo isn’t strong enough or stable enough to summon the creature so he is planning on enlisting Jun’s help although I wouldn’t put it past Jun to betray and kill them in a heartbeat if necessary with the exception of Katie. At this point in the novel I was a little confused because the character motivation is always changing almost as if the author couldn’t make up her mind about what she wanted the characters to do so she constantly changes what they will do. As we cross into the final section of the novel I was very uncertain the Sun would be able to wrap this trilogy and story up properly in the amount of pages left but I remained optimistic. While I loved the ending of this final novel I felt somehow it didn’t live up to the hype that had built in the previous two novel and honestly it felt like a little bit of a cop out but it did bring a resolution to the story arc and for that Sun can be forgiven. Overall, I loved the whole series but I personally felt the first book was the best by far and I will happily re-read Ink time and time again. I would recommend this novel to fantasy and mythology lovers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emelie 🦉

    I'm so relieved that the last book was sooo much better than the second. It was a good conclusion to this series and I'm satisfied overall. I do think some things at the end could've been handled different but whatever, it is what it is ;) I'm so relieved that the last book was sooo much better than the second. It was a good conclusion to this series and I'm satisfied overall. I do think some things at the end could've been handled different but whatever, it is what it is ;)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Madeline O'Rourke

    I'll be honest, it's been about two weeks since I finished Storm and it's already fading quickly from my mind. I remember the general outline of the story, but I can't remember having any significant thoughts that would lend well to a review. Nothing about the characterisation, plot, pacing, etc. I guess what this is all means is that Storm was a satisfactory conclusion to a series that I was never all that invested in. It continued the three-star trend. I wasn't upset with how things turned out I'll be honest, it's been about two weeks since I finished Storm and it's already fading quickly from my mind. I remember the general outline of the story, but I can't remember having any significant thoughts that would lend well to a review. Nothing about the characterisation, plot, pacing, etc. I guess what this is all means is that Storm was a satisfactory conclusion to a series that I was never all that invested in. It continued the three-star trend. I wasn't upset with how things turned out or thrilled, but I wasn't emotionally invested in the first place. It was fine, it was expected. I do think the Paper Gods series had some interesting ideas and mythology driving it. On the whole, though, I don't think it really stands out in the wider world of YA fantasy—it's very typical in its telling of the story. That doesn't make the book bad, but it does make for a very peripheral memory.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh {K-Books}

    Storm Review on K-Books Storm is a book that has been on my TBR for so long. I read the first two books years ago and really enjoyed them and for some reason just never got around to reading the final book. One of my reading challenges for 2019 is to complete some of my ongoing series so I picked this one up as part of it. I really wish I could say that I loved Storm as much as I did the other books... but I just didn't. I can't really pinpoint anything specific that stopped me loving this book, Storm Review on K-Books Storm is a book that has been on my TBR for so long. I read the first two books years ago and really enjoyed them and for some reason just never got around to reading the final book. One of my reading challenges for 2019 is to complete some of my ongoing series so I picked this one up as part of it. I really wish I could say that I loved Storm as much as I did the other books... but I just didn't. I can't really pinpoint anything specific that stopped me loving this book, I just didn't enjoy it quite as much as the others. Storm is an enjoyable read and I am so happy that I finally picked it up and experienced the ending of this utterly unique and magical series. Storm picks up where Rain left off with Katie and Tomo trying desperately to control the ancient magic that is consuming them both. One thing I enjoyed about this book was that is delved a little more into the history of the powers and I found that really intriguing and interesting. I do genuinely love the mythology base of this series and I love the characters as well. It actually is quite an addictive storyline. I really did enjoy Storm but for me, the pacing was a little off. There were times within this book where I couldn't read fast enough. I was so consumed by this story and couldn't wait to see what was going to happen... but then the pacing would slow down majorly and at times I lose interest. These two extreme feelings happened often, just as I'd be dying to read more, the pace would slow and I would be bored. It seemed that the further that I got into the book, the more my mind was wandering and I just didn't wanna continue. I almost DNF'd this one but I forced myself through my struggle due to my love of the mythology and characters. I am so glad I pushed through as I really enjoyed the ending. It was a really satisfying ending for the characters but honestly, I feel like this book could have been half the size that it was. Paper Gods was a great series, and I am so glad that I read it. Am I likely to re-read it? Probably not but that's okay. We can't love and want to re-read every book series, otherwise I'd never be reading new ones. I did enjoy Storm but compared to the previous books, I just felt like something was missing. If you're a fan of mythology based books, I definitely recommend this one but if you're loving fast-paced books, the third one may be a struggle.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Rule of 3 weird in book set in Japan. http://pussreboots.com/blog/2017/comm... Rule of 3 weird in book set in Japan. http://pussreboots.com/blog/2017/comm...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I briefly remember seeing the first book when it was first released. I thought it sounded good and wanted to check it out. Yet, I never did and forgot to write it down to check out. In fact, I still had forgotten about this series until I got this book. Which I did not realize was the final book in the trilogy until I picked it up to read it. I almost thought about not reading this book because it sounded like too much history had taken place in the first two books. However I gave in and tried t I briefly remember seeing the first book when it was first released. I thought it sounded good and wanted to check it out. Yet, I never did and forgot to write it down to check out. In fact, I still had forgotten about this series until I got this book. Which I did not realize was the final book in the trilogy until I picked it up to read it. I almost thought about not reading this book because it sounded like too much history had taken place in the first two books. However I gave in and tried the book out. So glad I did not wait to read this book. I was able to get a good idea up front of what this series was able. Even though I had not read the first two books, I could feel the connection between Katie and Tomo. The most fascinating part about this book is Tomo's ability and the rich history of Japan that the author infused into this book. I could not stop reading the book. It was like seeing a beautiful piece of art come alive before your eyes. I am now planning to go back and read book one and two.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ranie C

    I think this book was really GREAT!!!! because this book was talking about a girl name Katie Greene. She has been in Japan for like a year. It's about her boyfriend, there was a terrible secret about her boyfriend name Tomohiro ( For short Tomo). He has deadly secret, He has an ability to bring his drawing to lives he can even bring ancient Japanese gods. Katie has a mission she had to fines the three imperial treasures of japan. But there was a problem. The problem was she needs to fines more s I think this book was really GREAT!!!! because this book was talking about a girl name Katie Greene. She has been in Japan for like a year. It's about her boyfriend, there was a terrible secret about her boyfriend name Tomohiro ( For short Tomo). He has deadly secret, He has an ability to bring his drawing to lives he can even bring ancient Japanese gods. Katie has a mission she had to fines the three imperial treasures of japan. But there was a problem. The problem was she needs to fines more secret about her boyfriend deadly power to unlock the treasures. Which that was the only way to unlock it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    ★MC's Corner★

    *sad face* Yes I’m sad. I’m sad because Paper Gods ended. It is one of my favorite YA series. I don’t want it to end. UGH! *MC’s Corner* Note: Spoilers. • I’m gonna miss you so much Yuu Tomohiro! *sob* • If you love YA book don’t miss this series. ITS SO GOOD! It never disappointed me! • Plus! You’re going to learn a bit about Japan. Cool! @gleekidMC

  20. 4 out of 5

    Harlequin Books

    "The third book in the Paper Gods series is filled with action and romance. Reading this well-written roller-coaster ride is like an out-of-body experience, taking readers to a far-away place with a plot made of their wildest dreams. This read, which is part of an amazing series, is worth your time" (RT Book Reviews, 4 1/2 stars). Paper Gods, book 3 "The third book in the Paper Gods series is filled with action and romance. Reading this well-written roller-coaster ride is like an out-of-body experience, taking readers to a far-away place with a plot made of their wildest dreams. This read, which is part of an amazing series, is worth your time" (RT Book Reviews, 4 1/2 stars). Paper Gods, book 3

  21. 4 out of 5

    XZ

    Mythology makes me happy :) Mythology that reads like a manga/anime makes it even more fun :D The Twilight vibe is still pretty strong. But still worth reading because mythology. There's a bit of Death Note feels too~ but still mostly interesting because mythology. Mythology makes me happy :) Mythology that reads like a manga/anime makes it even more fun :D The Twilight vibe is still pretty strong. But still worth reading because mythology. There's a bit of Death Note feels too~ but still mostly interesting because mythology.

  22. 4 out of 5

    megs

    I am now a sad nugget that this series is over. Full review to come.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    I loved this book so much the drawing make the story come alive. All in all I have to say this is a great ending to a really good series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bel Watson

    I love profusely all the Japanese incorporation, it made the book refreshing and cool. I just couldn't ever stomach the protagonist. Still, good series. I love profusely all the Japanese incorporation, it made the book refreshing and cool. I just couldn't ever stomach the protagonist. Still, good series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    madeline

    I feel like it's been two years since I actually read this book, but in reality it was only, like, two weeks ago. What is there to really say about these books? There really isn't a lot to talk about one way or the other. My biggest complaints and questions from the last book were mostly resolved and answered, so I can appreciate the work Amanda Sun put in to make this finale as good as she could. And for the most part, it was pretty good. If these books didn't have their redeeming qualities the I feel like it's been two years since I actually read this book, but in reality it was only, like, two weeks ago. What is there to really say about these books? There really isn't a lot to talk about one way or the other. My biggest complaints and questions from the last book were mostly resolved and answered, so I can appreciate the work Amanda Sun put in to make this finale as good as she could. And for the most part, it was pretty good. If these books didn't have their redeeming qualities then I wouldn't have read all three of them. They are certainly very fluffy and satisfying in a way that will always appeal to me no matter how cheesy the plot or characters are. I love the whole "bad boy who's secretly a smol bean" trope, and I always will- regardless of the fact that it can be found in nearly every YA fantasy-ish book. I also really enjoyed Ishikawa's character in this! Even from the very first book, I could see something special in his character and I'm glad that I was able to see more of him and his personality in this book. He definitely was my favorite character in the series and I almost miss him a little bit, as strange as it sounds! (view spoiler)[ Although it was very out of nowhere, I was really pleasantly surprised when Ishikawa revealed his true feelings for Tomo! There were hints towards it in Rain, but I didn't want to jump to conclusions. However, I am a little disappointed that Tomo never found out about these feelings, and I also wish that Ishikawa wasn't just left all by himself! He deserves so much better :( (hide spoiler)] Of course, I have my complaints about this book and the series in general. I would have to say that my biggest one would have to be that the magic system is really underexplained and inconsistent. Rules were never really fully established, so I didn't have a very firm grasp on what was going on when a Kami would do something that I had no idea they could do. I addressed this a bit in my review of Rain, and my feelings still remain the same on the subject. Another complaint that I have is that this story is so completely and overwhelmingly underdeveloped!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Seriously, this is the finale of the series, and yet it is barely 300 pages long!!! By no means did this book need to be 700+ pages, but you'd think it would be at least as long as the first book in the series! I could tell while reading this how rushed Amanda Sun was, just trying to wrap everything up as quickly as she could. What could have really made this book good would be to slow things down a little bit more and let things really develop instead of just BAM! one thing happens and then BAM! another and then before you know it BAM! the book is over because the actual story itself is less than 300 pages long. I had this feeling that Amanda Sun was so ready for this book and series to just be over. Maybe she was working on another project on the side and couldn't focus on this? Maybe she had just lost interest in the story? There are so many things that were just briefly touched on that could have been really interesting side plots and mini-conflicts! (view spoiler)[ As I said before, Ishikawa's feelings for Tomo! (hide spoiler)] Take Tomo and his dad for example. We know that they have a lot of conflict with each other. We have read all about the tension between the two of them. And yet, it goes nowhere and is just accepted. There was so much that Amanda Sun could have done with so many aspects of this story that she created. I feel like first-person POV was a bit of a mistake in this series. I mean how cool would it be to get inside Tomo's head? Ishikawa's? Jun's? Even that one pregnant girl whose name I forgot? At the end of the day, we only got a look at Katie's perspective, which quite frankly gets boring after a while. I'm really torn over this series. As a whole, I would give it 3 stars because while it can be easy to read and quick, it can also be really disappointing given how interesting and creative the concept for it was. I really wish that Amanda Sun had written this when she had more experience under her belt and could create a more polished and put together story. This series grew on me a bit, probably because I really love Japan and I have actually never read a book set there. If there ever was a follow up to this book I would read it, but I highly doubt that will happen given how it appears that Amanda Sun was so quick to get this one over with.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ria Bridges

    The final novel of the Paper Gods trilogy ups the action of the previous 2, with Katie, Tomohiro, and Ishikawa trying to fight against Tomohiro’s destiny as they seek the Imperial Treasure of Japan in the belief that they can end the curse of the ink and kami. As such, it takes a leap away from the strong slice-of-life feel that the earlier 2 books had, abeit slice-of-life mixed with supernatural elements. The trend of introducing aspects of Japanese life and language still runs strong, though, The final novel of the Paper Gods trilogy ups the action of the previous 2, with Katie, Tomohiro, and Ishikawa trying to fight against Tomohiro’s destiny as they seek the Imperial Treasure of Japan in the belief that they can end the curse of the ink and kami. As such, it takes a leap away from the strong slice-of-life feel that the earlier 2 books had, abeit slice-of-life mixed with supernatural elements. The trend of introducing aspects of Japanese life and language still runs strong, though, which is one of the things I really like about this series. Most of what I said about Rain can be said about Storm. The characters all seem to get a lot stronger and more developed, though some of them have major changes of heart near the end. Some, like Jun, are understandable, even though I’d love to know more about how he rationalized half of his actions to himself. (“You’re the descendant of evil! Oh, wait, that’s actually me. Well… you’re still worse! I said so all along!”) Others, like Shiori, come out of left field and have no real explanation. She hated Katie, and then all of a sudden she just gets over Tomohiro and settles down to raise her kid happily and nicely, with no mention at all of her grief or attempts at blackmail. It seemed very much like the author was trying to wrap up dangling plot-threads but didn’t really had anywhere for them to do, so they just get tucked neatly away and let nobody speak of it again. It’s worth mentioning that I really love the twists on mythology that Sun plays with here. There’s a big deal made about how one has to give in to destiny and how patterns can’t be broken, and as much as the characters want to fight fate, it really does seem like fate can’t be denied in the end, no matter how much you wish otherwise. And that would still have been an interesting ending, to see how Katie deals with what she would have done, but the author instead went for a more typical twist of patterns getting broken anyway, because somebody outside the pattern demanded to have a say in things. And as cheesy as it may have been, it was still a satisfying ending, and it very much fit with the kind of anime that the Paper Gods trilogy clearly draws inspiration from. So while it may not have broken molds, it was still a good ending to the major plot arc, and I have no real complaints about it. In all, it was a decent YA trilogy that struck many of the right chords with me, with enough to keep me going so that I didn’t feel burned out on one series after reading it all from beginning to end. Which is rare enough, in my experience, and so it’s worth pointing out. It’s not the best, but it definitely has its merits, and if you’re a fan of anime or in decent YA novels set in Japan, then it’s worth checking this series out. It’ll probably amuse you as much as it amused me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alya

    I probably read Ink around 2014, so my taste in books was a lot different back when I was fifteen. I knew I want to finish the beloved trilogy that I always reread as a younger teen, but I just recently picked up Storm. Maybe I wanted to revisit the same memories I got when I read the book the first time. Anyway, I did end up going back to Ink and Rain to catch up again and remember what happened, and I realized that my opinion of the trilogy now is much different than before. It's not a bad seri I probably read Ink around 2014, so my taste in books was a lot different back when I was fifteen. I knew I want to finish the beloved trilogy that I always reread as a younger teen, but I just recently picked up Storm. Maybe I wanted to revisit the same memories I got when I read the book the first time. Anyway, I did end up going back to Ink and Rain to catch up again and remember what happened, and I realized that my opinion of the trilogy now is much different than before. It's not a bad series at all, but it's easier to pick out some things about it that stuck to my mind as I read through. Even though these problems persisted through the other two books, I noticed them more clearly in Storm. A lot of the character's actions seems too animated. It's as if the author took actions out of a manga or anime, because some don't seem believable or they seem too exaggerated. One thing that confused me was the number of times certain phrases or ideas are repeated. I think the readers can understand that Katie wants to fight for her own destiny, because it was probably mentioned at least six times in the span of 260-so pages. The plot buildup to the final battle doesn't follow through. It felt like a lot was left unanswered even if all loose ends are tied up. On a more technical scale, I had an issue with some of the sentences. It felt like I had to read some multiple times in order to understand them, and I don't know whether that stems from poor sentence structure or if the author just wanted to sound poetic. I nitpick at a lot, but I didn't hate the book. I actually loved some parts of it, like how we get to see Katie and Ishikawa's relationship transform into something pure and supportive. That is probably the best part, because there is that underlying light banter between the two that doesn't distract the reader too much, and the strings of a new friendship forming can be seen just from their interactions. The same goes for Katie and Diane, and you can tell they have a much more realistic relationship. The ~intimate~ scene in the hotel with Katie and Tomo is also great, but not because of THAT reason. It is refreshing to see a girl who wasn't sure about taking that step and actually stop because she isn't ready. I hope it hit home for some people that being hesitant about sex isn't a bad thing, and acknowledging it can do more good than harm. This trilogy is funny, unique, and interesting, even with its flaws. It's easy if someone is just looking for a fun book to take their mind off of things for a while.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    PopSugar 2018 Reading Challenge: A book with a weather element in the title This book picks up a few days after the end of "Rain." Katie's Kami powers have been awakened and she is plagued by dreams of Amaterasu telling her she will have to kill Tomo before he loses control of the ink entirely. She learns of the imperial objects, a mirror, a sword, and a jewel, that are the Kamii birthright and could potentially save Tomo. Ishikawa joins them on their quest to find these objects, but meanwhile Ju PopSugar 2018 Reading Challenge: A book with a weather element in the title This book picks up a few days after the end of "Rain." Katie's Kami powers have been awakened and she is plagued by dreams of Amaterasu telling her she will have to kill Tomo before he loses control of the ink entirely. She learns of the imperial objects, a mirror, a sword, and a jewel, that are the Kamii birthright and could potentially save Tomo. Ishikawa joins them on their quest to find these objects, but meanwhile Jun is gathering an army of Kami to take over Japan and rid it of the Yakuza. It is a race against time as well, as Tomo's control keeps slipping more and more frequently. After finding the first two objects, they learn that the sword was lost hundreds of years ago and must draw and fight the creature it came from in order to find the sword and cut the Kami out of Tomo. To do this, they must enlist the help of Jun, since Sousanu was part of the original battle with the creature. This leads to the climax of the Kami drama that they have been reenacting and that Katie has been dreading since she first fell in love with Tomo. There's not much to say about this book that I haven't already said about the others, except maybe that this one is "Twilight" AND "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows", but not good. It does clip along at a good pace, thankfully, although there is a distracting side story about Katie's dad wanting to be part of her life again that really adds nothing to the plot or any additional information. He confirms that Katie's mom was poisoned by a Kami-drawn fruit, which we already knew, and that's about it. So he's totally useless, basically. I did like Ishikewa more in this story, mostly because we actually learned a bit about his personality, but he just added to the relationship drama (I think we're up to a hexagon between him, Tomo, Katie, Jun, Ikeda, and Shiori) which was pretty unnecessary and also unresolved by the end. The book wrapped up pretty quickly and left a lot of loose ends/holes. Like the rest of this series, it was okay but super derivative and was extra disappointing because of how much potential the concept had.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Storm is the third and final book in the Paper Gods series written by Amanda Sun. It centers Katie Green and Yuu Tomohiro, a Kami – descendant of a Japanese god, cope with the danger he poses to her. Katie Greene has finally unearthed the terrible secret behind her boyfriend Yuu Tomohiro – his deadly ability to bring drawings to life is not only because he is descended from a god, but he is the heir to a tragedy that occurred long ago, which is doomed to repeat. Together, they must journey to find Storm is the third and final book in the Paper Gods series written by Amanda Sun. It centers Katie Green and Yuu Tomohiro, a Kami – descendant of a Japanese god, cope with the danger he poses to her. Katie Greene has finally unearthed the terrible secret behind her boyfriend Yuu Tomohiro – his deadly ability to bring drawings to life is not only because he is descended from a god, but he is the heir to a tragedy that occurred long ago, which is doomed to repeat. Together, they must journey to find the three Imperial Treasures of Japan – gifts from the goddess Amaterasu that would put to sleep Tomohiro's powers. However, in order to complete their quest, Tomo and Katie must confront out-of-control Kami and former friend Jun, who has begun his own quest of revenge against those he believes have wronged him. Storm is written rather well. It is fast-paced narrative and rather creative. Despite this installment indulges in tired tropes, it is a surprising enjoyable read. It captures the nostalgic adolescent feelings of first love with the rich mythology of Japanese lore – especially concerning Amaterasu, Tsukiyomi, and Susanou and the tragedy that surrounds them. Overall, the Paper Gods series is written rather well. Sun has created a wonderful urban fantasy, which mixes Japanese mythology and culture with the contemporary world events. Sun's genius lies in description, whether she delves deeper into war upon a battlefield or she depicts a perfect picnic in Japan – it was all done rather well. While some of the narrative and romance follows certain tropes – it was done in a somewhat fresh perspective that made it rather interesting. Furthermore, the glossary at the end of book was rather helpful to navigate through Japanese culture for the uninitiated. All in all, Storm is a good conclusion to an equally good series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Sabala

    Book Review- Storm by Amanda Sun In this third book of the trilogy, Katie can feel the ink of the Kami inside her. It doesn’t compare to what Tomo is going through. The cycle continues to play out of generations. Katie struggles learning the culture and keeping Tomo from giving into the dark powers of the vengeful gods that are determined to destroy Japan. I love Katie and Tomo together. They are sweet and Tomo is helping Katie. She still misses her mother, comes face to face with her absentee fa Book Review- Storm by Amanda Sun In this third book of the trilogy, Katie can feel the ink of the Kami inside her. It doesn’t compare to what Tomo is going through. The cycle continues to play out of generations. Katie struggles learning the culture and keeping Tomo from giving into the dark powers of the vengeful gods that are determined to destroy Japan. I love Katie and Tomo together. They are sweet and Tomo is helping Katie. She still misses her mother, comes face to face with her absentee father, and learns in nightmares she will betray Tomo. It is fascinating how this is all playing out. Jun and Tomo are pitted against each other. Jun is determined to stop Tomo and he is growing darker in his way of thinking. Katie is determined to find a better way. I really like her character. She and Tomo go on a quest to find the jewel, the mirror, and the sword. Katie thinks that a way to end the cycle without Tomo’s death is hidden somewhere within the items. I like how they team up. I also like how Tomo shucks a bit of the cultural restraints with his relationship with Katie. There are some public displays of affection that is frowned upon by authority. I like how the author weaves the magic into the ink where Tomo’s drawings come to life. O also see the inner battles that all three main characters are facing. There is a lot of drama happening around Katie and Tomo that is unexpected, normal life things. There are dark twists and turns full of Japanese culture and stories. It was a great read and end to a trilogy. I loved how it ended. I give it a 4 out of 5.

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