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British counterspy Lord Alexander Hawke must rescue a kidnapped American scientist and catch a villainous megalomaniac—a man obsessed with horrifying experiments in state-of-the-art warfare—in Ted Bell's latest mesmerizing, high-action thriller in his New York Times bestselling series, reminiscent of the very best of Clive Cussler, Tom Clancy, and Daniel Silva On the street British counterspy Lord Alexander Hawke must rescue a kidnapped American scientist and catch a villainous megalomaniac—a man obsessed with horrifying experiments in state-of-the-art warfare—in Ted Bell's latest mesmerizing, high-action thriller in his New York Times bestselling series, reminiscent of the very best of Clive Cussler, Tom Clancy, and Daniel Silva On the streets of Washington, D.C., a brilliant scientist in the high-tech military industry, the brains behind a revolutionary fighter aircraft prototype in development by the Pentagon, is snatched by masked thugs—along with his wife and children—and disappears without a trace. Now, five years later, an elderly professor at Cambridge University has been murdered, a victim of bizarre, ancient Chinese torture methods. Alex Hawke teams up with former chief inspector Ambrose Congreve, his Scotland Yard colleague and friend, to find the killer, but this death is merely the opening gambit in a tense and lethal game of geopolitical brinkmanship. In the United States, the president's behavior makes many question his fitness for leadership. Is his mental health deteriorating—or is there something far more sinister at work? The answer is crucial, for hostilities are rapidly escalating among China, North Korea, and the United States. At a somber state funeral in Arlington Cemetery, an unmanned drone twice the size of a twin-engine Cessna dives out of the sky and wreaks chaos on a shocked crowd of military and civilian dignitaries. In the East China Sea, a North Korean patrol crew murders four sailors aboard a U.S. Navy vessel. Then China launches vastly advanced fighter jets and a megasubmarine far more sophisticated than any seen before—military technology that might leapfrog everything the U.S. and Great Britain now possess. With the situation edging closer and closer to the yawning abyss, Hawke faces a female Chinese mastermind and assassin named Chyna Moon. He must pull off his most daring mission yet: infiltrate enemy territory and neutralize their advantage . . . or risk the outbreak of World War III.


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British counterspy Lord Alexander Hawke must rescue a kidnapped American scientist and catch a villainous megalomaniac—a man obsessed with horrifying experiments in state-of-the-art warfare—in Ted Bell's latest mesmerizing, high-action thriller in his New York Times bestselling series, reminiscent of the very best of Clive Cussler, Tom Clancy, and Daniel Silva On the street British counterspy Lord Alexander Hawke must rescue a kidnapped American scientist and catch a villainous megalomaniac—a man obsessed with horrifying experiments in state-of-the-art warfare—in Ted Bell's latest mesmerizing, high-action thriller in his New York Times bestselling series, reminiscent of the very best of Clive Cussler, Tom Clancy, and Daniel Silva On the streets of Washington, D.C., a brilliant scientist in the high-tech military industry, the brains behind a revolutionary fighter aircraft prototype in development by the Pentagon, is snatched by masked thugs—along with his wife and children—and disappears without a trace. Now, five years later, an elderly professor at Cambridge University has been murdered, a victim of bizarre, ancient Chinese torture methods. Alex Hawke teams up with former chief inspector Ambrose Congreve, his Scotland Yard colleague and friend, to find the killer, but this death is merely the opening gambit in a tense and lethal game of geopolitical brinkmanship. In the United States, the president's behavior makes many question his fitness for leadership. Is his mental health deteriorating—or is there something far more sinister at work? The answer is crucial, for hostilities are rapidly escalating among China, North Korea, and the United States. At a somber state funeral in Arlington Cemetery, an unmanned drone twice the size of a twin-engine Cessna dives out of the sky and wreaks chaos on a shocked crowd of military and civilian dignitaries. In the East China Sea, a North Korean patrol crew murders four sailors aboard a U.S. Navy vessel. Then China launches vastly advanced fighter jets and a megasubmarine far more sophisticated than any seen before—military technology that might leapfrog everything the U.S. and Great Britain now possess. With the situation edging closer and closer to the yawning abyss, Hawke faces a female Chinese mastermind and assassin named Chyna Moon. He must pull off his most daring mission yet: infiltrate enemy territory and neutralize their advantage . . . or risk the outbreak of World War III.

30 review for Warriors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bob/Sally

    I think the thing I enjoy most about Ted Bell's Alex Hawke novels is the sense of balance. It's there in the characters, the emotions, the plot threads, and the pacing. If you're like me, you come for the action and the adventure, but it's all the other elements that keep you reading each page closely, rather than just skimming head for the next 'big' moment. With Warriors we get more of that deliberately careful balance. Family (both intimate and extended) plays a significant role this time out. I think the thing I enjoy most about Ted Bell's Alex Hawke novels is the sense of balance. It's there in the characters, the emotions, the plot threads, and the pacing. If you're like me, you come for the action and the adventure, but it's all the other elements that keep you reading each page closely, rather than just skimming head for the next 'big' moment. With Warriors we get more of that deliberately careful balance. Family (both intimate and extended) plays a significant role this time out. It begins with a family dinner, a birthday present, and a roadside abduction of Bill Chase, his wife, and their two children. Captured by the Chinese, Bill is tortured and tormented, forced to put his military genius to work against the Western world for the sake of his family. It continues with the relationships between Alex and his son, as well as between father, son, and Nell, the governess from Scotland Yard. There are equal doses or sorrow and happiness there, mixed in with the difficult realities of protecting a child who presents a prime opportunity for striking at Alex himself. It even extends to the villains of the piece, General Sun-Yat Moon and his daughters (Jet, Li, and Chyna), all of whom have a complicated relationship with Alex. Theirs are relationships of love and hate, emotions powerful enough to push the world to the brink of nuclear war. With so much raw humanity to the novel, it's quite a surprise to find the technological aspects just as strong. There's a highly advance fighter jet designed to deliver Alex to his Chinese contact, and a pair of equally advanced missiles designed to prevent him from making that meet. There's an entirely new class of submarine here, far more dangerous and more chilling than anything fans have read before. The first appearance of one off the shore of the continental USA is almost as chilling as the reconnaissance team's descent below the waterline. There are extremely sophisticated drone planes, unmanned but well-armed, with a graveside attack that rivals just about anything else within the genre. By contrast, the devices of torture are decidedly old school - ancient in a few cases - but no less effective. Again, in terms of plotting, balance is everything. While Alex Hawke is highly reminiscent of a more human sort of James Bond, this is not a book that's all about him. In fact, his acts of heroism are probably just under half the novel. His old friend, Chief Inspector Ambrose Congreve, gets a great deal of time in the spotlight here, with a pair of criminal investigations and a vengeful pursuit of would-be assassins key turning points, and his son's governesses - the aforementioned Nell and her replacement, Sabrina - have key roles to play as well. Even the bit players have their scenes, with comradely banter and trash talk adding some color to the story as a whole. Of course, this is an Alex Hawke story, so it must be said he's once again given the opportunity to shine. The stakes are higher here than they ever have been before, but he tackles it all with his customary wit, charm, and prowess. The climactic set-piece is more of a team effort, with old friends and new heading into danger alongside him, but that doesn't diminish his contributions. As you would expect, it is Alex who ultimately stands before the fate of the world, and he who fights hardest to preserve it. A fun, fast read, Warriors proves once again that Ted Bell deserves to sit upon the same shelf as the likes of Clive Cussler, Vince Flynn, W.E.B. Griffin, and Ian Fleming. More tightly focused and to-the-point than many of his contemporaries, even with the balance involved, Bell knows how to tell a tale that hits all of the right emotional and intellectual highs. Originally reviewed at Beauty in Ruins

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Schwartz

    love the Alex Hawke novels for a number of reasons. I love the escape factor that each book brings. I love the steadily rising tension until the final big showdown. I love the recurring characters - Alex himself of course, but Congreve, Harry Brock and of course Stokely Jones. I also enjoy the exotic locales that each book takes me too. Unfortunately I didn't think that this latest book fulfilled all of those things as well as previous books in the series. The biggest disappointment was the ten love the Alex Hawke novels for a number of reasons. I love the escape factor that each book brings. I love the steadily rising tension until the final big showdown. I love the recurring characters - Alex himself of course, but Congreve, Harry Brock and of course Stokely Jones. I also enjoy the exotic locales that each book takes me too. Unfortunately I didn't think that this latest book fulfilled all of those things as well as previous books in the series. The biggest disappointment was the tension buildup. I just found that this book just didn't keep building tension at all. In fact in some places it seemed contrived, forced and unbelievable. For example why would an assassin choose to use weapons as unpredictable as birds? Wouldn't they much rather use something more final and certainly more dependable like guns or knives? The exotic locales in this book were certainly not five star either. North Korea and Communist China? But my biggest disappointment was my beloved characters. At times they even seemed somewhat contrived. Some scenes in the book were still exciting though. My favourite was the infiltration into a prison camp that Hawke and his crew succeeded in completing and they came out with their lives and the people they were meant to find and rescue too. Still I managed to finish and I'm not discouraged yet. I'll be ready for another Alex Hawke adventure when Ted Bell decides to publish another.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Bell return with another instalment of the Lord Alexander Hawke series, a modern James Bond in his own right. A pre-eminent scientist and his family are kidnapped on the streets of Washington, with no trace of them left for the authorities. This scientist had recently begun working on military technology to help the US keep a hold of its premiere status. Around the US, unimaginable military technology emerges and its fallout is disastrous, both in terms of body count and because it baffles US mi Bell return with another instalment of the Lord Alexander Hawke series, a modern James Bond in his own right. A pre-eminent scientist and his family are kidnapped on the streets of Washington, with no trace of them left for the authorities. This scientist had recently begun working on military technology to help the US keep a hold of its premiere status. Around the US, unimaginable military technology emerges and its fallout is disastrous, both in terms of body count and because it baffles US military analysts. Hawke is approached to retrieve the scientist, who may have been spotted in a North Korean prison camp. Once he's amassed his team, both with the regular actors and some new faces, Hawke and his gang are engaged to stop the Chinese at any cost. With their cross-section of abilities, Hawke leads the team into Asia, where he has a lukewarm history. All the while, an assassin the likes of which Hawke has never seen before strikes a personal blow against the agent's family, with a weapon so unusual that Hawke remains baffled and on high alert. Has Hawke finally met his match in Chyna Moon? Bell forges ahead with another adventure, tepid on plot, but high on action. Bell begins the story in a slow and highly unusual (for him) fashion. The story's engine only revs after the first half and even then, its predictability is somewhat annoying. Add to that, his incessant need to use dialogue to thoroughly recap the same series history left me wanting to yell at the top of my lungs. One can only assume that Bell worries the reader will not remember or have picked up on some of his references earlier in the book. Add to that, Hawke's character grates on me, perhaps for his pretentious nature or even his seeming infallibility, which leave me to wonder if I want to keep reading the series or if I have had enough. Could be a mood or perhaps I value powerfully written thrillers, a la Brad Thor and Vince Flynn. That being said, Bell is the third author I have read of late who has used North Korean prison camps as a setting for at least past of the book. Could this be the new trend or simply coincidental? For shame, Mr. Bell. A less than stellar piece of work left me highly disappointed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jon Kurtz

    Spy, combat pilot, and Lord are but a few of Alex Hawke's titles. In this latest installment from Ted Bell, Hawke and his merry band of mercenaries take on a rogue Chinese general bent on world domination. Sound familiar? It should as this is one of the basic models for the thriller. How can we forget the easy-to-hate soviet generals of the sixties and those from Germany and Japan in the forties. I've read all of the Hawke novels, though this is the first to which I've provided review. The first Spy, combat pilot, and Lord are but a few of Alex Hawke's titles. In this latest installment from Ted Bell, Hawke and his merry band of mercenaries take on a rogue Chinese general bent on world domination. Sound familiar? It should as this is one of the basic models for the thriller. How can we forget the easy-to-hate soviet generals of the sixties and those from Germany and Japan in the forties. I've read all of the Hawke novels, though this is the first to which I've provided review. The first few were my favorites. Learning about the characters was as interesting and enjoyable as the action. Lord Alexander Hawke - born into wealth and tragedy. Pelham - the butler and surrogate father. Chief Inspector Ambrose Congreve - surrogate uncle, friend, and detective extraordinaire. This installment maintained the expected level of swagger and action, yet it seemed predictable. I felt as though I had read the script of a movie prior to watching it on the big screen. Two other disconcerting and disenchanting issues were apparent. First, the events, at times, seemed unbelievable, e.g. China has leaped forward of the USA in military technology, yet can't track or anticipate twenty mercenaries coming for a visit to its ultra-secret military base, which also happens to hold ALL the keys to saving the world. This convenient, yet questionable, military move on the part of the Chinese left me thinking Mr. Bell or his publishers might have needed to trim some pages and bring the story to quicker climax. Remember, more pages cost more money. The second issue, the connections between parts of the story seemed spurious and added little, e.g. the death of a university professor, the attempt to kill Hawke's son, and the subsequent investigation by Chief Inspector Congreve. I liken this book to that familiar roller coaster at your favorite old-time amusement park. It's still fun, but nowhere near as exciting as you remember from your youth.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

    Great story, horrible storytelling. Almost couldn't finish it because of all the stupid cliches and the little sayings. I think author either was bored (some of the action just lops off and all of a sudden it's months later) or perhaps had a bet to see how pithy he could be. Where was the editor? Wtf- as they say throughout the book..... Great story, horrible storytelling. Almost couldn't finish it because of all the stupid cliches and the little sayings. I think author either was bored (some of the action just lops off and all of a sudden it's months later) or perhaps had a bet to see how pithy he could be. Where was the editor? Wtf- as they say throughout the book.....

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katie Bearor

    I was lucky enough to have received a free advanced-copy of this novel through Goodreads: Firse Reads, and did not pay for this book. First off, I would like to say that Ted Bell has mastered the art of literary imagery. Every single scene within Warriors is crisp and full of detail, making it an easy read that any action fan will love until the very end. I was hooked form the very first page, and after finishing the book, I can’t wait to get my hands on the other novels within the series. Fast- I was lucky enough to have received a free advanced-copy of this novel through Goodreads: Firse Reads, and did not pay for this book. First off, I would like to say that Ted Bell has mastered the art of literary imagery. Every single scene within Warriors is crisp and full of detail, making it an easy read that any action fan will love until the very end. I was hooked form the very first page, and after finishing the book, I can’t wait to get my hands on the other novels within the series. Fast-paced and action-filled, Warriors turned out to be a lovely novel that I simply couldn’t put down. With every turning of a page, new information and predicaments surfaced, leaving the main character, Alex Hawke, in many unfortunate situations to dig himself out of. Somehow, Bell managed to keep everything interesting and unpredictable. Plot twists were laid out behind every corner, taking readers for a ride. And, buried within the action, there is a deliberate balance that Ted Bell does a perfect job of maintaining. In the novel, family-members (both extended and immediate) matter, and Bell makes sure of that. In example, the book starts right off with family matters, with a birthday and the roadside abduction of Bill Chase, along with his two children and beloved wife. There is a certain rawness to some of these scenes that will probably make your heart pang a little. I didn’t find myself skipping to find the next action scene, instead I was indulging myself in all of the other grew things in this book. It was easy to enjoy this novel in its entirety, as all of its aspects were truly great. All of the separate plot threads within Warriors were special and mixed together wonderfully, and the storyline wasn’t just centered around Alex Hawke. Warriors orchestrated something much larger than a story about a kick-ass action character. He managed to show all of the different sides of each event, which let me feel more while reading. This book was built up in a way that you are exposed to many smaller plots that eventually blend into this one large, action-packed adventure. I was amazed by the complexity of some of the technology used throughout this book, as it was very fresh, yet, at the same time, it was realistic. There weren’t things that couldn’t possibly have happened, and I think everyone appreciates a novel where things are real and you can relate to some of the things that are going on. It isn't constant action, which, in my opinion, made this book all-the-better. There truly was a theme and a plot to the novel, and that just makes it stand out from others in its genre. Torture scenes weren’t terribly graphic, however they did get under your skin effectively. The author makes you feel badly for the characters as they’re suffering from these often old-fashioned torture techniques, which adds to the incredible balance of the story as a whole. Bell takes all of these individual components and finds a way to blend them together at a comfortable pace. Overall, Warriors was truly special, and I will certainly be remembering its characters and storyline for a long while. I would recommend this to any fan of the genre, or anyone who really likes crime-dramas or action-packed books and films. I will be recommending this title to many fiends of mine, and I recommend it to you as well. It really is worth your time, and I know that I will be reading more of Ted Bell's work in the future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mary E. Hastings

    I received this through first reads giveaways. I've only read a couple of these Alex Hawke novels, and Heaven knows neither of them were in any sort of order, but I honestly REALLY love them, and am thinking about getting the entire set. Ted Bell could possibly be one of the best writers of our time. I haven't read quite anything like him in years. I received this through first reads giveaways. I've only read a couple of these Alex Hawke novels, and Heaven knows neither of them were in any sort of order, but I honestly REALLY love them, and am thinking about getting the entire set. Ted Bell could possibly be one of the best writers of our time. I haven't read quite anything like him in years.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dchamp

    Wow! Best book yet...! A bit predictable in some spots, but lots of thrills and chills. Highly recommended!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie Bearor

    I was lucky enough to have received a free advanced-copy of this novel through Goodreads: Firse Reads, and did not pay for this book. First off, I would like to say that Ted Bell has mastered the art of literary imagery. Every single scene within Warriors is crisp and full of detail, making it an easy read that any action fan will love until the very end. I was hooked form the very first page, and after finishing the book, I can’t wait to get my hands on the other novels within the series. Fast- I was lucky enough to have received a free advanced-copy of this novel through Goodreads: Firse Reads, and did not pay for this book. First off, I would like to say that Ted Bell has mastered the art of literary imagery. Every single scene within Warriors is crisp and full of detail, making it an easy read that any action fan will love until the very end. I was hooked form the very first page, and after finishing the book, I can’t wait to get my hands on the other novels within the series. Fast-paced and action-filled, Warriors turned out to be a lovely novel that I simply couldn’t put down. With every turning of a page, new information and predicaments surfaced, leaving the main character, Alex Hawke, in many unfortunate situations to dig himself out of. Somehow, Bell managed to keep everything interesting and unpredictable. Plot twists were laid out behind every corner, taking readers for a ride. And, buried within the action, there is a deliberate balance that Ted Bell does a perfect job of maintaining. In the novel, family-members (both extended and immediate) matter, and Bell makes sure of that. In example, the book starts right off with family matters, with a birthday and the roadside abduction of Bill Chase, along with his two children and beloved wife. There is a certain rawness to some of these scenes that will probably make your heart pang a little. I didn’t find myself skipping to find the next action scene, instead I was indulging myself in all of the other grew things in this book. It was easy to enjoy this novel in its entirety, as all of its aspects were truly great. All of the separate plot threads within Warriors were special and mixed together wonderfully, and the storyline wasn’t just centered around Alex Hawke. Warriors orchestrated something much larger than a story about a kick-ass action character. He managed to show all of the different sides of each event, which let me feel more while reading. This book was built up in a way that you are exposed to many smaller plots that eventually blend into this one large, action-packed adventure. I was amazed by the complexity of some of the technology used throughout this book, as it was very fresh, yet, at the same time, it was realistic. There weren’t things that couldn’t possibly have happened, and I think everyone appreciates a novel where things are real and you can relate to some of the things that are going on. It isn't constant action, which, in my opinion, made this book all-the-better. There truly was a theme and a plot to the novel, and that just makes it stand out from others in its genre. Torture scenes weren’t terribly graphic, however they did get under your skin effectively. The author makes you feel badly for the characters as they’re suffering from these often old-fashioned torture techniques, which adds to the incredible balance of the story as a whole. Bell takes all of these individual components and finds a way to blend them together at a comfortable pace. Overall, Warriors was truly special, and I will certainly be remembering its characters and storyline for a long while. I would recommend this to any fan of the genre, or anyone who really likes crime-dramas or action-packed books and films. I will be recommending this title to many fiends of mine, and I recommend it to you as well. It really is worth your time, and I know that I will be reading more of Ted Bell's work in the future.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Will

    SUBJECTIVE REVIEW FOLLOWS: I'll admit to entering the Ted Bell tribe late, as this is my first novel in his catalogue that I've read. I found it entertaining and his writing style to be conducive to a week-long read. My biggest issue with 'Warriors' is the storyline; could the PRC actually build monster submersible ICBM launch pads and deploy them without our knowing? Most unlikely. I consider Tom Clancy's 'Threat Vector,' in which the Chinese deploy cyber warfare as a more believable threat than SUBJECTIVE REVIEW FOLLOWS: I'll admit to entering the Ted Bell tribe late, as this is my first novel in his catalogue that I've read. I found it entertaining and his writing style to be conducive to a week-long read. My biggest issue with 'Warriors' is the storyline; could the PRC actually build monster submersible ICBM launch pads and deploy them without our knowing? Most unlikely. I consider Tom Clancy's 'Threat Vector,' in which the Chinese deploy cyber warfare as a more believable threat than the monster unmanned submersibles. Having said that, it was a good read and an entertaining story. It was worth the price of admission. SPOILER STORYLINE SUMMARY FOLLOWS: The Restoration of Chinese Supremacy. Bill Chase, a prominent scientist with a major defense contractor is abducted along with his entire family after his 50th birthday party supper at a Georgetown restaurant. Soon after, The President Tom McClosky is poisoned by a White House chef and dies. In the ensuing two years, a number of military pitfalls happen to the US and UK without explanation. Finally, a US Navy destroyer observes a huge submersible breech off of the coast of Florida and the ensuing investigation reveals that it is an unmanned submersible platform longer than any existing submarine with forty ICBMs aboard, ready to launch. Following a number of mysterious deaths in the UK that point to Chinese nationals, Sir Alex Hawke is summoned to duty to stop a Chinese attempt to reconcile centuries of setbacks by blackmailing the US and the UK into surrender, using the submersibles designed by Bill Chase as the Chinese hold his family hostage in a North Korean prison. Hawke leads a group of incomparable mercenary commandos into North Korea and rescues Chase's wife and kids, only to learn that the operation is being centered from Xinbu Island in the South China Sea, headquarters of GEN Sun Yat Moon, Chinese Minister of Security. When the ultimate demands are made by Moon for the US to stand down its forces in the western Pacific or face nuclear incineration along its coast, Hawke and his team race to Xinbu Island, invade it, kill Sun Yat Moon and rescue Chase after destroying the hundreds of ICBMs already launched from the submersibles. Hawk is rewarded in the end by the return of his favorite nanny, Nell Spooner, who assures him of a sex filled future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mark Mitchell

    The latest installment in the Alex Hawke series is satisfying, if a bit trite. Lord Hawke and his usual friends (Congreve, Trulove, Stokely, et al.) are back and, once again, must fend off psychopaths intent on enslaving the free world and on causing Hawke personal harm. I've been a fan of Ted Bell since his debut novel (Hawke and this book has his usual trademarks: exotic locales (from aircraft carriers in the Pacific to Buckingham Palace to North Korea), a bewitching seductress or three, lots The latest installment in the Alex Hawke series is satisfying, if a bit trite. Lord Hawke and his usual friends (Congreve, Trulove, Stokely, et al.) are back and, once again, must fend off psychopaths intent on enslaving the free world and on causing Hawke personal harm. I've been a fan of Ted Bell since his debut novel (Hawke and this book has his usual trademarks: exotic locales (from aircraft carriers in the Pacific to Buckingham Palace to North Korea), a bewitching seductress or three, lots of action, well-paced writing, and just enough plausibility to hold it all together. Ted Bell picks up where Ian Fleming leaves off. Alex Hawke is, like James Bond, a British super-spy, a bon vivant, a devotee of fast cars, and a lover of alluring women. And, like James Bond, he must, all-too-often, protect a free world that is often blissfully ignorant of just how close it comes to disaster and how much brave men and women sacrifice to protect it. But, Lord Hawke is a bit more of a modern man than Mr. Bond; Hawke is a doting father, and forms sincere and meaningful relationships with both friends and lovers. My only complaint is that Warriors, like much series fiction, features characters that seem to be a bit caricatures of themselves. Congreve drives dangerously in his much-beloved Yellow Peril. Stokely Jones is even bigger and blacker than ever. Pelham dotters about doting on Alex and Alexi, but is still capable of saving the day when called upon. Hawke can fly any aircraft, survive any injury, and save everyone from everything. Here's hoping that when Hawke next returns he has gotten a little older, weaker, and wiser. Or that one of the characters can at least buy a new exotic sports car.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    I actually didn’t have too high of expectations for this book. But I was surprised. It sure was fun! I’d place it in the same genera as an Ian Fleming, James Bond novel. And it has the same depth of Clive Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series. First of all, Lord Alexander Hawke is coooool! He’s filthy rich (the 6th richest in England), living in the family’s 17th century manor house in the Cotswolds north of London, and, by gosh, he the best of EVERYTHING! All of the cool adult toys. Still, he lacks pretent I actually didn’t have too high of expectations for this book. But I was surprised. It sure was fun! I’d place it in the same genera as an Ian Fleming, James Bond novel. And it has the same depth of Clive Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series. First of all, Lord Alexander Hawke is coooool! He’s filthy rich (the 6th richest in England), living in the family’s 17th century manor house in the Cotswolds north of London, and, by gosh, he the best of EVERYTHING! All of the cool adult toys. Still, he lacks pretention and has a sense of humor. (While he’s not full of himself, he’s certain full of being a Brit!) He’s also a Commander in the Royal Navy (former fighter pilot and decorated combat veteran) now with MI6. This is the 8th in Ted Bell’s series and there’s certainly the basis for a darn good movie here (albeit in a “high camp” style James Bond, a la Roger Moore). I wish I had the film rights. The plot is OK. Bell includes current geopolitical issues - China and it surrogate, North Korea. And while there are a few Interesting premises regarding future WMDs, the story is simply a canvass to present some of “literature’s” (used loosely) over-the-top caricatures! A madman, the mysterious General Moon, wants to rule the world – the Moon Dynasty. Stokely Jones, an ex-Navy SEAL, ex-NYC cop and ex-NY Jet, has a fearless nonchalance. Harry Brock, is the CIA misfit CIA badass. And, of course, Hawke’s very best friend in the entire world, Scotland Yard’s Chief Inspector, Ambrose Congreve. All of the series’ books stand alone. This is my favorite (so far).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tom Tischler

    Counterspy Alex Hawke must rescue a scientist as the U.S. and China are on the brink of a nuclear war. At the same time an elderly professor from Cambridge is murdered by an ancient form of Chinese torture. Alex teams up with his good friend Inspector Ambrose Congreve of MI6 to find the killer. But this death is only the opening moves in a game of geopolitical brinksmanship. In the U.S. the President has begun behaving strangely and no one knows why. The answer is crucial because tensions between the U Counterspy Alex Hawke must rescue a scientist as the U.S. and China are on the brink of a nuclear war. At the same time an elderly professor from Cambridge is murdered by an ancient form of Chinese torture. Alex teams up with his good friend Inspector Ambrose Congreve of MI6 to find the killer. But this death is only the opening moves in a game of geopolitical brinksmanship. In the U.S. the President has begun behaving strangely and no one knows why. The answer is crucial because tensions between the U.S., China and North Korea are at the critical stage. China has launched fighter jets and a mega submarine vastly more sophisticated than the U.S. has. With the situation at the critical stage Hawke must pull off his most daring mission yet. Infiltrate China and neutralize the source of their advantage or World War III will start. This is book eight in the Hawke series and I think this is Ted Bell's best yet. He is right up there at the top of the best story tellers around. In order to get the characters right it's a good Idea to start with book one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    The newest Ted Bell book did not disappoint! The adventures of Alexander Hawke continue in this action-packed book taking the reader to North Korean slave camps and Chinese Te-Wu state-sponsored political terrorist agents in England, the Caribbean, and into the highest level of the Chinese government. There are even attack Raven's and ancient Chinese torture techniques that strike close to home and Hawke's family/neighborhood. Hawke's old nemesis, Gen. Moon, has kidnapped an American arms design The newest Ted Bell book did not disappoint! The adventures of Alexander Hawke continue in this action-packed book taking the reader to North Korean slave camps and Chinese Te-Wu state-sponsored political terrorist agents in England, the Caribbean, and into the highest level of the Chinese government. There are even attack Raven's and ancient Chinese torture techniques that strike close to home and Hawke's family/neighborhood. Hawke's old nemesis, Gen. Moon, has kidnapped an American arms designer and developed the most advanced jets and submarine weapons in the world, and uses them to threaten the West into total submission. Thunder the Lighting, along with Stoke and Brock, once again team up to defend the free world from maniacal villains. One weakness of the book, however, is the destruction of two well-known Japanese islands; that sort of takes away from the realism of the book. Still, this is a great thriller. Hard to set down. I very much enjoy reading Bell's writing. I look forward to seeing what comes in the 9th volume of the series!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    I did not enjoy this book as much as the previous books in the Lord Hawke series. Although exciting enough to keep the page turning, I found there were sections where I was scratching my head at the time gaps and wondering if there were missing chapters. Without going into spoiler alert mode, the villain is introduced fairly early enough, we learn his thoughts and plans, and then as Hawke and the good guys naturally go about thwarting those plans, we hear and learn nothing from the villain's poi I did not enjoy this book as much as the previous books in the Lord Hawke series. Although exciting enough to keep the page turning, I found there were sections where I was scratching my head at the time gaps and wondering if there were missing chapters. Without going into spoiler alert mode, the villain is introduced fairly early enough, we learn his thoughts and plans, and then as Hawke and the good guys naturally go about thwarting those plans, we hear and learn nothing from the villain's point of view (that darn Hawke!). Just seemed very odd and I felt the book was not fully developed and ended up being rushed out to meet the publishing deadline with the knowledge that the Hawke fan base is well established and will buy anything at this point in the series. For Hawke and thriller fans, it's still worth a read just keep your expectations in check.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    Ted Bell's "Warrior" continues the great Alex Hawke novels with a suspense driven story that lives up to the hype from Limbaugh, Patterson and Flynn. The story describes global political events that follow the development of a series of weapons by an genius held hostage by a truly dangerous world power. The novel tracks the efforts of Hawke, who seems to out-Bond Bond at times, as he traces the evidence of the hidden weapons and attempts to neutralize their impact. The story keeps the reader guess Ted Bell's "Warrior" continues the great Alex Hawke novels with a suspense driven story that lives up to the hype from Limbaugh, Patterson and Flynn. The story describes global political events that follow the development of a series of weapons by an genius held hostage by a truly dangerous world power. The novel tracks the efforts of Hawke, who seems to out-Bond Bond at times, as he traces the evidence of the hidden weapons and attempts to neutralize their impact. The story keeps the reader guessing and very engaged in this completely enjoyable spy yarn. It is a strong addition to the series and, if you liked the previous seven in the series, you'll be caught-up in this one. If this is you first Hawke novel, you'll go looking for the others to learn more about this great character and series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Scott Mohn

    Think I'd give it 2.5 if the AP would let me. I enjoy the characters and stories, but this just seems poorly put together. Felt like more than one author was writing and they were not comparing notes. The same phrases and descriptions were used over and over, there was no sense of how time was passing. I was disappointing when he described Bonnie Raitt as a Cowgirl getup wearing country singer, She is blues, rock, RnB, even soul, but not country. If feels like he was allowed to edit the story hi Think I'd give it 2.5 if the AP would let me. I enjoy the characters and stories, but this just seems poorly put together. Felt like more than one author was writing and they were not comparing notes. The same phrases and descriptions were used over and over, there was no sense of how time was passing. I was disappointing when he described Bonnie Raitt as a Cowgirl getup wearing country singer, She is blues, rock, RnB, even soul, but not country. If feels like he was allowed to edit the story himself. He has done better. Maybe he has become too interested in politics, rather than putting together a tight story. Hope he improves on the next.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    This story just did not have the excitement that I'm used to in an Alexander Hawke adventure. As a matter of fact, Hawke was absent for much of the 12 disk listen on audio book. Thank goodness that Stokely Jones Jr was there, and provided some much needed laughs. Even though I've not finished all the Hawke stories leading up to this one, I can say that Warriors was truly a disappointment and not near the caliber of writing I've come to expect of Ted Bell. There was a nice surprise at the end, bu This story just did not have the excitement that I'm used to in an Alexander Hawke adventure. As a matter of fact, Hawke was absent for much of the 12 disk listen on audio book. Thank goodness that Stokely Jones Jr was there, and provided some much needed laughs. Even though I've not finished all the Hawke stories leading up to this one, I can say that Warriors was truly a disappointment and not near the caliber of writing I've come to expect of Ted Bell. There was a nice surprise at the end, but not the big bang I like for a finale. Only 5 out of 10 for me on this one.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jean Kolinofsky

    I have read all of Ted Bell's books and even though I felt his last book was the weakest to date, I still read an advanced copy that I received. I was glad that I did. He has once again written a fast-paced novel that keeps you on the edge of your seat. There is a good balance between action and personal stories. While he has descriptive passages of weaponry, he does not get bogged down in detail and keeps the story flowing. Overall, I was very pleased to spend my time with Hawke and his compani I have read all of Ted Bell's books and even though I felt his last book was the weakest to date, I still read an advanced copy that I received. I was glad that I did. He has once again written a fast-paced novel that keeps you on the edge of your seat. There is a good balance between action and personal stories. While he has descriptive passages of weaponry, he does not get bogged down in detail and keeps the story flowing. Overall, I was very pleased to spend my time with Hawke and his companions and look forward to his further adventures.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    In this installment, Bell reaches back to an earlier adventure for his villain. The high point for me was Stokely Jones being knighted by Queen Elizabeth. The kernel of truth for this one is the Chinese expansion and threat in the Pacific which Bell uses as the launch point for this story. He uses bits of storylines and characters to create the suspense to support the main story. The one seemed nicely integrated with the usual hyperbolic events that are the mainstay of this series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    I absolutely loved Warriors and am planning to read more Alex Hawke novels. This book is an adrenaline rush the entire read. When a professor is murdered in Cambridge, it opens the door to a whole can of worms. When it looks like the beginning of World War III, Alex Hawke and his men must get into China and rescue a scientist, his wife and his children. I highly recommend this book!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    The best word to describe the first half of this novel is...bizarre. Typically, Ted Bell does not revel in misery, as much of this story does. Oh sure, there are a few good moments, but they are not flushed out, instead more wretchedness is written. Of all Bell's novels, this is the poorest. 4 of 10 stars The best word to describe the first half of this novel is...bizarre. Typically, Ted Bell does not revel in misery, as much of this story does. Oh sure, there are a few good moments, but they are not flushed out, instead more wretchedness is written. Of all Bell's novels, this is the poorest. 4 of 10 stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna Schubert

    loved the balance of the charactors in the plot i could picture myself in the story. a fun fast read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Eledge

    Great book. Would love to see this book made into a movie.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ben Scott

    Just like the rest great read lots of adventure never a dull min. Keep them coming The New James Bond.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Another great book by Ted Bell. In my top 5 favorite authors!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Greg Oaster

    My favorite book in the series, only because, I believe the Chinese and Nork's (sic) are very capable of this kind of scenario. Very well done series My favorite book in the series, only because, I believe the Chinese and Nork's (sic) are very capable of this kind of scenario. Very well done series

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelvin

    This is a classic case of where I wish I could give 3.5 stars. As I always do I enjoyed this latest Alex Hawke adventure but at times I found the story jumped about too much often leaving things unexplained that were never explained later. Also, perhaps more than ever as I read this I could not help but see the similarities between the characters and famous Ian Flemming characters. Alex Hawke is James Bond, C is M, Harry Brock is Felix Leiter. I also felt that after 500+ pages the end was much to This is a classic case of where I wish I could give 3.5 stars. As I always do I enjoyed this latest Alex Hawke adventure but at times I found the story jumped about too much often leaving things unexplained that were never explained later. Also, perhaps more than ever as I read this I could not help but see the similarities between the characters and famous Ian Flemming characters. Alex Hawke is James Bond, C is M, Harry Brock is Felix Leiter. I also felt that after 500+ pages the end was much too abrupt. So a good page turner but not a classic is my summary.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andria

    I thought that this series might be on an upward trajectory. And unfortunately, this one went right back downwards. It seemed like some of the plot lines would end and you just didn’t know what happened so it made the next scene or segment of the story disjointed (examples: Ambrose being attacked by wolves and then going to China Moon’s house alone to arrest her, the new nanny thinking she was abused somehow while sleeping...then she ends up murdered). I think that more threads needed to be conn I thought that this series might be on an upward trajectory. And unfortunately, this one went right back downwards. It seemed like some of the plot lines would end and you just didn’t know what happened so it made the next scene or segment of the story disjointed (examples: Ambrose being attacked by wolves and then going to China Moon’s house alone to arrest her, the new nanny thinking she was abused somehow while sleeping...then she ends up murdered). I think that more threads needed to be connected in this story. Not bad overall just not as good as Phantom.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Incredibly distinct characters make up a global cast ranging from the U.S. to England, China, Korea and little known islands. The story careens forward in cars, planes, submarines and a mysterious new technology. Political machinations run rampant, while the good guys try to keep megalomaniacs from blowing things up, plunging the world into chaos. The audio book is SUPERBLY narrated by John Shea (Reading)

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