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The Calorie Myth: How to Eat More and Exercise Less, Lose Weight, and Live Better

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Jonathan Bailor's The Calorie Myth is a revolutionary diet book that explains how cutting-edge science supports a radically different approach to weight loss, offering evidence that calories do not matter. Bailor shows that the key to long-term weight-loss is not the number of calories consumed but rather what kinds of calories. Some foods are used to repair tissue, boost b Jonathan Bailor's The Calorie Myth is a revolutionary diet book that explains how cutting-edge science supports a radically different approach to weight loss, offering evidence that calories do not matter. Bailor shows that the key to long-term weight-loss is not the number of calories consumed but rather what kinds of calories. Some foods are used to repair tissue, boost brain power, and fuel our metabolism--while others are stored as fat. The human body has a set point--the weight it naturally "wants" to be--that is regulated by hormones. When we eat the right foods--plants, lean proteins, nuts, and legumes--our bodies are naturally able to maintain a healthy set point weight. But when we eat sugar, starches, fats, and other poor-quality foods, our bodies' regulatory systems become "clogged" and prevent us from burning extra calories. Translation: Those extra 10 pounds you've been carrying around for years aren't the result of eating too much: They're the result of eating hormone-clogging foods. With its step-by-step program, including a "SANEity" scale that determines which foods are optimal for weight-control; an eating plan; and a high intensity interval training (HIIT) exercise program that allows you to spend less time in the gym and achieve better results, The Calorie Myth offers a radical new model for weight loss.


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Jonathan Bailor's The Calorie Myth is a revolutionary diet book that explains how cutting-edge science supports a radically different approach to weight loss, offering evidence that calories do not matter. Bailor shows that the key to long-term weight-loss is not the number of calories consumed but rather what kinds of calories. Some foods are used to repair tissue, boost b Jonathan Bailor's The Calorie Myth is a revolutionary diet book that explains how cutting-edge science supports a radically different approach to weight loss, offering evidence that calories do not matter. Bailor shows that the key to long-term weight-loss is not the number of calories consumed but rather what kinds of calories. Some foods are used to repair tissue, boost brain power, and fuel our metabolism--while others are stored as fat. The human body has a set point--the weight it naturally "wants" to be--that is regulated by hormones. When we eat the right foods--plants, lean proteins, nuts, and legumes--our bodies are naturally able to maintain a healthy set point weight. But when we eat sugar, starches, fats, and other poor-quality foods, our bodies' regulatory systems become "clogged" and prevent us from burning extra calories. Translation: Those extra 10 pounds you've been carrying around for years aren't the result of eating too much: They're the result of eating hormone-clogging foods. With its step-by-step program, including a "SANEity" scale that determines which foods are optimal for weight-control; an eating plan; and a high intensity interval training (HIIT) exercise program that allows you to spend less time in the gym and achieve better results, The Calorie Myth offers a radical new model for weight loss.

30 review for The Calorie Myth: How to Eat More and Exercise Less, Lose Weight, and Live Better

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Clement

    This book relies heavily on straw man fallacies. The basic premise, that human beings are not calculators and losing weight is more complicated than math, is fine. Obvious, even. Even more obvious are most of the recommendations, i.e. eat protein, healthy fats, and lots and lots of vegetables. He has a really strong aversion to starchy vegetables and also miscategorises some veggies, but that's nothing compared to what he did in his portrayal of arguments for "calories in, calories out" (CICO). This book relies heavily on straw man fallacies. The basic premise, that human beings are not calculators and losing weight is more complicated than math, is fine. Obvious, even. Even more obvious are most of the recommendations, i.e. eat protein, healthy fats, and lots and lots of vegetables. He has a really strong aversion to starchy vegetables and also miscategorises some veggies, but that's nothing compared to what he did in his portrayal of arguments for "calories in, calories out" (CICO). Rather than using the most well reasoned arguments for CICO, he creates a complete caricature of the argument, claiming that people actually think we function like calculators, and eating a single extra bite of food in a day will make us put on X number of pounds per year. If you are going to create a book that you claim is based on the best science (and constantly brag about how many journal articles you reference), then you should probably make sure that you are building a strong argument based on a true portrayal of alternative hypothesis. As he points out himself, the information he discusses is often well known and not disputed in the scientific literature. So why does he think he is so brilliant in designing a diet that is, essentially just a pretty healthy diet that only has a few marginally disputable features? Worst of all, for me, was that he misused many of the references. There are many examples, but I lost trust early in the piece when he was arguing that food quality matters (revolutionary), using a series of studies on the ketogenic diet to support his argument for HIS diet. Which is by no means ketogenic. When I find stuff like this in books, I quickly lose trust and tire of checking all the references. I actually enjoy some of Bailor's podcasts, and I think eating this way would certainly make most people far healthier than they are today. However, I really take issue with the fact that he relied on building a straw man and tearing it down, just to make his diet look clever.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Sarah Clement's review articulates everything there is to be said about this book, but I'll add twocents. It's an interesting-enough read, espousing some basic tenets of any healthy lifestyle, but it's hardly groundbreaking. The nutritional information runs parallel to just about every current fad-diet out there, but for me it was the fitness routine being advocated that really brought the book's thrust into doubt. With fitness, Bailor argues for better health by doing fewer/limited workouts, do Sarah Clement's review articulates everything there is to be said about this book, but I'll add twocents. It's an interesting-enough read, espousing some basic tenets of any healthy lifestyle, but it's hardly groundbreaking. The nutritional information runs parallel to just about every current fad-diet out there, but for me it was the fitness routine being advocated that really brought the book's thrust into doubt. With fitness, Bailor argues for better health by doing fewer/limited workouts, down to a workout once or (maybe) twice per week. Exercise is made to sound *scary*! It is a thing to be avoided, except for this 20-min block when Saturn and Uranus are in alignment. He omits the point that our general level of *activity,* not exercise, has become the problem over time. People used to walk places, bike places, etc. This is why you see cities (where people walk blocks to the grocery store or to catch public transport) boasting a better general level of personal health/fitness than rural or small-town areas where people drive everywhere. We have become sedentary. *That* is the real problem, and 20-30min of "smart exercise" each week isn't going to solve the issue. When did I get fat for the first time in my life? When I left DC and bought a car. A year later, while eating according to the basic tenets of SANE dieting, I've gained over 10lbs. Lovely. Here's how you get fit: commute under your own power as often as possible, take the stairs, garden and other outdoor hobbies, etc., like your lean grandparents used to do. With regard to diet, you're encouraged to drink water. And tea. And a LOT of it. Why? To make you feel full and to discourage you from eating, of course. Almost as if consuming too many calories was a concern. Go figure. Lastly, the recipes. I wanted to find some really nice ones to add to my routine outside of my Mastering The Art of French Cooking, but alas, most were somewhat sad/frightening, and were lacking in inspiration and excitement. Conclusion: more snake oil. Solution: eat healthy real foods, drink an appropriate amount of water, and increase your daily level of activity. Maybe join a club sport so you can play the way our ancestors used to.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Edwards

    I love this message and it would be nice if this book, and a few others, were required reading for all Americans. But I know that won't happen, and until then, those of us who read this need to pass the message on to others. My family has several medical professionals in it and they've never heard even half of the research that I've read in the Calorie Myth. Now I understand why I haven't been able to lose weight after having my second child, when with the first it was just a matter of cutting ba I love this message and it would be nice if this book, and a few others, were required reading for all Americans. But I know that won't happen, and until then, those of us who read this need to pass the message on to others. My family has several medical professionals in it and they've never heard even half of the research that I've read in the Calorie Myth. Now I understand why I haven't been able to lose weight after having my second child, when with the first it was just a matter of cutting back on my food and exercising an hour a day! Really? Who has time or energy to exercise an hour a day for the rest of their lives? I didn't and as work changed and our family grew, I couldn't sustain an hour of high intensity workouts. The weight came back on, I lost some by jumping back on the calorie-counting bandwagon, got pregnant, kept working out so I only gained 16 pounds, but 20 months later, I'm still the same weight I was when I gave birth despite exercising 4-5 times a week and eating quite well. After a week of adhering quite closely to the SANE way of eating I've lost 4 pounds and feel great. For the last 8 years my diet has been mostly unprocessed foods, but I live in China where everything is fried/sautéed in oil and seasoned with MSG. My MILs cooking is no exception. Once I get over my fear of insulting her and telling her that I won't be eating the foods she cooks, I'm sure I'll feel even better since I can really tell a difference in how I feel after eating at her place or a restaurant. I pray that once the family sees my success, they'll get on board to since they all suffer from various ailments. To address a few concerns I read in the comments: yes, there was a big push for reviews as soon as people read it; that's common among authors these days. In order to get to the top of the lists and get your message noticed, you have to have a audience that will help and support you. And Jonathan has just that. He has a great platform including his website, podcast and forums. I haven't read his first book, so not sure about what people are saying that it's mostly the same. But it's now out of print, and though I've been looking for a copy, I can't find one. I was afraid it would be a lot like his podcasts since he freely shares so much science, data and advice. Sure, some of the studies were ones he's talked about, but this book was totally worth the money. In fact this book gives more of a plan and talks about weight loss along with some recipes from his co-host Carrie. I know from the podcasts, that the recommended protein powder is one of the most SANE kinds, and it makes is super easy for busy people to get in enough protein. Living abroad, I can't get it without paying a small fortune in shipping, so I just eat meat and eggs to get in my protein. And like he says so many times, for many people it's about progress, not perfection. A protein shake filled with spinach and chia seeds is far better than a pastry and sugar-laden coffee drink.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Columbian

    "The Calorie Myth" will help you understand the importance of focusing on food/exercise QUALITY rather that QUANTITY. It simplifies getting and staying fit. It will also give you the tools and knowledge to stop worrying about your weight, so you can focus on the important things in your life. I got this book last night courtesy a download, and dove into it first thing. I have followed Jonathan Bailor's advice via his podcast for nearly a year, but having this book in my hands is a convenient way "The Calorie Myth" will help you understand the importance of focusing on food/exercise QUALITY rather that QUANTITY. It simplifies getting and staying fit. It will also give you the tools and knowledge to stop worrying about your weight, so you can focus on the important things in your life. I got this book last night courtesy a download, and dove into it first thing. I have followed Jonathan Bailor's advice via his podcast for nearly a year, but having this book in my hands is a convenient way to reference all the information to stay slim and healthy for life. Several years ago, I lost 90 pounds, mostly by eating alot less, and exercising alot more. That was the easy part. Keeping it off proved far more difficult, as long-term starvation is HARD. And worrying about gaining it all back made me feel miserable. Out of desperation, I turned away from the eat-less-exercise-more mantra, and began my exploration into eating well, rather than eating less. After a good start from other sources (Fat-Head, Wheat Belly) I found Bailor's program of SANE eating. Now I have no worries about gaining fat. I don't even worry about my "weight" (as I have gained muscle). My principle measure of success is my belt, not a scale. If you are looking for a quick way to lose weight with a temporary diet, this book is NOT for you. If you like small plates and going hungry, this book is not for you. If you want to follow old advice that continues to make you sicker, this book is not for you. Fast "weight" loss usually means breaking your body down, with poor long term results. But if you want to get fit and build your body up for the long term, this book is for you. If you enjoy eating satisfying and nutritious food until you are full, this book is for you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    After many years of formal education and practical hands on experience, I have come to the conclusion that both diet and exercise are as much an art as a science. The premise presented in The Calorie Myth is that we need to rethink how we view weight and weight loss. Clearly, not all calories are created equal, yet there are still many people out there, a number of my health coaching clients included, who seem to believe that they are. Misled by labels that tout "fat free," "reduced calories," "w After many years of formal education and practical hands on experience, I have come to the conclusion that both diet and exercise are as much an art as a science. The premise presented in The Calorie Myth is that we need to rethink how we view weight and weight loss. Clearly, not all calories are created equal, yet there are still many people out there, a number of my health coaching clients included, who seem to believe that they are. Misled by labels that tout "fat free," "reduced calories," "whole grains," and "natural" to name a few, they are genuinely confused. Case in point, I recently had a client who was concerned about eating a baked potato, but viewed "whole grain" "low-fat" crackers as a "health food." Bailor addresses this misconception and emphasizes the importance of quality calories. Luckily, it's a message that many health and wellness professionals have finally bought into but that still has not made its way to the average person. He references the set point theory, the idea that our bodies naturally gravitate to a set weight range. They do this by becoming either more or less efficient with the calories we do consume. The set point theory is thought to explain the high failure rate of weight loss that is achieved through dieting (95% of weight lost on diets will be regained). He claims that the only way to change your set point is to unclog the body's metabolic pathways. This clogging is the result of poor lifestyle (particularly dietary) choices. Bad foods clog the system, whereas good foods help to unclog the system and keep it from clogging in the first place. He ultimately recommends a diet high in non-starchy vegetables (at least 10 servings a day), 3 servings of low sugar fruits, and high quality fats (like nuts and seeds) and protein (animal and/or plant). He particularly likes cacao powder, flax seed, chia seeds, seafood, and green tea. And as far as exercise goes, he seems to think we are wasting our time with low and moderate intensity cardio like jogging and running. He thinks our time would be better spent with HIIT, and specifically with weight training that emphasizes eccentric loading. Eccentric is the lengthening phase of an exercise where the muscle is generating force to control the lowering of a weight. Some people refer to this as the negative. He provides a fairly impressive reference section as well as a rather long list of authors whose work has influenced his ideas. I don't agree with every point he makes, but agree with his overall approach and message. Clearly, anyone eating his suggested diet is going to find it hard to also eat the crappy processed stuff. Furthermore, there is a lot of science out there to support the numerous benefits of a whole-foods plant-based diet, which is basically what he is recommending. I also think he's onto something with the analogy of a clogged drain. I often work with people who are barely eating, yet still they struggle with their weight. Sometimes even when they are eating healthier foods. It's as if they are metabolically sick and/or metabolically inflexible from years of bad choices. And it can sometimes take a while doing the right thing to see an improvement, which is frustrating for the average person, since most people want results as of yesterday. As far as his thoughts on exercise? I think they are interesting. I've always included weight training into my fitness regimen, and even though I'm a woman, I've never shied away from lifting heavier weights. I also often use eccentric training as a PT helping to rehab patients as it's well understood that we are stronger eccentrically. For this reason, it's a good way to build strength, particularly in situations where strength is significantly impaired. All in all, I felt this was a great read. There is a lot here that resonates with my professional experiences as well as my personal experiences. Of course, I'm reading this from the vantage point of someone who has a Nutritional Sciences degree, a physical therapy degree, and close to 3 decades as a clinician with too many continuing education classes on various diet and exercise topics to count. I have not only been certified as a personal trainer, I teach a certification course for future personal trainers. My point is that I appreciate the complexity of these topics in a way that others may not. I've also been around long enough to see the health and wellness industry in action, for better or worse. Interestingly, in my personal life, my diet looks very similar to what Bailor recommends, and I've had a lot of success with it. I tend to eat huge volumes of delicious, gourmet foods (with an emphasis on fruits and veggies) and yet have no trouble with weight (or any health problems) despite having had four children, being female, and in my 49th year of life. The traditional practice of "dieting" doesn't even register on my radar. The idea of not eating something I wanted whenever I wanted is foreign to me. In fact, I am often shocked when I talk to a new client and find out how little they are eating, yet still struggling. Of course, I don't want to eat McDonalds. The very thought of eating at a fast food restaurant makes my stomach turn. And why on earth would I ever eat crap like that when I can eat the most scrumptious and sumptuous foods whenever I want? Bottom line: I think Bailor has much more right than wrong.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Covers a lot of ground in this book. Should be eating lots of veggies, protein, and cutting back on grains. As in not eating them. We should only exercise 10 minutes a week but those 10 minutes should be gruesomely hard with eccentric resistance training. I liked some things, and others didn't resonate. Like the fact that he doesn't account for if you actually ENJOY exercising and cardio (gasp). Still, interesting ideas. Covers a lot of ground in this book. Should be eating lots of veggies, protein, and cutting back on grains. As in not eating them. We should only exercise 10 minutes a week but those 10 minutes should be gruesomely hard with eccentric resistance training. I liked some things, and others didn't resonate. Like the fact that he doesn't account for if you actually ENJOY exercising and cardio (gasp). Still, interesting ideas.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    Incredible amount of research packed into this book. I found it thought provoking and informative. Highly recommend.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ada-Marie

    Great book describing the new way to think about nutrition and fitness, which is based on science and hormonal health. Calories in v. calories out has never added up. Basically to burn fact, eat clean, lift heavy, interval train, drink a lot of water, sleep as much as you can, and keep a positive attitude. Now to actually do that.... ;)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Some notions are good. The science is interesting and often eye-opening. The interpretation of some of the data is sometimes irritating. For example: The author (intentionally?) misinterprets the statement that people are, on average, eating 500 excess calories per day and have been doing so for quite some time. He - almost mockingly - wonders why we're not all 1000 pounds overweight if we've been eating 500 excess calories for so long. Um... because there comes a point where those 500 excess ca Some notions are good. The science is interesting and often eye-opening. The interpretation of some of the data is sometimes irritating. For example: The author (intentionally?) misinterprets the statement that people are, on average, eating 500 excess calories per day and have been doing so for quite some time. He - almost mockingly - wonders why we're not all 1000 pounds overweight if we've been eating 500 excess calories for so long. Um... because there comes a point where those 500 excess calories are simply maintaining our overweight? If I should be eating 1200 calories per day for my proper height, weight, and activity level, and I'm instead eating 1700 calories, I'm not going to balloon up and up and up until I explode. Instead, I'll probably be about 50 pounds overweight, and those 500 excess calories are merely maintaining that overweight. For the price I paid ($1.00 on Kindle), I won't complain too much, but I'll certainly not recommend it to anyone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Missy Miller

    I really liked the premise and especially liked how FOR ONCE someone addressed the fact that exercise is not only NOT the answer for weight loss but also can HURT efforts to lose weight. The only reason why I did not rate this book higher is that I felt there was not enough science to back it up to the point where a mass audience can easily receive it. I also thought that - though it does address the mental aspects required to change your diet and offer advice - it glosses over the hard part. L I really liked the premise and especially liked how FOR ONCE someone addressed the fact that exercise is not only NOT the answer for weight loss but also can HURT efforts to lose weight. The only reason why I did not rate this book higher is that I felt there was not enough science to back it up to the point where a mass audience can easily receive it. I also thought that - though it does address the mental aspects required to change your diet and offer advice - it glosses over the hard part. Lets fact it Americans are fat because we eat too much of the wrong things, yes, but more importantly is the addictive, emotional, and environmental forces behind the SAD problem. This book may give people more knowledge about why what they eat and the way they eat it is bad/wrong/harmful...etc. But the real problem we face is getting people to DO it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lara Putnam

    Not much new here. Eat fish daily and high protein each meal, have 10 servings of veggies a day, make careful fruit choices, and limit carbs, starches and sweets. Shorter, intense exercise is most effective.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Interesting look at what foods we should eat and how we should exercise -- including a look at how broken the food pyramid is. Now to see if following the ideas within actually work... the science suggests it should!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Devin

    "Ever since the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued the first U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans in 1980, the dietary and health-care communities all synchronized their message for nutrition and health: cut total and saturated fat, eat more 'healthy whole grains,' watch calories, and increase physical activity...Could the one in three Americans now obese and another one in three overweight all be glutenous and lazy? Or is there something "Ever since the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued the first U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans in 1980, the dietary and health-care communities all synchronized their message for nutrition and health: cut total and saturated fat, eat more 'healthy whole grains,' watch calories, and increase physical activity...Could the one in three Americans now obese and another one in three overweight all be glutenous and lazy? Or is there something fundamentally wrong with the concept of calories in, calories out? The year 1980 marks this astounding turn of events for the American public: the start of an unprecedented and dramatic increase in the calorie intake, weight gain, and overweight and obesity...that conventional wisdom is not just inaccurate, but devastatingly wrong." (x) "eating less of a traditional diet and doing more traditional exercise does not prevent obesity and diabetes. It may delay them, but the diet still destroys our metabolic system-albeit more slowly-and the exercise does not undo that damage." (2) The focus should be on food and exercise quality instead of quantity. By eating plenty of higher-quality food and doing less (but higher quality) exercise, we unconsciously avoid overeating and provide our body with a unique combination of nutrition and hormones, one that reprograms that body to behave more like one of a naturally thin person (5). *Set Point-a range of about ten pounds that our body works to keep us within (8); aka metabolism (22) ***"Studies show traditional calorie-counting approaches ailing 95.4 percent of the time-and often provoking even greater rebound weight gain." (18) We could temporarily lose weight by starving ourselves, but that isn't sustainable or healthy (19). "Achieving our health and fitness goals only appears complex because we have been given a whole lot of bad information" The cause of obesity is eating the wrong foods. Your Set Point Fast metabolism=low set point Slow metabolism=high set point (22) Our set point weight refers to the level of stored fat our body automatically works to maintain regardless of the quantity of calories we take in or burn off (23). "We all have a set point and that's what determines how slim or stocky we are long term. Not calorie counting" The explanation is that up until a few decades ago we ate foods that maintained our body's ability to balance calories automatically around a slim set-point weight. "For the past forty years, we've been told to eat things that prevent our body from doing what it did for the entirety of human history-stay healthy and fit, automatically." (24) *Calories count. However, counting them can't be necessary for health, considering that before most people knew what a calorie was about 90% of the population avoided obesity and over 99% of us avoided type 2 diabetes (25). Our initial set point is determined by our genetics; studies show 40-70% of weight is genetically determined. Our set point determines our long-term weight. If our weight is elevated, it's because our set point is elevated thanks to a "hormonal clog" (26). When we become hormonally clogged, our body can no longer respond to signals from our hormones and brain that otherwise enable us to burn body fat automatically. When we increase the quality of our eating and exercise, we can heal our hormones, "unclog," lower our set point and get our body to burn fat instead of store fat. When we put the wrong quality of food into it, our body becomes hormonally clogged, causing it to automatically balance us out at an elevated level of body fat (27). By focusing our efforts on restoring the natural set point, we can stop obsessing over diet and exercise and allow the body to do what comes naturally (28). When we feed our body low-quality foods, it becomes unable to effectively respond to these hormones. Without those hormonal "burn fat" signals, the metabolic processes that otherwise keep us slim do not happen. Once our body is not effectively responding to hormones like leptin and insulin, we become insulin and leptin resistant, and our body starts overproducing this hormones-causing a hormonal clog. When we eat poorly, we raise our set point (31). *Enjoying more whole-food fats-especially natural foods high in omega-3 fats such as salmon, flax seeds, and chia seeds-in place of refined, processed vegetable oils found in starch and sugar based junk food, reduces the inflammation in the brain that contributes to an elevated set point (35). By increasing the quality of our eating and exercise, we can resensitize ourselves to fat-burning hormones, reduce inflammation, and enjoy a metabolism more like that of a naturally thin person. "Returning mammals to the higher quality diet they are genetically adapted to reverses the clogging and resulting raised set point caused by a low-quality eating." (37) 4 Major problems of the traditional quantity focused fat loss approach (38): 1. Eating less does not cause long term fat loss 2. Exercising more does not cause long term fat loss. 3. Exercising less does not cause long term fat gain 4. Eating more does not cause long term fat gain Eating more doesn't make you fat Eating less of a traditional Western diet does not cause long term fat loss because this approach incorrectly assumes that taking in fewer calories forces our body to burn fat. Eating less does not force us to burn body fat. It forces us to burn fewer calories. "That is why dieters walk around tired and crabby all day. Their bodies and brains have slowed down." Even worse, if we still don't have enough energy, our body burns muscle, not fat (39-40). "If we want to burn fat and boost our health for the next sixty years as opposed to the next sixty days, let's not starve ourselves." (41) After our body survives starvation, its number one priority is restoring all the body fat it lost and then protecting us from starving in the future (44). It does that by storing additional body fat. Eating less also slows down the metabolism. "The more we starve ourselves, the worse off we are." (47) Eating more low quality processed foods causes us to gain body fat (49). Eating more and gaining less is possible because when we're hormonally healthy; we have all sorts of underappreciated ways to deal with calories other than storing them as body fat. They could be turned off automatically (50). *"If we can escape the trap of old calorie-quantity (versus calorie-quality) myths, we will never have to worry about our weight again." (52) Exercising more doesn't make you thin What is ineffective is traditional high impact and moderate intensity exercise like jogging. Low impact and low-intensity activity such as walking is phenomenal for our health. No-impact and high-intensity activity such as eccentric resistance training is instrumental in lowering our set point (55). "Exercise by itself has not been shown to be highly effective in treating obesity because the increased energy use from exercise is generally offset by increased caloric intake."-Jeffrey M. Friedman (55-56). Compounding the problem, many people who exercise more do not eat high-quality food; they get the majority of their calories from low-quality starches and sweeteners.Therefore, for most people, exercising more triggers the consumption of more low-quality food. More low-quality food means more hormonal clogging and a higher setpoint. Far from burning body fat, we burn time and build up clogs (56). "The food industry is well are that exercising more encourages eating more low-quality food." Companies like Coca-Cola, Hershey, Sara Lee, Kellogg, Kraft, and more serve on the executive board of the American Council on Fitness and Nutrition (57). The theory that we have an obesity epidemic because people are not exercising enough is disproved by the data (58). *The idea of aerobic exercise did not even exist in the mainstream until the 1968 publication of Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper's book Aerobics. "In the 1930s and '40s...high volume endurance training was thought to be bad for the heart. Through the '50s and even '60s, exercise was not thought to be useful...and endurance exercise was thought to be harmful to women." - Pauline Entin, Ph.D. (59). During the same period, the percentage of obese Americans was dramatically lower than today. Nowadays, Americans do more intentional "exercise" than people anywhere else in the world and make up the 6th heaviest population in the world. Obesity rises as income falls and manual labor rises (61). Therefore, it seems that activity level is not a good predictor of fitness. The Myth that all Calories are created equal The solution to today's obesity epidemic isn't to eat less food, but rather to ear higher-quality food (62). The quality of our calories can be determined by assessing our food based on 4 criteria (63): 1. Satiety: how quickly the calories fill us up and how long they keep us full 2. Aggression: how likely the calories are to be stored as body fat 3. Nutrition: how many nutrients (vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, essential amino acids) the calories provide 4.Efficiency: how many of the calories can be stored as body fat *If a program isn't flexible enough for us to follow it forever, forget it (65). Satiety The fewer calories needed to fill us up and the longer those calories keep us full, the higher the Satiety value of the food (66). *We can eat more high-Satiety food by focusing on foods that contain high amounts of water, fiber, and protein (67). More water and fiber means bigger food, more stretch, and getting fuller and staying fuller longer. That is why 200 calories of wet, fibrous celery is more filling than 200 calories of dry, fiber-free gummy bears. Aggression Calories vary in how likely they are to be stored as body fat (69). Anytime the body has more calories available than it can deal with at one time, it stores them as body fat (70). Our body doesn't run on the food we eat - most often it runs on glucose, a sugar our body creates from the food we eat. Body-fat storage is not caused by eating a lot of food. Body-fat storage is triggered as a response to eating food that causes us to have more glucose in our bloodstream that we can use at one time. The more Aggressive calories are, the faster they increase the levels of glucose in our bloodstream. The faster calories increase our glucose levels, the more likely we are to have more glucose than the body can deal with at one time. "That's when the traffic cop shuttles the excess into our fat cells." "We can eat pounds and pounds of food and avoid pounds and pounds of body fat if the glucose the food generates does not exceed the glucose level our body can accommodate right then...our body needs surprisingly little glucose yet the normal Western diet is full of foods that spike blood sugar." Nutrition Eat non-starchy vegetables, ones you can eat raw and find in salads like spinach, romaine lettuce, kale, any green leafy vegetable, broccoli, peppers, onions, zucchini, cauliflower, carrots, asparagus, etc. " (73). The companies that sell starchy foods typically say we get a great deal of fiber from their whole-grain products, but whole grains are not good sources of essential nutrients relative to non-starches (75). "While whole grains are better than processed grains, one broken leg is also better than two -being better doesn't necessarily make something desirable." "Eating whole-grain bread to get more fiber is like eating carrot cake to get more vegetables." (76) Efficiency *Fiber is not digested and therefore can never be stored as body fat. The body tries and tries to digest fiber, but then after burning a bunch of calories trying to break down and absorb fiber, it gives up and passes fiber through the digestive system. It takes our body 5-10xs more energy to digest protein than it does to digest fat or carbohydrate. About 30% of the calories we get from protein are burned in digesting it (78). *Only 35% of the initial calories we get from protein can be stored as body fat. Over two-thirds of calories from protein are burned converting protein into a compound that can be stored as body fat (79). 211 of 300 starch calories can be stored as body fat. That means 70% of calories from starch can be stored as body fat. This research doesn't suggest we should eat 100% protein, but that we can eat more and burn more by eating more protein-packed (and fiber packed) food (80). A SANE lifestyle is compatible with plant-based, paleo, primal, low-carb, organic, local, vegetarian, kosher, halal, diet type (83). The Myth of Moderation many of the institutions perpetuating this myth are funded by companies that produce processed foods. These institutions can keep their corporate benefactors happy and appear reasonable by preaching a message of moderation (84). The message of moderation and calories is rooted in money, not science. An accurate recommendation would revolve around food quality and hormones, not calorie count and moderation (85). Hormones are the key to our set point and therefore long term weight gain or loss (87). We gain weight because our metabolic system is hormonally broken. Starving a broken system will never fix it; there's a good chance it will make it worse. You can count calories all day and will not set yourself up for long-term fat loss if you are eating low-quality calories that trigger excess body fat storing hormones such as insulin (88). This science hasn't been heard of now because of "financial motivation is part of the answer. More money can be made off sick, overweight, and unhappy people than off healthy, fit, and happy people. The bigger we are, the bigger the profits of the $3.1 trillion food, $150 billion fitness, and $500 billion pharmaceutical industries. Big food, big fitness, and big pharma want us to stay slim the way big tobacco wants us to stop smoking." (91) Today 1 in every 4 people is diabetic or prediabetic (92). We are faced with the first generation with a lower life expectancy than their parents. About one in three American children is overweight or obese, and more than 40 million children under the age of five are overweight. Where the Calorie Myth Came From The diet recommended by the government's Dietary Guidelines was not possible for 99.8 of our history. Our ancestors did not hunt or gather pasta, rice, cereal, or bread. They did not eat whole grains. They ate no grains. They did not cut back on added sweeteners. They did not know what added sweeteners were (94).Obesity, diabetes, and heart disease are called "diseases of civilization." They did not become issues until agriculture enabled the production of starches and sweets about 12,000 years ago (95). Over 70% of our diet is made up of unnatural food. Over 70% of us have unhealthy and inflated waistlines (96). *It's not a coincidence that the decline in the quality of our food has coincided with the decline in the quality of our health. We are not designed to digest the majority of foods we're being told to eat. Starch has the same impact on our body as sugar (97). As soon as a food is digested and absorbed, the body does not know the difference between a simple sugar and a whole grain. "Why is a food that is 'biochemically equivalent to sugar recommended in mass quantities?' A great deal of money is being made from our nutritional confusion."The dietary guidelines and graphics were not drawn up by nutrition scholars (see p.98). Over a billion dollars' worth of studies have failed to prove that the government's guidelines are good for anything other than profits (102). Numerous studies have been unable to find a link between dietary fat and heart disease. Low-Fat, Low-Cholesterol Confusion Foods that contain far are not necessarily unhealthy (105). Obesity itself is not associated with dietary fat in either national or international studies (106). No solid evidence proves that dietary fat or percentage of calories from fat causes weight gain. There is even evidence that lower fat intake correlates with higher obesity rates (106). Many water-, fiber, and protein packed foods contain fat like seafood, meat, eggs, nuts, and seeds. Why Good Health is Bad Business Food companies aggressively fight any scientific information that threatens their bottom line (116). Nearly 64% of the members of national committees on nutrition and food receive compensation from food companies. "At least 530 government scientists at the National Institute of Health, the nation's preeminent agency for medical research, has taken fees, stock, or stock options from biomedical companies in the last five years."-David Willman Both the food industry and our government are paid to keep profits high, not to teach us about nutritional science *As a general rule, if it is not coming directly from a plant or an animal, then it has been sweetened (118). **Any form of caloric sweetener causes clogs. Our body does not care where we get caloric sweeteners. To our body, apple juice is basically the same as soda, since they both contain about 30 grams of sugar per cup (119). High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) sabotages our ability to feel satisfied by other foods and leaves us hungrier than if we did not eat it, altering our baseline levels of Satiety hormones and driving us to eat more and more over time. "Sweeteners are addictive." When you switch to SANE eating, you will temporarily feel you are going through withdrawal because you are. It takes the body a couple of weeks to overcome the chemical dependence caused by the sea of sweeteners we have been led to eat."(121) 70% of 6-8 year-olds believe fast foods are healthier than food prepared at home (123). *Why would anything or anyone "design" us to run on a low-fat/low protein/high starch diet that was not possible for 99.8% of our history (126). Paleo and primal diets high in nutrient dense vegetables and low in starches and sweets are extremely SANE and effective. The closer a food is to a plant we could gather or an animal we could hunt, the saner it is. Exceptions: Low sugar protein powders and bars,low-sugar jerkies, cottage cheese, and plain Greek yogurt. These foods are healthy sources of protein, so enjoy them even though they were not available to our ancestors. Researchers estimate that prior to the advent of starch and sweeteners, our ancestors ate up to 5 pounds of food per day (133). Sane Carbs Cover at least half of plate with nonstarchy vegetables (135). Nonstarchy vegetables= vegetables that you could eat raw. Corn, potatoes, and many root vegetables cannot be eaten raw; they are starches. Spinach, kale, romaine lettuce, broccoli, mushrooms, carrots, onions; deep green vegetables are the best of the best. With the exception of leafy green vegetables, a serving is about the size of your fist or what fits in an 8 ounce measuring cup (136). *The single most important part of living a SANE lifestyle is eating no less than 10 servings of nonstarchy vegetables per day (137). Sane Proteins get 30-55 grams of protein at each meal (142). Aim for a total of between 100 grams and 200 grams of protein per day. "Do your best to eat seafood daily." Nuts are more than 70% fat (144). Animal products provide much better essential amino acid 'profiles' than plant products (145). Eating a lot of protein doesn't harm the heart (147).

  14. 5 out of 5

    CP (Wayne)

    This is a solid book backed up by great scientific research.The writing style was surprisingly entertaining and easy to read as it didn’t bore me like other health books have the past. It reminds me how much bad food (starch and sweets) I subconsciously put into my body. Just thinking about some of my food choices makes me cringe as I sometimes take up whatever the food court has to offer. As a health noob, it was fascinating to learn about the concept of “Set-points” and how our bodies react to This is a solid book backed up by great scientific research.The writing style was surprisingly entertaining and easy to read as it didn’t bore me like other health books have the past. It reminds me how much bad food (starch and sweets) I subconsciously put into my body. Just thinking about some of my food choices makes me cringe as I sometimes take up whatever the food court has to offer. As a health noob, it was fascinating to learn about the concept of “Set-points” and how our bodies react to “Good’ and “Bad” food.The book also does a great job at deciphering the truth behind common myths : “ Eating more doesn’t make you Fat” “ Exercising more doesn’t make you thin” Pundits may argue that the information offered in this book is nothing new as it is common knowledge already used by many health experts and advisers. I am also personally unsure about the “exercising less” advice in the book. I must test it out personally and do more research to have a better idea about it. Essentially, having good health is the most important part of life. We could have all the money, time and friends in the world. But we can’t enjoy any of that if we don’t have good health. Therefore, I recommend this book for those looking to improve their health and overall life in general. There is too much good information in this book to summarize but the two ideas that stood out to me include: “ There is no pill, product, or service that comes close to providing the health and physique benefits you will get from eating so many non-starchy vegetables, nutrient-dense proteins and whole-food fats that you are too full for starches and sweets”. “Obesity, diabetes, and heart disease are called “diseases of civilization”. They did not become issues until agriculture enabled production of starches and sweets about twelve thousand years ago. They did not reach epidemic status until starches and sweets become highly processed, were genetically modified, and made up most of our diet. Colorado State University researchers found that a whopping 72 percent of what we eat today was not eaten for at least 99.8 percent of our evolutionary history”.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sw

    I have fought the battle for many years and definitely feel like a yoyo when it comes to weight. I got to the point of being sick of the battle, but then would begin to suffer the effects of having too much fat. I did NOT follow the fad diets. I followed what I and many others thought were reasonable, tried-and-true plans. I was brought up with the understanding, like so many other fellow scale-watchers that it comes down to "calories in, calories out", "eat in moderation", "you can eat anything I have fought the battle for many years and definitely feel like a yoyo when it comes to weight. I got to the point of being sick of the battle, but then would begin to suffer the effects of having too much fat. I did NOT follow the fad diets. I followed what I and many others thought were reasonable, tried-and-true plans. I was brought up with the understanding, like so many other fellow scale-watchers that it comes down to "calories in, calories out", "eat in moderation", "you can eat anything you want, just eat smaller portions". Since listening to the podcasts, I have learned there is just a bit more to the picture. Quite a bit more! Information that was not and has not been provided to us in the same way that so much other misinformation has been deemed newsworthy. (Nope, the food manufacturers and the diet industry won't get rich with this eating plan.) After listened to all the podcasts, I began to change what I ate. I knew the old methods of dieting didn't work. I was willing to be open-minded and give it a try. The book provides all the data found in the podcasts plus much more. Yes, we all (already) know that vegetables are important and we should eat as many as we can. But - MORE important - Mr. Bailor explains What NOT To Eat. His explanations include much descriptive "why?" information and mountains of scientific studies to back it up. Perhaps, for those of us who have given up on the old standby (plans), there IS hope! Read the book. Listen to the podcasts. What have you got to lose? : ) P.S. With the increase in veggie-comsumption, I highly recommend the book "Eat Smarter! Soups" by Carrie Brown. If, like me, you are NOT a veggie-lover, this book will help you along the way. It is filled with tasty, filling, and easy soup recipes that follow the guidelines of Jonathan Bailor's book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Bailor's book fits in with a number of authors who could be called amateur "experts". Bailor has clearly spent a lot of time looking at the literature related to weight lost and fitness and attempted to construct a general theory which integrated the research he has read. I agree with Bailor's assertion that calories in/calories out is an over simplification of how the body processes food. The metabolic system is very complicated with feedback, amplifiers, and cascade reactions with result in no Bailor's book fits in with a number of authors who could be called amateur "experts". Bailor has clearly spent a lot of time looking at the literature related to weight lost and fitness and attempted to construct a general theory which integrated the research he has read. I agree with Bailor's assertion that calories in/calories out is an over simplification of how the body processes food. The metabolic system is very complicated with feedback, amplifiers, and cascade reactions with result in non-linear results. While Bailor attempts to distance himself from the low-carb diet, I see very little difference between what he advocates and something like the south beach diet or the Zone when you take into consideration that when they recommend complex carbs, you should be primarily going for non starchy veggies. I appreciate that Bailor's attempts to use science as the basis of his plan, but from the brief investigation I did, it seems that he sometimes misinterpreters the studies he cites resulting in at best overstatements of what the study revealed. When I have more time I plan to research the major studies Bailor cited. If they consistently support his assertions i would upgrade this book to 4-stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shelly

    This book is easy to read, full of scientific proof in understandable terms, and hopefully on it's way to becoming the new standard in health and weight-loss. It is very well organized, includes interesting scientific studies, but doesn't get bogged down with details. The whole goal is to make getting to and maintaining our healthy weight simple. The Calorie Myth doesn't have all the usual hype of a diet book in the sense that you don't feel like someone is trying to force you to drink the Kool- This book is easy to read, full of scientific proof in understandable terms, and hopefully on it's way to becoming the new standard in health and weight-loss. It is very well organized, includes interesting scientific studies, but doesn't get bogged down with details. The whole goal is to make getting to and maintaining our healthy weight simple. The Calorie Myth doesn't have all the usual hype of a diet book in the sense that you don't feel like someone is trying to force you to drink the Kool-Aid, you feel like Jonathan truly wants you to be healthy in the best, smartest and scientifically proven way possible. It is very clear that he has no hidden agenda nor is he endorsing a product or name brand purely for profit. I would encourage anyone who has tried any other 'fad' diet to give this a try; I have already lost 7 lbs in 18 days following this, and I am eating more food than I ever have on any other weight loss attempt. I would also very highly recommend that you listen to Jonathan's podcast; there is even more detail and material, as well as fun conversation with Carrie Brown (who has amazing SANE recipes).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    While Jonathan Bailor and I are not simpatico in some areas of our food philosophy--I don't think hyper processed whey and soy protein powders count as food--I benefitted tremendously from his both his distillation of health and fitness research AND his food recommendations. I had so many, "A-ha!" moments in every chapter that my poor family could hardly escape constant interruptions to their activities whenever I picked up the book. The title makes it appear to be yet another cheap and cheesy " While Jonathan Bailor and I are not simpatico in some areas of our food philosophy--I don't think hyper processed whey and soy protein powders count as food--I benefitted tremendously from his both his distillation of health and fitness research AND his food recommendations. I had so many, "A-ha!" moments in every chapter that my poor family could hardly escape constant interruptions to their activities whenever I picked up the book. The title makes it appear to be yet another cheap and cheesy "weight loss" book targeting the deluded New Year's Resolution book buying market, which is terribly unfortunate. (And, I confess that I don't have a better title or cover design in mind that I think would clearly communicate the incredible usefulness and not-cheesiness of the content.) Being someone who lives in a very remote area and lives a busy, far-from-town homeschooling/homesteading lifestyle. . .someone who is NEVER going to join a gym. . .I was really disappointed by the very limited exercise smarter options that can be done at home. Since even some of those require equipment (or architecture) that I don't have, I have nearly NO exercise options to follow.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book, but the second half was a bit repetitive and boring and got. A it preachy for my liking. However, I'm a science nerd, so most people probably would like the second half better. Why? The first half was all the science. We're talking biology, physiology, biochemistry, endocrinology (hormone stuff), and exercise physiology. In short, everything I love. It was detailed, scientifically accurate, and not too biased. There were tons of examples of real studi I really enjoyed the first half of this book, but the second half was a bit repetitive and boring and got. A it preachy for my liking. However, I'm a science nerd, so most people probably would like the second half better. Why? The first half was all the science. We're talking biology, physiology, biochemistry, endocrinology (hormone stuff), and exercise physiology. In short, everything I love. It was detailed, scientifically accurate, and not too biased. There were tons of examples of real studies and research baking up the scientific claims/facts, and there was extensive explanations for those not as nerdy as me. The second half(ish) was the how to part. Recipes for what to cook and how to eat, helpful examples, how to exercise, weekly plans for both, even pictures of the suggested exercises. I don't need the second half. In reality, I don't need the first either, since none of the info is new to me, but I was more interested in that.m the second half felt like an infomercial. The first, like a cool college class.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Barbara M

    Jonathan Bailor did an excellent job reviewing the latest weight loss & exercise literature and explaining it in layman's terms. The old way of thinking i.e. "the Calorie Myth" is that all calories are alike. The author seeks to prove that NOT all calories are alike. You need to take in high quality calories by eating healthy food & when you do so you can eat MORE and lose weight. He lists "sane" food which is healthy and helpful to the body. He also provides a list of "insane" foods which are d Jonathan Bailor did an excellent job reviewing the latest weight loss & exercise literature and explaining it in layman's terms. The old way of thinking i.e. "the Calorie Myth" is that all calories are alike. The author seeks to prove that NOT all calories are alike. You need to take in high quality calories by eating healthy food & when you do so you can eat MORE and lose weight. He lists "sane" food which is healthy and helpful to the body. He also provides a list of "insane" foods which are destructive to the body. In addition, he provides information about the best way to exercise. It's not by exercising MORE - it's by exercising better. I believe that he is correct in his theories. Eating 200 calories of cookies is not the same as eating 200 calories of salmon. In addition, I do agree that you can exercise LESS and smarter.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This is yet another stop and start book, but I believe books get finished in proper time. I just started working with a strength coach about 5 weeks ago, and THIS is his philosophy. As a triathlete, I have hours and hours and hours of cardio logged over the last few years. But, in the 5 weeks of quality protein, lower carb vegetables, and less time spent doing cardio, I have seen changes in my body that I would have worked hours and hours and hours to achieve running, cycling and swimming. I am This is yet another stop and start book, but I believe books get finished in proper time. I just started working with a strength coach about 5 weeks ago, and THIS is his philosophy. As a triathlete, I have hours and hours and hours of cardio logged over the last few years. But, in the 5 weeks of quality protein, lower carb vegetables, and less time spent doing cardio, I have seen changes in my body that I would have worked hours and hours and hours to achieve running, cycling and swimming. I am still going to do those things, but getting them in perspective has been helpful. And, I look forward to a much more efficient racing season with a more lean and efficient machine out there on the road. This was a great book for this time in my life. ;)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sharry

    I suppose The Calorie Myth is just another diet book, but at least it seems logical and not faddish. I appreciate that Jonathan Bailor gave a lot of space to the science behind his nutrition ideas. I think he fell far below that mark, however, in his recommendations for exercise. Regardless, by unknowingly following his model with regards to eating habits, I managed to lose 45 pounds this year. I have no intention of giving up the exercise I enjoy, however, no matter what he thinks. For me, ther I suppose The Calorie Myth is just another diet book, but at least it seems logical and not faddish. I appreciate that Jonathan Bailor gave a lot of space to the science behind his nutrition ideas. I think he fell far below that mark, however, in his recommendations for exercise. Regardless, by unknowingly following his model with regards to eating habits, I managed to lose 45 pounds this year. I have no intention of giving up the exercise I enjoy, however, no matter what he thinks. For me, there are benefits to regular exercise that have nothing to do with weight control.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    This book sits right along with other excellent books like Eat To Live by Dr. Fuhrman and Why We Get Fat by Gary Taubes. All three books overlap on the science they use to come up with their recommendations to a high degree. Despite Fuhrman and Taubes' seemingly opposing stances on meat and fruit, Bailor has found a way to explain how both of them are right, and presents the current state-of-the-art findings on nutrition in a straightforward way. Easy to recommend. This book sits right along with other excellent books like Eat To Live by Dr. Fuhrman and Why We Get Fat by Gary Taubes. All three books overlap on the science they use to come up with their recommendations to a high degree. Despite Fuhrman and Taubes' seemingly opposing stances on meat and fruit, Bailor has found a way to explain how both of them are right, and presents the current state-of-the-art findings on nutrition in a straightforward way. Easy to recommend.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ling

    Wow, this book really changed how I look at calories and the whole industry behind it too. It was very well researched and had a ton of studies and research to back his points and his analogies are helpful in understanding the processes your body is going through. It sounds almost too good to believe that you don't need to count calories or any of that, but the first half of the book, the research, is very convincing. Wow, this book really changed how I look at calories and the whole industry behind it too. It was very well researched and had a ton of studies and research to back his points and his analogies are helpful in understanding the processes your body is going through. It sounds almost too good to believe that you don't need to count calories or any of that, but the first half of the book, the research, is very convincing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    The advice about diet in this book made a lot of sense to me. While I'm not dropping everything to follow it to the letter, I took three things from it: eat more protein (30g per meal if possible); eat LOTS more vegetables; try to decrease starches/bread/sweets. The advice about exercise is a little harder to get my head around, but I'll definitely be building more intervals into my runs. The advice about diet in this book made a lot of sense to me. While I'm not dropping everything to follow it to the letter, I took three things from it: eat more protein (30g per meal if possible); eat LOTS more vegetables; try to decrease starches/bread/sweets. The advice about exercise is a little harder to get my head around, but I'll definitely be building more intervals into my runs.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Wow! I learned we need to have at least 10 servings a day of non starchy vegetables...so the day I finished this book...we had an evening meal with about 7 servings of vegetables and it felt so good!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Terri Verrette

    Although he references some basic research articles, he doesn't follow the conclusions to their logical end. His recommended diet has multiple aspects that are not supported by the science he references. Although he references some basic research articles, he doesn't follow the conclusions to their logical end. His recommended diet has multiple aspects that are not supported by the science he references.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Becky Smoot

    I haven't made many changes but good to know if I'm ever ready to commit to a healthy life! I haven't made many changes but good to know if I'm ever ready to commit to a healthy life!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    Imperfect? Yes, but it helped me to feel confident enough to stop counting calories and stop being hungry all the time, and to spend less (but more effective) time in the gym. So glad I read it!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    *cranky face* you wouldn't think a book that recommends resistance exercise, leafy greens, protien and heathy fats would make me so grouchy. *cranky face* you wouldn't think a book that recommends resistance exercise, leafy greens, protien and heathy fats would make me so grouchy.

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