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Mobile Suit Gundam: THE ORIGIN, Volume 5: Char & Sayla

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Years before the White Base landed on Earth, the seeds of war were planted in a space colony called Side-3. Here the Munzo Empire's great philosopher Chairman Zeon Deikun would prepare a declaration before an assembly of senators, but before finishing his speech would fall victim to a sudden attack on the parliament's dais. Almost instantly, on the streets, the masses have Years before the White Base landed on Earth, the seeds of war were planted in a space colony called Side-3. Here the Munzo Empire's great philosopher Chairman Zeon Deikun would prepare a declaration before an assembly of senators, but before finishing his speech would fall victim to a sudden attack on the parliament's dais. Almost instantly, on the streets, the masses have risen calling for independence and have set protests in front of Earth Federation headquarters on Side-3. The calls for Earthnoids to return to their planet eventually would push the Federation to take up arms hoping to combat these riots. The hostilities pit men versus tanks on the streets of this colony and appear to not be letting up. Meanwhile, Deikun's family, including his children Artesia and Casval, are soon taken into hiding by a Zeon loyalist - Ramba Ral.


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Years before the White Base landed on Earth, the seeds of war were planted in a space colony called Side-3. Here the Munzo Empire's great philosopher Chairman Zeon Deikun would prepare a declaration before an assembly of senators, but before finishing his speech would fall victim to a sudden attack on the parliament's dais. Almost instantly, on the streets, the masses have Years before the White Base landed on Earth, the seeds of war were planted in a space colony called Side-3. Here the Munzo Empire's great philosopher Chairman Zeon Deikun would prepare a declaration before an assembly of senators, but before finishing his speech would fall victim to a sudden attack on the parliament's dais. Almost instantly, on the streets, the masses have risen calling for independence and have set protests in front of Earth Federation headquarters on Side-3. The calls for Earthnoids to return to their planet eventually would push the Federation to take up arms hoping to combat these riots. The hostilities pit men versus tanks on the streets of this colony and appear to not be letting up. Meanwhile, Deikun's family, including his children Artesia and Casval, are soon taken into hiding by a Zeon loyalist - Ramba Ral.

30 review for Mobile Suit Gundam: THE ORIGIN, Volume 5: Char & Sayla

  1. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    I want to start of this review by acknowledging that it had been a while since I read volume 4 in the series, and needed a few reminders of the sides in this confrontation between Zabi, Zeon, and the Federation and those loyal to each side. If I misinterpreted something in volume 5 because of the break length between this and the previous volume I apologize. Artesia Som Deikun, aka Sayla Mass, has fascinated me in the recent volumes, due to her ties to each side of this conflict. Her goal of tend I want to start of this review by acknowledging that it had been a while since I read volume 4 in the series, and needed a few reminders of the sides in this confrontation between Zabi, Zeon, and the Federation and those loyal to each side. If I misinterpreted something in volume 5 because of the break length between this and the previous volume I apologize. Artesia Som Deikun, aka Sayla Mass, has fascinated me in the recent volumes, due to her ties to each side of this conflict. Her goal of tending to and taking care of others (while being a badass in her own way) has been what causes me to be drawn to her character. Thanks to the backstory that consumes volume 5, of both her and her family, I feel a new level of admiration for her and understanding for why she does what she does. There is still a level of mystery about her, but I am ready to see what will be revealed in the volumes to come. I think what most can take away from this volume is that the antagonist has experienced a childhood, and often times the trauma of that childhood spark the reason for their role as the antagonist. War makes both sides unfortunate, and it is no exception to the characters in Yasuhiko's series. Hopefully peace will prevail, even if it takes time and hard work to accomplish it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt Ely

    (review of the whole series) In the original Gundam, it was hard to dispute that Zeon, and Char specifically, were cooler than Amuro and the Earth Federation. While this revisitation of the original series doesn't try to make Char the her per se, it does give his story equal weight to that of Amuro and the White Base. Some of the silliness is drawn out, and the extreme story feels much more human in this telling. It's probably still best to watch the original first, as this works best as a compan (review of the whole series) In the original Gundam, it was hard to dispute that Zeon, and Char specifically, were cooler than Amuro and the Earth Federation. While this revisitation of the original series doesn't try to make Char the her per se, it does give his story equal weight to that of Amuro and the White Base. Some of the silliness is drawn out, and the extreme story feels much more human in this telling. It's probably still best to watch the original first, as this works best as a companion piece. But I will admit I feel more inclined to reread this one than to rewatch the 1979 series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I will say that this was very interesting to see "char" and sayla backstory and too finally see char for who he really is inside however it took the whole volume which i though dragged out the back story by a bit. i would have liked to also see Amuro in the past too as we get to see a little bit of him but it wasnt enough for me. i wish we had gotten to see how Amuro had grown up with his dad as it references how he technically was neglected.

  4. 5 out of 5

    dedSteph (ded)

    holy shit kycilia fuckin owns

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    I wrote a more comprehensive review of the first volume here. This volume starts the flashback arc, all of which is brand-new material that was never in the anime. The order- starting the flashback here - does sometimes strike me as odd, as a lot of it gives new depth to characters we've already seen die. I don't think the manga should have started with it, as Gundam is ultimately a story about the White Base and her crew and it makes the most sense to start there, but I wonder if it would have I wrote a more comprehensive review of the first volume here. This volume starts the flashback arc, all of which is brand-new material that was never in the anime. The order- starting the flashback here - does sometimes strike me as odd, as a lot of it gives new depth to characters we've already seen die. I don't think the manga should have started with it, as Gundam is ultimately a story about the White Base and her crew and it makes the most sense to start there, but I wonder if it would have made more sense coming a volume earlier, as a direct follow up to Ramba Ral’s death. Either way, it’s a wonderful addition to the story. Char is one of the most popular characters in anime, and Sayla has always been a personal favorite of mine, so I love that the series took so much time to look at their backstory. It’s amazing that this was all written nearly a quarter of a century after the show, because everything in the backstory ties so well to the characters that we’ve known and loved for so long. And not only does it add to their characters, it also does a great job of propping up the rest of the world as well. It clarifies a lot about the political situation that was initially left vague in the show. We also see more of Ramba Ral and Harmon, and Ramba Ral’s last scene with Sayla in vol. 3 becomes all the more meaningful in retrospect. The character designs and settings are lovely - the story moves from Zeon to the Mediterranean, and back to space in neo-Western colony, and they’re all beautifully drawn. That, and there’s nothing cuter than young Sayla and her kitten!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sean O'Hara

    After three volumes mucking about on Earth, the story finally heads back to space--though not by advancing the plot towards the Federation counteroffensive, but with a massive flashback which looks like it'll take up three volumes. After a brief prologue, the story begins in Universal Century 0068 with Zeon Deikun dropping dead in the middle of a speech. Degwin Zabi immediately uses the opportunity to seize control of Zeon's revolutionary movement. With the help of his son, the hitherto never men After three volumes mucking about on Earth, the story finally heads back to space--though not by advancing the plot towards the Federation counteroffensive, but with a massive flashback which looks like it'll take up three volumes. After a brief prologue, the story begins in Universal Century 0068 with Zeon Deikun dropping dead in the middle of a speech. Degwin Zabi immediately uses the opportunity to seize control of Zeon's revolutionary movement. With the help of his son, the hitherto never mentioned media mogul Sasro, he sows unrest throughout the L5 colonies, sparking riots that overwhelm the Federation forces. In the meantime Zeon's loyal follower Jimba Ral, suspecting that Degwin was responsible for Zeon's death, takes the Deikun children, Artesia and Casval, under his protection and plans to smuggle them out of the colonies. This leads to a series of plots and counterplots, assassinations and kidnappings as Jimba and his son Ramba try to stay ahead of the Zabis. The first half of the book, involving the attempt to escape Side 3, is a thrill ride, but unfortunately once the escape comes off, things settle down for several chapters of Artesia (now known--surprise--as Sayla) and Casval (Edourd, not yet Char) grow up. Only at the end, when we find out how Char became Char, do things get good, and then it's "To be continued..."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Case

    This is a chunk of the Gundam universe we've never really gotten a good look at - how Char and Sayla were separated and why, how the Zabi family came to power, and what Zeon Dekium was like. Zeon's depiction is probably the biggest weakness in the volume. I was hoping he'd be more of a two-dimensional character, that he wouldn't be espousing the sort of spacenoid-supremicist fascist ideology that the Zabis were promoting. Instead, the two couldn't be more ideologically identical, with the sole di This is a chunk of the Gundam universe we've never really gotten a good look at - how Char and Sayla were separated and why, how the Zabi family came to power, and what Zeon Dekium was like. Zeon's depiction is probably the biggest weakness in the volume. I was hoping he'd be more of a two-dimensional character, that he wouldn't be espousing the sort of spacenoid-supremicist fascist ideology that the Zabis were promoting. Instead, the two couldn't be more ideologically identical, with the sole difference being that the Zabis want to be in power, and find Zeon to be an obstacle. Other than that, even if you haven't been following the manga thus far and you're a fan of the Universal Century portion of the Gundam multiverse, I'd recommend reading this volume.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ian Vance

    Should I be surprised that more than halfway through this 8-volume epic, we are finally treated to some substantial character development and a geographical outline of the conflict? Par for course for manga in general? I think this is 3.5 stars but I'm going to stick with my overall rating-assessment of the series so far, for now. It has improved quite substantially from the first volume, in any case. (note: I am unfamiliar with the anime or any other rendition, and started this merely as a hist Should I be surprised that more than halfway through this 8-volume epic, we are finally treated to some substantial character development and a geographical outline of the conflict? Par for course for manga in general? I think this is 3.5 stars but I'm going to stick with my overall rating-assessment of the series so far, for now. It has improved quite substantially from the first volume, in any case. (note: I am unfamiliar with the anime or any other rendition, and started this merely as a historical curiosity in Japanese trends + the public library had the first five volumes, all of which are elegantly bound.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    The best volume so far. With the exception of the first 20 pages, this one takes place prior to the main story-line, beginning in UC 0068, eleven years before the main story. Mostly telling the story of Char and Sayla growing up, but with significant parts for a few other characters, including some of the Zeon characters that have come and gone in the main story. It really fleshes out all the characters involved, and I think if I were to introduce this to someone new to Gundam, I might have them The best volume so far. With the exception of the first 20 pages, this one takes place prior to the main story-line, beginning in UC 0068, eleven years before the main story. Mostly telling the story of Char and Sayla growing up, but with significant parts for a few other characters, including some of the Zeon characters that have come and gone in the main story. It really fleshes out all the characters involved, and I think if I were to introduce this to someone new to Gundam, I might have them start on page 20 of this volume, rather than volume I.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paolo

    With the ending of the fourth book taking place after huge battle in South America, the reader is taken into the past, answering a boatload of questions and asking a whole lot more with Char and Sayala's backstory. I don't want to spoil anything, but it's safe to say that Yasuhiko adds a wealth of details and characterization not only to the volume's title characters, but to the entire history of the war and the politics and power plays that started it. Also, the series briefly becomes a Western With the ending of the fourth book taking place after huge battle in South America, the reader is taken into the past, answering a boatload of questions and asking a whole lot more with Char and Sayala's backstory. I don't want to spoil anything, but it's safe to say that Yasuhiko adds a wealth of details and characterization not only to the volume's title characters, but to the entire history of the war and the politics and power plays that started it. Also, the series briefly becomes a Western for reasons I can't reveal without major spoilers, but it totally makes sense I promise.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Oh, so Gundam Origins v5 was interesting. It was entirely devoted to Char/Sayla's backstory. I think it was really interesting because it was mostly a flashback to their childhood, afaik that isn't included in the series. I think the pacing of the volume suffered a little but overall it was good to have. It's place in the story was also a little odd as it provides a lot of background/reasons to care about some characters who are already dead.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Devin (Mostly Manga)

    Like the title suggests, this volume is full of much appreciated backstory behind Char and Sayla. And I thought the last volume was emotional. I mean, wow. My perspective of Char, Ramba Ral, and Hamon have completely changed after this.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    This collection focuses on the early days of Char Aznable and the Principality of Zeon. I'm not sure, but it seems to be original material rather than stories that appeared in the anime.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lucca

    This volume is easily the best one in the series so far.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Char and Sayla's backstory is depicted in a series of flashbacks. The Zabi family's political intrigues leave them orphaned, and drive Casval(aka Char) to a single-minded obsession with revenge.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dru

    The origins of Char, the red comet are revealed! This series works so well in quiet, personal moments, but also in action sequences and scenes of war.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This is the absolute best volume I have read so far. A must read for any Gundam fan.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    loved learning more back story to Char and Sayla

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah ~Sehrenity~

    This volume's flashback theme was absolutely brilliant in explaining the betrayals and intrigue that set up the events of our current story. So many non-verbals scenes that speak volumes. Brilliant!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt Grisdela

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yujie Ling

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Oliver

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rei

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Al-Thagafi

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jake

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wayne

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