web site hit counter Dogs Don't Tell Jokes - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Dogs Don't Tell Jokes

Availability: Ready to download

'Why did the guy eat two dead skunks for breakfast?' 'Because dead ones squeal when you stick the fork in.' Gary W. Boone knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It is the rest of the kids in the class who think he is a fool. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and he starts practising his routine nonstop to get it just right. Gary's sure 'Why did the guy eat two dead skunks for breakfast?' 'Because dead ones squeal when you stick the fork in.' Gary W. Boone knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It is the rest of the kids in the class who think he is a fool. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and he starts practising his routine nonstop to get it just right. Gary's sure that this will be his big break - he'll make everyone laugh and will win the $100 prize money. But when an outrageous surprise threatens to turn his debut into a disaster, it looks as if the biggest joke of all may be on Gary himself.


Compare

'Why did the guy eat two dead skunks for breakfast?' 'Because dead ones squeal when you stick the fork in.' Gary W. Boone knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It is the rest of the kids in the class who think he is a fool. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and he starts practising his routine nonstop to get it just right. Gary's sure 'Why did the guy eat two dead skunks for breakfast?' 'Because dead ones squeal when you stick the fork in.' Gary W. Boone knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It is the rest of the kids in the class who think he is a fool. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and he starts practising his routine nonstop to get it just right. Gary's sure that this will be his big break - he'll make everyone laugh and will win the $100 prize money. But when an outrageous surprise threatens to turn his debut into a disaster, it looks as if the biggest joke of all may be on Gary himself.

30 review for Dogs Don't Tell Jokes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is the story of 11 year old Gary Boone (or "Goon" as he likes to be called). Goon prides himself on making a joke of every situation, but he fails to recognize the negative effect his humor is having on his social relationships. When Goon makes a deal with his parents to quit telling jokes (in exchange for $100) he realizes how few friends he has. Ultimately, Goon (I mean, Gary) has to learn to cope in school and in life without hiding behind a wall of humor. The book is endearing and the en This is the story of 11 year old Gary Boone (or "Goon" as he likes to be called). Goon prides himself on making a joke of every situation, but he fails to recognize the negative effect his humor is having on his social relationships. When Goon makes a deal with his parents to quit telling jokes (in exchange for $100) he realizes how few friends he has. Ultimately, Goon (I mean, Gary) has to learn to cope in school and in life without hiding behind a wall of humor. The book is endearing and the ending is both surprising and satisfying. There are some great jokes - and some 'groaners' throughout. There is some mild sexual content (Gary notices his teacher's legs, and he makes several jokes related to nudity) so parents should be aware of this. Even so, the overriding themes are important ones; maturity and acceptance vs. rejection. This is a good read for most middle-schoolers.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Gary Boone, or Goon as people call him, has a problem. He doesn’t have any friends at his school, he gets teased and bullied, and he hides his low self esteem and insecurity behind a wall of never ending bad jokes. He thinks his humor is the only asset he has and yet it seems it’s what cripples him the most. He knows people don’t like his jokes and he knows it will cause more teasing but he can’t turn off his barrages of verbal diarrhea. But he thinks that by showing off his best jokes at the sc Gary Boone, or Goon as people call him, has a problem. He doesn’t have any friends at his school, he gets teased and bullied, and he hides his low self esteem and insecurity behind a wall of never ending bad jokes. He thinks his humor is the only asset he has and yet it seems it’s what cripples him the most. He knows people don’t like his jokes and he knows it will cause more teasing but he can’t turn off his barrages of verbal diarrhea. But he thinks that by showing off his best jokes at the school talent show, people will realize he’s the gifted genius he always thought he was. That’s the premise of Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes. Sachar throws in a few Wayside School references such as Maurecia’s Ice Cream Parlor and how Gary doesn’t understand Sideways Arithmetic from Wayside School and Gary’s references to his teacher’s legs or imagining her in the shower were a little racy! I did like that bit of naughtiness. While it was sometimes cute and while I did enjoy Gary’s standup routine at the end of the book, I didn’t think it was a great Sachar book. Gary is honorable and I appreciate that being a little white kid, he doesn’t tell ethnic jokes and he’s definitely more mature and the bigger person when compared to his bullies but I still didn’t really like Gary. I’m supposed to sympathize with him but I couldn’t. It felt like this kid had some kind of social anxiety disability because he’s totally unable to read social cues. People nowadays might say he’s on the spectrum so maybe he needs an IEP instead of a comedy routine. It was cool to see how he puts together a set and all the thinking that goes into it but it seemed to be one of the main plotlines and I wasn’t all that interested. I learned sometimes students think about their teacher’s legs which is why I never wear skirts to class.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Blackmagic

    Its about this boy who has this dog and one day the dog all of the sudden starts to talk.Yea thats right TALKS kind of wierd because he tells a joke and freaks the lil boy out

  4. 5 out of 5

    daniella

    Just as funny and charming everytime I read it. :) Sachar's legendary wit and childlike sense of humor has you rooting for Gary through the whole novel. Charming, truly charming. Just as funny and charming everytime I read it. :) Sachar's legendary wit and childlike sense of humor has you rooting for Gary through the whole novel. Charming, truly charming.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma Vardy

    Another great book. The rising of the under dog or in this the 'class clown'. Just wanted to give Gary a big hug!! The jokes made me laugh. Another great book. The rising of the under dog or in this the 'class clown'. Just wanted to give Gary a big hug!! The jokes made me laugh.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lily Hayes

    Very funny dog book. Not really about.dogs but yeah.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dani Butler

    This book is a mix between Louis Sachar's other works: There's a boy in the girls' bathroom and [Sideways stories from Wayside School]. Again from memory, it wasn't as serious as There's a boy in the girl's bathroom and it's nowhere near the realm of Wackiness that is present in the Wayside School series. This book is about a kid who tells jokes but very few people think he is funny. Like There's a boy in the girl's bathroom, the character is likeable and realistic and easy to relant to for ma This book is a mix between Louis Sachar's other works: There's a boy in the girls' bathroom and [Sideways stories from Wayside School]. Again from memory, it wasn't as serious as There's a boy in the girl's bathroom and it's nowhere near the realm of Wackiness that is present in the Wayside School series. This book is about a kid who tells jokes but very few people think he is funny. Like There's a boy in the girl's bathroom, the character is likeable and realistic and easy to relant to for majority of children. Although he has a single friend, he still is protrayed as loner/outsider. It has a great happy ending and if I remember right the last part of the book is just the comments other children in his class think of one of his routines-- which totally impressed me as a child.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This book is about a boy called Gary W. Boone that wants be a comedian when he grows up. He always tell jokes to his classmates, so everyone are calling him GOON. However, there is a talent show, and that is the time that Gary can show his talent to everyone, and proves that he is not a goon. But Gary can not imagine that the talent show list does not have his name on it, so he can not be on the talent show. However, he still goes up, and makes everyone laugh. I think I should learn from him, I This book is about a boy called Gary W. Boone that wants be a comedian when he grows up. He always tell jokes to his classmates, so everyone are calling him GOON. However, there is a talent show, and that is the time that Gary can show his talent to everyone, and proves that he is not a goon. But Gary can not imagine that the talent show list does not have his name on it, so he can not be on the talent show. However, he still goes up, and makes everyone laugh. I think I should learn from him, I’m scared of standing on the stage, and talking to everyone. I should look like Gary not to scare of it, and face it, that shows I can do it. Also I like how the author writes this book, he uses many ways to show the main character's personality, makes the readers can remember him very deeply.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Verena

    Gary Boone (people call him Goon) has a habit of turning everything into a joke. He can never be taken seriously, and people who are near him will never be taken seriously by him. He thinks he has a good talent, of making jokes, so he signs up for the school's talent competition and gears up for his first stand-up comedy show. Egs of his jokes: Do you feel like an egg this morning? I don't know. How does an egg feel? Just call me Humpty Dumpty. Yes. You better not drop me. I might crack. Was expe Gary Boone (people call him Goon) has a habit of turning everything into a joke. He can never be taken seriously, and people who are near him will never be taken seriously by him. He thinks he has a good talent, of making jokes, so he signs up for the school's talent competition and gears up for his first stand-up comedy show. Egs of his jokes: Do you feel like an egg this morning? I don't know. How does an egg feel? Just call me Humpty Dumpty. Yes. You better not drop me. I might crack. Was expecting the book to be as funny as Wayside School, but I only started bursting in giggles on pg 165: This guy is complaining that he is always lined first because of his name, "Fred Furst".

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tween Reader

    I like a lot of kinds of books but I usually don’t love light, funny books like I loved DOGS DON’T TELL JOKES by Louis Sachar. The main character, 12-year-old Gary Boone is funny. At least he thinks so. He decides that if he tells jokes in the talent show, people will realize that he does have a talent. But things aren’t easy. Gary has his share of frustration, teasing, and school trouble. Maybe he should quit . . . This book was hilarious, like most writing by Louis Sachar. It teaches to follo I like a lot of kinds of books but I usually don’t love light, funny books like I loved DOGS DON’T TELL JOKES by Louis Sachar. The main character, 12-year-old Gary Boone is funny. At least he thinks so. He decides that if he tells jokes in the talent show, people will realize that he does have a talent. But things aren’t easy. Gary has his share of frustration, teasing, and school trouble. Maybe he should quit . . . This book was hilarious, like most writing by Louis Sachar. It teaches to follow your dreams no matter what. I would recommend it to fans of Andrew Clements. It’s a well written book with realistic problems that kids will gobble up.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Koh

    'Why did the guy eat two dead skunks for breakfast?' 'Because dead ones squeal when you stick the fork in.' Gary W. Boone knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It is the rest of the kids in the class who think he is a fool. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and he starts practicing his routine nonstop to get it just right. Gary's sure that this will be his big break - he'll make everyone laugh and will win the $100 prize money. But when an outrageous surpri 'Why did the guy eat two dead skunks for breakfast?' 'Because dead ones squeal when you stick the fork in.' Gary W. Boone knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It is the rest of the kids in the class who think he is a fool. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and he starts practicing his routine nonstop to get it just right. Gary's sure that this will be his big break - he'll make everyone laugh and will win the $100 prize money. But when an outrageous surprise threatens to turn his debut into a disaster, it looks as if the biggest joke of all may be on Gary himself.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josie

    IT´S ABOUT A BOY THAT LIKES TO TELL JOKES

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn

    I love pretty much anything by Louis Sachar. This one is hilarious. especially the end

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sisp4c_charmainelee

    Gary W. Boone is very funny!

  15. 5 out of 5

    The book-addicted teenager

    This sequel of someday Angeline is about Gary W. Boon (or Goon). He gets bullied in school, and hides behind a wall of jokes. Nobody finds his jokes remotely funny. So when Brenda Thompson organizes a talent show he immediately signs up. It's a good plot but the big thing that brings the level of this book down a notch from other Sachar books is that the characters are unrealistic, and impossible to sympathize with. I didn't feel anything throughout this books. I think that's probably not what S This sequel of someday Angeline is about Gary W. Boon (or Goon). He gets bullied in school, and hides behind a wall of jokes. Nobody finds his jokes remotely funny. So when Brenda Thompson organizes a talent show he immediately signs up. It's a good plot but the big thing that brings the level of this book down a notch from other Sachar books is that the characters are unrealistic, and impossible to sympathize with. I didn't feel anything throughout this books. I think that's probably not what Sachar intended. Though if you're looking for an enjoyable, light book this is what I would recommend. This Gary was basically socially incompetent, if I was Sachar I would change that. So he still is bullied, and makes horrible jokes but doesn't do really weird, and dumb things. Another big problem with this book is that the plot line is introduced far too late. Also this book is a mixture between being quirky and being serious which wasn't my cup of tea. This book isn't only bad though as I said the plot was absolutely brilliant, and although the middle of the book wasn't great, the ending, and especially the build up to the ending were fantastic. I think this is a pretty great book for people of all ages to enjoy, and maybe if you are able to sympathize with Gary this book will be brilliant for you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    2020 It definitely has the Louis Sachar magic, but it didn't hold the same appeal to me as Holes or There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom did. Still, the main character is mostly likable (especially as the book goes on and he starts acting more like a normal kid and not just a joke telling machine). I liked his friendship/relationship with Angeline. Especially with how supportive she is with him. I thought that was just adorable. And I like that he made some genuine friends, and even though th 2020 It definitely has the Louis Sachar magic, but it didn't hold the same appeal to me as Holes or There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom did. Still, the main character is mostly likable (especially as the book goes on and he starts acting more like a normal kid and not just a joke telling machine). I liked his friendship/relationship with Angeline. Especially with how supportive she is with him. I thought that was just adorable. And I like that he made some genuine friends, and even though there were clearly some kids who were never going to be friends with him, he still tried to be their friends, too.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    I loved this. This thing where, as an adult, I find out some of my favorite kids books had sequels is pretty great. I LOVED Someday, Angeline, and to get to read more about Gary Boone and see it all through his eyes, and get to revisit the characters from the first book, was so great. This was, literally, laugh out loud funny. Louis Sachar is an amazing writer - such a light hand, such a good build-up, and funny as well as extremely sweet and heart-wrenching? I loved this a whole lot.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Doug Wilhelm

    Louis Sachar is better-known for his classic novel Holes, but I absolutely love his earlier, funny books, from Sideways Stories from the Wayside School through this one to its sequel, Someday Angeline. Compared to Sideways Stories, which are largely farce, this one and Angeline are warm-hearted comic stories in which the characters really come to life. A warm-hearted, really funny novel is a rare jewel, and that's what this one is. Louis Sachar is better-known for his classic novel Holes, but I absolutely love his earlier, funny books, from Sideways Stories from the Wayside School through this one to its sequel, Someday Angeline. Compared to Sideways Stories, which are largely farce, this one and Angeline are warm-hearted comic stories in which the characters really come to life. A warm-hearted, really funny novel is a rare jewel, and that's what this one is.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I read this book as a novel study with my 5th grade students. They called it “Cringe Time,” and I feel it’s an apt title. Gary has a habit of trying to make everything a joke, and his taste is less than appropriate. However, the book is written well, and there is a good amount of character growth. Some bits require explanation, because today’s kids won’t get a lot of the references. Overall, this was a decent book, but not as good as “Wayside School” or “Holes.”

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    While this took a little while to grow back on me, I can see why I liked this so much as a kid. The end routine is so funny, and considering that I got into comedy and also collected hats as a kid, I'm guessing this had a sizable influence. It's not something I'd reread again, but I am glad I revisited it. While this took a little while to grow back on me, I can see why I liked this so much as a kid. The end routine is so funny, and considering that I got into comedy and also collected hats as a kid, I'm guessing this had a sizable influence. It's not something I'd reread again, but I am glad I revisited it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Sachar is so great at creating characters that you can completely understand why everyone thinks they're annoying but show you how this is a coping mechanism that no one is willing to see that. It's so frustrating and at sometimes heartbreaking to read. The emotions that Sachar manages to write into a story that could just be a silly comedy, and I really like that. Sachar is so great at creating characters that you can completely understand why everyone thinks they're annoying but show you how this is a coping mechanism that no one is willing to see that. It's so frustrating and at sometimes heartbreaking to read. The emotions that Sachar manages to write into a story that could just be a silly comedy, and I really like that.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Robinson

    Not as good as Holes or There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom. Maybe because this is the 2nd in a series and we hadn't read the first. But, my 9 year old enjoyed it, even though we had to skim over some parts we didn't fully understand. Not as good as Holes or There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom. Maybe because this is the 2nd in a series and we hadn't read the first. But, my 9 year old enjoyed it, even though we had to skim over some parts we didn't fully understand.

  23. 4 out of 5

    arlothearlo

    I loved this book because it reveals the harsh truth about being the resident goofball/ class clown.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sid

    That was a very nice book. Light read, with fun. I liked the character of Gary W. Boone, "Goon", and the book becomes even more interesting after Gary's parents make a deal with him. That was a very nice book. Light read, with fun. I liked the character of Gary W. Boone, "Goon", and the book becomes even more interesting after Gary's parents make a deal with him.

  25. 5 out of 5

    HinLok(Einnor) WAT

    Good, but not as impressive as holes.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Just too many jokes. Not the best for Sachar

  27. 4 out of 5

    Max Reh

    really funny.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dearwassily

    My first favorite book, still instilling lessons two decades later.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hugh Goovaerts

    Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes by Louis Sachar has nothing to do with dogs. Gary W. Boone, nicknamed Goon, knows he was born to be a stand up comedian, but it’s everyone else who doubts him. Then when Gary’s school puts on a talent show, Gary is sure it’s his big break. Gary then spends all of his time making up jokes, preparing them and putting them into order. While doing all this Gary forgets about his homework and then has to catch up on everything he’s missed, giving him less time to practice for th Dogs Don’t Tell Jokes by Louis Sachar has nothing to do with dogs. Gary W. Boone, nicknamed Goon, knows he was born to be a stand up comedian, but it’s everyone else who doubts him. Then when Gary’s school puts on a talent show, Gary is sure it’s his big break. Gary then spends all of his time making up jokes, preparing them and putting them into order. While doing all this Gary forgets about his homework and then has to catch up on everything he’s missed, giving him less time to practice for the talent show. These many story twisting moments occur throughout the book forcing Gary to make decisions. This is a very funny, well-written book that I enjoyed reading. One of my favorite parts of the book is when Gary goes and asks his math teacher, who is also the faculty adviser for the talent show, why she gave him four pages of math homework. He states “Four pages is a lot of homework. Other teachers assign homework too. I have to read a book and do a book report by Friday. How am I supposed to work on my act for the talent show if I have to waste all my time doing homework?” The book report was actually assigned three weeks earlier, but Gary forgot all about it. His math teacher basically tells him, maybe you should have started the book report when you were assigned it. I liked this part of the book because it was funny and I could relate to it. Another one of my favorite parts of the book is when Gary is in his room thinking about the talent show and then sees Mrs. Snitzberry who is a made up person Gary makes fun of all the time. Mrs. Snitzberry is getting mad at Gary because she believes he is making the wrong decision by quitting the talent show. She says “You’ve been making fun of me for the last two years. Did I ever complain? No, of course I didn’t complain, because it was humor. Humor, mans greatest gift! That’s what separates humans from other animals. That’s why we call it humor. Humans-humor. You never hear dogs telling jokes, do you? No, thats because dogs have no sense of humor.” Dogs don’t tell jokes. I liked this part of the book because it explains the meaning of the name and it is also what motivates Gary to still perform in the talent show.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    After getting hooked on Louis Sachar from a childhood friend who lent me the Wayside School boxed set, I devoured 'There's A Boy in the Girl's Bathroom' and then this lesser known gem. It is the second book in the 'Someday Angeline' series (launched with the eponymous novel in 1983), but it seems the original book in the series is less popular. While I haven't read that earlier book, one can read this novel without missing much, as the character Angeline figures into the novel as the protagonist After getting hooked on Louis Sachar from a childhood friend who lent me the Wayside School boxed set, I devoured 'There's A Boy in the Girl's Bathroom' and then this lesser known gem. It is the second book in the 'Someday Angeline' series (launched with the eponymous novel in 1983), but it seems the original book in the series is less popular. While I haven't read that earlier book, one can read this novel without missing much, as the character Angeline figures into the novel as the protagonist Gary W. Boone's best friend. But since she is a child prodigy and lives far away at a boarding school funded by the government, she only appears in the novel sporadically and no references are made to previous plot lines. I thought this book was quite entertaining, full of silly jokes and awful puns, but quite inspirational as it tells the story of an aspiring middle school comedian preparing for the upcoming talent show. Any person who either uses humor regularly or enjoys humor (i.e., most human beings) would get a kick out of the psychology behind Sachar's protagonist, who really seems to grow up through the novel, doing a lot of self reflection as to not only what makes a joke funny but to why his personality/identity seems so tied to being the funny man or Goon, as he nicknames himself. There is a lot of warmth and love in the book, especially between Gary & Angeline, as well as her extended family (Abel Persepolis, his garbage truck partner Gus, & Miss Turbone AKA Mr. Bone, their former 5th grade teacher now in a relationship with Abel). Gary's social awkwardness is illustrated in a subtle way that builds empathy for the odd kid out. The build up to the talent show is a great example of effectively structuring a story arc (climax/denoument), the characters are varied and entertaining, and the main theme of entering adolescence/growing up and figuring out who you are is authentic. I would highly recommend this children's/young adult novel to anyone.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.