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A Bertie and Jeeves classic, featuring the Junior Ganymede, a Market Snodsbury election, and the Observer crossword puzzle. Jeeves, who has saved Bertie Wooster so often in the past, may finally prove to be the unwitting cause of this young master's undoing in Jeeves and the Tie that Binds. The Junior Ganymede, a club for butlers in London's fashionable West End, requires e A Bertie and Jeeves classic, featuring the Junior Ganymede, a Market Snodsbury election, and the Observer crossword puzzle. Jeeves, who has saved Bertie Wooster so often in the past, may finally prove to be the unwitting cause of this young master's undoing in Jeeves and the Tie that Binds. The Junior Ganymede, a club for butlers in London's fashionable West End, requires every member to provide details about the fellow he is working for. When information is inadvertently revealed to a dangerous source, it falls to Jeeves to undo the damage.


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A Bertie and Jeeves classic, featuring the Junior Ganymede, a Market Snodsbury election, and the Observer crossword puzzle. Jeeves, who has saved Bertie Wooster so often in the past, may finally prove to be the unwitting cause of this young master's undoing in Jeeves and the Tie that Binds. The Junior Ganymede, a club for butlers in London's fashionable West End, requires e A Bertie and Jeeves classic, featuring the Junior Ganymede, a Market Snodsbury election, and the Observer crossword puzzle. Jeeves, who has saved Bertie Wooster so often in the past, may finally prove to be the unwitting cause of this young master's undoing in Jeeves and the Tie that Binds. The Junior Ganymede, a club for butlers in London's fashionable West End, requires every member to provide details about the fellow he is working for. When information is inadvertently revealed to a dangerous source, it falls to Jeeves to undo the damage.

30 review for Jeeves and the Tie That Binds

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    "It was one of those heavy, sultry afternoons when nature seems to be saying to itself, 'Now, shall I, or shall I not, scare the pants off these people with a hell of a thunderstorm?'" One of the fine mornings Bertie Wooster decided life could not become better. He was right - it could not, but it very well could become worse. Right after finishing breakfast he received a phone call from his aunt Dahlia (the good one, not to be confused with the bad one - Agatha who according to Bertie eats nails "It was one of those heavy, sultry afternoons when nature seems to be saying to itself, 'Now, shall I, or shall I not, scare the pants off these people with a hell of a thunderstorm?'" One of the fine mornings Bertie Wooster decided life could not become better. He was right - it could not, but it very well could become worse. Right after finishing breakfast he received a phone call from his aunt Dahlia (the good one, not to be confused with the bad one - Agatha who according to Bertie eats nails and performs virgin sacrifices at the full moon). Apparently she decided to help a son of her former schoolmate; the said son nicknamed Ginger also happened to be an old buddy of Bertie. The guy was running a local election. Aunt Dahlia asked Bertie to come and help. We all know politics is a dirty business, but nobody ever had so much troubles being involved in it as our poor Bertie. This should be enough for a brief outline of the beginning of the plot. I will only mention that the people that kept appearing in the last books made an encore here: Aunt Dahlia, Madeline Basset, Florence Craye, and Roderick Spode. Speaking honestly at this point of the book I got a little tired of this crowd and would gladly see somebody else, like Betrie's biggest nemesis, Aunt Agatha. First things first: we need to acknowledge P.G. Wodehouse was 90 when he wrote the book. I can challenge anybody (including myself) to write something at least half as funny at this age. I do not think there will be many takers. Having said this, the plot feels familiar, some of the situations are rewrites of those from the previous books and some of the jokes are copied verbatim. For this reason the plot feels somewhat stale, but Wodehouse's "stale" is still miles ahead of 99% of humorous literature. Once again, keep in mind the author's age. I gave the book 3 stars and weak stars at that, but this rating only reflects he story's standing among the rest of the series. As a standalone it is quite good and a recommended read to any fan of P.G. Wodehouse. It was just me: at this point (fourteenth installment) I was only mildly amused, but I do not think I wasted my time read it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Aw, this makes me sad. Much Obliged, Jeeves is one of Wodehouse's last books in the Jeeves & Wooster series, just when it's starting to show some life after so many books by rote. The usual plot and characters are all in order. Finicky friends and daffy family members all seemingly conspire to thrust Bertie Wooster neck-deep into the soup, then jam him between a rock and a hard place. Hovering about the periphery is the all-knowing, gentleman's gentleman extraordinaire Jeeves, ready to extract hi Aw, this makes me sad. Much Obliged, Jeeves is one of Wodehouse's last books in the Jeeves & Wooster series, just when it's starting to show some life after so many books by rote. The usual plot and characters are all in order. Finicky friends and daffy family members all seemingly conspire to thrust Bertie Wooster neck-deep into the soup, then jam him between a rock and a hard place. Hovering about the periphery is the all-knowing, gentleman's gentleman extraordinaire Jeeves, ready to extract his master and set all to rights. Where this book differs from other Wodehouses is in the little details. Bertie's narration makes it plain that Much Obliged, Jeeves comes later in the Wodehouse oeuvre by referencing past exploits, and I'm not just talking about that scripture prize he won in school or the article he wrote for Milady's Boudoir on "What the well-dressed man is wearing." I'm not even talking about the big reveal that Jeeves actually has a first name. The real difference is in how Jeeves interacts with Wooster. It's not a vast shift to the left, but there is a slight subversion in his tone, a sort of sauciness to his lip service, a kind of sass to his soliloquy. Yes indeed, Jeeves expresses himself here with more than just a raised brow and I found it shocking. SHOCKING, I SAY! Seriously though, it was nice to see an old familiar character being appropriately stretched a bit. After all the patience-straining nonsense Jeeves endures, it seems quite natural for such a clearly superior mind to grow a tad surly after such trying times. I only wish Wodehouse had started this process and expanded upon it years, nay, decades prior. In summary, Much Obliged, Jeeves is a solid book in the series, but if you're a newcomer, I'd suggest starting somewhere earlier. Perhaps, Right Ho, Jeeves or The Code of the Woosters would be more suitable. These books don't need to be read sequentially, and you'd be fine if you read this one first, but I think the Wodehouse newb would be better severed with a more elementary introduction. Wouldn't want to muddle the grey matter, now would we?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    I was going through the Jeeves/ Wooster list on my GR bookshelf and found that I had missed out adding this book! I think this is the last in the series, where Bertie is finally rid of the danger of getting married to either the intellectual Florence Craye or the maudlin Madeline (hey, that rhymes!). But the crux of this story is an election in Market Snodsbury, and how the journal detailing the exploits of various gentlemen - recorded faithfully by their valets and kept securely at the butlers' I was going through the Jeeves/ Wooster list on my GR bookshelf and found that I had missed out adding this book! I think this is the last in the series, where Bertie is finally rid of the danger of getting married to either the intellectual Florence Craye or the maudlin Madeline (hey, that rhymes!). But the crux of this story is an election in Market Snodsbury, and how the journal detailing the exploits of various gentlemen - recorded faithfully by their valets and kept securely at the butlers' and valets' club, the Junior Ganymede - becomes central to its outcome. The tome in question is stolen by a renegade valet and creates all sorts of havoc before it is reclaimed by Jeeves. I was thinking that if such a thing really existed today, how the news channels will be slavering after it! Trivia:It is in this novel that we hear Jeeves's first name for the first and last time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    P.G. Wodehouse was ninety years old when "Much Obliged, Jeeves" was published in 1971 and it is the penultimate Jeeves and Wooster novel. This was the first time I had read this particular Wodehouse book. One chapter in and it was like being with old friends. Just sublime. You probably don’t need me to tell you that P.G. Wodehouse is the funniest writer of the past century. Wodehouse defies superlatives. He is, quite simply, the best comedic writer to ever put pen to paper. I am a confirmed Wode P.G. Wodehouse was ninety years old when "Much Obliged, Jeeves" was published in 1971 and it is the penultimate Jeeves and Wooster novel. This was the first time I had read this particular Wodehouse book. One chapter in and it was like being with old friends. Just sublime. You probably don’t need me to tell you that P.G. Wodehouse is the funniest writer of the past century. Wodehouse defies superlatives. He is, quite simply, the best comedic writer to ever put pen to paper. I am a confirmed Wodehousian and revel in the man’s comedic genius. I have read numerous books by the great man and all, to one degree or another, are a delight. "Much Obliged, Jeeves” contains all the familiar tropes but is no less entrancing for that. Wooster blunders around, narrowly avoiding engagements that threaten his bachelor lifestyle whilst Jeeves dispenses his learning, bon mots and quiet wit, whilst simultaneously ensuring his master’s mishaps are quietly and efficiently solved. How P.G. Wodehouse maintained his supreme level of quality is one of the great mysteries, however, even at the tail end of the Jeeves and Wooster series, he kept the magic to the now familiar levels of brilliance. Suffice it to say that, if you don’t know why so many people worship at the comedic altar of PGW, this novel will reveal all. 4/5

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kris Larson

    Good lord, Jeeves has a first name. No, don't just skip right by that sentence. Really take a minute. JEEVES HAS A FIRST NAME. It never even occurred to me that he might. It doesn't seem like the sort of possession Jeeves would own; I feel as if I'd caught him cuddling a Beanie Baby or something. Honestly, this would have been worth reading just to discover this little bit of trivia, but even without that it's a fine Wodehousian romp; not my favorite of the Woosters, but very entertaining all th Good lord, Jeeves has a first name. No, don't just skip right by that sentence. Really take a minute. JEEVES HAS A FIRST NAME. It never even occurred to me that he might. It doesn't seem like the sort of possession Jeeves would own; I feel as if I'd caught him cuddling a Beanie Baby or something. Honestly, this would have been worth reading just to discover this little bit of trivia, but even without that it's a fine Wodehousian romp; not my favorite of the Woosters, but very entertaining all the same. If you like any of the Jeeves books you'll like this one; if you do not like the Jeeves books, check your pulse. Are you dead? I can think of no other explanation.

  6. 5 out of 5

    HBalikov

    Either you like Bertie Wooster and Jeeves or you don’t. There isn’t much in between. This is not the first of these books I have read but the first Wodehouse that I have reviewed. The gifted Bernard Cornwell (many of whose books I have reviewed) was recently quoted as saying that Wodehouse “…wrote the most English novels ever written.” I would add that he did so while skewering many of the class lines, traditions and manners that we find so familiar. It can be argued that one Wooster and Jeeves is Either you like Bertie Wooster and Jeeves or you don’t. There isn’t much in between. This is not the first of these books I have read but the first Wodehouse that I have reviewed. The gifted Bernard Cornwell (many of whose books I have reviewed) was recently quoted as saying that Wodehouse “…wrote the most English novels ever written.” I would add that he did so while skewering many of the class lines, traditions and manners that we find so familiar. It can be argued that one Wooster and Jeeves is much like the next…and it’s true that Wodehouse has only “rearranged the furniture” among a limited number of plot elements to wit: Wooster is requested to do what turns out to be an impossible favor for a chum Wooster is stuck with an impossible relative Wooster finds himself about to marry an impossible woman And…………eventually Jeeves is there to guide him through the minefield It’s the journey, full of upper-class twits; hilarious names and nick-names; wonderful quotes and literary references; and, always, Bertie’s self-confident, yet illogical, reasoning. This is one of Wodehouse’s last efforts but it still hits the mark. Much obliged, P.G.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Girish

    The book read like a montage to Bertie and Jeeves with a handful of references to the best parts of their previous adventures. And yet, it has you in splits - like any good thing in ration. Bertie wakes up on top of the world, with a rainbow between his shoulders - And we know thunderstorm is imminent. Bertie's pal Ginger is contesting elections. Bertie's safely engaged lady terrors threaten to come unhinged towards him and his 'reputation' for pinching stuff threatening the good name of Woosters The book read like a montage to Bertie and Jeeves with a handful of references to the best parts of their previous adventures. And yet, it has you in splits - like any good thing in ration. Bertie wakes up on top of the world, with a rainbow between his shoulders - And we know thunderstorm is imminent. Bertie's pal Ginger is contesting elections. Bertie's safely engaged lady terrors threaten to come unhinged towards him and his 'reputation' for pinching stuff threatening the good name of Woosters. Amidst all this Jeeves feels responsible when the Junior Ganymede book of secrets fall in wrong hands. With the typical atypical muddle that are characteristic of Bertie and Jeeves and featuring a near all star cast, this book written by PGW in his 90s is a riot. Loved it!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vimal Thiagarajan

    Surely below par for something in the Jeeves series. May be because the master wrote this in his nineties, he couldn't match his own towering standards. There is always a certain level of repetition in Wodehouse's plots, but in this one it was unusually high. Wodehouse's usual bubbling vigour was less-pronounced, the comic possibilities were under-explored, there was an over-reliance on Bertie's stammering and word-groping, and even some of his trademark daft turns of phrase seemed subdued and l Surely below par for something in the Jeeves series. May be because the master wrote this in his nineties, he couldn't match his own towering standards. There is always a certain level of repetition in Wodehouse's plots, but in this one it was unusually high. Wodehouse's usual bubbling vigour was less-pronounced, the comic possibilities were under-explored, there was an over-reliance on Bertie's stammering and word-groping, and even some of his trademark daft turns of phrase seemed subdued and laborious. In many parts I couldn't shake off a slightly depressing feeling akin to watching my favorite cricketer past his prime and struggling to put bat on ball. Nevertheless it was great fun being among Bertie and co after long, for a change at the Ganymede club instead of the Drones, and it was a good relaxing read. Apparently even a half-good Wodehouse is still good enough for a potent de-stressing potion. P.S. - Super-like to this cover from HarperCollins!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anna Kļaviņa

    Much Obliged, Jeeves first published in 1971 in the UK and in the same year in the USA by alternative title Jeeves and the Tie That Binds is second to last in the Jeeves & Wooster series. The two editions have slightly different endings. In the USA edition after Jeeves informs that he has destroyed the 18 pages from the Junior Ganymede Club Book that he has written about Bertie, Jeeves express hope that he will stay in Bertie's service permanently. As my copy was UK edition (ISBN: 9780099513964) Much Obliged, Jeeves first published in 1971 in the UK and in the same year in the USA by alternative title Jeeves and the Tie That Binds is second to last in the Jeeves & Wooster series. The two editions have slightly different endings. In the USA edition after Jeeves informs that he has destroyed the 18 pages from the Junior Ganymede Club Book that he has written about Bertie, Jeeves express hope that he will stay in Bertie's service permanently. As my copy was UK edition (ISBN: 9780099513964) I had to look for the added tidbit. Here it is: “…For I may hope, may I not, sir, that you will allow me to remain permanently in your service?” “You may indeed, Jeeves. It often beats me, though, why with your superlative gifts you should want to.” “There is a tie that binds, sir.” “A what that whats?” “A tie that binds, sir.” “Then heaven bless it, and may it continue to bind indefinitely. Fate’s happenstance may oft win more than toil, as the fellow said.” “What fellow would that be, sir? Thoreau?” “No, me.” “Sir?” “A little thing of my own. I don’t know what it means, but you can take it as coming straight from the heart.” “Very good, sir.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Dear Mr. Wodehouse - Thank you for the delightful visit to a time when the sun never set on the British empire and a wealthy idiot could spend his days at his aunt's estate in the English countryside and only worry about avoiding becoming engaged. It was lovely spending a few hours with the best gentlemen's gentlemen ever and that dear fool Bertie. Thank you for not aging them or trying to make them modern. ~A~ Dear Mr. Wodehouse - Thank you for the delightful visit to a time when the sun never set on the British empire and a wealthy idiot could spend his days at his aunt's estate in the English countryside and only worry about avoiding becoming engaged. It was lovely spending a few hours with the best gentlemen's gentlemen ever and that dear fool Bertie. Thank you for not aging them or trying to make them modern. ~A~

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I just had to squeeze in a Wodehouse for Christmas, and how wonderful it was. I can't believe I almost finished the Jeeves and Wooster series (woe and woe upon woe); when the fatal moment inevitably arrives, I'll be seeking solace in the Blandings Castle series. I just had to squeeze in a Wodehouse for Christmas, and how wonderful it was. I can't believe I almost finished the Jeeves and Wooster series (woe and woe upon woe); when the fatal moment inevitably arrives, I'll be seeking solace in the Blandings Castle series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ruthiella

    We learn that Jeeves belongs to a club for manservants in which pertinent details of their employers are committed to a book “to inform those seeking employment of the sort of thing they will be taking on”. Bertie is afraid that the book (with an incredible 18 pages devoted solely to him) will fall in to the wrong hands. For once, Bertie isn’t wrong. Jeeves and Wooster go to stay at Aunt Dahlia’s with the aim of helping Bertie’s old pal Harold “Ginger” Winship who is standing for Parliament in t We learn that Jeeves belongs to a club for manservants in which pertinent details of their employers are committed to a book “to inform those seeking employment of the sort of thing they will be taking on”. Bertie is afraid that the book (with an incredible 18 pages devoted solely to him) will fall in to the wrong hands. For once, Bertie isn’t wrong. Jeeves and Wooster go to stay at Aunt Dahlia’s with the aim of helping Bertie’s old pal Harold “Ginger” Winship who is standing for Parliament in the by-election at Market Snodsbury. Unfortunately, Ginger’s impetus for politics is his fiancée, Florence Cray, one of Bertie’s old paramours. Also staying at Brinkley Court is Madeline Bassett and her suitor, Lord Sidcup, one of Bertie’s avowed enemies. Without any spoilers, this is the novel where Bertie finally commits to a relationship. I laughed out loud more reading this book than I did the previous two. I wonder if that is because each book builds a bit on the previous books adventures and/or I have become fully integrated into this ridiculous world.

  13. 5 out of 5

    F.R.

    Even below par Jeeves and Wooster is still pretty good. Madeline Bassett, Roderick Spode, Aunt Dahlia all return in this latest instalment of sundered engagements, purloined silver ornaments, obstinate moneymen and the kind of fiendishly tricky problems which can only be neatly ironed out by almost deity-like butler with a huge brain he owes to his consumption of masses of fish. All is seemingly as it should be then. However there’s a decided lack of oomph in this volume of the Wooster memoirs. A Even below par Jeeves and Wooster is still pretty good. Madeline Bassett, Roderick Spode, Aunt Dahlia all return in this latest instalment of sundered engagements, purloined silver ornaments, obstinate moneymen and the kind of fiendishly tricky problems which can only be neatly ironed out by almost deity-like butler with a huge brain he owes to his consumption of masses of fish. All is seemingly as it should be then. However there’s a decided lack of oomph in this volume of the Wooster memoirs. All the elements are present, yet the fire singularly fails to ignite. At the end we’re even robbed of the great normal set-piece where Jeeves sorts everything out while Wooster googles at him, unsure of his intentions. Instead Bertie exits stage left beforehand and is merely told about events afterwards. Without a doubt it’s a dispiriting anti-climax. An interesting side-note though is that one of the plot strands we have concerns a local by-election, and Wodehouse identifies the two political parties – Conservative and Labour – as being very much of the same sort. Okay, one of the candidates is of the idle rich, while the other is a retired barrister, so aristocracy versus the professional middle class; but in language, tone and public standing (and the fact they both keep servants), they are both very much of the right sort of stock. There is no oily fingered, ex-mechanic trade unionist in this particular scenario. What makes this fascinating to your humble reader in 2014 is that hailing from the same kind of stock, having gone to the same type of schools and being basically interchangeable is one of the (many, many, many) things we criticise our modern British politicians for. This was published in 1967 with one ex-grammar school boy as Prime Minister and the other as Leader of the Opposition. But Wodehouse was already thirty years into his exile from Blighty so how much he would have his finger on the political pulse is up for debate (a brief reference to Tony Benn renouncing his peerage to sit in the commons, apart). Perhaps more likely is that this is the way he remembered the political classes from his time at home, that he always viewed the type of individual who sought political power as basically interchangeable. Or possibly, given this is Wodehouse, he just didn’t really know how to write an oily fingered, ex mechanic, trade unionist.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This was my first Jeeves and it came at a good time. I would never have picked it up, as I thought I had no interest in Wooster or Jeeves. During an intense week of work, they provided lightness and levity. Well-written with an incredible amount of detail, almost nothing really goes on. Wooster has gone to his Aunt's house to canvas for a friend running for political office. After knocking on one door, he is done. It seems that everyone wants to marry Wooster rather than the men they are betroth This was my first Jeeves and it came at a good time. I would never have picked it up, as I thought I had no interest in Wooster or Jeeves. During an intense week of work, they provided lightness and levity. Well-written with an incredible amount of detail, almost nothing really goes on. Wooster has gone to his Aunt's house to canvas for a friend running for political office. After knocking on one door, he is done. It seems that everyone wants to marry Wooster rather than the men they are betrothed to already. Light and frothy, this series might be a good escape from everyday life and weighty, difficult subjects.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie Hanna

    "There is a tie that binds, sir." *snifflesssssssssssssss* who gave Wodehouse the RIGHT to be so darn emotionally affecting "There is a tie that binds, sir." *snifflesssssssssssssss* who gave Wodehouse the RIGHT to be so darn emotionally affecting

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ensiform

    Visiting his Aunt Dahlia, Bertie is confronted once again by Spode, as well as a businessmen who suspects him of being a thief, Madeline Bassett perhaps wanting to marry him, and the perplexing problem of how to reconcile his pal Ginger with the secretary of his dreams when he’s actually engaged to the bossy Florence. The usual lunacy results, with some quick acting by Jeeves, of course, to straighten things out. Perhaps the most remarkable things about this book, given that it was written by Wod Visiting his Aunt Dahlia, Bertie is confronted once again by Spode, as well as a businessmen who suspects him of being a thief, Madeline Bassett perhaps wanting to marry him, and the perplexing problem of how to reconcile his pal Ginger with the secretary of his dreams when he’s actually engaged to the bossy Florence. The usual lunacy results, with some quick acting by Jeeves, of course, to straighten things out. Perhaps the most remarkable things about this book, given that it was written by Wodehouse at the age of 90, is how little the series has declined over the years. Sure, this entry creaks with perhaps a few too many forced and oft-repeated literary allusions and gags (the “fretful porpentine” line must be in every single Jeeves book), but if this is a lesser work, it’s the lesser work of a master. Reading this book, coming from a lifetime of association with Bertie and Jeeves, I felt as if I’d had a slightly disappointing meal at an excellent steakhouse: not up to snuff, but still well worth the money and time expended.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mela

    There were great moments of pure 'Jeeves-essence' and I did enjoy it but I am not sure why not more. Perhaps it was not the best time to listen to it... [I was listening to Frederick Davidson's reading and although he wasn't Johnatan Cecil, he did a good job. He was the second-best, after Mr Cecil] There were great moments of pure 'Jeeves-essence' and I did enjoy it but I am not sure why not more. Perhaps it was not the best time to listen to it... [I was listening to Frederick Davidson's reading and although he wasn't Johnatan Cecil, he did a good job. He was the second-best, after Mr Cecil]

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    Every sentence is a delight. Jeeves and Wooster never fails to make you laugh out loud, which often results in concerned looks from one's co-workers, but a sentence or two read aloud will serve to enlighten them. Every sentence is a delight. Jeeves and Wooster never fails to make you laugh out loud, which often results in concerned looks from one's co-workers, but a sentence or two read aloud will serve to enlighten them.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Darinda

    The 14th book in the Jeeves series by P.G. Wodehouse. Humorous and delightful.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Delightful language,clever and funny. Kept me smiling as I listened to the audiobook while stuck in bad traffic this week.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    Yet another from the archives of Bertram Wilberforce Wooster in which he is once again rescued by the very large, and fish stoked, brain of Reginald Jeeves. This is the book in which I learned both Bertie’s middle name – which he got after his father, now deceased, gave to him in remembrance after a particularly good win at the races at the time Bertie was born – and that Jeeves even had a first name. We learn this close to the start of the book and Bertie also comments that he had never thought Yet another from the archives of Bertram Wilberforce Wooster in which he is once again rescued by the very large, and fish stoked, brain of Reginald Jeeves. This is the book in which I learned both Bertie’s middle name – which he got after his father, now deceased, gave to him in remembrance after a particularly good win at the races at the time Bertie was born – and that Jeeves even had a first name. We learn this close to the start of the book and Bertie also comments that he had never thought of Jeeves having a first name either. Something else I only noticed in this novel is how much fish Wooster eats – kippers in the morning, and fish every night – and yet it is only Jeeves’ brain that seems to benefit from fishy-goodness. And no one does funny cats in quite the way the Wodehouse does! I have learnt that if there is a cat a smile is not far away either. There are some wonderful lines in this – I’ve forgotten the context now, but Bertie is feeling particularly harassed by one of the characters, perhaps Roderick Spode, 8th Earl of Sidcup, and says that to get away from him he would climb a tree and pull it up after himself. During this novel, well, during the moments when I was not laughing, I couldn’t help thinking how dangerous it would seem to make Bertie the narrator of this series of books. Bertie is universally regarded as a bit of a half-wit – in fact, he is perhaps even considered a fraction less than a half, maybe even a third-wit. The temptation might have been to have used Jeeves as the voice to these stories. But that would have been as much a mistake as making Holmes the narrator of the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes or Dr Johnson as the teller of his own life. Genius is best viewed from a human perspective – and Wooster, Watson and Boswell are precisely the right voices. At least, I think that is true of Boswell, I haven’t gotten around to opening the book yet, but I will eventually. This is the second to last of the series (perhaps even the penultimate story – if that is the word I’m after) and written in 1971. Hard to imagine.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gieliza

    3.5 stars! 'Too often it is when one feels the fizziest that the storm clouds begin doing their stuff.' ~ Much Obliged, Jeeves by PG Wodehouse . Still good, but not as good as the other Jeeves books I've read before. With Wodehouse, you can usually see plot twists coming from a mile away, but it hardly matters since the getting there is highly enjoyable. However, I find that this is short on those sublime turns of phrase that I came to expect in a Jeeves story. What I found most hilarious is how Be 3.5 stars! 'Too often it is when one feels the fizziest that the storm clouds begin doing their stuff.' ~ Much Obliged, Jeeves by PG Wodehouse . Still good, but not as good as the other Jeeves books I've read before. With Wodehouse, you can usually see plot twists coming from a mile away, but it hardly matters since the getting there is highly enjoyable. However, I find that this is short on those sublime turns of phrase that I came to expect in a Jeeves story. What I found most hilarious is how Bertie constantly finds himself engaged to one female or another. I'm as boggled as Aunt Dahlia! Overall, this is not Wodehouse's best, but definitely still worth a read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

    Another great novel. Laugh out loud. Witty lines throughout. I love the characters and how Reginald Jeeves always finds solutions for Wooster’s tribulations. Ginger, Aunt Dahlia with her loud voice and aristocratic snorts whimsical and oddly believable characters. I am so glad that I have another 86 PG Wodehouse novels to read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Harshvardhan Maheshwari

    Wodehouse is the funniest I've read. Good story with peculiar characters. He weaves humour into interesting story plots. Wodehouse is the funniest I've read. Good story with peculiar characters. He weaves humour into interesting story plots.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aditya Sinha

    This book was my intro to Wodehouse, and it worked its charm wonderfully. The story revolves around an English aristocrat and his wise-cracking butler on a quest to help a friend win an election. The premise is just an excuse to take you on a fun ride through the pompous, silly, adorable world of Wodehouse. The cast entertains you cover to cover, and the book is loaded with one-liners you will remember long after you've put down the book. It's a light read that doesn't require too much investment This book was my intro to Wodehouse, and it worked its charm wonderfully. The story revolves around an English aristocrat and his wise-cracking butler on a quest to help a friend win an election. The premise is just an excuse to take you on a fun ride through the pompous, silly, adorable world of Wodehouse. The cast entertains you cover to cover, and the book is loaded with one-liners you will remember long after you've put down the book. It's a light read that doesn't require too much investment on your part - emotional or cognitive. And yet it's thoroughly entertaining, packed with witty prose and fun characters. The plot does sag a little in the middle where it loses some steam and you spend time in details you don't care much about. But all in all, it's a great read especially when sandwiched between two heavier/darker/more tedious reads.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cassie Troja

    The reviews printed on the cover are true - it is impossible to remain grumpy while reading PG Wodehouse. Jeeves and Wooster are delightful! This was my first time reading them and now I want all the books. I love the way Wodehouse wrote from the first-person perspective of Wooster, the bumbling young aristocrat. It’s endlessly entertaining in its witticisms and snark, as well as cleverly-timed clumsiness. If you need a brain-break from more serious reading, don’t hesitate to reach for Jeeves. Y The reviews printed on the cover are true - it is impossible to remain grumpy while reading PG Wodehouse. Jeeves and Wooster are delightful! This was my first time reading them and now I want all the books. I love the way Wodehouse wrote from the first-person perspective of Wooster, the bumbling young aristocrat. It’s endlessly entertaining in its witticisms and snark, as well as cleverly-timed clumsiness. If you need a brain-break from more serious reading, don’t hesitate to reach for Jeeves. You won’t be sorry. Note: it is first person, so the grammar is informal and conversational. Wodehouse, however, clearly had an impressively extensive vocabulary and sharp wit. The only real fault I found with this book was that it was so short!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Crompton

    I had remembered really enjoying this book when I read it several years ago, but then I think I let my mind do a number on me. It's late Wodehouse, written when the master was 90, and most of the very late Wodehouse I've read seems very thin and forced. But on rereading this one, I found that my positive memories were correct. While not without some minor flaws, it's very good - nearly the equal of Wodehouse in his prime. The web of conflicting interests and alliances is woven as well as ever, B I had remembered really enjoying this book when I read it several years ago, but then I think I let my mind do a number on me. It's late Wodehouse, written when the master was 90, and most of the very late Wodehouse I've read seems very thin and forced. But on rereading this one, I found that my positive memories were correct. While not without some minor flaws, it's very good - nearly the equal of Wodehouse in his prime. The web of conflicting interests and alliances is woven as well as ever, Bertie Wooster is goodhearted but ineffectual, and Jeeves saves the day at the end. And the last couple of pages contain perhaps the sweetest scene between Bertie and Jeeves that Wodehouse ever wrote. Don't let the copyright date scare you off from this one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peter Wolfley

    The stakes were not as high for everyone's favorite man about town in this one , but the language and word play was as great as ever. Wodehouse wrote Jeeves stories for so long that you can see the stories modernize over the course of the series. This one is much more concise with fewer sidebars and asides than other entries in the collection. The stakes were not as high for everyone's favorite man about town in this one , but the language and word play was as great as ever. Wodehouse wrote Jeeves stories for so long that you can see the stories modernize over the course of the series. This one is much more concise with fewer sidebars and asides than other entries in the collection.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I've largely avoided these later Jeeves novels because I've questioned whether it was really possible for them to feel relevant as late as the 1970s. The answer is "no, but it doesn't matter." Wodehouse's world never really existed, and his keeps on writing it just the same. I think he did actually call someone an "SOB" one point, but otherwise, his characters just keep on stealing things, getting caught, making embarrassing speeches, becoming engaged to the wrong people, and quoting the poet Bu I've largely avoided these later Jeeves novels because I've questioned whether it was really possible for them to feel relevant as late as the 1970s. The answer is "no, but it doesn't matter." Wodehouse's world never really existed, and his keeps on writing it just the same. I think he did actually call someone an "SOB" one point, but otherwise, his characters just keep on stealing things, getting caught, making embarrassing speeches, becoming engaged to the wrong people, and quoting the poet Burns.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Fun, light, and witty. This one had so many good wordplays and “down the garden path” type sentences. I love listening to the audiobooks, but always wish I could go back and underline some of his phrases for my own use! 😂

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